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A BIT ABOUT BUTTERMILK

Contrary to what a lot of people think, buttermilk is not simply ‘butter added to milk’. Traditional buttermilk is the liquid that is left over from churning butter but the term buttermilk can also refer to fermented milk or cultured buttermilk. All are sour, acidic, thick in texture and are great for baking (though traditional buttermilk might be hard to come by in your local supermarket). Why do we need buttermilk in baking? The acid in the buttermilk reacts with the alkaline of the baking soda. When this happens, carbon dioxide is released which removes the sour taste of the buttermilk and the soapy taste of the baking soda. It is also what helps our pancakes, muffins and sweet breads to rise sky high with an airy, tender and fluffy crumb.

BUTTERMILK INGREDIENTS 250ml (1 cup) milk (cows or dairy free milk of choice) 1 tablespoon of vinegar or lemon juice METHOD 1. Gently stir the vinegar/lemon juice into the milk and let it sit for 5-10 minutes or until it has thickened. The milk will curdle and look like it is no good to use anymore – this is what it is meant to look like! 2. Use in your recipe as you would storebought buttermilk. NOTES *If you use a non-dairy milk (e.g. almond milk), note that the buttermilk mixture will not be as thick. ** If your buttermilk isn’t clumpy, add another dash of vinegar or lemon juice. Sarah Sears What Sarah Bakes

Issue #7 | The Inspired Guide | January 1st 2020

93

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The Inspired Guide - Issue #7  

Read Issue #7 of The Inspired Guide - FREE Conscious Living and Holistic Wellbeing eMagazine! Filled with inspiring and informative article...

The Inspired Guide - Issue #7  

Read Issue #7 of The Inspired Guide - FREE Conscious Living and Holistic Wellbeing eMagazine! Filled with inspiring and informative article...

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