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NEW YORK 2020

Iconic TRAVELING DURING COVID-19 Hotels implement safety protocols Brooklyn Bridge

HOW DO YOU LIKE THEM APPLES? Ciders and spirits showcase state’s fruit

MILESTONE MOMENT The Met marks 150 years


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CONTENTS

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NEW YORK

WORTHY WALKS These tours offer fun, ямБtness and facts

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USA TODAY SPECIAL EDITION

CONTENTS This is a product of

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Jeanette Barrett-Stokes jbstokes@usatoday.com

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Jerald Council jcouncil@usatoday.com

MANAGING EDITOR Michelle Washington mjwashington@usatoday.com

ISSUE EDITOR Tracy Scott Forson

Union Square, Manhattan

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ANGELA WEISS/GETTY IMAGES

UP FRONT

FEATURE

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HER HONOR Visit iconic venues of the women’s suffrage movement

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

UPSTATE

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Try these “big” appleflavored beers and liquors

GERM-FREE JOURNEY Take these COVID-19 precautions when you travel

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IMPROVED AMENITIES

ADIRONDACKS Reach the peak of adventure in this mountainous region

Experience upgrades at the revamped LaGuardia Airport Fly through the forest on a mountain roller coaster

STAY SAFE Hotels adopt protocols to keep guests healthy

EDITORS Amy Sinatra Ayres Harry Lister Deirdre van Dyk Debbie Williams DESIGNERS Hayleigh Corkey David Hyde Debra Moore Gina Toole Saunders CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Margaret Buranen, Luisa Colón, Ana Connery, Sean Lahman, Jeanne Muchnick, Kae Lani Palmisano, Carli Pierson, Sarah Sekula, Joseph Spector, Curtis Tate, Julia Thompson

ADVERTISING

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CORE CONCOCTIONS

ISSUE DESIGNER Lisa M. Zilka

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NEW YORK CITY

ROCHESTER

VP, ADVERTISING Patrick Burke | (703) 854-5914 pburke@usatoday.com

ACCOUNT DIRECTOR Vanessa Salvo | (703) 854-6499 vsalvo@usatoday.com

Sled down the slopes at these snow-packed parks

FINANCE

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REVITALIZATION New outdoor attractions emerge amid pandemic

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HUDSON VALLEY Trek along the region’s picturesque trails

ART ANNIVERSARY The Met and other New York icons mark milestones

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The region offers lots for lobster lovers

SAFE CELEBRATIONS

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NIAGARA FALLS

ON THE COVER New York City’s Brooklyn Bridge remains a national landmark. PHOTO ILLUSTRATION: GETTY IMAGES

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City’s holiday traditions adjust to COVID-19

Maid of the Mist’s electric vessels set sail

Billing Coordinator Julie Marco ISSN#0734-7456 A USA TODAY Network publication, Gannett Co. Inc USA TODAY, its logo and associated graphics are the trademarks of Gannett Co. Inc. or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Copyright 2020, USA TODAY, a division of Gannett Co. Inc. Editorial and publication headquarters are at 7950 Jones Branch Dr., McLean, VA 22108, and at (703) 854-3400. For accuracy questions, call or send an e-mail to accuracy@usatoday.com.

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

Issue Editor Tracy Scott Forson with Santa in New York City in 2016, before social distancing MICHAEL FORSON

THE OUTBREAK OF AND response to COVID-19 has affected our lives, our livelihoods and the economy at the local, national and global levels. And it has had a profound effect on the travel industry. Visiting New York City in December has become an annual tradition for me. Before I got married, I’d travel from the Washington, D.C., area with my friends, shopping at outdoor holiday markets and seeing Broadway shows. Once I met my husband, we would visit Rockefeller Center, hang out with college classmates and hit legendary venues, like Junior’s Cheesecake in Brooklyn. As we grapple with the unprecedented scope of this pandemic, many events, festivals and celebrations have been suspended or canceled. Many people have delayed or altered their travel plans. However, I’m encouraged to know that some traditions, such as the elaborate holiday-themed retail window displays, will continue this year. Restaurants have expanded outdoor dining options, and artists have taken to the streets to share their talents. As usual, New York serves as an example of America’s resilience. Across the country, businesses that provide lodging, food and transportation are starting to reopen with varied stipulations and baseline measures that aim to reduce the risk of spreading the virus. The USA TODAY Network is committed to providing timely, engaging and accurate information in our coverage, but given

the evolving nature of this health crisis, we realize that there will undoubtedly be changes to the accessibility of many of the locations, venues and services mentioned throughout this publication. Please check with businesses for the latest updates. We also know that the travel and tourism industry is resilient. It has rebounded from natural disasters, economic recessions and other crises before, and while this pandemic is uncharted territory, it is our hope that national and international exploration will resume soon. For now, we will continue to look beyond today and provide you with the amazing sights, sounds, tastes and experiences that await. In the meantime, go ahead and ask Santa for a COVID-19-free 2021.

Tracy Scott Forson Issue Editor


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UP FRONT | TRAVEL

Germ-Free Journey Be cautious of coronavirus during your travels By Curtis Tate

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RAVEL IN THE MIDDLE of a global pandemic presents challenges, with each activity carrying its own level of risk for contracting the coronavirus. Dr. Joseph Khabbaza, a pulmonary and critical care physician at the Cleveland Clinic medical center, says many of his patients have questions related to travel activities. “Every industry has interventions in place to make things safer,” he says.

PLANES, TRAINS AND BUSES

The Cleveland Clinic has been helping United Airlines develop its coronavirus mitigation policies, including requiring face masks, installing touchless kiosks and encouraging physical distancing. “Companies are bringing in outside health experts,” Khabbaza says. “That can be a little bit reassuring.” Khabbaza, who recently took a 500-mile road trip with his family to New York’s Long Island, offered his thoughts on the relative risks of different travel activities and best practices.

ROAD TRIPS

In spite of all the precautions now in place, Khabbaza says flying offers the most potential for exposure because of the nature of how planes are configured. “You’re in relative closer proximity to people you don’t know,” Khabbaza says. Surface transportation presents similar challenges, he adds. “Distancing isn’t always possible to the extent you’d like,” he says. “That’s not going to go away as long as the virus is around.” Like the airlines, train and bus operators are requiring passengers to wear face masks. They’re also promoting physical distancing when possible and cleaning and disinfecting high-touch surfaces more often.

Take precautions every time you step out of the car, whether for gas, food or a rest break, Khabbaza advises. Use hand sanitizer every time you’re at the gas pump and avoid using your phone while you’re doing it. Adults and older children can visit convenience stores and eat in restaurants, says Khabbaza. With younger kids, take them to the restroom and then back to the car to eat, he suggests. That minimizes exposure to surfaces and items where infected droplets may have fallen.

CRUISE SHIPS Although cruise ships were some of the original hot spots for the coronavirus, Khabbaza says when they resume sailing, their risk should be lower as long as passengers and crew members adhere to precautions cruise companies are putting in place. “It involves buy-in from everyone,” he adds. Cruise ship passengers can stay separate from other groups on the ship by remaining in their rooms. Common areas of the ship offer space for distancing, and outdoor activities are inherently less risky for disease transmission, Khabbaza explains. The elimination of buffet food service, a move under consideration by multiple cruise lines, would remove a point of potential transmission not only for the coronavirus, but also for the foodborne illnesses that have long plagued cruise ship operations, Khabbaza notes.

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UP FRONT | TRAVEL

New state-of-the-art terminal at LaGuardia Airport BEBETO MATTHEWS/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Airport Upgrade New LaGuardia terminals open, with more improvements to come

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OT ONLY IS NEW York’s La-

Guardia Airport undergoing a billion-dollar renovation that will offer travelers more amenities, safety features

and innovations, but it’s also making it easier for them to access with a proposed AirTrain that will connect the facility to the city’s subway system. “AirTrain LGA will provide millions


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UP FRONT | TRAVEL upon millions of air travelers with a reliable, 30-minute trip from midtown Manhattan to the airport,” said chairman of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey Kevin O’Toole and Executive Director Rick Cotton in an August statement. “Getting people out of cars and onto environmentally friendly rail mass transit will reduce traffic congestion for all motorists and reduce greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution in the communities surrounding the airport.” Initially slated to begin service in 2020, the rail line is now expected to open in 2025, connecting LaGuardia to the Mets-Willets Point subway station and the Long Island Rail Road. This route eliminates a 3-mile gap that currently exists between the airport and the city’s public transportation. “The AirTrain LGA is essential to the redevelopment of the airport, and it will bring notable benefits to the surrounding community,” Cotton said. The AirTrain is part of an $8 billion redevelopment of LaGuardia Airport that was announced in 2015. Since construction began, a 3,000-space parking garage, new concourses at terminals B and C and multiple gates have been opened. In June, the new 850,000-square-foot Arrivals and Departures Hall, with world-class amenities, public art installations, new concessions, 17 bathrooms with touchless entry and a shopping experience worthy of the city’s retail reputation was unveiled. When complete, the new Terminal B will also include two pedestrian skybridges, a children’s play area and a total of 35 gates serving American, Southwest, United and Air Canada airlines. “LaGuardia Airport is going to be the first new airport in the United States in 25 years, and we’re building it while still operating the old airport,” Gov. Andrew Cuomo stated in a press release. “Travelers coming to New York should expect nothing less than a world-class experience, and that is what we are delivering with this modernization project.”

PROVIDED BY PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY

When completed, the renovated LaGuardia Airport will offer AirTrain connections to nearby subway and rail stations.

AMERICAN AIRLINES

American Airlines and United Airlines are now operating out of the newly renovated Terminal B.


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UP FRONT | LODGING

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Stay Safe Hotels adopt pandemic protocols to keep travelers healthy By Julia Thompson

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S TRAVELERS SLOWLY BEGIN

to get back on the road and in the air amid the coronavirus pandemic, they may be wondering if it’s safe to stay in a hotel. Hotels have rolled out a slew of cleaning and safety programs, and in July, the American Hotel & Lodging Association (AHLA), the industry’s major trade group, released a checklist for guests who plan to stay in hotels.

“Utilizing these best practices, including requiring face coverings and practicing social distancing in public spaces, will create an even safer environment for all our guests and employees,” Chip Rogers, president and CEO of AHLA, said in a statement. Dr. Keith Armitage, medical director of the University Hospitals Roe Green Center for Travel Medicine & Global Health in Cleveland, commends hotels’ efforts to stem the spread of COVID-19. “A lot of hotels are really taking steps to mitigate risk — having online check-in,

cleaning the rooms, keeping people out of the lobby — but again, it’s indoors with strangers,” he says. “If you’re walking through a hotel lobby, you want to have a mask on.” Some hotels require that masks are worn and provide them to guests who need them. Another thing to consider in public spaces: Armitage suggests not eating in a breakfast buffet area. “Take a mask, get your food and eat it in your room.” Once you get to your room, be aware of high-touch surfaces.


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UP FRONT | LODGING

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HILTON

The AHLA traveler checklist includes these tips: ▶ Wear face coverings in all indoor public spaces and practice social distancing in all common areas. ▶ Choose contactless options, where available, including online reservations, check-in and payment. ▶ Consider daily room cleaning only if necessary. Ask the hotel about options. ▶ Request contactless room service delivery. ▶ Refrain from traveling if you have, or recently had, any symptoms of COVID-19 or contact with anyone diagnosed with it.

Joseph Khabbaza, a pulmonary medicine physician at the Cleveland Clinic, says it’s a good idea to bring your own wipes to disinfectant surfaces in the room. Armitage agrees. “In the room, there might be risk for higher-touch surfaces. You can wipe things down yourself, like the telephone and the doorknob and the most important thing, the remote control,” Armitage says. Some hotels sanitize and then seal items in rooms, such as remotes, coffee

cups and glassware, and have eliminated minibars. Other hotels offer daily housekeeping only upon request, though Khabbaza says the risk of contracting the coronavirus from housekeeping should be relatively low. The same is true of the risk of the virus spreading from room to room. With proper air circulation in your room, Armitage notes, it’s unlikely the virus will spread through the hotel ventilation system.

COVID-19 CONSCIOUS These three hotel brands have taken steps to keep you safe: Hilton It’s Hilton’s policy that all guests and employees wear face coverings in indoor public areas of the hotel. “CleanStay” labels are attached to doors to let guests know that rooms have been sanitized and sealed. Signs encourage guests to social distance. Hilton’s protocol calls for disinfecting many surfaces in the room such as light switches, handles and knobs, major bathroom surfaces and the remote control. Marriott Marriott provides disinfecting wipes in rooms and hand-sanitizing stations are available throughout the hotel, including in elevator banks on guest floors. Plexiglass barriers separate guests from front desk workers. Marriott is following Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and World Health Organization guidelines, as well as those from local health departments. Hyatt Hyatt’s policy requires masks in indoor public areas and when moving around in outdoor areas. The company’s Global Care & Cleanliness Commitment includes an international cleanliness and training accreditation process and a trained hygiene and well-being leader or team at all locations. Hand-sanitizing stations are prominently placed throughout the hotels.

— David Oliver


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NEW YORK CITY | ATTRACTIONS

Customers dine outdoors in New York City. JAMIE MCCARTHY/GETTY IMAGES

Back in Business City offers new outdoor attractions amid COVID-19 By Ana Connery

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EW YORK CITY HAS long been a home for

creatives to unleash their brightest ideas, and this year has shown that not even a global pandemic can quell that imaginative energy. That’s, in part, what drew California native Shannon Rudd to the area. An avid cyclist, Rudd was thrilled when the New York City Department of Transportation (DOT) launched the Open Streets initiative in July, closing 100 miles of roads to traffic and giving pedestrians and cyclists more room to spread out safely. “It felt great to have places to go without worrying that

everybody would be on top of each other,” Rudd says. The Open Streets initiative made it possible for restaurants and retailers across all five boroughs to make use of previously unavailable outdoor space. Tables spilling over the sidewalks onto city streets was “a big win for the restaurant scene,” Rudd says. “Suddenly musicians start showing up, and it feels like you’re in Europe. It’s like a street party, except everyone is wearing masks and social distancing.” Some of the city’s widest promenades now feel like urban versions of Main Street, USA. From socially distanced yoga and Zumba classes to family bike rides and daily programming for kids, the organizers have

found ways to bring the community back together safely. “Opening up the streets has actually quadrupled the room, making social distancing easier,” says Jim Burke, one of the founding members of the 34th Avenue Open Streets Coalition in Queens. “Two weekends ago, we featured a Mexican dance troupe. Yesterday, we featured local artists. We’re reconnecting and strengthening friendships by creating these town squares. It offers a celebratory place to go after a dark time.” Also new on the scene: the NY Phil Bandwagon, a pickup truck that rolls through the five boroughs with musicians from the city’s prestigious New York Philharmonic orchestra. Now on hiatus until March 2021, it presented


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NEW YORK CITY | ATTRACTIONS

Activities for children

Mural, Prince Street, Manhattan

Outdoor yoga classes

NY Phil Bandwagon in October, Queens JIM BURKE/34TH AVENUE OPEN STREETS COALITION (2); DIA DIPASUPIL/GETTY IMAGES; MARY ALTAFFER/ASSOCIATED PRESS

more than 80 “pull up” performances throughout the spring, summer and early fall, featuring everything from Broadway show tunes, baroque-period compositions and world premiere pieces. Also on view throughout the city is a series of Black Lives Matter-inspired murals. Images on buildings and asphalt depict people who have been killed by police, as well as vibrant symbolism representing freedom and hope. The murals supported by the DOT are spread throughout the five boroughs (along Centre Street in Manhattan, Richmond Terrace on Staten Island, Joralemon Street in Brooklyn, 153rd Street in Queens and Morris Avenue in the Bronx).

They’re not the only additions to the local art scene, however. Several organizations and businesses have commissioned public art in recent months, including the popular Fifth Avenue mural directly in front of Trump Tower, and a newer set of literary-inspired murals outside the New York Public Library on Fifth Avenue. Neighborhood Curbside Canvas Project, a volunteer recovery effort that pairs local artists with restaurants, has helped transform some of the city’s outdoor dining areas into pop-up art galleries. It works on the barter system: Restaurateurs pay the artists with meals; artists provide their talents, and the public enjoys street art. There’s even a socially distanced, biweekly art crawl for those

who want to explore all of the installations. Performing artists have leveled up their creativity, too. While Broadway shows may be canceled through next summer, pandemic-friendly theatrical walking tours like Voyeur: The Windows of Toulouse-Lautrec, are using the sidewalks and shop windows of Greenwich Village as stages. Capped at masked groups of eight, the open-air, intimate experiences have drawn rave reviews. Many of these recently launched programs have become so popular, there’s already talk of making them permanent. “The pandemic has caused us to rethink how we use public spaces,” Burke says. “And in a way, it’s helping us heal.”


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NEW YORK CITY | ATTRACTIONS

Max Hollein, director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, left, is interviewed on reopening day at the plaza entrance on Aug. 29. Museums and cultural institutions around the city had been closed since mid-March due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

MICHAEL LOCCISANO/GETTY IMAGES


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By Luisa Colón

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The Met at 150

ILESTONES ARE NOTHING NEW

at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. At 150 years old, the institution, beloved by tourists and locals alike, has amassed thousands of years worth of art history. Among its oldest works is a clay jar from Iran that was created between 3800–3700 B.C. during the Chalcolithic period. More recently created is a thoroughly modern sculpture made with thousands of bottle caps and seals (2007’s Dusasa II, by El Anatsui). And in August 2020, the largest museum in the United States presented an exhibition that by its very definition is its most expansive to date: Making the Met, 1870–2020. This collection of more than 250 works was originally slated to open in March, but as a result of the city’s pandemic lockdown, it reopened nearly six months later in August — in some ways making the event more celebratory and meaningful. One of New York’s biggest tourist attractions, it had never before closed for more than three days — and that was for bad weather in March 2017. “By reflecting on the history, from 1870 up to the extraordinary developments that have defined the year 2020, the exhibition provides the opportunity to learn from our past and inform our future,” says Max

Legendary institution offers glimpse into its eclectic collection

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7 PROVIDED BY THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

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Torah crown (keter), Andrea Zambelli “L’Honnesta” (circa 1740), Italy Dusasa II, El Anatsui (2007), Ghana Street Story Quilt, Faith Ringgold (1985), United States Egyptian queen Hatshepsut, (circa 1479-1458), Egypt Native American pomo basket, (circa 1890–1910), United States Tell Halaf Orthostat relief lion-hunt scene, Hittite, (circa 10th–9th century B.C.), Syria Dress and wool coat, Yves Saint Laurent; House of Balenciaga (circa 1966), France

Hollein, director of the museum, adding that “in ways both planned and unanticipated, this anniversary year has highlighted how it is people — artists, staff and visitors — who truly make the Met, and we look forward to welcoming all to this exhibition.” Making the Met is a vast exhibit as all-encompassing as the museum’s collection, including not just stunning works, but the narrative behind the art and the Met itself. There’s an exploration of the history of the museum — chronicling the concepts and ideals behind its founding (Creating a National Narrative), its evolution during pivotal periods like World War II (Fragmented Histories) and the stories about the incredible collection of works (Visions of Collecting). Those in awe of the Met’s Ancient Egyptian treasures will marvel at how the Met has strived to unearth and preserve artifacts such as jewelry, sculpture and actual mummies (Collecting through Excavation). And anyone looking to get a sneak peek (or an online primer) can visit metmuseum.org for an interactive feature narrated by actor Steve Martin. “You can find here respite, solace, maybe even energy again, passion, excitement,” Hollein adds. “All these things I would say: That’s what a museum is for and what art, in general, is for.” USA TODAY writer Karen Weintraub contributed to this article.


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NEW YORK CITY | ATTRACTIONS

CITY’S ICONS CELEBRATE MILESTONES

Happy birthday to these Big Apple attractions

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150TH The Met isn’t the only New York City institution celebrating an anniversary in 2020-21.

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130TH

125TH

April 2021 marks the 130th year of Carnegie Hall, the prestigious landmark that has delighted audiences with performers from around the world, including Frank Sinatra, the Beatles and Gustav Mahler.

Another NYC mainstay with a recent anniversary is the New York Public Library. Established in 1895, the main branch in midtown Manhattan, with its entrance famously flanked by lion statues named Patience and Fortitude, is a must-visit landmark that turned 125 in May 2020.

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90TH

90TH

Almost a hundred years ago, competing skyscrapers shot into the atmosphere in a race to become the world’s tallest building. At 1,046 feet, the Chrysler Building — which celebrated its 90th anniversary in May 2020 — was the first to hold the title, but only briefly.

One year after the Chrysler Building was built, the Empire State Building was completed, topping off at 1,250 feet (or 1,454 if you count the antennae and spire) and remained the world’s tallest building for a respectable 40 years. The iconic skyscraper — synonymous with the Big Apple itself — turns 90 in May 2021.


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NEW YORK CITY | ATTRACTIONS

New York Is Open for Christmas Where to find the magic of the season in the Big Apple this year By Ana Connery

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ROADWAY MAY HAVE GONE dark until 2021, but there are still plenty of ways to enjoy the merriment of the season in the holiday capital of the world. Despite the pandemic, many of the city’s most iconic destinations have announced plans to open for the season with social distancing, mask-wearing and other policies in place so that everyone can have a safe and enjoyable experience. With its world-famous shops, promenades and parades, perhaps no other American city is as beloved as New York, especially during the holidays. Here’s a peek at some of the most anticipated activities on the calendar: NYCGO.COM

SEE THE WORLD’S MOST FAMOUS CHRISTMAS TREE. The live tree-lighting

Visit nycgo.com for up-to-date information on holidays in New York. GETTY IMAGES

ceremony and the Rockettes’ Christmas Spectacular may have been canceled this year, but you can still see the tree and the displays surrounding it in person throughout the season. At press time, the famous Rockefeller Center ice skating rink was set to reopen in mid-November. For the first time, you’ll have to buy tickets and rent skates online prior to your visit, and timed entries will help control the number of people using the rink at any given time.


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NEW YORK CITY | ATTRACTIONS WALK THROUGH A NEW NEIGHBORHOOD. Brooklyn is considered one of New York’s coolest boroughs, and during the holidays, there’s no better place to be than Dyker Heights. The neighbors in this enclave with an Italian American heritage take holiday decorating seriously. From interactive displays blanketing gardens and courtyards to artificial snow and neck-craning rooftop attractions, expect to be wowed by every exterior square inch of the homes there. To see it all, be sure to stroll from 11th to 13th avenues and from 83rd to 86th streets. The light displays usually stay up through the first week of the new year.

BILL WALDORF

WANDER PAST WHIMSICAL WINDOWS. Even if you don’t step inside the largest store in New York, Macy’s at Herald Square’s famous holiday window displays are a sight to behold as they’re decorated in the store’s signature overthe-top style. This year, the interactive street-level window displays are taking the form of a thank-you letter to “first responders, essential workers, those who’ve marched for equality and New Yorkers who showed their grit, good humor and hopeful spirit during a tumultuous year,” according to a company statement. Also on this year’s must-see list: The creative “Give Happy” windows at Bloomingdale’s 59th Street flagship store, where the theme is all about the spirit of positivity, a soothing antidote to 2020. You can also check out in-store and outdoor pop-ups offering hot cocoa, craft cocktails and treats, plus a gift-wrap station. For a quick trip to the tropics, take a walk through Barefoot Dreams, a palm tree-packed outdoor lot adjacent to the store. Over at the Saks Fifth Avenue flagship store, window displays celebrate the diversity of the people and neighborhoods that make New York one of the world’s most unique cities. The windows can be admired anywhere along Fifth Avenue between 49th and 50th streets, across from Rockefeller Center, making social distancing easier to come by.

VISIT A EUROPE-INSPIRED WINTER VILLAGE. Modeled after Germany’s world-famous Christmas markets, the Bank of America Winter Village at Bryant Park has become one of New York’s most beloved traditions. A new layout designed for social distancing ensures an easier and safer stroll through the customized kiosks filled with artisanal vendors selling creative finds for giftgiving. Take a few graceful laps around one of the city’s free ice skating rinks (advance reservations required), followed by a stop at one of the innovative food stalls that line the park. For the perfect après-skate activity, enjoy world-class people-watching while sipping festive holiday cocktails on the outdoor lounge deck or cozy up with your favorite people in one of the igloo domes surrounding the park. The festivities run through Jan. 3. If you’re up for a holiday market crawl, the Grand Central Holiday Fair at Grand Central Terminal focuses on American-made gifts. This market is held indoors and just a short walk from Bryant Park.

TAKE A WALK ON THE WILD SIDE. The quintessential holiday field trip is a stroll through the Bronx Zoo Holiday Lights, an annual extravaganza of animal-shaped light installations in five illuminated safaris this year, each with its own theme: Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Ocean and North America. Add to that three kid-friendly puppet shows in the Wildlife Theater and stilt walkers at every turn, and it’s the ideal way to get in the spirit of the season. Make plans to see the nightly ice-carving demos or visit on a Friday when experts go head to head in live ice-carving battles. JULIE LARSEN MAHER/WILDLIFE CONSERVATION SOCIETY

LUMINOCITY

IMMERSE YOURSELF IN ISLAND LIGHTS. Walk through a fantastical winter wonderland of light sculptures, illuminated jungles and towering, artistic light displays at LuminoCity at Randall’s Island Park, just a short walk across Manhattan’s pedestrian-friendly 103rd Street footbridge. This year’s open-air, walkable journey whisks you through five enchanted exhibits with names like Mystical Moon Land and Mysterious Forest, each one bringing to life the story of Lumi, a magical lightbulb who serves as the star of the festival. Warm up with hot cocoa, s’mores and more at some of the city’s most popular food trucks. This year’s festival takes place Nov. 27 through Jan. 10, with timed entries and other socialdistancing policies in place to prevent bottlenecking.


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By Carli Pierson

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Online resource shares suffragists’ stories

Central Park’s new bronze suffragists statue features Sojourner Truth, Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

ugust marked the centennial of the ratification of the 19th Amendment, which gave women the right to vote. For travelers curious to learn more about the women’s suffrage movement, New York is one of the best places to explore the history of the fight for women’s rights. Any trip to New York must include

a stop in the Big Apple, and this August the city unveiled a statue in Central Park’s Literary Walk, the first to depict pioneering women. “The (city’s public design) commission specified statues of Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and the challenge was to find an artistic way to include other women who were an important part of the suffrage movement,” explains sculptor Meredith Bergmann, who

added the famous abolitionist and women’s rights activist Sojourner Truth. “She seemed like the perfect third member of this triad.” Venturing upstate, see the site of the historic Women’s Rights Convention, which took place on July 19 and 20, 1848, at the Wesleyan Chapel in Seneca Falls and was organized by Stanton, Lucretia Mott, Martha

The interactive website womenandthevotenys.com highlights the New York burial sites of suffragists and provides biographies and histories that have been compiled by more than 30 volunteers in recent months. The website was created to honor the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment. Also included on the website, conceived by filmmaker Linda Moroney, is information about activists who fought for gender equality in the years after 1920. The site was unveiled on the 100th anniversary of when the 19th Amendment went into effect, according to Moroney, who considers the project “a dynamic way to connect the past and the present and bring suffrage stories to life.” “Our goal is to shine a light on New York State’s rich suffragist legacy, as inclusively as possible,” Moroney said in a statement, “and to create a conversation with contemporary voters on where we are with political equality now, and where we want to be.”

— Gary Craig

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HINDA MANDELL


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Isabella Baumfree, the brilliant woman who would later change her name to Sojourner Truth, was born into slavery in New York state in 1797. In her late 20s, she escaped the cruelty of enslavement and became heavily involved in the abolitionist movement. She later became an outspoken advocate for women’s rights. In a fascinating twist on history, Truth, well known for her speech Ain’t I a Woman likely never uttered those words. The speech traditionally attributed to her with a Southern dialect was written 12 years after Truth spoke at the Women’s Rights Convention in Akron, Ohio. But a different version of the speech, which doesn’t include the phrase “ain’t I a woman?” was published in the Anti-Slavery Bugle in June 1851, a few weeks after the Akron convention. Koritha Mitchell, an English professor at Ohio State University and author of From Slave Cabins to the White House and Living With Lynching, explains how little we know about suffragists of color. “Frances (Ellen Watkins) Harper was very much (Frederick Douglass’) equal and contemporary. She wasn’t around for Seneca Falls because many Black women were working toward abolition. But Harper is so important because, unlike Sojourner Truth, who was easily misrepresented because she didn’t write for herself, Harper did write for herself ... She died in 1911, but even if she had lived until 1920 the vote still wouldn’t have been available to her.” “After 1920, things don’t actually change for women of color,” Mitchell explains. “For the most part, whiteness is the requisite that determines your citizenship. It’s not until the Voting Rights Act of 1965 that you begin to see Black people actually able to access the vote. Even after the 15th and 19th amendments, there was the bloodless violence of poll taxes and then there was the bloody violence of lynching — that’s how you give the message that the only people that are citizens are white, straight men with property.” For more on Black women’s struggle for equality and the right to vote, visit the Museum of Women’s Resistance in Brooklyn, N.Y. — Carli Pierson

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Martha Wright, Mary Ann M’Clintock and Jane Hunt. Nearby, don’t miss Hunt’s house in Waterloo, where the convention was planned. The M’Clintock house, also in Waterloo, where the Declaration of Sentiments was drafted, is another worthy stop. Inspired by the Declaration of Independence, the Sentiments outlined the rights that American women should enjoy as citizens. It was written primarily by Stanton, who read it at the Seneca Falls Convention, and it was followed by the passage of 12 women’s rights resolutions. The only resolution that didn’t pass unanimously was about women’s suffrage. Visitors interested in learning more about New York’s suffrage movement should visit the Matilda Joslyn Gage Home and Foundation in Fayetteville, says Susan Zimet, a member of New York’s Women’s Suffrage Commission and author of Rebels and Roses: The Epic Story of The Women’s Right to Vote. Gage “was sort of written out of history, but was a radical women’s suffrage leader and abolitionist,” Zimet says. “It’s not just a museum, but it’s also a place for inspirational work on social justice and equal rights.” While you’re upstate, head over to the Susan B. Anthony Museum & House in Rochester. Her home was the headquarters of the National American Woman Suffrage Association and the site where she was arrested for voting in 1872.

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USA TODAY SPECIAL EDITION

Pedestrian Pleasure Walking tours offer facts, fun and fitness By Margaret Buranen

F

OR SO MANY AMERICANS,

the pandemic has us feeling cooped up, unable to interact with fellow humans and, in many cases, with the landscape itself. COVID-19 and its effects have kept many away from air travel, cruise ships and crowded beaches. Enter a decidedly unplugged alternative, a very concrete antidote to a suddenly more virtual life: the walking tour.

“Our mental health matters also, and it’s very important for us ... when we’re really feeling extremely alienated from each other and feeling trapped in our homes, to walk our streets, in the safest way possible,” says Rebecca Manski of Social Justice Tours in New York City. Walking tours have increased in popularity with people seeking outdoor activities while maintaining health and safety precautions and staying in small groups. Here are some tours to try in the Big Apple:

— Dan Sewell of The Associated Press contributed to this story.

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SOCIAL JUSTICE TOURS Get “woke” while you walk with these tours that explore the experiences of New York’s marginalized groups. Learn about gentrification, the city’s LGBTQ community, women’s history, environmental justice and more. There’s also a (Donald) Trump Tour that connects national and local events. Dan Kaminsky founded the company after working as a tour guide in New Orleans. He used the opportunity to educate tourists about how systemic injustice led to the disproportionate destruction of underprivileged neighborhoods following Hurricane Katrina. That led to more public and private tours meant to create a dialogue. ▶ socialjusticetours.com/ current-tours.html New York Walking Tours MARK HERDTER

NEW YORK WALKING TOURS

Mark Herdter

Of the options offered by New York Walking Tours, the Greenwich Village tour is a favorite of Mark Herdter, who became a city tour guide when he retired from The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s department of photography. Randomly walking through the city or visiting locations in tour books or apps might get you an overview, but with an experienced guide, “you’ll go places that you didn’t know existed. You’ll see things you would never see on your own,” says Herdter, a member of the Guides Association of New York City. He gets many repeat customers. One family went on their first tour with him when their children were young. They see him every time they’re in the city, and now the children are teens. “Half of my business is local — New York City residents — and half is people from other states and countries. I’ve had Greenwich Village residents take my tour there. They told me they live there, but wanted to learn about their neighborhood,” Herdter says. His most requested tour is Yesterday & Today’s Immigrants, which takes visitors to neighborhoods where Irish, Jewish and German immigrants lived. Now the same buildings are occupied by Asian immigrants. ▶ walkingtoursny.com

MARGOT NORTON

TIP: Not all venues are handicapped-accessible. Ask about special accommodations when booking the tour.


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USA TODAY SPECIAL EDITION

BIG ONION WALKING TOURS Founded in 1991 by two history graduate students, this tour company has continued to hire educators and students as its guides. The name Big Onion refers to an earlier moniker for the city before it was known as The Big Apple. Tour options include Brooklyn Distilled (which explores the distillery and brewing industries’ effect on the history of Brooklyn), Central Park, Chelsea and The High Line, Gangs of New York, Historic Harlem and Immigrant New York (Chinatown, Little Italy and the former Five Points). Founder Seth Kamil says the most popular trips are the Brooklyn Bridge and the Lower East Side Multi-Ethnic Eating tours, where participants “sample local foods from a series of unique shops and markets that represent the communities we are touring.” Kamil’s favorite is Greenwich Village, which “brings so many important aspects of New York history and architecture,” he says. ▶ bigonion.com

1840s home, Brooklyn Heights

Arch at Grand Army Plaza, Brooklyn BIG ONION TOURS


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High Line tour PROVIDED BY CIMINE ENTERPRISES

MANHATTAN WALKING TOUR This company’s group walking excursions never have more than eight participants. There are four choices of historic walking tours and four choices of neighborhood food tours. Visitors can also choose a combo tour. For example, the Times Square walking tour is offered with the Hell’s Kitchen Food tour. Most routes are about a mile-and-a-half long and the walking pace is slow. ▶ manhattanwalkingtour.com

Shorewalkers tour PROVIDED BY CIMINE ENTERPRISES

SHOREWALKERS

CENTRAL PARK CONSERVANCY TOURS

Visitors who want a longer, more strenuous walk can join members of Shorewalkers for their group tours near New York City’s waters. Founded in 1982, this local nonprofit is dedicated to protecting the city’s scenic shoreline areas. While these walks are led, don’t expect as much stopping and talking as a typical guide provides. You’ll get a good workout, meet some residents and see some sights that many tourists miss. “As a lifelong New Yorker, I’ve been amazed how much green space there is throughout the city and new places to explore that are rich in history,” says Shorewalkers board member Diane Cimine. “Our walks are equal parts education, socialization and exercise. They raise environmental awareness and uplift the spirit.” Held each October, the Great Saunter, Shorewalkers’ best-known walk, is a daylong 32-mile jaunt around Manhattan’s coast. It was held as a virtual event this year, spread over two weeks, with participants from about 40 states and several countries. ▶ shorewalkers.org

Explore many of Central Park’s most serene locales. The Central Park Conservatory offers maps and information for several self-guided tours. Visitors can learn about the park’s landscaping, animals and history while taking in the sights of The Ramble, where more than 270 bird species have been spotted; the north end, home to a centuries-old military fort; the diverse flora of the Upper West Side and other park areas. ▶ centralparknyc.org


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GREAT UPSTATE 34

APPLE ELIXIRS

State’s official fruit infuses ciders and spirits

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ROCHESTER

Grab a sled and head to these hills for thrills

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HUDSON VALLEY

Hike to picturesque peaks; enjoy lobster treats

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NIAGARA FALLS

New passenger vessels have electric appeal

ADIRONDACK MOUNTAINS Bike snowy trails, climb frozen waterfalls or ride a roller coaster in this wintry wonderland

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USA TODAY SPECIAL EDITION

10BEST | DRINKS

Apple Elixirs State fruit inspires ciders, beers and booze By Kae Lani Palmisano MIKHAIL LIPYANSKIY

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HERE ARE PLENTY OF crops that signal the harvest season in New York

state, but none signifies the spirit of autumn quite like apples. In fact, the humble apple is considered New York’s official fruit. Aside from apple doughnuts, apple pies and applesauces, New Yorkers are finding creative ways to enjoy some of the nearly 30-millionbushel bounty that they produce each year. Some are distilling the crisp, tart fruit into spirits and others are fermenting the apples into wines. Here are 10 apple drinks to indulge in this fall, all made in New York:

EVE’S CIDERY BECKHORN HOLLOW Van Etten With every sip of Eve’s Cidery Beckhorn Hollow, your nose is greeted with effervescent bubbles that bring texture to the crisp, tart beverage. Made from organically grown and wild-foraged apples and pears, this line of ciders is distinct to the region.

TUTHILLTOWN SPIRITS HALF MOON ORCHARD GIN Gardiner In traditional gins, the flavor of juniper berries dominates the spirit. With Tuthilltown Half’s Moon Orchard Gin, the flavor is a complex but balanced blend of citrus peels, cardamom, elderberries, bergamot orange zest, coriander and almonds along with juniper.

HARVEST SPIRITS CORNELIUS APPLEJACK Valatie This small-batch spirit is distilled from 100 percent homegrown apples. Aged for five years, its distinctive flavor is slowly developed from American oak casks that once held bourbon. It’s naturally gluten-free, so it’s a delicious and smooth alternative to whiskey.

SAM KAPLAN FLY CREEK CIDER MILL & ORCHARD

FLY CREEK CIDER MILL & ORCHARD ORIGINAL APPLE WINE Fly Creek Dating back to 1856 when the mill was built, this line of wines mixes apples with a variety of other fruits like tart cranberries and sweet black currants. For a real taste of apple vino, go with the Original Apple Wine.

NEVERSINK SPIRITS APPLE BRANDY Port Chester Made from 100 percent New York apples, Neversink’s apple brandy has its roots in a European tradition, but the local treatment gives this fruit brandy an American flair. The tart sweetness of the apples is enhanced by hints of spicy vanilla, earthy woods and subtle notes of pear. This spirit truly captures the best that New York apples have to offer.


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10BEST | DRINKS

JESSICA MONTGOMERY

1911 ESTABLISHED PREMIUM VODKA LaFayette Beak & Skiff, the orchard that provides the apples to make 1911 Established premium vodka, knows what it means to develop high-quality products. In fact, the orchard won USA TODAY’s 10Best.com Readers’ Choice Award for best apple orchard in 2020. The 1911 Established distillery makes a diverse line of spirits spotlighting the mighty apple and its versatile applications. But the premium vodka, the distillery’s oldest product, with its notes of vanilla and caramel, is a fan favorite.

FINGER LAKES DISTILLING

BLACK BUTTON DISTILLING

BLACK BUTTON DISTILLING APPLE PIE MOONSHINE Rochester Be careful with this apple pie moonshine! It’s sweet and smooth, infused with cinnamon and vanilla with a touch of brown sugar. It goes down easy, but at 40 proof, it can sneak up on you.

ROYAL MEADERY

ROYAL MEADERY NEW YORK APPLE CYSER Delmar A cyser refers to a mead that is fermented with apples rather than just water, giving it a bit more tartness. With the Royal Meadery New York Apple Cyser, the mead has a balanced floral aroma from the honey and a sweet tanginess from the fresh apple cider.

BIG DITCH BREWING COMPANY

BIG DITCH BREWING COMPANY CINNAMON APPLE Buffalo When the weather cools, Big Ditch Brewing Company spices things up with its seasonal cinnamon apple beer. This amber ale is brewed with local malts and local apple cider, and it’s flavored with oatmeal, brown sugar, cinnamon and allspice. If fall were a drink, it would be this beer.

10Best.com is your source for what’s tops in travel, food and culture, providing inspiration to explore the world around you.

FINGER LAKES DISTILLING MAPLEJACK LIQUEUR Burdett Although the Finger Lakes is known for its wine, several craft distilleries also have taken root in the area. At Finger Lakes Distilling, the 70 proof Maplejack Liqueur starts off with a brandy made from local apples, then it’s aged in oak barrels with a bit of local maple syrup.


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USA TODAY SPECIAL EDITION

UPSTATE | ADIRONDACK MOUNTAINS

Adventure in the Adirondacks Pick your pleasure in this picturesque playground of the hottest winter sports around. However, it’s not as tough as you’d think. Kids as young as 8 can participate. Valentine, who provides ice-climbing instruction and guided trips, says there are beginner spots at Trap Dike and Chouinard’s Gully. “For the intermediate to advanced climber, there are incredible climbs like Roaring Brook Falls or Multiplication Gully, up to some of the thin but incredible routes in areas like Poke-OMoonshine mountain,” he says.

By Sarah Sekula

A

DIRONDACK PARK, WHICH SPANS 6 million acres in

upstate New York, is an adventurer’s playground no matter the season, but wintertime is extra special. Just ask Josh Valentine, founder of Basking Ridge, N.J.-based outfitter Embrace the Animal (embracetheanimal. com), which offers guided wilderness trips. He’s traveled all over — scaling summits in the Himalayas, exploring the Panamanian jungle and living with the indigenous Hadza Tribe of Tanzania — but the Adirondacks will always hold a special place in his adventurous heart. More specifically, the High Peaks region is one of his areas of expertise. “It’s one of my favorite places on this whole planet,” he says. “There is something for everyone there year-round, from basic hiking to incredible rock climbing in the summer to snowshoeing and ice climbing in the winter.” For the past few decades Valentine has been exploring tucked away pockets of the Adirondacks that he says are mind-blowing. When you look at a map, however, you might not expect to find such remote places here. With the sprawling network of roads, you’d likely assume isolated spots would be hard to come by. But he’s happy to report that’s not the case at all. “Anyone who’s ever climbed the Trap Dike over Lake Colden in the winter can tell you that you feel in a world of your own real quick,” Valentine says. “Oftentimes, that four or five miles of distance to a nearby road is made up of rugged, elevation-laden and challenging terrain.” Here are some ways to rack up an adventure of your own:

CLIMB A FROZEN WATERFALL Despite the cool temperatures, scaling a waterfall happens to be one

LAKEPLACID.COM

BRIAHNNA GIBSON

FOCUS ON FISHING Valentine leads trips to a pristine spot in the western Adirondacks, surrounded by mountain lakes and accessible only by floatplane. Here, you can canoe, camp and fish until your heart is content, all while drinking in the perfect silence and crystal clear night skies. Packages, which include bush-plane flights and all equipment and food, can be customized. “It’s centered on the idea that we are not designed to survive in nature, but rather we have been crafted by countless thousands of years to thrive there,” says Valentine. “One of the best parts about New York state in general is the fact that it is absolutely loaded with areas that can be mere miles from a road, and yet the ruggedness and scope of the wilderness allows for an almost immediate sense of separation from civilization.” RENT A FAT-TIRE BIKE What better way to get to know an area than by seeing it on two wheels? If it’s a snowy day, fat-tire bikes are a great way to get around. High Peaks Cyclery (highpeakscyclery. com) takes guests on guided trips through the High Peaks region on Salsa Mukluk SX Eagle fat bikes. It’s a low-impact sport, so it makes a great mild adventure for the whole family.


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UPSTATE | ADIRONDACK MOUNTAINS

COLIN DELANEY


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UPSTATE | ADIRONDACK MOUNTAINS

OLYMPIC REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY

On a Roll New York debuts mountain coaster near Lake Placid By Joseph Spector

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NE OF THE NATION’S

longest mountain coasters opened in October near the Lake Placid Olympic sites. At 7,650 feet long, the new Cliffside Coaster at Mount Van Hoevenberg rivals those in the Smoky Mountains and Colorado, according to New York officials. The 1.4-mile mountain coaster travels alongside the 1980 Olympic bobsled track and is the newest year-round attraction at the Olympic park, according

to the Olympic Regional Development Authority (ORDA), which owns the facility. “The Cliffside Coaster is one of our latest and most thrilling additions to the (ORDA) venues and part of our ongoing effort to modernize the entire Mount Van Hoevenberg complex,” New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said in a statement. “This revitalization is transforming the complex into a year-round provider of excitement and entertainment for both athletes and families, which will attract more summer visitors and provide a critical boost to local businesses as we

work to build back better,” Cuomo said. The coaster will be open on weekends only, weather permitting. Tickets are $55 for a driver or $65 for a driver and passenger. Guests must prepurchase tickets online. As part of its COVID-19 safety protocols, coaster carts are sanitized between each use, and face coverings are required. The coaster travels 2,250 feet uphill and 5,400 feet downhill, with an elevation change of 495 feet, according to the state authority. It is equipped with a timing and audio system that “allows visitors to experience the thrill of what

it was like to be an Olympic bobsledder during the 1980 Olympic Winter Games in Lake Placid,” the state’s announcement read. There is “informative and exciting commentary for riders as they glide through twists and turns that replicate the historic track.” “The views are amazing, and the curves get your heart pounding,” ORDA president Mike Pratt said in a statement. “Everyone will feel like they deserve a medal.” Joseph Spector writes for the (Rochester, N.Y.) Democrat and Chronicle.


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UPSTATE | ROCHESTER

BLACK CREEK PARK There are 21 parks in Monroe County, N.Y., covering 12,000 acres. ▶ monroecounty. gov/parks

Black Creek Park has one designated sledding hill, located on the northern end of the park behind the Woodside Lodge. The park can be found at the intersection of Union Street and Chili Avenue, and it covers more than 1,500 acres. There are five hiking trails if you want to bring your cross-country skis or snowshoes along as well.

WEBSTER PARK This park sits on the shore of Lake Ontario and spans 550 acres. There is one sledding hill next to the Parkview Lodge. The hill is at the north end of the park, near Holt Road and East Lake Road. There are also five groomed trails for crosscountry skiing or snowshoeing.

MENDON PONDS PARK There are two sledding hills in Mendon Ponds — the largest park in Monroe County, with a total of 2,500 acres. One of the hills is situated across from the Cavalry House Lodge on Douglas Road, and the second is next to the East and West lodges on Canfield Road. There are more than 20 miles of marked, groomed trails for other winter activities as well.

ELLISON PARK

Black Creek Park DEBI BOWER/DAYTRIPPINGROC.COM

Off Landing Road, by Ellison Park’s disc golf course, are two designated sledding hills to explore. The park also boasts an ice skating rink and five trails. Playground equipment, a baseball diamond, tennis courts, a dog park and creek access are also available for mild winter days, as well as lodges/shelters.

NORTHAMPTON PARK

Hills and Thrills

Five places to sled in Rochester By Sean Lahman

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OTHING SCREAMS WINTER LIKE hurling yourself down

a steep hill while riding a sled. Children and adults will get a thrill out of the cold, the speed and the crashes. If you plan on sledding in the Rochester, N.Y., area this year, make sure you’re doing so on a hill that welcomes sliders. Try one of these five specially designated sledding hills found at Monroe County parks. Here’s a handy guide to these snowy fun spots:

This park covers 973 acres and includes five hiking/nongroomed cross-country trails as well as a ski hill with a rope tow. The park’s sledding hill is located on Hubble Road across from the Ski Lodge. Soccer fields, a model airplane flying field and Springdale Farm — an agricultural education facility open to the public — are also onsite. — Sean Lahman writes for the (Rochester, N.Y.) Democrat and Chronicle.


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UPSTATE | HUDSON VALLEY

Take a Hike Explore Hudson Valley’s peaks for perfect views

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ALL IS COMING TO an end in the

Hudson Valley, so get out and enjoy the views while you can. One of the best ways is by heading to one of the many hiking trails in the region that offer interesting terrain and spectacular views. Many popular trails have become overcrowded during the pandemic, so if you find a full parking lot at any of these trailheads, consider returning at an off-peak time or trying another destination. Follow all socialdistancing and mask-wearing guidelines.

Cat Rocks TOM RICCI/WESTCHESTER (N.Y.) JOURNAL


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UPSTATE | HUDSON VALLEY

View from Joppenbergh Mountain TOM RICCI/WESTCHESTER (N.Y.) JOURNAL

The 1.4-mile loop at Joppenbergh Mountain in Rosendale offers a bit of history before you even get started. Old kilns that were used to make cement in the mid- to late-1800s greet you. Just to the right of the kilns is the start of the trail. It’s only about a half-mile of mild hiking to the small rock outcropping that offers a spectacular view of the Rosendale Trestle, a 940-foot continuous truss bridge and former railroad trestle that is an extension of the Wallkill Valley Rail Trail. Take an easy 3-mile walk from Madam Brett Park to Dennings Point

in Beacon that features a waterfall and the Hudson River. From the parking lot at Madam Brett Park, it takes about five minutes before you arrive at the viewing platform for Tioronda Falls and Mount Beacon peeks through the trees in the background. The white trail opens up into a wide woods road with the red trail off to your left. The red trail dives farther into the marsh and leads to an overlook by the water

before rejoining the white trail. No matter which one you choose, be sure to take the time to skip a few rocks on the river before retracing your steps back to your car. Ferncliff Forest in Rhinebeck offers a 2.2-mile stroll along woodland trails and the chance to climb a fire tower. Follow the yellow trail markers until you meet an intersection with the East Tower Trail. Take the trail to the left and continue; you will see a small sign for the tower. Take a deep breath and hold on to the railing as you ascend. From the top you can see the Catskills, the Hudson River and the Kingston-Rhinecliff Bridge, and if you’ve timed it right, the most spectacular sunset this side of the Hudson.

The trail that leads to Cat Rocks between the towns of Pawling and Wingdale promises a majestic view. Follow the white blazes to the stairs downhill, where there are wooden

walkways leading through the marshy section of the Appalachian Trail. Within a few steps of the hike, the trail begins to gain elevation and then it’s less than a mile to the money spot. Follow the white blazes the rest of the way to Cat Rocks — a big reward for a relatively easy hike. The views at the end of an arduous section of trail can often make it worth the trek, which is the case for Harvey Mountain near Austerlitz, a 3.4-mile out-and-back hike. In the beginning, the trail climbs rather sharply before quickly leveling off, and from there it’s only a quarter-mile to the intersection. Take the time to savor the next quartermile, because after crossing the stream it’s an unrelenting climb until you get to the top of Harvey Mountain, where you’ll be rewarded with an almost 360-degree view. Harvey Mountain

Tom Ricci contributed to this article for the (Westchester, N.Y.) Journal News.

GETTY IMAGES; TOM RICCI/WESTCHESTER (N.Y.) JOURNAL


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UPSTATE | HUDSON VALLEY

Loving Lobster Enjoy Maine’s main course at these upstate locales By Jeanne Muchnick

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ID COVID-19 RUIN YOUR vacation plans

to Maine or Cape Cod? No problem. You can still get your lobster fix at these upstate New York restaurants:

BREAD & BRINE

BREAD & BRINE, HASTINGS-ON-HUDSON Steamed Maine lobster dinners are available Wednesday through Sunday and can be ordered as an entree or as part of a dinner, which includes New England clam chowder, boiled potato, corn on the cob, coleslaw, grilled cornbread and chocolate chip cookies. ▶ breadandbrinehoh.com

GETTY IMAGES; BREAD & BRINE


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UPSTATE | HUDSON VALLEY

CORNETTA’S, PIERMONT One-, 2- and 3-pound lobsters are available at this longstanding seafood spot, where you can get them steamed, broiled or stuffed with crabmeat. Depending on where you sit, you’ll enjoy a view of the Hudson River. ▶ cornettas.com JEANNE MUCHNICK

GETTY IMAGES; JEANNE MUCHNICK

CONTE’S RESTAURANT & FISH MARKET, MOUNT KISCO Owner Rob Conte gets his lobsters from either Maine or Nova Scotia. He makes sure they’re flavorful by keeping them under a blanket of seaweed rather than in a tank. ▶ contesfish.com

GILLIGAN’S CLAM BAR & GRILL, POMONA There are lots of lobster choices at this casual, eclectically decorated seafood shack, including lobster for one, served with steamed clams and mussels, drawn butter and coleslaw; lobster for two (double that); or go for “Louie Lobster” with three steamed lobster tails. ▶ gilligansclambar. com

HUDSON VALLEY STEAKHOUSE, YORKTOWN HEIGHTS This fine-dining restaurant has managed to bring its high-quality service and food to its parking lot where tables are 12 feet apart. Feast on Maine lobsters wheeled to your table and then cut up and dissected to avoid any messiness. (The same holds true if you’re dining indoors.) There’s also surf and turf, as well as twin 7-ounce Maine lobster tails on the menu. ▶ hudsonvalleysteakhouse.com

KEE OYSTER HOUSE, WHITE PLAINS This upscale eatery takes pride in its fresh-off-the-boat catches, attention to detail and well-stocked raw bar where oysters, clams, shrimp and crabmeat are great to share with friends. Not for sharing: the lobster dinner complete with mashed potatoes and broccoli in garlic and olive oil. ▶ keeoysterhouse. com

SALTAIRE OYSTER BAR AND KITCHEN, PORT CHESTER

MARK VERARGI

GUS’S FRANKLIN PARK RESTAURANT, HARRISON Steamed or boiled lobster is on the menu at this nostalgic spot, originally called the Franklin Park Tavern. With a seafood market next door, this restaurant has a reputation for its high-quality fish and welcoming tavern vibe. It also has an outdoor patio for those not comfortable eating inside. ▶ gusseafood.com

You know when there’s a special lobster tab on a restaurant’s website that it’s serious about its offerings. Lobsters of various sizes are available and served with roasted fingerling potatoes, seasonal vegetables and drawn butter. ▶ saltaireoysterbar. com

JEANNE MUCHNICK

— Jeanne Muchnick covers food and dining for The (Westchester, N.Y.) Journal News


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UPSTATE | NIAGARA FALLS

JAMES CAVANAUGH

Sustainable Sails Iconic attraction launches electric boats

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IAGARA FALLS’ MAID OF the Mist has been around for more than 170 years, but this October marked a new beginning for the famous tourist attraction. Vessels James V. Glynn and Nikola Tesla, the first electric, zero-emissions tour boats of their kind to set sail in the U.S., welcomed their first passengers on Oct. 6. “With no engine noise, our guests

will be amazed by the sounds of nature and the roar of the falls they will hear from the decks of our vessels,” said Christopher Glynn, Maid of the Mist president, in a statement. The vessels’ blue and green color scheme is designed to remind passengers of the Mist’s commitment to the environment. Visit maidofthemist.org for more information.


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Profile for STUDIO Gannett

GO ESCAPE NEW YORK 2020