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LEARNING AS A DRIVER FOR THE FUTURE CITY


A Studio Weave project

in collaboration with

B U R E AU B U R E AU

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commissioned by


CONTENTS

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

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HULL AS UK CITY OF CULTURE

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POST-INDUSTRIAL RECOVERY

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Inner-city challenges

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Routes to regeneration

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Summary 17

EDUCATIONAL INNOVATION

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Learning challenges

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New modes of learning

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HULL

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The riches of Hull map

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Bringing these challenges together

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Five future institutes for Hull

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Institute of Body

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Institute of Mind

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Institute of Social Relations

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Institute of Making

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Institute of Earth

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Hull 2037 map

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Summary and next steps

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REFERENCES 53

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

We live in a culture where festivals—whether civic, music or art—act as fleeting moments in which to dream: utopian places or hours, or perhaps a year, where we take part in temporary (and delightful) experiences that enable us to see the world, and ourselves, in a different light. Moments of greater openness and possibility, where new friendships are formed and new ideas explored; but then it’s over. We return to the everyday, leaving behind the ideas, connections, energy, and sense that anything could be possible—until the next year. At worse, such festivals become escapist—fun, but insubstantial. So how do we ensure that this shared feeling of openness stays with us, and the sense of possibility becomes real? After 2017 City of Culture, where will Hull go from here? There are plenty of signs that the great success of the City of Culture has already achieved much of this ambition. The lived stories of volunteers, and the rich community-generated content are as real and long-lasting as the physical changes across the city. LIMITLESS, No Limits Festival aims to take the next step in this journey. LIMITLESS, No Limits Festival is the culmination of activities driven by the Learning and Participation element within Hull 2017. The ‘No Limits’ programme generated artistic commissions and partnerships with over fifty schools, nurseries and colleges right across Hull, taking the form of performances, objects and experiences in a range of mediums ranging from animation, architecture, dance, drama, music, photography, visual art, poetry and literature. It is an opportunity to showcase what was created and explored—and, more importantly, to chart a course towards what could come next. This paper proposes what that ‘learning legacy’ for Hull 2017 could look like, what it’s about and how it would manifest itself in the city. The legacy addresses two separate and profound challenges of our time: firstly, a longstanding trend of ‘hollowed out’ post-industrial city centres. Secondly, our existing models of education and learning which often seem to limit our individual and collective potential as human beings, regardless of our age. These two challenges may not seem innately linked; yet, if addressed together, they present an opportunity to reimagine learning as a driver for transforming Hull’s city centre into a more integrated, dynamic network of places.

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The time is ripe for this, as the future is one of ongoing and profound shifts in how we live, work and learn: • •

The World Economic Forum [1] suggested that 65% of children entering primary schools today will work in new job functions that don’t yet exist. Artificial Intelligence has the potential to free us from unfulfilling jobs but this will only feel as ‘freedom’ if we enable the current workforce to shift to more meaningful and sustainable activities. Our care system has hit its limits; new models like ‘Neighbourhood Care’ do exist, but they might only work if we rediscover what ‘caring’ for each other actually means at local level. Digital manufacturing technology can increasingly enable anything to me made anywhere (housing, energy, furniture, food…) but we need to actively enable people to reap the rewards from ‘distributed production’, fostering creativity across traditional siloes and sectors. At a time where identity is once again increasingly driving both group behaviour and collective political movements, it is more important than ever to enable people to feel that culture(s) can be shared, mixed, enjoyed, decoded and reconfigured together across any social and cultural divides.

To address these challenges, Hull has an opportunity build a next generation of learning institutions, building on its year as UK City of Culture, to maintain and grow a permanent sense of possibility, rooted in a vibrant local culture and a resilient and inclusive economy. The city centre is the ideal starting point for this. Its rich history, its buildings with capacity for new activities, and its recent success as the stage for the City of Culture all show that it can be a place for people to come together and share a positive dream. Learning Without Borders presents a vision of Hull as a permanent driver of shared urban optimism, drawing in investment from elsewhere as well as being a platform for diverse local people, no matter what age or background, to develop their talents. Anchored in five new institutes for Hull that offer forms of learning not currently delivered in formal education, this vision offers a glimpse into a possible future where a range of spaces across the city offer residents the chance to work, create, experiment, play and learn—and look forward not just to the next festival, but whatever the future may bring.

Studio Weave November 2017

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HULL AS UK CITY OF CULTURE

In 2009, the UK government established the UK City of Culture designation, having recognised the cultural and economic benefits generated via the UK’s diversity of national arts and culture accolades and programming, and the potential to distribute these benefits by offering different cities, every four years, the opportunity to host awards, attract visitors, and to invest in their own city infrastructure and artistic and social capital in the process.[1] Following off the back of Derry/ Londonderry’s designation as the first UK City of Culture in 2013, Hull beat Dundee Leicester and Swansea Bay to become the second city to receive this national designation—with a theme ‘A City Coming out of the Shadows’ divided into four seasons highlighting the city’s contribution to arts and industry (Made in Hull) experience of migration and flux (Roots and Routes) its role in the abolition movement (Freedom) and its aspirations for the future (Tell the World). No Limits was a programme driven by the Learning and Participation element of the festival team over the last year. In addition to involving a huge number of students and schools in creative and participatory processes, the team have maintained an interest in converting the energy, synergies and optimism

achieved over the last year into a lasting legacy learning programme intent on addressing broader questions around the shared culture, new strengths, skills, relationships and opportunities Hull wishes to cultivate for the next generation. The city is in a unique position to deliver such an ambitious legacy. The successes of Hull 2017 have positioned the Culture Company, which set up and delivered the overarching City of Culture programme, as a Hull-based national arts company with the remit and resources to develop a 20-year legacy plan informing the city’s £250 million legacy plans for investment to improve Hull’s culture and visitor infrastructure. Along with continuing world-class arts commissioning and programming, the Culture Company will develop a portfolio of strategic projects to reinforce Hull’s cultural dynamism, preserve the conditions in which artists and creativity can thrive, and to develop a learning programme to ensure that culture remains central to the lives of children and young people living in the city—with explicit intentions to boost the opportunities of a generation over the next 20 years.

* Including the Turner Prize, Brit Awards, Man Booker Prize and Stirling Prize

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POST-INDUSTRIAL RECOVERY

Inner-city challenges Detroit. Cleveland. Liverpool. Lens. Bochum. Sheffield. Hull. The last century saw cities within developed countries across Western Europe and the United States experience a profound social and economic turbulence in shifting from industrial to post-industrial economies. In the UK, the early seeds for this were sown by shifting Victorian ideals around ‘the good life’ and later cemented by the loss of industries and their large workforces. Victorian cities were densely packed, warrens of “dead-ends and foul alleys, and damp cellars” offering miserable accommodation for the masses, particularly in the first half of the 19th century.

TRADITIONAL URBAN CENTRE

Places of study, work and worship centralised

01: ‘Victorian Industrialisation’

Following on from multiple cholera epidemics, the pervading belief in the transmission of diseases through bad air or noxious fumes (miasma) and a growing awareness of public health for the working poor, Ebenezer Howard’s Garden City Movement, at the tail end of that century, planted the first seeds of a new suburban ideal, proposing a new model of living in which network of green villages would act as satellites to a central city, linked by rail and road, and bringing commuters to and from work each day.

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SUBURBANISATION

Commuting to urban centre

Decentralization of civic core

02: ‘Suburbanisation’

The model promised separation of housing from industry, cleaner, healthier and larger spaces, and marked a shifting pattern around how we organise our working and home lives that still largely resonates today. Later, it was the loss of industries, with their large workforces on middle class incomes that brought on the hollowing out of countless city centres, particularly in the North, as they failed to generate enough jobs in new industries to offset the losses seen in more traditional areas. The resulting high levels of unemployment, low levels of expendable income and the knock n effect to town centre activities contributed to profound loss of their “economic independence, self-esteem and immediately recognisable identities.” [2] More recently, new forms of homogenised commerce arose, as inner city shopping centres attempted to draw people back into the town centres for the shopping experience, leaving a lasting legacy of ring roads, parking garages and car dependency; meanwhile, the ‘cloning’ of High Streets across UK town centres became a well-documented phenomenon, with profound implications for not only for the cultural identity of places but their economic resilience too, as there were fewer reasons to visit or dwell, and limited ability to recycle spend and profits from large chains back into local circulation. [3]

OUT-OF-TOWN 03: ‘Out-of-Town’ Dev. DEVELOPMENT

Rise of parking based retail centres

Fewer inner-city residents

Self-contained suburban fringe: residents work, study and shop closer to home

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Routes to regeneration There are differing ideas as to why some cities have managed to recover from deindustrialisation while others have not—from their ability to act as centres for innovation within the wider ‘knowledge economy’ to the degree to which they have successfully identified a distinct specialisation. Cities have adopted a range of strategies and related investments to deliver post-industrial recovery. These have largely consisted of positioning the inner city either as a place of consumption (of retail or art, for instance), creating conditions attractive to anchor institutions (whether large-scale employers or educational), or some combination of these.

1 Consumption-led regeneration Some cities have attempted to lead urban regeneration by positioning their urban cores as places of consumption, inviting wider populations ‘back in’ with shopping malls, high street investments, or enhanced specialist markets. Some cases, such as Birmingham’s Bullring [4] have proved successful in generating footfall and money back into city centres. Others, like Bradford’s Westfield site, which remained behind hoarding for 11 years, risk targeting the “symptom of a poorly performing city centre economy” rather than the cause. [5] Although the Bullring generates £10M a year; other research demonstrated how it draws people away from nearby already established small businesses. [6]

Retail-led regeneration is not without substantial risk. In addition to potential loss of unique identity, an over-reliance on larger retail can bring about unintended impacts, potentially negatively impacting on wider economic resilience by threatening independent retail, and reducing levels of currency kept in local circulation* as well as demanding infrastructures (parking lots, shopping malls) that bring about long-term impact on how people move through, and experience the city).

* The local multiplier effect (sometimes called the local premium) refers to additional economic benefit accrued to an area from money being spent in the local economy.

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2 Employment-led regeneration Some cities have focused their energy on enticing large employers—whether corporations, cultural organisations, government offices or universities—to their centres in an attempt to either repurpose vacant sites or stimulate wider regeneration by importing a new workforce and harnessing their spending power. Newport’s ONS offices, Sunderland’s Software City and Salford’s Media City are all illustrative of this approach.

Recent research by the Centre for Cities suggests that the BBC’s move to Salford has had negligible effects on greater Manchester [8] with many workers ending up commuting, rather than relocating and making a sustained commitment to the place.

The success of local job markets rely on sensitivities to both the supply and demand of those jobs. ONS experienced a major challenge in attracting and retaining talent [7] and there is evidence that many of Media City’s workers commute. Ultimately, policymakers and practitioners should be ensuring that inner city neighbourhoods—not least those with the highest concentrations of unemployed people—create endogenous employment opportunities, as well as ensuring greater attention is paid to the mix of complementary sectors in an area—alongside access to financial tools, mutually supportive networks, and investment or business support for start-ups.

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3 Arts and Culture-led regeneration Culture-led regeneration, involving both “high culture” and “vernacular culture” is nothing new. Since Bilbao opened the Guggenheim in 1997, the ‘Bilbao effect’ has been chased across the UK—from The Public in West Bromwich to the Hepworth Gallery in Wakefield as a means of enticing visitors back into the city.

The Hepworth Gallery, by David Chipperfield which was opened in Wakefield in 2011.

The City of Masan, South Korea spent $2.2 million on renting 50 rented and sublet vacant buildings at 60% the market rate to artists in the Changdong Arts Village [9].

On the other end of the spectrum, many post-industrial city centres, with an abundance of inexpensive and vacant space, have been magnets for artists. In select cities, their presence eventually led to perceptions of ‘vibrancy,’ higher footfall, real estate demand and prices. Since then, cities have recognised the value of artists within regeneration processes. Street art aesthetics, including previously illegal activities, like graffiti, are now actively curated—sometimes through direct commissioning, such as the murals commissioned at Here East during the London Invictus Games.* Some cities have taken a proactive approach to securing space for artists, as they believe this has innate benefits. The potential benefits of arts and culture-led strategies are supporting social and economic activities that have high impact (but low ‘visibility’); of establishing a level of affordability (e.g. in ‘meanwhile spaces’) which allows fledgling enterprises and cultural activities to flourish. That said, it’s vital that these approaches are implemented critically. Arts-led strategies need to ensure they do not quash the very creations that foster creativity. Temporary or ‘meanwhile’ projects in particular should look to support the long-term growth of artists or entrepreneurs they work with at early stages of longterm developments, and public art must never be used as part of a ‘civilising mission’ or branding exercise, leaving unloved murals or vandalised sculptures as their main legacy.

* Global Street Art was commissioned by HereEast, a Creative Tech Hub in East London, to deliver an 80m long mural of famous British Inventors.

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4 Learning-led regeneration: Global and national organisations and cities are shifting their focus towards city-centres as places for learning. At the 2013 Remaking the City Congress in the US, the second most popular proposal for post-industrial regeneration, backed by 94% of participants, was for cities to “invest in education to cultivate the talent of their people.”* Barcelona is often considered a pioneer of progressive regeneration strategies. Since 2014 it has invested in becoming a ‘prototyping city’ where residents’ talent and local knowledge is cultivated to solve

Some cities are positioning universities as the central driver of regeneration. Newport City Council, for example, is part-funding a £35 million University of Wales campus in the centre. Glasgow is responding to constrained resources by merging four education institutions to create what it calls Scotland’s first College “super campus…to regenerate and renew Glasgow city centre.”

problems [11]. This includes an initiative to create numerous Ateneu de Fabricació Digital (making workshops) [12]—with three now running.

Others have taken a more distributed, partnership based approach focused on bridging the gaps between education and employment. Initiatives like UNESCO’s Learning Cities and RSA’s Cities of Learning highlight the range of stakeholders who can promote learning, ranging from public bodies, schools, museums, workplaces, civic organisations. For example, Bristol’s Learning City Partnership Board represents a wide alliance of city-based organisations dedicated to championing learning as a means of transforming lives.

Bristol set up the Learning City Partnership in 2015 and designated 2016 as the year of learning. The 70 institutions and businesses that make up the partnership work on long-term learning goals through facilitating opportunities for people to experience ‘hands on’ learning through participation in live projects. Inclusive goals include raising attainment of all, ensuring a skilled workforce and promoting the value of learning.

* Second only to the need to connect the city [10].

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Institutions Coordinating to Deliver Inclusive Growth

PLANNIN UNIVERS

TABLE OF CONTENTS

GUCI oversees a capacities of mul projects seeks to

WADE PARK MASTER PLAN

INTRODUCTION 6

Executive Summary

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The Greater University Circle Initiative: Bridging the Invisible Divide

GREATER UNIVERSITY CIRCLE COMPOSITE MASTER PLAN (2005)

FOREwORD: RONAlD B. RIChARD, ThE ClEvElAND FOUNDATION

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why This Report? why Now?

MASTER PLANS

INTRODUCTION: INDIA PIERCE lEE AND lIllIAN KURI, ThE ClEvElAND FOUNDATION

TRANSPoRTATIoN PRoJECTS

BACKGROUND 13

Context & Neighborhood

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Organizing a Multi-Anchor Strategy

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Planning Greater University Circle Initiative (GUCI)

UPTOWN UPPER CHESTER MASTER PLAN

LITTLE ITALY MASTER PLAN

THE INITIATIVES 34 48

Physical Development Economic Inclusion

48 live local: The Greater Circle living Program 56 Buy local: Anchor Procurement Strategies 68 hire local: workforce & hiring Strategies 76 Community Engagement & Community-Building Strategies

CLEVELAND, USA  400,000 people 82

LESSONS LEARNED & LOOKING AHEAD

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RESOURCES & ACKNOwLEDGMENTS

Cleveland is a city of contrasts. The city has, in parts, recovered from the decline and financial difficulties of the de-industrialisation process; with growth in some highlyskilled sectors (such as health), attracting highly-skilled workers to the city but there are still many areas of abject poverty. In order to bridge the ‘invisible divide’ between the city’s important and wealthy institutions - such as the Cleveland clinic - and the areas of disadvantage which surrounded them, the ‘Cleveland Greater University Circle Initiative’ (GUCI) was set up as a partnership between BRIDGING THE INVISIBLE DIVIDE

LEFT Image courtesy: University Hospitals

FAIRFAX MASTER PLAN

these anchor institutions, the public sector and wider civil 28 network. The strategy is ‘spearheaded’ by the Cleveland Foundation, a large philanthropic organisation which is key to the strategy - both in terms of driving the partnership approach and in the provision of funding for projects. Regular monitoring is conducted under four themes - Buy 4. Achievements in Preston Local; Hire Local; Live Local; and Connect - and since it’s creation the economic inclusion project has increased local has described the activities undertaken in Preston procurement as well The as above providing $175,000 in neighbourhood over the course of the last five years. It is clear that a diverse set of activities have been undertaken around anchor institutions, grants. CLEVELAND’S GREATER UNIVERSITY CIRCLE INITIATIVE

Living Wage, and business citizenship. This section explores the achievements of these activities and the change they have instigated.

Placing Preston on the map

Cooperation across institutions

An evidence baseline

Agreed statement of intent

Greater understanding of existing local business base

Changed behaviour in institutions & enhanced impact

Continued & ongoing influence

Realisation of importance of scale

Realising impact

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PRESTON, LANCASHIRE (UK)  150,000 people Preston, whose textile sector fell into terminal decline from the mid-20th century, has launched a programme by which six anchor institution (including local authorities, the police, education and housing) have made a collaborative commitment to support inclusive economic growth. Part of this includes a commitment to local procurement, looking at redirecting the £1.2bn total annual spending power of these anchor institutions to local businesses. The work has sought to shift the behaviour of procurers of goods and services so that they adopt collective principles and practices. Activities

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include raising awareness of procurement opportunities; simplify and localise the procurement process. Since setting up, Preston city council has since spent an additional £4m locally, from 14% of its budget in 2012 to 28% in 2016. Across the six institutions, spending was 18% of their budget - up from 5% in 2013, an extra £75m being spent in the city. This has helped to materially improve the life of residents who experienced the joint-second biggest improvement in position on the multiple deprivation index between 2010 and 2015.

LEFT

2005 Consolidated Master Plans. Image courtesy: City Architecture


Summary The language traditionally associated with ‘urban renewal’ is now shifting, giving way to a raft of new language and concepts—employed across research, policy and practice—which recognises that a much wider variety of metrics, from environmental sustainability to social outcomes, are required to measure the ‘success’ of cities and urban development. The Inclusive Growth Commission, a national inquiry led by the Royal Society of the Arts (RSA) is now devising “new models for place-based growth, which enable the widest range of people to participate fully in, and benefit from, the growth of their local area,” as opposed to growth at all costs, with the trickle-down benefits it has failed to deliver. [13] Cities such as London have recently developed funding programmes specifically targeting projects which deliver holistic outcomes and benefits across people, place and (shared) prosperity. [14] Beyond shifting language, these approaches to place-based outcomes based on new behaviours and relationships—a fundamental condition which enables effective and sustainable systems change. This means greater coordination between institutions to generate shared outcomes; stimulating greater trust between citizens and government (through tools enabling ‘digital’ citizenship and distributed decision making, for instance) to harnessing insights generated by ‘citizen data’ into smarter city design.* We are already seeing a number of disruptive new models ventures, initiatives and projects—across diverse areas such as locally owned renewables, [15] care networks, [16] and self-build housing groups—embodying these principles and ways of working, and creating the conditions for genuinely inclusive mobility and regeneration. Whether driven by consumption, employment, arts and culture, many past approaches have focused on a one-dimensional approach—sometimes economic, sometimes institutional.

Ultimately (and perhaps most simplistically) the cities which have managed to retain ‘successful’ urban cores share some basic characteristics: retaining or inviting higher levels of intensity and mixed use; a ‘rubbing up’ of residential and working life, and plenty of places to dwell, play, explore and socialise. The most inspiring cities have retained not only a sense of vibrancy, but a sense of possibility—room to experiment.

* Examples include Barcelona—which installed 19,500 smart meters that monitor and optimize energy consumption as well as municipal smart bins that monitor waste levels and optimize collection routes—and London, where Mayor Sadiq Khan appointed London’s first chief digital officer.

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EDUCATIONAL INNOVATION “...the world no longer rewards people simply for what they know: what matters is what you can do with what you know, working with others to solve tricky problems. In a more volatile, uncertain world, driven by innovation and entrepreneurship, we need to equip young people to find, frame and solve problems, including those that don’t come with instructions.” –Charles Leadbetter [17]

Learning challenges There are a number of recognised shortcomings within our existing learning systems, as well as emerging leadership on how it should shift. Some of the elements that offer a possibility for improvement and innovation include:

Specialisation

Functionality

As early as 14, we are asked to select an academic subject or vocation that will set the direction of our entire life course; this often means choosing one subject at the cost of another—as curriculum reforms make it hard for pupils to study science and arts together, for example, or to pair practical with academic learning. Consider that this selection process takes place at a time when we’re still very much learning about the world around us— and unaware of the plethora of career paths and possibilities available—most of which are non-specialist, and unrelated to the academic studies we pursue.

At one point, technical and vocational education was undervalued in comparison to more ‘academic’ subjects, but more recently the tables have turned, and there have been calls to provide more vocational education for the growing number of medium to low-skilled job. This ‘tailoring’ of learning to the future jobs market and gaps in industry requirements is a key theme in all government policy and think tanks: how to prepare our students for the job market and what that job market will require. While pragmatic, this functionality is somewhat troubling; by this logic, subjects that lack a preconceived purpose are devalued.

Exiting the bubble In addition to the issue of focused specialisms is the issue that many schools are fortress-like: environments closed to their surrounding context, where students learn in classrooms by subject, until the age of 16, when they ‘fall off a cliff’, leaving behind a clear structure, routine, and support networks inherent to school.

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Repeating learned patterns As adults, we often repeat these patterns of isolation and segmenting, from social behaviour, segregating ourselves by age, income, profession. We’re told to ‘act our age.’ We become awkward in the company of others who are different. We forget how to perceive and value the innate creativity we all have—favouring the more obvious creativity of artists over the creativity of the accountant.

What we’re not (yet) taught in school Many of the skills we need in life go far beyond those useful to work: these are to understand ourselves, the systems in which our lives are enmeshed, our wider world and relation to it; we require the ability to problem solve, to collaborate, to listen, empathise and communicate … skills that are not often explicitly taught or designed into our curricula, save for subjects such as language, music, drama, religious education and citizenship—many of which are offered as extra-curricular offerings, and dwindling under ever tightening school budgets [18].

This tendency towards compartment­ alising ourselves by age group and profession is reflected not only in our social interactions, but in how we occupy our cities and urban spaces. Many of our city buildings from theatres, libraries, to museums offer single use or function—and while they experience peaks and troughs through the course of a day, they lay unused for much of the time, or act as inert storage space for objects.


“By one popular estimate, 65% of children entering primary schools today will ultimately work in new job types and functions that currently don’t yet exist... Most existing education systems at all levels provide highly siloed training and continue a number of 20th century practices that are hindering progress on today’s talent and labour market issues. Businesses should work closely with governments, education providers and others to imagine what a true 21st century curriculum might look like.” –World Economic Forum [1]

Children take part in a daily mindfullness

New modes of learning

activity in Bhutan.

From Denmark’s Den Grønne Friskole (the Green School), where all learning incorporates mindfulness and sustainability [19] to Bhutan focusing on Gross National Happiness (GNH) instead of Gross National Product (GNP) select countries are in the process of considering the ideal qualities and capacities of their citizens, and how these can best be encouraged. Innovators in learning are therefore reconsidering the role of traditional disciplines or subjects, who learners and teachers are (and can be); where learning takes place, as well as potential scales of teaching and learning.

Dissolving traditional barriers Ørestad Gymnanisum’s open studying environments.

Within both formal learning and professional environments, a major shift has been taking place towards the idea of multi-disciplinary learning, and the removal of subjects in isolation. Trailblazing schools like Copenhagen’s Ørestad Gymnasium are removing classrooms altogether and adopting open plan ‘learning zones’ where students work autonomously visited by ‘roving teachers,’ while the Finnish education has given rise to the idea of “transversal competencies” such as Cultural Competence, Interaction, and Self-Expression and Managing Daily Life, as well as ICT (information and communication technologies) competence.

Finland is renowned for the quality of its education (even though it spends 30% less per student than the US) [20]. Most recently, it reformed its curriculum to remove boundaries between subjects; instead of learning isolated knowledge they focus on ‘phenomenon learning’, which promotes student autonomy in studying. By enabling the student to become active in the planning and evaluating of lessons, they gain ownership over their education and learn seven “transversal competencies”.

The seven “transversal competencies” promoted through the Finnish educational system.

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Chicago launched the ‘Summer of Learning’ in 2013; where over 100 organisations offered participants opportunities to learn

This also applies to where learning takes place. Where many innovations discussed are happening at the hyper-local scale—e.g. schools without classrooms—there is an increase in wider systemic, approaches to learning ‘in place.’ Chicago’s City of Learning initiative presents ‘digital badges’ to students for taking part in activities anywhere in the city, for instance, while Harlem Children’s Zone in New York has invested in a range of services across an area spanning roughly 100 blocks, which might traditionally inhibit learning and empowerment.*

skills they wanted. Learning was gamified so that participants earned digital badges,

Learning by Doing

that they can then share with teachers,

New evidence from cognitive neuroscience supports the idea of ‘embodied cognition’: ie that movement—for instance when we play—has an impact on our ability to learn. [22] Novel teaching methods are trying to support this idea through project-based, ‘gamified’ forms of hands-on learning. [23] Whether learning about maths in the forests of Finland [24] or through business planning in the US [25]—there is a trend to connect school activities to the surrounding community, forging links between learning and the ‘realworld’ as well as make better use of resources. Students globally [26] and across the UK are spending ‘school time’ doing internships in UK learning a range of employability and life-skills [27]; social innovation projects like ‘Year Here’ offers opportunities for recent UK graduates to become involved in addressing social challenges in the ‘real world’—supported by industry mentors and a social innovation curriculum. [28] Increasingly, self-directed learning is gaining credence. At Inquiry Hub, Canada, students spend almost 50% of time structuring their own learning experience; at Berlin’s Oberländer’s school, pupils “decide which subjects they want to study for each lesson and when they want to take an exam.” [29]

friends and employers; as well as enabling them to ‘unlock challenges’ and have their production exhibited. With over 100,000 students getting involved, Chicago extended it from a summer activity to a year-long programme, an initiative which is now in 11 US Cities as well as being piloted by the RSA in 3 UK Cities. [21]

The focus at Inquiry Hub is on fostering autonomous and creative students. A great example of this is the school garden which began as an individual project of one of the students. Along with two other interested school-mates they applied for a grant and have spent the last 4 years creating and maintaining the garden, as well as writing a manual for future students.

* Harlem Children’s Zone has invested in child-development, social services, family support, health, and community-building services.

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Learning for life

From 2011 to 2016, Suwon more than doubled its number of participants in informal learning, up to 790,000 learners (in a city of 1.2 million)—contributing 178 M $ to operate 42,000 different programmes. Suwon reached these phenomenal figures, over ¾ of all inhabitants, by focusing on creating a variety of learning activities.

Learning does not end after school or university. Many governments, research institutions and even civic groups have recognised the importance of continually learning throughout life, especially as we will be both living and working longer than previous generations. It’s more important than ever that we create opportunities to learn for all—from prisoners to pensioners. Cities like Suwon, Korea, are attempting to create a network of over 600 lifelong learning places where all citizens can come take part in activities and are encouraged to access online learning tools—or Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). Online technologies for a new scale of access with FutureLearn, the MOOC platform run by the Open University in partnership with 72 other academic institutions and specialist organisations, providing access to over 6 million course learners enrolled.

They added 90 learning spaces, increasing the number to 614, as well as introducing

Peer to Peer Learning Movements

Morado Kakgyo (anything schools) to

Peer to peer learning has been around since the 1960s, when educational theorists like Paulo Freire advocated for teachers to treat students as cocreators of knowledge. Today, there are many platforms that aim to provide opportunities to learn laterally from one another—both in the acquisition of new hobbies, new fields or subjects, to professional skills. The Anti-university project is one such example. Calling itself a collaborative experiment in learning, since 2015, the network has encouraged self-organised lectures, readings, demonstrations and workshops to occur in venues across London, shaped and delivered by volunteer academics and open to the public. [30] It is comparable to the international network of more than 50 “Trade Schools,” the first of which was founded in 2010, which is based on the idea of ‘bartering for wisdom.’ Students wishing to learn from what a volunteer teacher has to offer, bring a barter item for the teacher, who can be instructing on a wide array of topics, from bread-making to digital photography. [31]

enable senior citizens to study whatever they want and Nuguna Hakgyo (Anyone Schools) where anyone can come to teach (or learn) encouraging skills swaps. Their open learning spaces programmes massively widened access to all.

Trade Schools, are a global network of 50 groups which enable informal peer-to-peer learning.

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HULL

‘The gritty English industrial city of Hull, a superficially implausiblechoice for a resilient city.’ –Carl Abbott [29]

At the meeting point of the Humber and Hull, Hull is often described as at the edge—on the road to nowhere. Its maritime location has seen it play the role of monastic port-town exporter of wool, with immense industries in the dry docks, fishing, paint, breweries, confectionery, [33] oil-seed crushing, timber, logistics— and now UK Capital of Culture. Hull knows change and knows setbacks: from the Cod War and closing down of dry docks and other industries, to widespread unemployment, negative press and even stigmatization.* It has, in many senses, been left-behind. Yet these setbacks sometimes obscure what Hull is to the 260,000 Hullensians who live there: a city described lovingly by Tracy Thorn as having a “gritty resilience” that “helps you survive and to make Saturday night go with a bang.” [34] It is a unique place shaped and influenced by centuries of innovators and revolutionaries: a city which gave us William Wilberforce and the abolition of slavery; Philip Larkin and poems like ‘This be the verse’; Amy Johnson and female empowerment; the ‘Headscarf Revolutionaries’; John Hotham’s defiance which sparked the Civil War (as well as trawler safety and Needler’s boiled sweets). Hull also has a rich and diverse spread of ‘hidden assets’ ranging from its civic networks consisting of ‘professional amateurs’ and hobbyists, charities and community-led projects to learning facilities, sustainability initiatives, and a huge number of creative and cultural skills, networks and spaces. It’s a city with diverse and civic and social networks. From social enterprises such as Probe, which repurposes vacant flats to provide affordable places to live for local people to spaces, to institutes such as the Khedrubje Kadampa Buddhist Centre which offers free courses, lecture and study groups on meditation and mindfulness. Not-for-profits, like Warren Records, support vulnerable and marginalised young people into music industry by providing free rehearsal and recording studio space and support, while the Men in Sheds project offers older men in Hull a safe space to socialise and support one another through practical DIY. Food4Hull, a network of over 20 growing spaces across the city aims to make food more local sustainable and affordable for everyone, and is just one of many greening and growing initiatives across the city.

* Hull was voted “the crappest town in the UK” to coming in the lowest 10 UK cities in terms of population, private sector business and start-up growth—as well as employment rates. The city has had to ‘make-do’ with £104 M less (or 42% of the annual budget) central government funding.

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AMATEUR BOXING CLUB

MEN IN SHEDS

THE SPACE DANCE STUDIO THE ADELPHI CLUB

UNIVERSITY OF HULL

HULL PARKOUR AND FREEST

ATOM BEERS

Microbrewery now stocked in over 150 ASDA stores

Popular live music venue

HULL TRAINING AND ADULT EDUCATION

SKELTON HOOPER SCHOOL OF DANCE

HULL CVS

Support to voluntary and community groups

AMIYOGA STUDIO

GROUND

Gallery space opened by Hull artists

THE ROYAL BRITISH LEGION

COMPASS HU HULL CENTRAL LIBRARY HULL CODE CLUB ALBEMARLE MUSIC CENTRE HULL MUSIC SERVICES

TIGERS SPORT & EDUCATION TRUST Youth sport programming with employment and training support

GK BEAULAH & CO

Home of Hull music hub rehearsal and performance space for ens

Wall plaques, shields and heraldic coats of arms

HULL LITERATURE AND PHILOSOPHY SOCIETY

Promotes literature and science through public lectures

FE GA

GENE POOL BREWING Microbrewery

KHEDRUBJE KADAMPA BUDDHIST CENTRE

Free drop-in sessions in meditation / mindfulness

GOODWIN DEVELOPMENT TRUST

Social enterprise employing 200 staff and 140 volunteers

THE CONSERVATION VOLUNTEERS

Regional network of environmental volunteers

MIDDLE CHILD THEATRE COMPANY

ROCK CITY Climbing centre and skate park PICKERING ROAD GREEN LIFE COMMUNITY ORCHARD

Youth-led skills on live ‘green’ projects

AUNT BESSIE’S / WILLIAM JACKSON

Food products company founded in Hull in 1851


TYLE GYMNASTICS

MKM BUILDING SUPPLIES

SEWELL GROUP LTD

Construction and facilities management

ANNETTE BURLEY SCHOOL OF DANCE CLIFTON RICHARDSON ACADEMY OF DANCE

KINGSTON CARVING LTD

Specialists in ornate wood carving

RECKITT BENCKISER HEALTHCARE

JAMES RECKITT PUBLIC LIBRARY

Innovative library with future maker space

THE MENTAL HEALTH ACTION GROUP BLOK CNC HULL

WRECKING BALL PRESS

Publishers of accessible literature

HULL HISTORY CENTRE

DANCE DYNAMIC

Specialist dance tuition providers

SIEMENS PROBE

Social enterprise that repurposes vacant buildings

ULL TRAINING RY

sembles

THE WARREN MARITIME MUSEUM

ERENS ART ALLERY

WILBERFORCE HOUSE Free music, counselling, training resource for youth KARDOMAH94 Restaurant, bar, exhibition and event space ONESIXONE Co-working and incubation space for 18-30 year-olds LAND OF GREEN GINGER SPRAY CREATIVE Collective of aerosol artists Award-winning HULL & EAST RIDING MUSEUM puppetry company

THE MUSEUM OF CLUB CULTURE TRINITY MARKET

HANDS ON HISTORY MUSEUM

C4Di

Co-working space and technology incubator

SPENCER GROUP

STUDIO ELEVEN Artist-run studios, workshops and exhibition space KINGSTON ART GALLERY FRÃœIT STRAWBERRY HUMBER ST GALLERY THE DEEP State-of-the-art aquarium

Leading UK engineering company

The Riches of Hull Creative industries Cultural infrastructure Green initiatives Workspaces and businesses Civic networks Education


Hull contains a rich variety of learning spaces and teaching resources: from initiatives like Hull Code Club, hosted by James Reckitt Library, which teaches children about coding and creating websites, to the forthcoming Fablab: a makerspace on the second floor of Hull Central Library, which has already received £300,000 of funding to provide access to equipment for people of all ages who want to “make, think, collaborate, invent, explore and exhibit” their work.

Informal learning events with craftspeople at Traenerhus

There is also a richness of both creative industry and cultural spaces: Traenerhus is a workshop space for 40-50 local makers who operate it as a cooperative, both selling their wares and running workshops in crafts like willow weaving while publishing houses like Wrecking Ball Press, has delivered a flagship spoken word festival in partnership with the BBC and regularly champions new writers and poets in the city. Alongside more formal cultural venues and performance spaces such as Humber Street Gallery, Albemarle Music Centre and Hull Truck Theatre, sit valuable spaces of Hull’s “everyday culture” such as Trinity Market and the Fruitmarket District, or St Paul’s amateur boxing club. It’s an entrepreneurial city—home to the William Jackson Food Group, which employs nearly 2,000 people manufacturing “Aunt Bessie’s range of Yorkshire puddings.” Arthur’s Organic—one of the UK’s first organic vtdropbox schemes— hails from Hull. The city hosts cutting edge spaces for enterprise, such as C4Di, a 22,000 square foot building for innovative start-ups and SMEs, alongside smaller enterprise networks like One Six One, a co-working and incubation space set up in 2016 and run by Hull Youth Support Trust (HYST).

Bringing these challenges together

Pre-industrial city:

Post-industrial challenge:

Post-industrial recovery:

Inner city as centre of social and economic life

A hollowing out of city centres

City centre as a place of learning

Taking all this into account, the question becomes: what would ‘better’ learning look like in Hull?

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What if Hull as a city decided to champion the development of skills and capabilities in its young people that are vital for life, but not always taught most effectively in schools—around well-being in body and mind, our role in society, how to create and collaborate as well as how to understand our place in a rapidly changing world?

What if this took the form of a network of inner city spaces providing new forms of experiential learning, across subjects and themes?

What would it look like to have young, middle aged and older people comfortably mingling and exchanging knowledge?

What if this aspiration took the form of a family of new learning institutions, open to all students in and around Hull, and clustering industry expertise, equipment, classes and ‘experiential’ learning in close proximity?

What if these were combined in novel ways to generate self-sustaining income that could support continued learning, project spin-offs and wider programming possibilities?

What if these new institutions built local partnerships around a shared social mission— utilising the city’s ‘hidden’ abundances—spaces, time, knowledge and other resources to make the whole of Hull a de facto ‘school without walls’?

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LEARNING WITHOUT BORDERS

Learning Without Borders is a vision for learning and education as a driver for achieving a more diverse and resilient future Hull. The seeds of a new vision lie in considering key themes and competencies that are critical for living a fulfilled life, but not yet explicitly taught in schools or workplaces. These include, for example, forms of learning associated with physical movement, mental health, developing the power to design and make, and awareness of wider social and environmental systems in which we sit: qualities which support our development into more reflective, conscious, empowered and fulfilled beings. Learning Without Borders proposes five new institutes for Hull offers a glimpse into a possible future where a range of spaces across the city offer residents the chance to work, create, experiment, play and learn.

Embodied Being

Mindful Being

Social Being

The links between

Mental health,

physical and Commnityhealth apothecary

self-confidence, Meditation mornings &

and nutrition workshop & mental health are choregraphed dance

book creativity clubs resilience, -

well known: from

the capability of the

improved moods

human brain is one of

Creative being

Natural being

We are complex

We are creative

We are increasingly

social beings, Communal soup

and collaborative Inter-school collabora-

kitchen & cross-culturresearch highlights al music-making and appreciation workshop how loneliness

increases chance

tive craft-making/ beings, with research app-developing

disconnected from Foraging, growing &

River Hull clean-up our wider ecosystem,

challenge links highlighting

with 1/3 of young

between making and

people not knowing bacon comes from

to lowering risks

the least understood,

of heart attacks,

well-being, through

of depression and

and most studied

cognitive decline and

increased stimulation

pigs. It is clear

dementia.

subjects.

depression.

and reduced negative

we need to raise

self-focus.

awareness of wider systems in which we sit.

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Five future institutes for Hull Independent, but coordinated by a central platform, the institutes represent a starting point within a longer-term journey involving the transformation of Hull’s spaces, forging of new relationship, policies and underlying infrastructure to deliver inspiring change.

Institute of the Body

Institute of the Mind

A learning environment/facility dedicated

A learning environment/facility dedicated

to awareness of body and health, the

to exploration of the self and being, and

expression of individuality and well-

realised through activities such as reading,

being through the body, from exercise

language, music and meditation.

to nutrition—and brought to the fore through activities such as dance, physical performance, cookery and healing.

Institute of Earth

Institute of Social Relations

A learning environment/facility

A learning environment/facility

for retaining our awareness and

dedicated to exploring our place in

connection with our surrounding

society, meaningful relationships,

and natural world and materials—

shared purpose, empathy and social

from the cycles of food production

action, brought to the fore through

to understanding plants, materials,

activities and facilities such as

foraging or survival.

social enterprise, lectures and debate, hobbies, craft and ‘hanging

Institute of Making

out’.

A learning environment/facility dedicated to exploring and bolstering our ability to make and collaboratively produce— from traditional craft in woodworking, metalworking to new forms of digital creation—from coding to digital technologies in the mediums of film, light and sound.

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LEARNING KITCHEN INGREDIENTS SUPPLIED BY INSTITUTE OF EARTH

Welcome to the future home of the Institute of the Body! The Institute of environment Body is a learning environment and The Institute of Body is a learning and facility facility dedicated to raising awareness of body, physical dedicated to raising awareness of body and bodily health, and health, and well-being related to exercise, nutrition, and well-being related to exercise, nutrition and self expression. self expression.

The Institute is born of the recognition of the links between Themental Institute was born thethat recognition of the links physical health and health and the of belief between physical mental are health and the healthy and active bodies, as well as health physicaland expression, belief healthy and active as well as physical fundamental to not onlythat living healthier and longerbodies, lives, but expression, arehealth fundamental to improving living healthier and to countering a range of mental issues, from longer We promote activities moods to lowering risks lives. of depression and dementia, asshown well as to counter a of by mental health from improving your mood generating socialrange benefits offering ways issues, for people to develop toand lowering riskseach of depression and dementia, but also new relationships bonds with other.

PHYSICAL THERAPY

activities that generate social benefits by offering ways

people to develop new relationships and bonds with The Institute for for Body is a place of dynamic learning: each other.

1

where budding performers can find rehearsal space and The Institute for Body is a place of dynamic learning. practice ‘works in progress’;

Budding performers can find rehearsal spaces and

‘works in progress’. Community members can 2 where thepractice community can participate in movement participate in movement classes such as yoga, tai chi classes such as yoga, tai chi and dance;

and dance. You can explore your culinary curiosity in by

taking lessons in our open kitchen 3 where locals cancooking explore their curiosity in nutrition and and learning about Our on-site café kitchen provides affordable and cooking by takingnutrition. cooking lessons in the open balanced workers meals for workers. and neighbourhood canneighbourhood get affordable and nutritious meals. Whether you’re young or old, amateur or professional, whether you’re a hobbyist or running a business, you’re invited to exercise, play, and develop a healthy body.

A Studio Weave project

in collaboration with

B U R E AU B U R E AU

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commissioned by

START FINISH LINE FOR RUNNING GROUPS


SHOWERS AND CHANGING ROOMS

GYM

A HEALTHY MIND IN A HEALTH BODY INSTITUTE OF MIND TRANQUILLITY GARDEN

YOGA, MARTIAL ARTS, AND DANCE STUDIOS AQUA-FITNESS AND SWIMMING CLASSES

DUKE OF EDINBURGH EXPEDITIONS AND FORAGING WALKS WITH INSTITUTE OF EARTH

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Institute of Body Example projects and activities

Open Kitchen, Helsinki Incubator for food start-ups

Schanzenpark, Hamburg Outdoor climbing wall

Urban Physic Garden, London Community Medicinal Garden

Good Gym, UK-wide Runners who do social good

Skelton Hooper, Hull Dance school

LO:CUS Dance, Hull Hull based dance troupe

Badeschiff, Berlin Harbourside swimming pool

Darwin Ecosystem, Bordeaux Re-purposed army-barracks skate-park

Programme idea Parcour training

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Programme idea Contact improvisation

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PERFORMANCE SPACE SHARED WITH INSTITUTE OF BODY

Welcome of health, the future home of the Mental self-confidence, resilience, creativity—the Institute of theofMind! capability the human brain is one of the least understood, and most studied subjects.

Mental health, self-confidence, resilience, creativity—the capability of the The Institute of the Mind is a human multi-generational, inclusive active brain is one ofspace the least understood and of the self and reflective learning dedicated to exploration most learning studied and subjects. personal development. It is focused on activities such as reading, language, music and meditation.

The Institute of Mind is a multigenerational andaccommodate inclusive active learning The spaces a range of activities including: space dedicated to exploration of the self, reflective learning, and personal homework clubs, as well 1 children joining after-school development. will find children as Here wideryou members of the community meeting for book joining after-school clubs, clubs or homework language exchanges; members of the community meeting for book clubs language exchanges, andin guided meditation and 2 or practitioners leading courses practitionersreflection; leading courses in guided meditation and reflection. 3 individuals swapping skills, such as music lessons;

Enjoy our regular programmes and events, and relax4 in exhibitions our Tranquillity Garden, talented photography, as well that showcase which is tended by members of the localdesigned to provide food as sound and light installations community and schools, orpeace spend for thought and of time mind; in our exhibition spaces showcasing photography, sound, andediting light installations 5 documentary for budding film-makers. designed to bring you food for thought and peace of mind.

A Studio Weave project

in collaboration with

B U R E AU B U R E AU

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commissioned by

EXHIBITION SPACE CURATED BY INSTITUTE OF MAKING

TRANQUILLITY GARDEN POWERED BY INSTITUTE OF EARTH

VID


CO-WORKING SPACES ORGANISED BY INSTITUTE OF SOCIAL RELATIONS

LIBRARY / BOOK EXCHANGE

MEETING SPACES FOR GROUPS PRACTICE ROOMS

DEO EDITING SUITE SHARED WITH INSTITUTE OF MAKING

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Institute of Mind Example projects and activities

Woodburner, London Evening of Music

The Moth, International Story-telling Events

826 Valencia, San Francisco Innovative after-school club

Candy Chang “Before I die”, International Interactive public art

Men in Sheds, International Well-being through DIY

Brainbrushing, Bhutan Daily mindfullness exercises

Uni-project, New York Pop-up library spaces

Stitch & Bitch, International Social Craft

Programme idea Art therapy

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School of Life, International Philosophy-school offering lectures and classes

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CAFÉ INGREDIENTS SUPPLIED BY INSTITUTE OF EARTH

People do not exist in future isolation: we are socialof beings Welcome of the home of complex the Institute whoSocial derive Relations! pleasure and meaning through interpersonal relationships and shared purpose. Research highlights how loneliness, impacts health—from Peoplefor doinstance, not existsignificantly in isolation; we are complex social increasing chance of heart attacks, to contributing to cognitive beings who derive pleasure and meaning through decline and depression and even shortening life expectancy. interpersonal relationships and shared purpose. An In aabundance world which of hasresearch become divisive, thehow Institute of Socialfor highlights loneliness, Relations represents a celebration of what we have in increasing instance, significantly impacts health—from common. the chance of heart attacks, to contributing to cognitive

INFORMAL MEET-UPS

decline and depression, and even shortening life

Theexpectancy. Institute of Social Relations is a learning space divisive, dedicatedthe In a world which has become to exploring our place in society, meaningful relationships and of Institute of Social Relations represents a celebration shared purpose. what we have in common. Its most importantof feature is Relations that peopleisfeel welcomespace to just The Institute Social a learning ‘hang out’ and meet (or make new) friends through its cafe, where, for instance, documentaries are edited and outdoor spaceslectures and programming. Spaces a a coscreened, and debates areaccommodate hosted, where range of activities including: working space provides affordable workspace for social

OUTDOOR CAFÉ

entrepreneurs looking to solve city-wide and global

1 documentaries being screened edited, as well as challenges. Hull ‘meet-ups’ takeand place here, including for lectures and debates being hosted volunteer groups hosting ‘guerilla meals’ in abandoned

locations across the city and drawing attention to sites

2 providing affordable thata co-working are derelictspace but also quite special. workspace for social entrepreneurs looking to solve city and global Its challenges. most important feature is that people feel welcome

to just ‘hang out’ and meet (or make new friends) in

3 for enthusiasts hobbyist its Hull café‘meet-ups’ and common room andand outdoor spaces. You’re

invited to this institute whether you’re young or old,

Thisamateur is just one for meet-ups, as the orlocation professional, whether youInstitute want tofor run a Social Relations helps facilitate ‘Guerilla meals’ odd or commercial business or pursue hobbiesinfor fun. abandoned locations across the city, drawing attention to sites that are derelict but also quite special. A Studio Weave project

in collaboration with

B U R E AU B U R E AU

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commissioned by

CONFERENCES, DEBATES, AND PANEL DISCUSSIONS


CO-WORKING SPACE SUPPORTED BY INSTITUTE OF MAKING MEDIA SUITE

MEETING SPACES FOR GROUPS SHARED WITH INSTITUTE OF MIND

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Institute of Social Relations Example projects and activities

Sidcup Discovery Incubator, London Local retail incubator

InstituteX, Aarhus Self-built city-zone for creatives

Library Lab Creche, London Experimental pay-what-you-can childcare

Sunday Soup, International Peer-to-peer fundraising meals

Open City Doc Festival, London Annual film festival

Impact Hub, Birmingham Co-working space for social enterprises

Folly for a Flyover, London Temporary outdoor cinema

Freespace, San Francisco Crowd-funded community space

Proposed idea Riverside CafĂŠ

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Willesden Green Library Lab, London Experimental library and community space

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EXHIBITION SPACE PROVIDED BY INSTITUTE OF MIND

Welcome of the future home of the Institute of Making! We are innately creative beings. The Institute of Making to long-standing research highlighting the links Weresponds are innately creative beings. The Institute of Making was set up between DIY and lifelong learning with increased well-being, following long-standing research highlighting the links between art, stimulating mental activity andincreased increasing overall confidence. craft, and lifelong learning with well-being, mental activity, and confidence. Learning to make or produce something isItempowering. Learning to make or produce something is empowering. It enables and mend mend (rather (rather than than buy buy anew) anew) and and to to creatively enables us us to to make make and solve problems byproblems understanding new materials, creatively solve by understanding newtechnologies, materials, and their applications. technologies and their applications. In partnership with a wider network of friends and collaborators, the The Institute of Making is a dynamic learning environment Institute of Making is a dynamic learning environment. It is a space that dedicated to harnessing our ability to make and collaboratively aims to support society’s ability to make and produce—from traditional produce. A central space—brought to life in partnership with acreation craft in woodworking and metalworking to new forms of digital wider network of friends and collaborators— a as and experimentation through programming andaccommodating technologies such augmented reality andcraft virtual range of traditional andreality. digital creation. Here, within cross-discipline one institute, you can findhosted practitioners of traditional craft To enable creativity, under one roof, together with digital creators and software engineers. Our ‘Fabrication there will be: Laboratory’ hosts shared tools and equipment (open to businesses, the community, and school children), a media suite for editing and producing shared tools andcraft equipment (open businesses, pottery and music,1 videos, web apps, workshops fortowoodworking, the community and school children), craft workshops painting, and a gallery to showcase Hull products and talent. We even for woodworking, pottery and painting, as well as who want to have a guest suite for hosting ‘maker’ residencies for those of traditional crafts (like and metal while come andpractitioners access our equipment, networks andwood city environment contributing back to the local community. working); Whether young old, amateur professional, whether 2 you’re a media suiteor for editing and or developing music, videos,you are a hobbyist or starting a business, you’re invited to become a member and web apps, as well as new digital creators using coding develop your creative and productive interests. and digital technologies such as augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR); A Studio Weave project

3 a gallery showcasing Hull products and talent. B U R E AU B U R E AU Additionally, a guest suite hosts ‘maker’ residencies for those who want to come and access equipment, networks and city environment while contributing back to the local community.

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in collaboration with

LEARNING WITHOUT BORDERS

commissioned by

ART STUDIOS

SCREEN-PRINTING

POTTERY AND CASTING


MEDIA SUITE

TEAMWORK SPACES SUPPORTED BY INSTITUTE OF SOCIAL RELATIONS

CNC ROUTER, LASER CUTTING, 3D PRINTING, AND RAPID PROTOTYPING

FURNITURE AND EQUIPMENT FOR OTHER INSTITUTES MADE AT THE INSTITUTE OF MAKING

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Institute of Making Example projects and activities

Bikeworks, London Bicycle Repair shop working with disadvantaged youth

Build-up, London Playground construction with local children

Chatsworth Road, London Craft, art and treatment room

Wikihouse, International Open source house-building

Hackspace, International Peer-run DIY spaces

Mural painting, Seattle Community projects funded through Neighbourhood Matching Fund

Library of Things, London Tool-lending library

Trade-school, International Bartering and skills-swapping

Makerfaire, International Exhibition events

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Building Bloqs Enfield, London Open Access Workshop Space for crafts-people

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TRANQUILLITY GARDEN FOR THE INSTITUTE OF MIND

Welcome of the future home of the Institute of Earth!

The Institute of Earth was founded in recognition that we were in Institute danger of becoming increasingly disconnected from The of Earth was founded in recognition thethat wider natural systems that nourish and sustain us. These we were in danger of becoming increasingly range from knowledge of food cultivation and climate change, disconnected from the wider natural systems that through to the physiological psychological benefits of time nourish and sustain us.and These range from knowledge simply spent in nature. of food cultivation and climate change, through to

the physiological and psychological benefits of time

Thesimply Institute of Earth is a dynamic ‘nature’s classroom’ spent in nature. providing facilities and activities which build our awareness of wider natural systems, expose us to processes of The Institute of Earth is a dynamic ‘nature’s food production, and grow our understanding traditional classroom’ providing facilities and activities which applications medicinal plants, foraging andsystems, survival skills. build ourofawareness of wider natural expose

us to processes of food production, and grow our Theunderstanding institute hosts: of traditional applications of medicinal plants, foraging, and survival skills. a magical ‘vertical farm’ for food production, as well as growing and sustainable farming—all Heremushroom you can find a magical ‘verticalfish farm’ for food tended to by Hull residents; production, operated by local residents, and linked

VEGETABLE GROWING AND GARDENING GROUPS

1

with a wider network of city farms throughout Hull 2 links with a wider network of city farms throughout which harvest and supply produce to local schools, Hull which harvest and supply produce to local cafés, and restaurants across the city. Hull University cafes and restaurants across the city—onrunsschools, an experimental horticulture programme this network willshort be available at to an the on-site site,produce and weofoffer visits and courses outlet; community in permaculture, apiculture, aquaculture, botany, fungiculture, bushcraft, and orienteering. 3 take spaces for Hull University to run experimental We pride in the fact that we’re the ‘jumping horticulture programme on-site—the will off’ point for local Duke of Edinburgh community and Rambler also have visits and short courses available to them in expeditions, as well as curating talks and exhibitions topics such as permaculture, apiculture, aquaculture, reporting on the latest geographical expeditions and botany,discoveries. fungiculture, bushcraft and orienteering; scientific 4 a socialising point for local Duke of Edinburgh in collaboration with commissioned by and Rambler expeditions, as well curating talks and exhibitionsBwelcoming U R E AU the latest geographical BU R E AU discoveries. exploration and scientific

A Studio Weave project

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DUKE OF EDINBURGH EXPEDITIONS AND FORAGING WALKS


VERTICAL HYDROPONIC FARMING

SUSTAINABLE FISH FARMING

UNIVERSITY OF HULL HANDS-ON LABS

MUSHROOM CAVE

AFFORDABLE ORGANIC PRODUCE OUTLET ALSO SUPPORTING INSTITUTE OF BODY SOCIAL KITCHEN

FRESH PRODUCE SUPPLIED TO LOCAL RESTAURANTS

SUPPLYING PRODUCE TO CAFÉ AT INSTITUTE OF SOCIAL

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Institute of Earth Example projects and activities

Bristol Power Energy Co-op

De Ceuval cafe, Amsterdam Closed loop cafe

The People’s Supermarket, London A social enterprise grocery store that sells responsibly sourced food

Incredible Edible, Todmorden City-wide community growing project

Dalston Eastern Curve, London Green event space

Bio-bean, Cambridge Enterprise using coffee grounds for energy production

Urban Orchard, London Cider-production from foraged fruit

Programme idea Mushroom farm

Programme idea Horticultural training

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Eden Project, Cornwall Bio-dome visitor attraction housing rainforests

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HULL HULL 20372037

Welcome to Hull 2037, a vision for cityfuture of learning! Welcome to Hull 2037, a vision for Hull’s as a cityThe of legacy of the c as 2017 City of Culture lives on thr learning! The legacy of the city’s designation as 2017 City of of projects supported by the Hull I Culture lives on through the dozens of projects supported making Hull a family-friendly, forw by the Hull Impact Fund, making Hull a family-friendly, connected city. Through its city-wi forward-looking, connected city. Through its city-wide

Freetown Way Park

Hull New Theatr Disused car park Urban farming Albion Street Community Allotments Hull Central Library Co-working and meeting rooms Self-driving car depot

Hull Truck Theatre Conferences and film projections

Old BHS Building Co-working spaces St. Stephen’s Shopping Centre Jameson Street Busking Festival

Ferensway Park

Hyperloop Terminal

Europa Building Co-working spaces Digital incubator

City Hall Co-working spaces Community meetings

Princes Fish far

Ferens Art Gallery Exhibition spaces

Disused car park Urban farming

Hull Maritime Museum Maritime technology c

Princes Quay Institute of Earth

Old Staples Building Movement studios

Pr Li Hull Venue

Space used by the Institute of Body Space used by the Institute of Mind Space used by the Institute of Social Relations Space used by the Institute of Making Space used by the Institute of Earth

Castle St Footbrid

Castle Street Park Linear park Herb garden


vehicle ride-sharing scheme, Hull has managed Hull’s future as a to radically decrease motor traffic, making it city’s designation autonomous vehicle ride-sharing scheme, Hull has managed very accessible to pedestrians and cyclists. Part rough the dozens to radically decrease motor traffic, making it very accessible of the and city’s road network has been converted Impact Fund, to pedestrians cyclists. Part of the city’s road network linear parks andparks obsolete parking parking structures ward-looking, has beentoconverted to linear and obsolete have been transformed into vertical urban farms. ide autonomous structures have been transformed into vertical urban

Over the last 20 years Hull has benefitted from its pioneering renewable energy andits its farms. Over the last 20 years Hull has initiatives, benefitted from inclusive Learning Without Borders programme pioneering renewable energy initiatives, and its inclusive has Without enriched the lives of thousands of people of Learning Borders programme has enriched the lives all ages and backgrounds and empowered them to of thousands of people of all ages and backgrounds and contribute to the city in turn. empowered them to contribute to the city in turn.

re George Street Vertical Farm Institute of Earth Teaching gardens Hull College Co-working spaces Hull School of Art and Design

Queen’s Gardens Band Stand Speakers’ corner Disused car park Urban farming

m centre

Old HSBC Building Social innovation centre

s Quay rming

Old Argos Building Institute of Making Open workshops Holly Trinity Church

Scale Lane Swing Bridge

Garrison Road Park

Victoria Dock Primary School

rinces Quay ido

treet dge

Myton Bridge Park

Hull Riverside Park Running clubs

C4Di Technology park Multi-purpose events space Humber Street Gallery Hull makers’ showcase Humber Wind Farm

The Deep Hull and Yorkshire Cruise Terminal


Summary and next steps Hull’s City of Culture designation presents a unique opportunity to deliver a truly inspiring legacy for learning across the city. This paper has proposed an approach to that legacy that combines the energy and momentum of the last year with the key challenges of our time to drive a lasting vision for a more inclusive, prosperous and resilient inner city. Critically, it looks to extend the concept of learning beyond established boundaries of the classroom to imagine how people in Hull—regardless of their age or background— can acquire the mental, emotional and practical tools to both fulfill their unique potential and fully participate in the shaping of their urban spaces. Learning Without Borders presents an initial framework for aligning Hull’s urban regeneration aspirations with this ambitious learning agenda. From repurposing carparks into vertical urban farms to establishing a network of open access makerspaces, the document proposes a set of hard urban interventions, alongside ‘What If’ programming, to provoke wider conversation about what a future Hull might look like, how it can be made more joyful, and how this can continue to be an inclusive process. Turning business as usual on its head, Learning Without Borders can harness the energy and resources of partners to drive the next generation of learning institutions, while acting as a ‘Guardian’ promoting the shared mission and providing thought leadership and practical support (residencies, funding bids) to make partnership working easier, more frequent, aligned and impactful. This is the starting point for a much longer journey, and there will be much to do. The thematic lenses for learning, highlighted in this piece, should act as invitations—to a range of players across the city—to begin honing this shared vision and mission. This might take the form of: Commissioned ‘provocations’ delivered by artists and peppered throughout the city which pique interest throughout the city on the five key learning themes highlighted in this document: • • • •

A TEDx Hull on the city’s Learning Legacy A series of thematic meet-ups, network mapping or ‘thought dinners’ to find interested collaborators A mission statement or charter on Learning Without Borders Seed funding for ‘prototypes’ of the five institutions in existing spaces in the city

What is Learning Without Borders? Optimistic. Inclusive. Exciting.

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REFERENCES

1

http://www3.weforum.org/docs/ WEF_Future_of_Jobs.pdf

2 https://www.architectural-review. com/rethink/campaigns/notopia/ notopia-the-post-industrialhollowing-out-of-cities-is-atragedy-for-civic-identity/10007021. article 3 http://www.pluggingtheleaks.org/ about/ 4 https://www.bitc.org.uk/system/ files/retail-led_regeneration_study. pdf 5 http://www.centreforcities.org/ reader/delivering-change-puttingcity-centres-heart-local-economy/ economic-importance-city-centres/ 6 https://core.ac.uk/download/ pdf/6580395.pdf 7 http://www.walesonline.co.uk/ business/business-news/ ons-should-stay-newportneeds-10544773 8 http://www.independent.co.uk/ news/business/news/bbc-movesalford-negligible-impact-greatermanchester-public-sector-jobsmediacityuk-london-a7884801.html 9 http://www.centreforcities.org/ reader/delivering-change-puttingcity-centres-heart-local-economy/ city-centre-case-studies/16masan-changwon-south-korea/ 10 In Donald K. Carter Remaking PostIndustrial Cities: Lessons from North America and Europe

12 http://ateneusdefabricacio. barcelona.cat/ 13 https://www.thersa.org/actionand-research/rsa-projects/publicservices-and-communities-folder/ inclusive-growth-commission 14 See The Good Growth Fund https://www.london.gov.uk/sites/ default/files/good_growth_fund_ prospectus.pdf 15 See Fintry Development Trust http://www.fintrydt.org.uk/ 16 https://birmingham.impacthub.net/ mission/radicalchildcare/

23 https://www.thersa.org/discover/ publications-and-articles/ rsa-blogs/2014/10/usinginsights-from-neuroscience-ineducation-using-the-body-toimprove-thinking-skills 24 http://content.time.com/time/ magazine/article/0,9171,2062465,00. html 25 http://www.q2l.org/upper-school/ curriculum/ 26 http://www.oecd.org/edu/ ceri/49930659.pdf 27 https://studioschoolstrust.org/

17 London Essays, Volume 7 “Work� http://essays.centreforlondon.org/ issues/work/

28 http://yearhere.org/

18 http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/ uk-england-essex-40422351/musicremoved-from-school-s-curriculum

30 See http://www.antiuniversity.org/ ABOUT

29 See http://bit.ly/2goaQBK

31 See http://tradeschool.coop/ 19 See Schools of the Future in Denmark https://medium.com/ edtech-europe-tour/schoolsof-the-future-in-denmark55f22cf7f772

32 Carl Abbott, Imagining Urban Futures: Cities in Science Fiction and What We Might Learn from Them

20 http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/ articles/2bjqmTBp9rVgC8vvs1sJs6p/ top-of-the-class

33 https://www.hull2017.co.uk/ discover/article/made-hull-boiledsweets-people/

21 https://www.thersa.org/action-andresearch/rsa-projects/creativelearning-and-development-folder/ cities-of-learning

34 https://www.newstatesman.com/ politics/uk/2017/10/hull-may-becity-culture-it-s-still-scepticalplace-helped-form-me

22 http://ww2.kqed.org/ mindshift/2015/03/26/whykids-need-to-move-touch-andexperience-to-learn/

11 http://lameva.barcelona.cat/ bcnmetropolis/en/dossier/dels-fablabs-a-les-fab-cities/

LEARNING WITHOUT BORDERS

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Studio Weave is part of the Project 00 family, a collaborative design studio of architects, technologists, social scientists and urban designers practicing design beyond its traditional borders. We work with individuals, governments, corporations and communities to solve problems, anticipate change, and design deeply successful products, processes, platforms and places.

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