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USA TODAY SPECIAL EDITION

JOBS & EDUCATION

It’s important for veterans to translate their military work experience into civilian terms. ANDREW BURTON/GETTY IMAGES

HIRING OUR F HEROES

By Adam Stone

Veterans seek strategies for entering civilian workforce

ORMER AIR DEFENSE ARTILLERY officer Jeff Zanelotti knew his Army skills would not be a perfect fit when he applied for a print operations manager position with Broadridge Financial Solutions, a financial planning company. “Coming out of the military, one of my biggest concerns was that anything I did would be an area where I had zero experience,” said Zanelotti, who retired in 2016 as a lieutenant colonel after a 20-year military career. “Whatever I did, I would be starting on the ground floor as a man in his early 40s.” His experience is a common one. Veterans are proven leaders. They can

organize and execute. They manage troops and supplies. At the same time, they may lack the specific skills needed on the civilian side. Not every hiring manager can look at an artillery officer and see a print operations manager. Veterans need to be thoughtful and strategic as they seek to swap the uniform for civvies.

TRANSLATING SKILLS

Unemployment numbers among veterans paint a picture of a population that sometimes struggles to find its place in the workforce. In 2011, in the depths of the recession, the unemployment rate for veterans who served on active duty in the U.S. armed CO N T I N U E D

Profile for STUDIO Gannett

VETERANS AFFAIRS 2017  

VETERANS AFFAIRS 2017