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GREEN A P R I L 201 8

Kristen

Bell MAKING

EARTH A ‘GOOD PLACE’

PLUS FOOTBALL FIELD OF GREENS RECYCLING RULES FOR RUBBISH MEATLESS MEALS MAILED TO YOU

LIVING

10

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GREEN LIVING

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PAPERLESS PREMIERE

Welcome to the first digital issue

THEN & NOW

Decades of recycling have made a difference

BETTER BUYS

From cufflinks to cleaners, shop eco-friendly goods

IMPORTANT IMPACT

The more we reuse, the better for our planet

CURBING CONTAMINATION

Are you recycling the right way?

CONCRETE JUNGLE

Cities are finding creative ways to go green

NAVIGATION TOOLS Click to explore video.

4 GREEN LIVING

16 PROVIDED BY THE COMPANIES; GETTY IMAGES

6

Go crazy for these cork products

ALL PRODUCT PRICES AND AVAILABILITY ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE.

Tap for more information.

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Contents APRIL 2018

24 28 30 34 38

CARING COMPANIES

34

Sustainability is a priority for these corporations

KRISTEN BELL

Actress’ small steps make a big difference

PREMIUM PUBLICATION

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Jeanette Barrett-Stokes jbstokes@usatoday.com CREATIVE DIRECTOR Jerald Council jcouncil@usatoday.com MANAGING EDITOR Michelle Washington mjwashington@usatoday.com ISSUE EDITOR Tracy Scott Forson

FIELD GOALS

Paul Quinn College trades football for farming

EDITORS Amy Sinatra Ayres, Sara Schwartz Debbie Williams

FOOD BOXES

DESIGNERS Amira Martin, Miranda Pellicano Gina Toole Saunders, Lisa M. Zilka

Subscription services offer healthy plant-based meals

MYSTERY SOLVED

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Laura Beil, David Benda, Mary Helen Berg, Scott Berman, Gina RobertsGrey, Ashley May, Peggy J. Noonan, Christine Romero, Paul Singer, Adam Stone

Scooby-Doo and the gang are on the case

ADVERTISING VP, ADVERTISING Patrick Burke | (703) 854-5914 pburke@usatoday.com ACCOUNT DIRECTOR Justine Madden | (703) 854-5444 jmadden@usatoday.com

PROVIDED BY THE COMPANIES; NBC

FINANCE BILLING COORDINATOR Julie Marco This is a product of

28 Kristen Bell eco-activist

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Without limiting the rights under copyright reserved herein, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in or reproduced in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form, or by means electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the written consent of USA TODAY. The editors and publisher are not responsible for any unsolicited materials. PUBLISHED IN THE USA

5


OVERVIEW

Walking the Talk Welcome to our first digital edition of Green Living BY AM Y SI N ATRA AY RES

A

the importance of preserving our planet — something most Americans care deeply about. Seventy-four percent of U.S. adults believe the country should do “whatever it takes” to protect the environment, according to a 2017 Pew Research Center survey. The 50th anniversary of that first Earth Day is fast-approaching, and we’ve come a long way, but there are still plenty of challenges. We’ll give you a status report on what’s working in the world of recycling — and what’s not. (Hint: Wash items well before tossing them in your bin.) We share profiles of cities, companies and people making a difference with their eco-

friendly initiatives, like San Francisco’s move to require plantfriendly green roofs on new buildings. Plus, you’ll read about mealsubscription services that provide fresh vegetarian and vegan ingredients. Also, actress Kristen Bell talks about passing the eco-conscious baton to her daughters. Whether you’ve just gone green or have been working on reducing your carbon footprint for years, our goal is to educate you on recent developments in sustainable living and help you help the environment on Earth Day and every day.

GETTY IMAGES

s we get ready to mark Earth Day this year, many of us are changing the way we eat, live and learn in an effort to leave a smaller carbon footprint. USA TODAY’s Green Living is changing, too. We’re taking the magazine digital for the first time, so we can walk the talk and help you do the same. Americans have been observing Earth Day, which falls on April 22, since 1970. Over the decades, the movement has gone global, with more than 1 billion people taking part in events that clean up streams, plant trees and end plastic pollution, to name a few. The day has helped raise awareness about

2 GREEN LIVING 6 GREEN LIVING


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OVERVIEW

THEN AND NOW Strides have been made to decrease municipal solid waste (MSW) and reuse materials: 1990 2000

136

2014

In million tons

145

89 70

MSW entering landfills

The Rise of Recycling Significant progress made in decreasing waste, reusing materials

MSW recycled and composted

52%

61%

Yard trimmings composted

10%

42%

BY SCOTT B ERM AN

more efficient landfills nationwide have driven key changes, says David Biderman, executive director and CEO of the Solid Waste Association of North America. Although recycling rates surged from 1990 to 2005, the growth rate “leveled off ” between 2009 and 2014, the Environmen-

tal Protection Agency reports. “People have grown up with recycling,” says Caryn Shinske, public information officer for the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. “Now it’s as much a part of everyday life as taking out the trash, raking leaves or shoveling snow.”

Consumer electronics recycled

2%

5%

Food composted 99% of leadacid batteries are recycled, making them the top recycled item

99%

– SOURCE : EPA

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ILLUSTRATIONS: AMIRA MARTIN

S

ince the early 1990s, the U.S. has experienced a recycling revolution that’s resulted in an increase in the reuse of materials and a decrease in the amount of waste filling landfills. But make no mistake; there’s much room for improvement. Federal regulations for safer,


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ECO-PRODUCTS

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The sustainable material is good for more than wine bottles

B Y TRACY SCOTT FORSON

Eco-friendly artisans are creating a wide variety of products using cork, a natural material primarily grown in Portugal and Spain. Unlike wood, cork oak bark can be stripped from its source without harming the tree, and harvested again in nine years. However, cork’s sustainability wasn’t the initial appeal for Martha Vainer of Vancou-

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ver, British Columbia, owner of Cork by Design, which sells cork handbags and wallets. For Vainer, cork’s ecological benefits were a bonus to its water-resistant, lightweight and durable qualities. Plus, Vainer says, it’s easy to clean using soap and water. To stain the cork, she uses natural dyes that don’t harm the environment. “Everything is eco-friendly and sustainable,” she notes. “I use waterbased dye — no harsh chemicals.”

While Vainer receives her cork material specifically prepared — steamed, cleaned, thinly sliced and applied to cotton — for use as fabric, many manufacturers use recycled wine corks, according to Peter Weber, executive director of the Cork Quality Council. “Just grind it up, and you have the same cork material that you started out with,” he says. “It’s remarkable.” Check out these everyday items made from cork:

This vegan handbag, made in Portugal, offers three compartments, two inside pockets and a soft cotton lining. $179, corkbydesign.com

The polarized lenses in these fashion-forward, eco-friendly, wood and cork shades help to reduce glare. $69, queork.com

These stainless steel monogrammed cufflinks are perfect for a ritzy wine-tasting event or a night out. $49.95 per pair, wineenthusiast.com

Leather and cork coexist in these classic oxford shoes made in Portugal. $270, queork.com

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From the Excitement of New York City to a Refreshing Outdoor Adventure

Concerned About The Environmental Future of the Country? The best way to protect our nation from greater environmental damage is to reduce our population size and growth.

U.S. population now exceeds 327 million people and we are on track to add another 70 million by mid-century. In order to preserve our quality of life for future generations, we must slow, halt and eventually reverse population growth. For more information, please visit our website at

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Healthy Home Go green with these eco-friendly products and energy-saving appliances

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D SMALL APPLIANCES

PERSONAL CARE PRODUCTS

HOUSEHOLD CLEANERS

Samsung’s 1.2-cubicfoot countertop power convection microwave with sensor cooking combines the convenience of microwaving with convection so food cooks faster, which saves energy. “It’s our top ecofriendly unit,” says Home Depot spokeswoman Kathryn Emery. $399.99, homedepot.com

Kelley Hall-Barr and husband John created Barr-Co.’s eco-friendly fine shea butter lotion using aloe, purified water and assorted oils, including safflower, avocado and jojoba seed. $24, anthropologie.com

Use Absolute Green’s lemon multipurpose cleaner on mirrors, countertops, showers, sinks and more. The brand’s biodegradable cleaning products are nontoxic, vegan and environmentally friendly, and have earned an endorsement from People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, or PETA. Also available in peppermint or lavender. $7.49, myabsolutegreen.com

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Eco-friendly Effect BY AS HLEY M AY

T

he world would look a lot different if everyone recycled. Most likely, it would be cleaner. Landfills would shrink tremendously. With so many substances flowing through recycling plants, new products would be created. “It would contribute enormous environmental, economic and social

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benefits across the country,� says Brenda Pulley, president and CEO of Keep America Beautiful. The Bureau of International Recycling, a Belgium-based global recycling organization, believes recyclables should be recognized as the seventh-most important resource, behind water, air, coal, oil, natural gas and minerals.

GETTY IMAGES

Better recycling practices may lead to a cleaner world


One act of recycling If every American (323 million people) recycled one of these items, here are the results:

1 PLASTIC BOTTLE = 54+ MILLION T-SHIRTS

Ranjit Baxi, the group’s (recognize) the huge president, says recycling carbon emission savings has not only environmental our industry continues to benefits, but important contribute,” he adds. economic gains as well. Chaz Miller, director of In Apple’s 2016 policy and advocacy with Environmental the National Waste and Responsibility Report, Recycling Association, the company says a trade association it recovered for private more than a ton companies in of gold from the recycling of plastic bottles were recycled in recycled devices industry, the U.S. in 2013. — worth an estimates – SOURCE : EPA estimated $40 the U.S. would million. need “a couple The recycling thousand” facilities industry, while continuing to process materials, which to promote sustainability, is could affect the workforce. also projected to add about If the U.S. alone reached a $850 billion to the global recycling level of 75 percent, gross domestic product by 1.5 million new jobs would 2025, Baxi says. “It is time become available, Recycle that all global stakeholders Across America reports.

1 ALUMINUM CAN = 295 MILLION NEW ALUMINUM CANS

GETTY IMAGES; MIRANDA PELLICANO

10%

1 PLASTIC BAG = 28+ THOUSAND PARK BENCHES SOURCES: REPREVE; ALUMINUM ASSOCIATION; TEXDATA; KEEP AMERICA BEAUTIFUL

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LIVE

The recycling industry is grappling with a dual threat: The value of recovered waste products has plummeted and the amount of effort required to extract them has risen.

Curbing Contamination BY DAVI D B EN D A, ASH L EY M AY AN D PAUL S I N G ER

C

urbside recycling programs have become increasingly popular, but many residents across the country still waste recycling opportunities despite the prevalence of programs and efforts to educate communities on the proper way to do it. Take Redding, Calif., for example, where about 35 percent of the

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recyclables end up processed as trash because they can’t be recycled. Materials are often too dirty, discolored or damaged to be reused. Often, there’s also confusion around what items local facilities can accept. In one area, plastic water bottles might be accepted in recycling bins, but Styrofoam may not. One city may accept glass, while a neighboring community may only recycle paper products.

USA TODAY

When it comes to recycling, you may be doing it wrong


This is a nationwide problem, Experts suggest eco-responsible says David Biderman, executive residents learn which materials are director and CEO of the Solid Waste accepted at their local recycling Association of North America. facilities and always clean items “Ten or 15 years ago, to increase before tossing them in bins. recycling rates, we “The chance that all wanted to make it as of us would be perfect easy as possible for recyclers is pretty Americans to recycle, slim,” says Chaz Miller, so we told them to put director of policy and it (in) one big bin,” he advocacy with the says. So people are National Waste and putting everything Recycling Association. they think could — or “For us to recycle should — be recycled everything implies into the bins. that we’ve figured out –David Biderman, Solid “We have a lot of a way to take all of Waste Association of North aspirational recyclers,” the recyclables out of America Biderman explains. mixed garbage.” “Contamination rates at recycling facilities have increased significantly Visit epa.gov for more info on recycling. over the past five years.”

“Contamination rates at recycling facilities have increased significantly over the past five years.”

COMMONLY RECYCLED MATERIALS:

Batteries

Glass

Plastics

Aluminum

Electronics

JASPER COLT

Cardboard

Julia Canabal sorts materials at a recycling facility run by Waste Management in Elkridge, Md.

– SOURCE: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY; WASTE MANAGEMENT

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LIVE

How Green is Your City? BY MARY HEL EN B ERG

T

he best big cities for green living boast lower greenhouse gas emissions, plenty of mass transit, renewable energy, open spaces, farmers markets and bike paths, among other ecofriendly amenities, according to a recent analysis by the personal finance website WalletHub. Cities with high-density housing and fewer cars on the road are

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headed toward an eco-friendly future, says Laura Tam, sustainable development policy director for SPUR, which focuses on civic planning. “If we want to have a low-carbon future and a sustainable future, we have to reduce driving,” Tam says. “Being more efficient about planning land uses allows for a driving-lite lifestyle, and it’s one of the most important things cities can do.”

GETTY IMAGES

The top 5 eco-friendly places to live


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WalletHub’s top five greenest cities in the U.S. 1. SAN FRANCISCO The City by the Bay was one of the first in the U.S. to ban plastic bags, offer curbside compost recycling and mandate buildings to include solar or green roofs (see sidebar). The city aspires to achieve zero waste and run on 50 percent renewable energy by 2020. It has already passed laws that ban businesses from using or selling products made out of polystyrene foam and require construction projects to install electric charging stations in 20 percent of parking spaces.

2. SAN DIEGO

3. FREMONT, CALIF. As home to an enormous Tesla manufacturing plant, this city boasts nearly 6,000 electric vehicle owners, more than any other city in California, says Rachel DiFranco, Fremont’s sustainability manager. In 2017, the nonprofit Institute for Local Government honored Fremont for cutting energy use by 28 percent and community greenhouse gas emissions by 11 percent, among other achievements.

4. HONOLULU Residents of Hawaii’s

capital voted overwhelmingly in 2016 to establish the Office of Climate Change, Sustainability and Resiliency, a department that will develop programs and policies to protect the area’s natural resources from the effects of greenhouse gases. Honolulu tied for first place in the WalletHub survey for cities with the most green space and farmers markets per capita.

5. SAN JOSE, CALIF. This tech hub hopes to be a zero-waste city by 2022. San Jose prides itself on waste management and recycling, diverting more than two-thirds of its waste from landfills, recycling 75 percent of construction waste and working with local restaurants to convert more than 67,000 tons of organic food scraps into compost and electricity.

GETTY IMAGES

California’s secondlargest city is a “solar star,” according to a 2016 analysis by the Environment America Research and Policy Center, a nonprofit that works to protect

our “air, water and open spaces.” San Diego is among the U.S. cities with the most solar installations per capita. It is moving toward a goal of 100 percent renewable electricity and aims to cut greenhouse emissions in half by 2035.

4 GREEN LIVING 20 GREEN LIVING


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LIVE

Raising the Roof Flowers and trees grow where smokestacks once stood. Cities around the world are taking advantage of unused acreage on rooftops, creating community farms, butterfly gardens and other eco-friendly spaces. San Francisco

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became the first U.S. city to require that new buildings set aside roof space for either green or solar installations in 2017, and Denver instituted a green-roof law that went into effect Jan. 1. Sky-high greenery improves air

GETTY IMAGES

Green space in an unexpected place


What makes a city “greener”?

GETTY IMAGES

Gardens aren’t just for the ground. More cities are requiring the creation of green spaces on rooftops of buildings.

quality, reduces stormwater runoff and increases biodiversity, among other benefits, says Laura Tam, sustainable development policy director for the San Francisco Bay Area Planning and Urban Research Association. The green roof on a Dearborn, Mich., truck plant provides better building insulation and a bird nesting habitat, while the living roof atop the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park is home to grassy hills and a native wildflower garden along with solar panels and a weather station. “If we get serious about implementing green roofs, and other forms of living architecture like green walls,” says Steven Peck, founder and president of Green Roofs for Healthy Cities, “we can actually transform the city and make it a better place to live, a much healthier place for our children and better for us psychologically.” – Mary Helen Berg

Reserved space for farmers markets

Laws restricting or prohibiting the use of plastic bags

Availability of electric cars and charging stations

Curbside and compost recycling programs

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BUSINESS

Companies That Care Top corporations make the environment a priority

BY ADAM STO N E

In 2013, Walmart and SunEdison completed the installation of solar power panels on the store in Kapolei, Hawaii.

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executives who participated in an eight-year study from MIT Sloan Management Review and the Boston Consulting Group, say sustainability is important,

and nearly half have changed their business models to incorporate eco-friendly practices in their operations. They’re also looking beyond their stores or corporate >

WALMART

F

or many of the nation’s biggest companies, sustainability has become a core business consideration. Ninety percent of


BUSINESS

Eco-friendly practices Here’s what some of the most proactive companies have been doing to enhance their environmental stance.

FORD MOTOR COMPANY

FORD MOTOR COMPANY; HEWLETT-PACKARD

The automaker in 2017 released its 18th sustainability report, which focused on climate change and responsible water use. Between 2000 and 2015, Ford decreased water use by more than 61 percent and recently signed on to the international Business Alliance for Water and Climate “Improve Water Security” initiative, which aims to implement solutions to global water issues.

HEWLETT-PACKARD In its 2016 sustainability report, technology leader HP says it supports the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, a set of 17 distinct sustainability actions, and HP is actively pursuing progress on 15 out of the 17. In 2016, supply chain emissions were 21 percent lower than in 2010, and HP is using plastic waste from Haiti in its printer cartridge recycling efforts.

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BUSINESS

By 2025, Walmart aims to have 50 percent of its global energy needs met through renewable sources, and it’s already 26 percent there, according to the company, which also has been one of the leading corporate users of on-site solar energy.

PATAGONIA To support its outdoors image, this clothing and gear company has taken an active role in endorsing sustainable practices, speaking out, for example, over the use of public lands. Patagonia runs an environmentally responsible shop, with 498 solar panels at its Ventura, Calif., headquarters, reducing electricity demand by an estimated 14 percent. It also provides monetary incentives to employees who carpool, bike, skateboard or take the bus to work.

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FORD MOTOR COMPANY: Ford recycles 20 million pounds of aluminum per month. HEWLETT-PACKARD: Haiti’s discarded water bottles become ink cartridges. WALMART: The retailer is creating new sources of renewable energy. PATAGONIA: Cotton grown without the use of harsh chemicals makes fashionable outdoor clothing.

WALMART; GETTY IMAGES

WALMART

offices, seeking environmentally sensitive practices in their partners and suppliers. For example, in April 2017, Walmart launched Project Gigaton, a toolkit to help its broad network of suppliers reduce their greenhouse gas emissions by one gigaton. “Supply chains are the new frontier of sustainability,” says Carter Roberts, president and CEO of the World Wildlife Fund, in announcing its partnership with the project. “As more companies follow in the footsteps of Walmart and their suppliers, we can achieve the critical mass needed to address climate change.” l


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28 GREEN LIVING


Living a ‘Good’ Life Actress Kristen Bell takes small steps to make big changes BY GIN A ROBERTS- G REY

GETTY IMAGES

K

risten Bell’s art is imitating her life. On her NBC comedy The Good Place, she portrays a woman learning to have — and follow — her conscious in the afterlife. Here on Earth, the actress and activist’s daily routine is filled with conscious decisions aimed at keeping her carbon footprint small while taking big steps to raise her daughters in an ecofriendly manner. In addition to partnering with the World Wildlife Foundation to protect endangered animals and The Nature Conservancy to promote domestic water conversation, Bell is walking the talk in her everyday life. “I want my girls to grow up understanding it’s important to care. ... Whether it’s water conservation or animal rights, there are a million terrific and worthy causes,” says Bell, 37, mom to daughters Lincoln, 5, and Delta, 3, with husband Dax Shepard, 43. Saving the planet would be a gargantuan responsibility for anyone to tackle, so Bell advises starting at home with realistic tasks. “It’s important to not get overwhelmed trying to change the entire world and to stick to doable things that let you feel your side of the street is clean.” Pedaling to dinner or for ice

cream is one way her family tries to limit its carbon footprint. “We bike a lot to reduce emissions and also stay physically active as a family,” she adds. She avoids food waste by using storage containers that

“It’s important to not get overwhelmed trying to change the entire world and to stick to doable things that let you feel your side of the street is clean.” — Kristen Bell

keep produce and leftovers fresh longer. “It might take my girls eight days to eat strawberries, and that little change prevents me having to toss half a pint or more after three or four days.” She’s resourceful with her cooking, too. “I try really hard to not throw away food, which sometimes means making a meal my family doesn’t feel like eating that day, but that uses ingredients that are nearing expiration.”

She also finds crafty, artful uses for items commonly tossed out. “Ripped or stained clothes can become capes or cut up to make streamers or ribbons to decorate a tree. Paper rolls make great musical instruments or become part of art projects, and cereal boxes can become canvases to paint on,” says Bell. “They play almost exclusively with junk and don’t know the difference, but I know it unleashes their creativity and prevents from filling up landfills.” Bell says she and her husband are still learning how to live as eco-friendly as possible. He dislikes clutter and quickly throws items away, she says. “I’ll pull it from the trash and find another place for it.” Her challenge is one likely common to many working moms: distractions. “I’ll turn the shower on and get sidetracked,” she says. “Ten minutes later, my husband will come in and turn the water off.” Like many, Bell’s busy lifestyle means environmental responsibility is a deliberate decision that ideally will make an impact one action at a time. “On The Good Place, you see that life is a series of choices, and it’s never too late to make a different choice, be a little kinder or make a good decision.”

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Field goals remain as relics on the Tigers football field, where sustainability is now the goal.

Crops of kale grow where grass and yard lines once covered the football field.

A portion of the crops grown on campus is sold to local residents at a weekly farmers market.

Paul Quinn College students work the soil while learning about agriculture and sustainability.

Basil and peas are among the herbs and vegetables grown in the campus greenhouse.

A student harvests shoots in the greenhouse.

2 GREEN LIVING 30 GREEN LIVING

GETTY IMAGES; PROVIDED BY PAUL QUINN COLLEGE

EDUCATION


Field of Greens A football stadium-turned-farm helps save a college and community

B Y LAURA BEIL

W

hen Chandler TaylorHenry started thinking about college, Paul Quinn College in Dallas wasn’t at the top of his list. Then, during a summer camp, Taylor-Henry, who planned to study agriculture and business and one day own a ranch, heard about the working farm on the campus of the historically black college. “My face just lit up,” he recalls. A decade ago, Taylor-Henry, now a sophomore, might not have found Paul Quinn so appealing. In 2007, the school, founded in 1872, was struggling financially and on the brink of closing. The new school president, Michael Sorrell, immediately scrapped the football program to save money. Two years later, at the urging of an environmentalist, the school established an organic farm and named it We Over Me. The campus had no agriculture program, and no one there had any experience in farming. When Sorrell presented the idea to the school’s board of directors, they asked who would run it. “And I said, ‘I’ll be right

back,’” he recalls. He raced to his assistant’s desk and called on a staff member who had a degree in economics. “You’re going to run the farm,” he told her. She pointed out her lack of experience, but he didn’t care and directed her toward Google.

“The ultimate goal is to create an urban food-distribution network.”

–Michael Sorrell, president, Paul Quinn College

In the 10 years since, there have been trials and setbacks, but as a symbol for what is possible through dedication and grit, the farm renewed school spirit. And more than that, it brings fresh produce into a former food desert. Last summer, Paul Quinn began offering weekly a farmers market for its neighbors. James Hunter tends 100 yards of greens, peppers, tomatoes and other produce as the school’s professional farm director. There’s a greenhouse and

six bee hives for pollination and honey sales. A portion of the produce goes to the local food bank, while other crops are purchased by some of Dallas’ most notable chefs. And the field still has a connection to football — the farm’s biggest customer is Legends Hospitality, which supplies food to AT&T Stadium, home of the Dallas Cowboys. School administrators want the farm to continue as a focal point for sustainable produce in the area. Hunter would like to add solar power, collect rainwater and compost leftovers from the school cafeteria. “The ultimate goal is to create an urban food-distribution network,” Sorrell says. “We want to grow the food; we want to create a mobile distribution unit that allows us to sell it by going to the places where people need it.” Sorrell says he also wants to create a restaurant experience on campus. Until that happens, TaylorHenry is happy being a parttime farmhand on campus. “I have loved educating my peers about sustainability,” he says. “It’s a great experience.”

3 31


EDUCATION

Eco-warrior training Where to learn about ecology and sustainability Colleges nationwide are offering undergrad and graduate programs designed to arm the next generation of eco-warriors with the knowledge needed to save the Earth. Majors in this highly interdisciplinary field are focusing on issues such as sustainable development and protecting natural resources, the interaction of environmental and human health and how to use science and technology to solve the problems with our environment. Those who graduate with degrees in this evolving field are moving on to careers in the industry, nonprofits and the government. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment for environmental scientists and specialists is expected to grow by 11 percent over the next eight years, and by 8 percent for environmental engineers. — Amy Sinatra Ayres

Here’s a list of some schools offering environmentally focused degrees:

BAYLOR UNIVERSITY

This Waco, Texas-based school offers a Bachelor of Science degree in environmental health science; either Bachelor of Arts or Science in environmental studies; a master’s in environmental studies; and master’s and Ph.D. programs in environmental science among other environment-focused studies.

NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY

The McCormick School of Engineering at Illinois’ Northwestern University offers a Bachelor of Science in environmental engineering, producing engineers who answer questions about whether the region’s water and air are safe. Master’s and Ph.D. programs in environmental engineering are also offered.

BOSTON UNIVERSITY

Students can choose from a variety of eco-focused degrees, including a Bachelor of Arts (minor) in environmental analysis and policy; a master of public health or Ph.D. in environmental health; and three earth science options: Bachelor of Arts, a bachelor’s/ master’s or Ph.D. Candidates study the key natural and physical processes that affect the Earth, and some get the opportunity to reside at the university’s Earth House, where they put sustainable living practices to use.

ROCHESTER INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY (RIT)

AUBURN UNIVERSITY

Colleges nationwide are educating and preparing a fresh crop of environmentalists.

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This Alabama university focuses on the complex and changing nature of environmental quality issues. Auburn offers bachelor’s degrees in environmental science and environmental design, and its College of Agriculture also offers Master of Science and master of agriculture degrees in agricultural economics and a Ph.D. in applied economics.

STEVE DEBENPORT/GETTY IMAGES

Located in New York, RIT offers either a four-year Bachelor of Science in environmental science or an accelerated five-year Bachelor of Science/Master of Science program. The school also offers two-year master’s programs in environmental science. One track requires a thesis; the other a project.


take your

CAREER

to the

NEXT LEVEL

These fields are only going to grow bigger. Take advantage of these opportunities and position yourself on a path to a greater, more rewarding career and future.

866-IALAKES iowalakes.edu WIND ENERGY &TURBINE TECHNOLOGY

ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGY

HVAC TECHNOLOGY

Projected 10-Year Growth: 108%

Projected 10-Year Growth: 14%

Projected 10-Year Growth: 14%

Projected 10-Year Growth: 16%

Projected 10-Year Growth: 6%

Projected 10-Year Growth: 6%

Median Salary: over $51,000

Median Salary: over $51,000

Median Salary: over $45,000

Median Salary: over $48,000

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Median Salary: over $40,000

ENGINEERING ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY STUDIES

WATER QUALITY & SUSTAINABLE AQUATIC RESOURCES

EE: A Force for the Future

Join us in Spokane, WA from October 9 – 13, 2018 for #NAAEE2018!

The Annual NAAEE Conference & Research Symposium in North America brings together over 1,000 educators from around the globe to learn, network, and expand their perspectives on the field—from research to practice. EXPERIENCE OUR CONFERENCE IN 3 MINUTES!

For over four decades, the North American Association for Environmental Education (NAAEE) has been dedicated to accelerating environmental literacy and civic engagement through the power of education. NAAEE supports a network of over 100,000 educators and 56 regional affiliates working in environmental education in 30+ countries. CONNECT WITH US

Join our professional development hub, eePRO, and follow us on social media for the latest in environmental education!

“At Unity College, you don’t have to choose between your environmental values and your business career.“ Do both with a B.S. in Sustainable Business Enterprise.

Learn more: unity.edu/sbe


FOOD

VIVACIOUS VEGGIES Sun Basket is just one food subscription service specializing in healthy, meatless meals, like this crispy tofu udon noodle salad with orange miso dressing.

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FOOD

What’s for Dinner? Subscription services focus on plant-based meals B Y CH RI STI N E ROM ERO

SUN BASKET

M

aybe you’ve adopted Meatless Monday, or perhaps you’re trying to transition to a vegetarian diet that benefits you, as well as the planet. Today, it’s easier than ever to combine plant-based meals with convenient subscription food services that offer healthy, interesting recipes. “Even if it’s only a few times per week, eating plant-based meals has a positive impact on people’s health and the

environment,” says Andy Levitt, founder and CEO of Purple Carrot, a 100 percent plantbased meal-kit company. “Purple Carrot is actively fighting the stigma that plantbased food is tasteless and boring by showing consumers how to create dishes that are full of flavor and nutrients.” And eliminating meat from your diet means less pollution as a result of factory farming that causes waste runoff. One in 4 people signed up for a mealkit free trial in

2016, according to a recent Harris Poll. Harris credits timesaving as the primary reason people find subscription food services appealing. Although preparing the meal may take an hour or so, consumers don’t have to trudge to the grocery store, research recipes or meal plan. Plus, with preproportioned ingredients, there’s little to no food waste. Blue Apron, HelloFresh and Martha Stewart (with Marley Spoon), are among those dishing up plant-based,

vegan and vegetarian offerings with an eye on consumer demand and making healthy, sustainable eating more accessible. “Developed with our customers’ health in mind, our nutrient-rich vegan and vegetarian meals deliver bold flavors, yet come together quickly and conveniently,” says Justine Kelly, executive chef and co-founder of Sun Basket. Most companies offer free or discounted trials and waive shipping fees for first-time orders.

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FOOD

Special Delivery Here’s a look at some services offering plant-based fare: SUN BASKET

PURPLE CARROT

GREEN CHEF

starting at $80/2 meals per week, feeds up to four

starting at $72/3 meals per week, feeds two

starting at $63 (vegetarian) or $72 (vegan) for 3 meals per week, feeds two

A team of chefs offers 100 percent plantbased recipes that can be prepared in 40 minutes or less.

Green Chef’s vegan black bean posole is made with hominy, kale, gorditas and pepita pesto.

Chinese five-spice powder brings flavor to Sun Basket’s black bean and cremini tacos with avocado. This Purple Carrot entree pairs potato latkes with a creamy horseradish sauce and a crunchy fennel slaw.

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Green Chef touts at least 90 percent USDAcertified organic ingredients.

PROVIDED BY THE COMPANIES

Options include vegetarian, vegan, paleo, gluten-free and “Lean & Clean” entrées.


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ACTIVISM

Scooby-Doo “Doo Good” volunteers collected trash and debris cleaning Little Hunting Creek in Alexandria, Va.

Cleanup Clues

Cartoon sleuths tackle the case of saving the environment

I

t’s time for ScoobyDoo and the gang to rev up the Mystery Machine, but this time, instead of traveling to the nearest haunted mansion or abandoned factory to solve a crime, they’re on a mission to save the planet. Scooby and his fellow do-gooder pals are helping parents and children’s groups encourage kids to make small changes in their local communities that will go far in protecting the planet. Launched April 15, the Scooby-Doo “Doo Good” campaign, a partnership between Warner Bros.

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Consumer Products and generationOn, focuses on three national initiatives: saving the environment, fighting hunger and protecting animals. “By engaging children in service early on, they begin to lead a civic life, which in turn helps to create a civic culture,” says Tammea Tyler, vice president of generationOn. “Partnering with an iconic brand like Scooby-Doo allows youth to get excited about service and find ways to participate in a variety of important topics.” Whether it’s cleaning up a neighborhood park

or reusing plastic bottles in fun and innovative ways, Fred, Velma, Shaggy, Daphne and Scooby are helping youth solve the mystery of how to best cherish the Earth.

Go to doogood. •scoobydoo.com to download helpful tools, motivational materials, project ideas and more.

PROVIDED BY WARNER BROS.

BY TRACY S COTT FORSON


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GREEN LIVING 2018  
GREEN LIVING 2018