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NEW ENGLAND S U M M E R 201 7

RELISH THE REGION Lobster rolls and craft breweries

DISTINCT DESTINATIONS Island life’s quiet sanctuary

SAY YES TO YESTERYEAR Visit historic Mystic Seaport

Discover Iconic towns, urban gems, coves and cuisine

Brant Point Light Station on Nantucket Island


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NEW ENGLAND

CONTENTS

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The Clam Shack in Kennebunkport, Maine DARYL GETMAN

FEATURES

ON THE COVER

NEW ENGLAND REGION

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WINNING WEEKEND The outstanding amenities of Connecticut’s largest casinos

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REEL ONE IN The region’s most succulent — and diverse — lobster rolls

Brant Point Light House on Nantucket Island | Getty Images

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This is a product of

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

Jeanette Barrett-Stokes jbstokes@usatoday.com CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Jerald Council jcouncil@usatoday.com Tilted Barn Brewery in Exeter, R.I. AMY SOUCY

MANAGING EDITOR

Michelle Washington mjwashington@usatoday.com EDITORS

UP FRONT

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Patricia Kime Elizabeth Neus Sara Schwartz Tracy L. Scott Debbie Williams

THE REGION

BOTTOMS UP Six breweries contributing to New England’s beer boom

HOME RUN Fastballs, fireworks and frankfurters at four minor league baseball parks

GRAND SLAM Rhode Island’s International Tennis Hall of Fame hits the spot

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CONNECTICUT Mystic’s living history museum has something for everyone in your entourage

DESIGNERS

Miranda Pellicano Gina Toole Saunders Lisa M. Zilka

MAINE Leave your car behind to tour the artists’ enclave of Monhegan Island

MASSACHUSETTS The Rose Kennedy Greenway’s urban oasis beautifies Boston

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Antoinette D’Addario CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

34 KYLE KLEIN

Bart Beeson, Elizabeth Quinn Brown, Emily Burnham, Jennifer Bradley Franklin, Melanie D.G. Kaplan, Frances Katz, Melissa Locker, Nancy Monson, Shelley Seale, Allison Tibaldi ADVERTISING VP, ADVERTISING

A low-key, low-impact getaway to the Atlantic island paradise of Nantucket

Patrick Burke | (703) 854-5914 pburke@usatoday.com ACCOUNT DIRECTOR

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Justine Madden | (703) 854-5444 jmadden@usatoday.com

What to explore with only 48 hours on Martha’s Vineyard

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DAVE SCHOFIELD

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Julie Marco

NEW HAMPSHIRE Huttopia opens a new glampground in the state’s scenic White Mountains

ISSN#0734-7456 A USA TODAY Network publication, Gannett Co. Inc. USA TODAY, its logo and associated graphics are the trademarks of Gannett Co. Inc. or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Copyright 2017, USA TODAY, a division of Gannett Co. Inc. Editorial and publication headquarters are at 7950 Jones Branch Dr., McLean, VA 22108, and at (703) 854-3400.

RHODE ISLAND The soulful standout of Providence provides tastes for every appetite

VERMONT Make cheese your dairy directive as you traverse the state

For accuracy questions, call or send an e-mail to accuracy@usatoday.com.

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PRINTED IN THE USA All prices and availability are subject to change.

MYSTIC SEAPORT

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UP FRONT | FOOD + DRINK

BEER BOOM

Six New England breweries contribute to the explosive growth in craft brewing By Emily Burnham EW ENGLAND IS ONE of the primary drivers of the craft beer boom, with Vermont coming in at No. 1 in the country in breweries per capita, Maine and New Hampshire ranking in the top 10, and Rhode Island, Massachusetts and Connecticut not far behind. In the past two years, nearly 50 craft breweries have opened across New England. You’d have to be a dedicated beer fanatic to have tried even half these new breweries. And for the casual beer fan, it can be a little overwhelming to keep up with all the tasting rooms, brewpubs and small-scale spots popping up (though it would be awfully fun to try). Where to start? Maybe a new brewery in each state — from backwoods hops havens to upscale tap rooms, all with their own distinct brews suitable for any palate.

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GOOD MEASURE BREWING COMPANY Vermont

DECIDUOUS BREWING New Hampshire

ORONO BREWING COMPANY Maine

One of the newest kids in town, this brewery opened its tasting room in late 2016, offering a carefully crafted selection of beer, many sourced from local ingredients. There are several standouts, but Early Rise is a hit — a smooth cream ale with just a hint of floral hops that is imminently quaffable in any season. ▶ 17 East St.; Northfield; 802-485-4600; goodmeasure brewing.com

New Hampshire’s seacoast is jam-packed with great breweries, but one standout is Deciduous, which opened in late 2015. Rave reviews abound, but Auroral is the one to try first. The Berliner weisse — a wheat beer — bursts with blood orange and tropical fruit flavors, pairing perfectly with a sunny summer day. ▶ 12 Weaver St., Suite B, Newmarket; 603-292-5809; deciduousbrewing.com

Although Portland gets much of the craft brewery attention, the Bangor area equally overflows. Leading the pack is Orono Brewing Company, which launched in late 2014 and operates two hip tap rooms in Orono and Bangor. Ozone IPA is darn near perfect — hoppy, but not too overwhelming and full of big citrus flavor. ▶ 20 Main St., Orono, and 26 State St., Bangor; 207-866-4677; oronobrewing.com

EXHIBIT A BREWING COMPANY Massachusetts

KENT FALLS BREWING COMPANY Connecticut

TILTED BARN BREWERY Rhode Island

Exhibit A opened in burgeoning beer destination Framingham in late summer 2016 and offers up a number of standout brews. Give the Goody Two Shoes Kölsch a try first. Crisp and grassy, this might be the ideal warm weather brew. The German Kölsch style has grown in popularity, and this is one of the best. ▶ 81 Morton St., Framingham; 508-202-9297; exhibit-a-brewing.com

This brewery, which opened in late 2014, has rapidly established itself as one of the best in Connecticut. The working farm sells bottles of its creatively named beers, including Awkward Hug, an American IPA. The citrus-infused hoppy brew has a clean, dry finish and just might inspire you to hug the brewers yourself. ▶ 33 Camps Rd., Kent; 860-398-9645; kentfallsbrewing.com

The staff at Rhode Island’s first farm brewery grows much of the hops on-site, so many of the beers are hop-centric. The Chosen One, an American double IPA, is bound to please hop-lovers but is easy-drinking enough for beer novices. It clocks in at 8.5 ABV, but you wouldn’t guess it from the balanced flavor. ▶ 1 Hemsley Place; Exeter; 401-829-6088; tiltedbarnbrewery.com

GETTY IMAGES; PROVIDED BY BREWERIES

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UP FRONT | SPORTS

Pawtucket Red Sox at McCoy Stadium

OUTTA THE PARK

PAWTUCKET RED SOX

New England's minor league baseball games provide quirky entertainment and family-friendly fun By Bart Beeson HE CROWD CHEERS AS a cowboy rides a pink flamingo around the field and throws hot dogs to the fans, and kids duel with novelty light sabers as part of a Star Wars night celebration. This is the kind of offbeat entertainment you might see while catching a minor league baseball game in New England. At these always family-friendly affairs, minor league organizations often pay as much attention to creating a fun ambiance as they do to the baseball. Teams offer theme nights, giveaways, promotions, between-inning

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entertainment, colorful mascots and a variety of local food and drink. As the venues are generally smaller than major league parks, fans have the chance to get close to the action on the field, at a fraction of the cost. A family of four could easily spend upwards of $350 to go to a Boston Red Sox game (the most expensive in the majors), including parking, food and other purchases, compared with about $65 for a similar experience at a minor league game. Here’s a sample of what you can look forward to from four minor league teams in New England:

PAWTUCKET RED SOX For Boston Red Sox fans, the closest thing to catching a game at Fenway Park is to see the Pawtucket Red Sox — known to their fans as the PawSox — at McCoy Stadium in Rhode Island. The arena is celebrating its 75th anniversary this year, and that history is on display throughout the venue, with murals and displays throughout. Last summer, the team established its own Hall of Fame, inducting Red Sox players Jim Rice and Wade Boggs. And then there are the displays commemorating the longest game in baseball history, which took place there in 1981 and lasted 33 innings played on two days, two months apart. While the PawSox games offer a great chance to see up-and-coming major leaguers, or a pro back for rehab (now-retired Red Sox slugger David Ortiz spent some time there several years ago), it’s also family-friendly. “We know that when people come here, they’re not always coming for nine innings of baseball,” says Dan Rea, PawSox general manager. “People might just be looking for a fun night out and maybe catch a little baseball while they’re at it.” Saturday nights in the summer feature fireworks, and on Family Fun Sundays, fans can run the bases after the game. Those looking for New England tastes can find Del’s frozen lemonade, local brews and Rhode Island-style clam chowder. General admission for kids starts at $6; $9 for adults. ▶ 1 Columbus Ave.; 401-724-7300; pawsox.com

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UP FRONT | SPORTS

Field of Dreams/Fan Appreciation game PORTLAND SEA DOGS

PORTLAND SEA DOGS The lighthouse in center field rises up from behind the center field wall; the beacon flashes and fireworks spark as the fans cheer a home run for their team. This is baseball in Portland, Maine, home of the Sea Dogs and their mascot, Slugger. The Sea Dogs, a Class AA affiliate of the Boston Red Sox, play at Hadlock Field, home to the Maine Monster — a replica of the left field wall known as the Green Monster in Fenway Park. Visitors get treated to the full Maine experience, including lobster rolls and

Northeast Delta Dental Stadium

crab cakes and local craft beers like Shipyard and Allagash to wash it all down. The team hosts a number of promotions throughout the summer; one of the most popular is the Field of Dreams/Fan Appreciation game (this year, on Sept. 3), when players wearing replica 1929 Portland Eskimos uniforms, emerge from a cornfield erected in center field and go into the stands to thank fans. The team also hosts Throwback Thursday events. Last season, its Top Gun night was a hit, and for the 2017 season, there is a League of Their Own night planned to commemorate

the film's 25th anniversary. With an average ticket price of $10, a Sea Dogs game is an affordable family outing, and general manager Geoff Iacuessa says they try to appeal to both baseball and non-baseball fans: “If five people are coming to the game, we want to have something for each of them.” Fans may catch future major leaguers — Red Sox players and alumni including Dustin Pedroia, Josh Beckett and Jonathan Papelbon have come through the organization. ▶ 271 Park Ave.; 800-936-3647; seadogs.com

HARTFORD YARD GOATS The obvious question when catching a minor league game in Hartford, Conn., is, “What exactly is a Yard Goat?” Before moving to Hartford in 2016, the team formerly nown as the New Britain Rock Cats held a contest in which fans submitted new names (River Hogs, Praying Mantis and Whirlybirds were among other top finishers), with the Yard Goats — named for a small train that works in a train yard — winning out. The Class AA team, an affiliate of the Colorado Rockies, will play in Hartford for the first time in 2017, in the new Dunkin’ Donuts stadium, where a 15-foot-high Dunkin’ Donuts coffee cup will emit steam every time the Yard Goats hit a homer. General Manager Tim Restall says they’ve created distinct food and entertainment areas that fans can visit while walking the 360 degrees around the concourse. “The days of fans sitting in their seats for nine innings has changed, so we were able to create these neighborhoods so that people can mingle and go on to the next (neighborhood)

and catch up with friends and family,” he says. Visitors will be able to head to the Bears Barbecue deck to grab a pulled pork sandwich, or go to Reggae Right for a meat patty from Scott’s, a local Jamaican bakery, and a Red Stripe beer. Along with the food and promotions, there’s high-quality baseball. In 2016, six Yard Goats players made it to the major leagues. Seats in the new stadium will start at $6 and go up to $19. ▶ 1214 Main St.; 860-246-4628; yardgoatsbaseball.com

Outfielder Raimel Tapia

DAVE SCHOFIELD

NEW HAMPSHIRE FISHER CATS The outfield is filled with adults and children parrying and dodging, taking part in what is unofficially New Hampshire’s largest balloon sword fight. Every year, New Hampshire Fisher Cats fans take to the field to partake in this tradition, one of many annual promotions. The Fisher Cats (named for the native fisher, a weasel-like mammal known for its ferocity) play in Northeast Delta Dental Stadium in downtown Manchester, a city that has seen revitalization over the past several years, with once-abandoned mill buildings being filled with businesses and restaurants, Mike Ramshaw, president of the Class AA affiliate of the Toronto Blue Jays, says the open concourse design of the newly renovated property makes for a great baseball experience: “From the moment you walk into the stadium you can see everything. You can stand in line at the concession stand and not miss a beat of the action.” This season will see the Fisher Cats hosting the Eastern League All-Star game on July 12 as well as the popular PoutineFest on June 24. The Fisher Cats host 33 fireworks shows every season, at nearly half of their home games. Tickets are $12 in advance and $14 day of game. ▶ 1 Line Dr.; 603-641-2005; nhfishercats.com

NEW HAMPSHIRE FISHER CATS

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UP FRONT | SPORTS

IF YOU GO GETTING THERE: The International Tennis Hall of Fame is in the heart of Newport, R.I., and is part of the historic district. If downtown, visitors can easily walk to the museum or take tourist trolley #67. 194 Bellevue Ave.; 401-849-3990; tennisfame.com

Newport’s International Tennis Hall of Fame hits the sweet spot By Nancy Monson

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HERE’S MORE TO DO in Newport, R.I., than visit the stunning mansions and stroll the Newport Cliff Walk, a popular 3.5-mile public access walkway. The International Tennis Hall of Fame —

GETTY IMAGES; PROVIDED BY INTERNATIONAL TENNIS HALL OF FAME

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which underwent a major update in 2015 — is housed in what was formerly the Newport Casino social club, a National Historic Landmark, and is located just blocks from other tourist attractions such as grand 19th-century mansions and the downtown harbor area. “Visiting the International Tennis Hall of Fame is an incredibly special experience for a tennis die-hard, and something I’d encourage all tennis fans to have on their bucket lists,” says Todd Martin, CEO of the Hall of Fame and a retired professional player once ranked No. 4 in the world. Along with trophies, vintage equipment and outfits worn by some of the sport’s most successful athletes, Hall of Fame’s updated museum now includes more interactive exhibits and boasts a hologram of Switzerland’s Roger Federer, currently ranked No. 10 in the world by the Association of Tennis Professionals. The modern-

day exhibit explains Federer’s love of tennis. Other offerings include a chronological history of the game and its champions, such as this year’s prospective inductees Andy Roddick of the United States and Kim Clijsters of Belgium. “The (updated) museum was designed to be enjoyed by our patrons,” adds Martin. “Interactive trivia touch tables and a broadcast recording booth (are) among other great exhibits that engage visitors.” You can also tour the grounds, which include 13 grass and six hard courts, and even reserve a court to play, book a lesson with a pro or join a round-robin. Or, plan your visit to coincide with the Hall of Fame Tennis Championships July 16-23, the only professional men’s tournament to be played on grass courts in the United States. (Note: During the Hall of Fame Tennis Championships, the museum is open to tournament ticket holders only.)

SUMMER HOURS: Open daily 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission: $15 for adults; $12 for students, seniors and members of the military; kids 16 and under, free. United States Tennis Association members receive a $3 discount. TOURS: Docent-led group tours run at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. daily during July, August and September and are included in the price of admission; self-guided audio tours are available for $3. TENNIS CHAMPIONSHIPS: July 16-23; multiple ticket packages available. halloffameopen.com

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Connecticut’s resort casinos feature a full house of family-focused entertainment By Elizabeth Quinn Brown OT SO LONG AGO, casinos were often characterized as smoky, adultoriented establishments. But today, these dazzling, deluxe attractions cater to adults and children — gamblers and non-gamblers — with world-class amenities and entertainment.

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Standing out are two of Connecticut’s largest casinos: Foxwoods Resort Casino in Mashantucket (which houses 2,230 rooms in four hotels); and about 10 miles to the west, Mohegan Sun in Uncasville (which houses 1,563 rooms in two hotels). These destinations have embraced the chance to redefine their roles as casinos. They’ve become resorts that boast an

enriched, well-rounded experience, the perfect mini-escape in the heart of New England. “The casino atmosphere has evolved over the past decade,” says Monique Sebastian, Foxwoods’ vice-president of entertainment and entertainment marketing. “It’s so amenity-driven that it makes for such a great retreat or staycation for families. By bringing your family

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GETTING THERE Mohegan Sun and Foxwoods Resort Casino are about 10 miles apart, located in a scenic area on southeastern Connecticut’s coast within a short drive of the historic village of Mystic and Rhode Island’s beaches.

Mohegan Sun 1 Mohegan Sun Blvd., Uncasville; 888-226-7711; mohegansun.com

VISTA Lounge at Wombi Rock, which houses a lounge and dance floor, is a popular spot in the Casino of the Sky at Mohegan Sun.

Foxwoods Resort Casino 350 Trolley Line Blvd., Mashantucket; 800-3699663; foxwoods.com ILLUSTRATIONS BY GETTY IMAGES; MOHEGAN SUN

here, you’re exposing them to a very beautiful part of the Northeast.” And these destinations draw crowds. Entertainment events on weekends feature comedians and musicians who attract fans who then explore the casinos’ action-packed mazes. Foxwoods tapped Kesha and the Creepies for a free show Feb. 15 for its

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25th anniversary — a yearlong celebration that includes the debut of its Broadway Series, featuring Jesus Christ Superstar, 42nd Street, Mamma Mia! and Pippin. Mohegan Sun boasts a 10,000-seat arena, where a number of notable talents — including Billy Joel, Fleetwood Mac, The Eagles and Taylor Swift — have performed. This year features

Tim McGraw and Faith Hill, The Lumineers, Neil Diamond and New Kids on the Block. The arena also functions as “home” for the National Lacrosse League’s New England Black Wolves and the WNBA’s Connecticut Sun. “(The casinos) do a great job of ‘double-pairing’ tours,” says Marshall Weinstein, the owner of SET Artist Management, which

books deejays at Foxwoods. “I remember there was a show where Boz Scaggs and Toto performed, which is rare. Usually, you can’t go to a show where they’re both together because they’re both headliners.” The grandness extends to these resorts’ bars and CO N T I N U E D

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WINNING WEEKEND

FOXWOODS

PHOTOS PROVIDED BY FOXWOODS

restaurants. At Foxwoods, there are a whopping 35 choices when it comes to chow, including the new (and Kardashian-approved) Sugar Factory, as well as David Burke Prime, Fuddruckers, Guy Fieri’s Kitchen + Bar, Junior’s and Hard Rock Cafe. Mohegan Sun boasts the allure of celeb-owned eateries: Jimmy Buffett’s Margaritaville; Todd English’s Tuscany; Bobby Flay’s Bar Americain and Bobby’s Burger Palace; Michael Jordan’s Steakhouse; and Tom

Ryan’s Tom’s Urban — plus fun spots Chick-fil-A and Frank Pepe (a beloved, New Haven–based pizzeria). If you’re looking for retail therapy, there’s a parade of prime retailers at both casinos. Foxwoods has a collection of designer shops that include Bulgari, Chopard, Omega and the popular Tanger Outlets, which accommodates 80-plus brands. Mohegan Sun is a shopper’s mecca that includes popular spots Coach, Dylan’s Candy Bar, Lush, Sephora,

Tommy Bahama and Victoria’s Secret. Children (and children at heart) will find fun at Foxwoods’ Tree House Arcade, with more than 50 games including Candy Crush, Skee Ball X-Treme and Big Buck Safari, and at High Rollers, a retro bowling attraction that comprises 20 lanes. Mohegan Sun’s Kids Quest has crawl-and-climb tunnels, movies and age-appropriate games for the younger set, while Cyber Quest keeps older kiddos occupied with video and

arcade games. This summer, Mohegan Sun also will continue its event, Hot Summer Fun. “One of the attractions of the event is our firework display,” notes Ray Pineault, Mohegan Sun’s general manager. “We do one to kick off the summer and one to conclude the summer.” Both casinos also offer awardwinning 18-hole golf courses as well CO N T I N U E D

SMOKE-FREE SPOTS

HISTORY AND CULTURE

While both casinos still allow smoking, each has designated spots for non-smokers. At Foxwoods Resort Casino, there is one casino (Rainmaker) that is non-smoking and one area of the Great Cedar Casino that is non-smoking. The resort is non-smoking with the exception of the concourses. At Mohegan Sun, 25 percent of the casino’s gaming floor is non-smoking. Outside of the casino’s gaming floor, the resort is non-smoking.

Foxwoods, the first Native American–owned casino in the United States, is operated by the Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation. The casino honors the area and the Mashantucket Pequot, who continue to live on this continent’s first Native American reservation, established in 1666. During your stay, be sure to visit the Mashantucket Pequot Museum and Research Center and the Pequot trails. This summer, Foxwoods plans to introduce the HighFlyer, a zip line connecting the 32-story hotel to the museum. ▶ redwoodparkscompany.com/highflyer-zipline

PROVIDED BY FOXWOODS

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WINNING WEEKEND

MOHEGAN SUN

PHOTOS PROVIDED BY MOHEGAN SUN

as fitness centers and pools — Mohegan Sun’s 10,000-square-foot solarium, with an indoor/outdoor pool, and Foxwoods’ Fox Tower Pool, a 5,500-square-foot oasis with private cabanas and two additional pools. And of course, luxury spas should be part of every vacation. The Elemis Spa at Mohegan Sun includes pampering massages, a spa-therapy room for couples and a full-service hair and nail salon. Foxwoods’ Norwich Spa

HEDGE YOUR BETS Two other noteworthy New England casinos

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has a whirlpool, steam room, sauna and private rooms for massages and scrubs. The G Spa, a 21,000-squarefoot haven in the Fox Tower, features facials and mani-pedis as well as a full array of spa services. “It’s very serene,” notes Weinstein. “I’m a guy who loves going to the Russian and Turkish baths for a hot, hot, hot shvitz and Foxwoods has that. The treatments they offer are affordable and very good. And, of course, the cucumber water. Who

doesn’t love cucumber water?” Of course, the gaming remains a big draw. Mohegan Sun’s three casinos — Casino of the Earth, Casino of the Sky and Casino of the Wind — include more than 5,000 slot machines and 300 table games, including crowd-pleasers like blackjack, roulette, baccarat, craps and poker. Foxwoods, the largest resort casino in North America, boasts six casinos, $1 blackjack tables, 22 kinds of table games and 4,800 slot machines —

from penny slots to $100 machines. Erik Seidel, an eight-time World Series of Poker winner, won the World Poker Tour Foxwoods classic in 2008, earning $992,890: “(That) may have been my biggest cash at the time, so I have great memories.” Our “gambling” advice? Bet on a weekend at one of these casinos. Because what happens in Connecticut doesn’t stay in Connecticut: It goes home with its guests in the form of memories.

Plainridge Park Casino

Twin River Casino

Harness racing at Plainridge Park Casino is the biggest draw from April through November. There are a number of bars and restaurants, including the Dark Horse at the track as well as Flutie’s Sports Pub and Slack’s Oyster House & Grill. Small-scale entertainment can be discovered at Revolution 1776, a lounge with live music. ▶ 301 Washington St., Plainville, Mass.; 844-327-4347; plainridgeparkcasino.com

The Ocean State has an admirable attraction in Twin River Casino. The entertainment at the casino’s event center features a rotation of renowned names like Olivia NewtonJohn and Martin Short, a schedule that’s sweetened by a collection of bars and restaurants that includes the Blackstone Cigar Bar. ▶ 100 Twin River Rd., Lincoln, R.I.; 877-827-4837; twinriver.com

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THE REGION’S BEST LOBSTER ROLLS By Jennifer Bradley Franklin EW FOODS ARE MORE singular to New England than the succulent lobster roll. Far from being one-note, the interpretations of the dish are as particular as the eateries serving them. Opinions run high, akin to barbecue loyalties in the South, pizza in Chicago and bagels in New York. The origin of the iconic sandwich is somewhat murky. Some CO N T I N U E D

The Portland Head Light lighthouse in Fort Williams Park in Cape Elizabeth, Maine, is the backdrop for Bite into Maine, known for its diverse lobster rolls. BITE INTO MAINE

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FEAST |

Know how to choose a great lobster roll, and you may go from a naysayer to an evangelist 1

Fresh is Best If the menu doesn’t explicitly say “fresh-picked,” ask! A good lobster roll shouldn’t be made with previously frozen meat. Sally Lerman notes, “Just because you’re in New England, don’t make assumptions. A lot of touristy places coast on the reputation of the region without using fresh meat.”

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Mix it Up A lobster roll should be like eating a lobster dinner, but on bread, with all of the parts mixed in — tail, knuckles and claws. Think of it as a “lazy lobster dinner,” because someone else does the work for you.

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Whole Deal 4 Look for whole chunks of tender meat. The lobster shouldn’t be shredded and mashed like tuna salad.

Rise Up You’ll find nearly as many types of bread as you will restaurants serving lobster rolls in New England. Some eateries use a plain, hot dog-style bun, while others get fancier with brioche or custom-baked white bread. The bottom line: The roll itself should be a vehicle for the sweet meat, without competing for the taste spotlight.

Neptune Oyster

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not had them all,” she says. “Restaurants can use different parts — tail, claw, knuckle, fresh or frozen, plain bread or specialty. … All of those decisions result in very different sandwiches.” Bite into Maine, a food truck in Fort Williams Park, Cape Elizabeth, Maine, is pushing the creative envelope in delicious ways. Sarah Sutton, who started the business in 2011 with her husband, Karl, says that while their menu includes wasabi, curry and chipotle mayonnaise rolls, classic Maine style is still the overwhelming favorite, to the tune of 10 to 1. Demand is high: The 72-square-foot truck can go through as much as 120 pounds of fresh-picked lobster a day, sourced from local lobstermen. “Regardless of the style, we’re obsessed with quality,” Sutton says. “A good lobster roll is the perfect sandwich — the contrast of sweet and buttery is kind of like a kiss from the ocean.”

Skip the Sides You might be spending close to $20 for a sandwich, which can easily end up being a half a pound of tender lobster meat. Forgo the fries, chips and slaw and you’ll have more room to finish your roll. A good one is a self-contained meal.

Bite into Maine

ANA M. REYES

New Englanders claim that the nowclosed Nautilus Tea Room in Marblehead, Mass., crafted the first-ever lobster roll, while others swear that the invention credit goes to Bayley’s Lobster Pound in Pine Point, Maine. According to food critic John Mariani’s Encyclopedia of American Food and Drink, the original was crafted by the now-closed Perry’s in Milford, Conn., in the 1920s and the concept spread like wildfire thereafter. It’s generally accepted that there are two primary styles: the cold, or Maine, lobster roll, dressed with mayonnaise and piled into a simple, white-bread bun; and the hot, or Connecticut-style, drenched in butter. However, within those categories, the variations are near-endless. Sally “Lobster Gal” Lerman has eaten her way around New England, sampling more than 250 unique sandwiches to write her 2014 book, Lobster Rolls of New England. “If you’ve had one, you definitely have

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BITE INTO MAINE

CONNECTICUT City Fish Market (Wethersfield) This market is in Connecticut, but the owners generously offer both a hot lobster roll option and a “lobster salad” roll, Maine-style, lightly dressed in mayonnaise. ▶ 884 Silas Deane Highway; 860-522-3129; cfishct.com Seawell Seafood (Pawcatuck) Don’t let the lack of ambiance at this tiny retail fish market fool you. The sweet, hand-picked fresh lobster meat in a bun is sublime. ▶ 83 Liberty St.; 860-599-2082; seawellseafood.com

MAINE Bite Into Maine (Cape Elizabeth) This food truck manages to turn out six different versions of lobster rolls, including the signature “Picnic” style, which comes layered with coleslaw, warm butter and celery salt. ▶ 1000 Shore Rd.; 207-420-0294; biteintomaine.com

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| FEAST

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“A good lobster roll is the perfect sandwich — the contrast of sweet and buttery is kind of like a kiss from the ocean.” — Sarah Sutton, co-owner of the Bite into Maine food truck

The Canteen

Clam Shack

THE CANTEEN

Boothbay Lobster Wharf (Boothbay Harbor) Watch the local lobstermen deliver their catches while you wait. This dockside market is one of the few places in Maine where you can get a hot lobster roll by special request (it’s not on the menu). ▶ 97 Atlantic Ave., 207-633-4900; boothbaylobsterwharf.com Clam Shack (Kennebunkport) Owner Steve Kingston has his perfect lobster roll down to a science: a one-pound whole lobster is steamed in seawater, hand-picked and includes tail, knuckle and claw on a custom-baked bun. ▶ 2 Western Ave.; 207-967-3321; theclamshack.net

MASSACHUSETTS Neptune Oyster (Boston) While this North End restaurant does serve Maine-style rolls, it has a near-cult following for its succulent warm version: fresh-steamed knuckle, tail and claw meat piled into a grilled brioche bun. ▶ 63 Salem St.; 617-742-3474; neptuneoyster.com

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The Canteen (Provincetown) For locally sourced purists, this quaint restaurant only uses Massachusetts-caught crustaceans for guests’ choice of hot and buttery or mayo-kissed lobster rolls. ▶ 227 Commercial St.; 508-487-3800; thecanteenptown.com

NEW HAMPSHIRE The Ice House (Rye) Warm buttered lobster rolls have been this family-owned restaurant’s house specialty since 1980. Finish the meal with one of their famous ice cream cones. ▶ 112 Wentworth Rd.; 603-431-3086; theicehouserestaurant.com Sanders Fish Market (Portsmouth) This market uses ultra fresh, never frozen lobster meat, piled high on an impossibly buttery, crisp round bun. ▶ 367 Marcy St.; 603-436-4568; sandersfish.com

DARYL GETMAN

RHODE ISLAND Anthony’s Seafood (Middletown) Fresh-picked lobster tossed with peppered mayo and thinly sliced celery in a grilled hot dog bun is the house specialty. ▶ 963 Aquidneck Ave.; 401-846-9620; anthonysseafood.net Champlin’s Seafood Deck (Narragansett) For more than 50 years, this dockside restaurant has been the go-to spot for fresh seafood in the Galilee port. The lobster rolls are served chilled with a touch of creamy mayonnaise. ▶ 256 Great Island Rd.; 401-783-3152; champlins.com

VERMONT The only totally land-locked state in New England is a great place to find terrific ice cream, chocolate and cheese. Go for dessert!

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NEW ENGLAND CONNECTICUT MYSTIC SEAPORT’S CHARM

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MAINE SECLUDED MONHEGAN ISLAND

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MASSACHUSETTS BOSTON GREENWAY + LOW-KEY NANTUCKET + MARTHA’S VINEYARD

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NEW HAMPSHIRE MOUNTAIN GLAMPING

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RHODE ISLAND PROVIDENCE’S DIVERSE TASTES

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VERMONT MORE CHEESE, PLEASE

Nantucket’s Dionis Beach MIKE GALVIN

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CONNECTICUT | MYSTIC

Ships dock at Mystic Seaport. From left, 1908 steamboat Sabino, the 1841 whaler Charles W. Morgan and the Breck Marshall, a Cape Cod catboat.

EXPERIENCING YESTERYEAR

MYSTIC SEAPORT

Maritime history comes to life at the coastal village of Mystic By Shelley Seale

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PERFECT SHAFT OF sunlight falls through the rafters, lighting the artisan working on the sawdust-strewn floor below. He carefully planes a long piece of wood by hand. The large, two-story building is quiet except for the whooshing sounds of the work, the craftsman lost in concentration. This is the Henry B. duPont Preservation Shipyard at Mystic Seaport, a living history maritime museum

on 19 acres on the Mystic River in Connecticut. Here, skilled craftspeople build and repair wooden ships using Colonial-era techniques made nearly obsolete by the invention of steel and fiberglass. The upstairs gallery offers a bird's-eye view of the work being done on the 85-foot spar lathe and rigging loft, using tools such as adzes and saws that are more than a century old. There is also an old-fashioned sawmill and metalworking and paint shops. “It’s the only museum shipyard in the country, and we let people right in to see what’s going on,”

says Walter Ansel, senior shipwright. “There’s a tremendous amount of respect for the historical methods that were carried out before us, and we try to duplicate things and make (the repairs) look like the ships were when they were built.” The museum houses more than 500 historic watercraft, with the jewel of the fleet being the Charles W. Morgan, the last surviving wooden whaling ship in America and the oldest commercial vessel still afloat. Launched in 1841, the Morgan sailed for 80 years before retiring. Restoration work


A horse and carriage tour

MAKE A TRIP OF IT Mystic Pizza You'll recognize this setting from the 1988 movie of the same name, starring Julia Roberts in her breakout role. This pizza parlor has been a staple of the town since 1973; its walls are lined with memorabilia from the movie. 56 West Main St.; 860-5363700; mysticpizza.com

Inn at Mystic

Oyster Club This “farm and sea to table” fine dining restaurant changes its menu daily, using the freshest local ingredients. Don’t miss the terrific raw bar. 13 Water St.; 860-415-9266; oysterclubct.com

Inn at Mystic Enjoy great views, a swimming pool, tennis courts, walking trails, horseshoes, a putting green and free bicycle use at this family-friendly resort. 3 Williams Ave.; 860-5369604; innatmystic.com

Henry B. duPont Preservation Shipyard TOP LEFT: OYSTER CLUB; TOP RIGHT AND BOTTOM LEFT: SHELLEY SEALE; BOTTOM RIGHT: TOM BOMBRIA

began at the Mystic shipyard in 1968 and wasn’t completed until 2013, when the ship was relaunched and embarked on a tour of the historic ports of New England. Today, you can board the Morgan and enjoy a historic re-enactment performed several times daily, with maritime songs and the lowering of small whaleboats into the water. Mystic Seaport’s unique portrayal of the region’s seafaring past even allows summer visitors to set sail themselves, on classically rigged yachts, schooners or a launch cruise. On land, there are exhibits for children and adults alike, including play boats and a children’s museum, a planetarium and educational displays inside 19th-century buildings. Interactive activities include building ship models and exploring the shallows of the river. In the fall of 2016, the seaport opened

“There’s a tremendous amount of respect for the historial methods that were carried out before us.” — Walter Ansel, senior shipwright

its first new exhibition space in nearly three decades, the Thompson Exhibition Building, which houses the museum’s extensive collections and provides event and education space. “No matter the season, there is always something new and special to see or do,” says Susan Funk, executive vice president of Mystic Seaport. “The exhibit galleries change regularly, and visitors don’t just watch, they participate — whether it be working a giant press in the print shop or helping staff raise the sails.”

Historic interpreters complete the New England experience of days gone by, roaming the streets in period costumes with fishermen, craftsmen, teachers, musicians and others. “There are countless fascinating sea stories, tales of adventure, bravery and disaster, with moments for reflection as well as engaging performances,” Funk says. “Mystic Seaport is truly unique, from its setting on the beautiful Mystic River to the scope of stories and experiences that are available to our visitors.”

Whaler’s Inn This boutique hotel offers a charming historic coastal town experience. With its 150-year history evident in its meticulous restoration, 48 rooms offer modern amenities in five separate buildings. 20 E. Main St.; 860-536-1506; whalersinnmystic.com

Downtown Mystic Chock full of charming boutiques, bookstores, restaurants and galleries. mysticdowntown.org Mystic River Bascule Bridge This 1920s drawbridge opens at 40 minutes past the hour from 7:40 a.m. to 6:40 p.m. Nearby Mystic Drawbridge Ice Cream offers homemade sweet treats and sandwiches. themysticwave.com/ attractions; mysticdrawbridge icecream.com


MAINE | MONHEGAN ISLAND

Weathered gray cottages surround the Island Inn, center, on Monhegan Island.

GETTING THERE Ferry schedules vary by season; visitors are encouraged to work directly with the ferry line for arrival information, reservations and costs. Balmy Days Cruises Day trips to Monhegan during the high season; leaves from Boothbay Harbor. Pier 8, 42 Commercial St.; 207-633-2284; balmydayscruises. com

ISLAND FUN

Hardy Boat Cruises Offers travel to Monhegan mid-May to October; leaves from New Harbor. 132 State Route 32; 207-677-2026; hardyboat.com

Maine’s Monhegan Island has been a summer idyll for centuries

Monhegan Boat Line Monhegan’s yearround “mail boat;” leaves daily from Port Clyde. 880 Port Clyde Rd.; 207-372-8848; monheganboat.com

MELISSA DUDEK

By Melissa Locker

M

AINE MAY LAY CLAIM to the title of “vacationland” on its license plates, but when Mainers are looking for a break, they head 10 miles offshore to the inspiring Monhegan Island. The island barely covers a square mile and is home to a year-round population of fewer than 70 artists, farmers, fishermen and hardy, multitasking residents scraping together a living. Its numbers swell in summertime, though, as the island transforms from craggy, windswept rock in the ocean to a golden wonderland.

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Monhegan has served as an idyll for centuries — the Wabanaki Indians used it as a summer outpost well before Capt. John Smith landed in 1614 on what he dubbed the “Rockie Ile.” Smith’s glowing report brought European settlers to Monhegan and their descendants still live there today, catching cod and braving winter lobster fishing — a practice that is just as cold and hardscrabble as it sounds. Today, Monhegan is a destination for tourists looking for a contemplative, nature-filled getaway. There are no car ferries to the island — and no cars on the island, either — so the pace of life is set by foot. Three ferry lines carry visitors to the

island: Monhegan Boat Line, which brings passengers from Port Clyde; Hardy Boat Cruises, which ferries people and goods from New Harbor; and Balmy Days Cruises, which leaves from Boothbay Harbor. “I spend the entire boat ride birdwatching,” says Brian Allen, who visits the island each summer. “If you’re lucky, you’ll see a puffin. If you’re unlucky, it’s a good place to fight seasickness.” The Monhegan ferries dock at a wooden wharf that clings to the island’s side. As cargo is unloaded from the boat, residents and visitors alike walk from the dock toward the salt-worn buildings that make up the diminutive village. “It’s rugged and

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wind-blown and littered with lobster pots, which makes it just about perfect,” says Mark Locke, who has visited the island. The Black Duck Emporium is a welcome stop after the more than hourlong trip for a hot cup of coffee and some shopping. Following the pick-me-up, peruse the Monhegan Museum’s trail map to plan a day of hiking on the well-trod paths that criss-cross the island’s central forest. If you haven’t packed a lunch, pick up a sandwich or chowder from The Barnacle Cafe, the Island Inn’s deli that sits dockside. Then walk a few minutes toward the Monhegan CO N T I N U E D

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MAINE | MONHEGAN ISLAND House and make sure to grab a house-made whoopie pie from the Novelty, a bakery and shop tucked behind the 150-year-old historic inn’s back door. A trek toward the southern tip rewards hearty walkers with picturesque headland cliffs and Lobster Cove, great for bird watching, listening to the roaring surf and visiting the fragile skeleton of the D.T. Sheridan, a tugboat shipwrecked in 1948. Artists have long found inspiration in Monhegan’s beauty. American realist George Bellows fled urban life in New York City for a summer retreat on Monhegan; painter Edward Hopper traded lonely scenes of city nightlife for Monhegan’s waters; and three generations of Wyeths sought inspiration on the island. The tradition continues with a vibrant community of artists setting up easels on the front lawn of the Island Inn or taking part in the Monhegan Artists’ Residency. Any stay should include a visit to Monhegan Island Light, a now-solar-powered lighthouse that continues to serve as a navigation aid and also houses the Monhegan Museum of PUFFIN TOURS During evenings in the Art and History, filled spring and summer, with Wabanaki and boats depart from Port colonial artifacts and Clyde and New Harbor contemporary art. filled with bird watchers During the summer, eager to see the puffins stop by the Monhegan that nest on Eastern Brewing Company, Egg Rock, 5 miles from where all the brews Monhegan. Boats circle are named after the island while a natuMonhegan landmarks ralist narrates. Hardy or with nods to island Boat, which leaves from living. Lobster Cove Port Clyde, works with American Pale Ale and the Audubon Project Trap Stacker ale are Puffin to preserve the local favorites. area. Reservations The waters of recommended. Monhegan barely get hardyboat.com/ out of the 50s and can puffin-watch be treacherous, with unpredictable surf and hard tides. But hearty souls who want to brave the bracing SHERRI TUCKER; GETTY IMAGES sea can do so at Swim Beach, considered the only safe place to swim. Daytrippers leave Monhegan by 4:30 p.m. with the last boat, and as dusk settles, stars fill the sky. Overnight guests can bunk at the Island Inn, whose striking silhouette has loomed over the harbor since 1816, the Monhegan House or at one of the island’s guest houses. Summer cottages also are available for longer stays. The island’s hotels serve three meals a day to guests and the public in their dining rooms, and Monhegan’s lone grocery, L. Brackett & Son, has staples as well as vacation necessities such as doughnuts, beer and wine. Monhegan Island is a place to immerse oneself in peace, quiet and nature, to walk among soaring trees, spot countless shore birds or watch harbor seals flit around the rocks of nearby Manana Island, much as the Wabanaki probably did some 400 years ago. This is the true joy of Monhegan — never changing, always welcoming.

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MAKE A TRIP OF IT

Monhegan harbor

The Island Inn, open May 26 to Oct. 9 1 Ocean Ave.; 207-596-0371; islandinnmonhegan. com The Monhegan House, open May 19 to Oct. 1 300 Port Clyde; 207-594-7983; monheganhouse.com

The Monhegan Museum and Island Light

The view from the Island Inn

Summer cottages For those looking to stay longer, reserve on HomeAway (homeaway.com) or Airbnb (airbnb.com). Local Realtor Brackett Rentals also has sea-centric cottages (brackettrentals.com).

The Barnacle Cafe The Island Inn’s dockside deli islandinnmonhegan. com/the-barnacle

Long known as “The Artists’ Island,” Monhegan has a long tradition of inspiring creativity.

The Novelty Located just behind the Monhegan House monheganhouse.com/ the-novelty L. Brackett & Son 222 Monhegan Ave.; 207-594-2222; brackettrentals.com/ the-carina Monhegan Brewing Company, open May to October 1 Boody Ln.; monheganbrewing.com

Monhegan Museum and the Monhegan Island Light, open June 24 to Sept. 30 1 Lighthouse Hill; 207-596-7003; monheganmuseum.org

SHERRI TUCKER; MAINE OFFICE OF TOURISM; MELISSA DUDEK; MAINE OFFICE OF TOURISM

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MASSACHUSETTS | BOSTON

PHOTOS BY THE ROSE KENNEDY GREENWAY CONSERVANCY

GREEN ACRES

Spend an afternoon on the Rose Kennedy Greenway By Frances Katz and Sara Schwartz

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HE ROSE KENNEDY GREENWAY wasn’t always an oasis in the middle of Boston. The 1.5-milelong green space running parallel to the Financial District and Waterfront is the result of a 15-year project dubbed The Big Dig, which turned the city into one of the largest construction sites in the world from 1991 to 2006. The project moved a deteriorating, elevated portion of Interstate 93 underground because it could no longer accommodate the commuter traffic, and new bridges and tunnels were created to move more traffic more efficiently. The Big Dig didn’t just make getting

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around easier; it made staying put that much more enjoyable. Before the dig began, the state required that 75 percent of the land created by burying the highway must be left as open space. That park sitting above the underground highway tunnel is now known as the Rose Kennedy Greenway — complete with awe-inspiring art, performance spaces, produce markets and fountains. And while the old highway cut off waterfront neighborhoods from the rest of the city, the Greenway now provides easy access to the Boston Harbor, the Italian North End, the New England Aquarium and surrounding wharfs. Named in honor of Kennedy family matriarch Rose Kennedy, who grew up in the North End, the Greenway’s concept

is similar to Atlanta’s BeltLine, a network of public parks and multiuse trails along a 22-mile former railroad corridor — or New York City’s High Line, a public park built on a historic freight rail line elevated above the streets on Manhattan’s West Side. Boston’s Greenway is entirely accessible by public transportation, which makes it ideal for an afternoon adventure. It’s also an excellent way to see and sample some of the best of Boston. Denise Rooney, a travel agent who’s lived in the North End for more than 15 years, says now that everything is connected, the feel of the city has improved: “It’s so nice now — so much to see and do with parks and playgrounds, live music events in the summer. It’s wonderful.”

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PICK ONE PARK, OR WALK THEM ALL The Greenway is made up of a series of parks, each with its own distinct feel. It’s enticingly walkable — start at either Chinatown Park in the south or at the North End Park. Boston’s tangle of narrow one-way streets, dearth of parking spaces and pricey parking garages make public transportation the best option. Take the T (the local name for the subway) to each of the individual parks. To view an interactive map, go to rosekennedygreenway.org.

NORTH END PARK

North End Park

ARMENIAN HERITAGE PARK

▶ The Greenway Open Market, open Sundays and every other Saturday ▶ The Norman Leventhal Walk to the Sea (walktothesea. com), a 1-mile path across land that was once harbor FORT POINT CHANNEL PARK (BETWEEN OLIVER STREET AND CONGRESS STREET)

Getting there: South Station NORTH END PARK WHARF DISTRICT PARK

ROSE KENNEDY GREENWAY FORT POINT CHANNEL PARK

DEWEY SQUARE PARK

CHINATOWN PARK

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(BETWEEN NEW SUDBURY STREET AND NORTH STREET)

Getting there: Haymarket T station Don’t miss: ▶ The Canal Fountains, a shallow water “canal” with vertical water jets perfect for cooling off in the summer ▶ The 2.5 mile-long Freedom Trail (thefreedomtrail.org) crosses the Greenway on the north side of Hanover Street. Check out the site of the first house owned by an AfricanAmerican woman in colonial Boston, Zipporah Potter Atkin, who owned the property in the late 1600s. ▶ Ample seating at tables or underneath a decorative pergola ▶ Nearby Boston Public Market, which offers a yearround, indoor marketplace of 40-plus vendors selling locally sourced food and drinks Rings Fountain

ARMENIAN HERITAGE PARK (BETWEEN FANEUIL HALL AND CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS PARK)

Getting there: Haymarket T station Don’t miss: ▶ The Abstract Sculpture, a fountain shaped like a split dodecahedron that represents the immigrant experience ▶ The Labyrinth, a circular winding path designed as a tribute to accomplishments and contributions made to American life and culture ▶ Faneuil Hall, site of the first protests that led to the American Revolution, and nearby Faneuil Hall Marketplace WHARF DISTRICT PARK (BETWEEN ATLANTIC AVENUE AND OLIVER STREET)

Getting there: Aquarium T station Don’t miss: ▶ Rings Fountain ▶ Rowes Wharf Plaza, with year-round food trucks and occasional free dance or fitness classes ▶ Boston Harbor Islands Pavilion, where visitors can get additional information ▶ Ticket booth for the Boston Harbor Cruises ▶ New England Aquarium ▶ The Greenway Carousel

Don’t miss: ▶ The Atlantic Wharf, a mixed-use building with dining options, live theater performances and exhibits ▶ Short walk to the Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum (bostonteapartyship.com) DEWEY SQUARE PARK (BETWEEN CONGRESS STREET AND SUMMER STREET)

Getting there: South Station Don’t miss: ▶ Spaces Of Hope, a surrealist giant mural by Iranian artist Mehdi Ghadyanloo ▶ Free seasonal weekly block parties Thursday evenings ▶ Food vendors and a lively farmers market on Tuesdays and Thursdays CHINATOWN PARK (AT SURFACE ROAD AND BEACH STREET)

Getting there: South Station Don’t miss: ▶ River Stream fountain ▶ Annual Chinese zodiac art installation, currently featuring a 3-D printer dispensing free replica roosters ▶ A free, summer outdoor theater of kung fu and classic Chinese-language films ▶ All the dim sum, noodles or dumplings you’re craving

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MASSACHUSETTS | NANTUCKET

BEYOND THE BEACH A low-key, low-impact getaway to an Atlantic island paradise

MIKE GALVIN

By Allison Tibaldi

N

ANTUCKET’S MYTHICAL BEAUTY HAS inspired generations of artists, writers, beachcombers and stargazers. With 82 miles of unspoiled coastline, the island paradise provides breathtaking views and seashell-strewn shores. Visitors return year after year, beckoned by its nautical charm and understated elegance. But dramatic landscapes and

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pristine beaches aren’t the only story. With no chain stores, fast food or traffic lights, an Americana spirit infuses the quaint downtown. The independently owned shops, eateries and boutiques are reminiscent of when life was just a tad simpler. For visitors seeking low-impact travel, 32 miles of bike paths, the efficient islandwide WAVE shuttle and a compact, pedestrian-friendly village make it a fine car-optional vacation. Nantucket is located 30 miles off

the shore of Cape Cod and getting there is part of the fun. Catch the year-round ferry from Hyannis, with more than a dozen daily departures in high season, and you’ll be treated to striking seascapes along your breezy journey. The ferry docks at the picture-perfect harbor brimming with seaworthy vessels and you’re just a short stroll from the island’s premier hotels, beaches and attractions. CO N T I N U E D

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MASSACHUSETTS | NANTUCKET

THE BEACHES The variety and quality of beaches on this 14-mile-long island are dazzling. Nearly all of its beaches, including private ones, are publicly accessible via designated entryways. If you’re looking for calm seas, stick to the island’s north side, where public beaches such as Jetties and Dionis Beach present tranquil waters. The public beaches on the island’s southern fringe can have rough surf with powerful riptides. Kite fliers favor the stretch of sand on the western edge of south-facing Surfside Beach, so you’ll be sharing the beach with whimsical flying objects and frolicking families. If you’re seeking aquatic adventures, surfers ride the break at south shore’s Cisco Beach, where surfboards and stand-up paddleboards can be rented. Novices can take a lesson from the experienced instructors at Nantucket Island Surf School. nantucketsurfing.com

Main Street

ISLAND LIVING RECOMMENDATIONS FRESH EATS Epicureans will find a range of global cuisines, but expect fresh seafood to dominate. Locals flock to casual Sayle’s Seafood to feast on the ocean-to-plate offerings. Order take-out and dine al fresco on their rustic patio. ▶ 99 Washington Extension; 508-2284599; saylesseafood.com

Treat your taste buds to a confection at Petticoat Row Bakery, which serves nostalgic baked goods with a homespun edge, such as lemon squares and oatmeal raisin cookies. Morning buns — buttery croissant dough rolled in brown sugar — are a house specialty. ▶ 35 Centre St.; 508-228-3700; petticoatrowbakery.com

At Ventuno, house made pasta, hearty meats and fresh fish are served in a romantic setting. Start your meal with Nantucket oysters paired with a Campari-infused Italian ice. The radiatori di farro is a lush tangle of woodsy wild mushrooms sautéed with pasta so light it could levitate off the plate. Open seasonally. ▶ 21 Federal St.; 508-228-4242; ventunorestaurant.com

POTENT POTABLES If you’re partial to hops and barley beverages, Nantucket has its very own craft brewery, Cisco. Give one of their specialty Island Reserve beers a try or sip the English-style Whale’s Tale Pale Ale, a balanced thirst quencher. MIKE GALVIN

▶ 5 Bartlett Farm Rd.; 508-325-5929; ciscobrewers.com

If you require something more

“The Point,” Nantucket Hotel’s luxury suite KIT NOBLE PHOTOGRAPHY

fortifying, clink glasses with a local crowd at the Rose & Crown.

▶ 23 South Water St.; 508-228-2595; theroseandcrown.com

COZY DIGS The 60-room Nantucket Hotel blends old-school charm with sophisticated comfort. Complimentary lemonade and cookies are an afternoon delight. ▶ 77 Easton St.; 508-228-4747; thenantuckethotel.com

If you’re looking for lodging that blends Nantucket’s past and present with panache, consider the Jared Coffin House, housed in an 1845 mansion downtown. The 30 sumptuously furnished rooms in the main building are available seasonally, while 13 rooms in the adjacent Daniel Webster building provide guests with an intimate experience year-round. ▶ 29 Broad St.; 508-228-2400; jaredcoffinhouse.com

BEYOND THE BEACH If the fickle New England weather doesn’t cooperate, you can still find engaging indoor diversions that highlight Nantucket’s rich maritime history. The Whaling Museum (nha.org) is not just for fans of Melville’s Moby-Dick. If you’re curious about the folklore, traditions and history of Nantucket, you’ll find artifacts and exhibits that paint a vivid picture of the island during its heyday as a whaling capital. Elegant hand-woven rattan and wood baskets — Nantucket Lightship Baskets — are a unique island-made craft and stylistically in tune with the island’s Quaker simplicity. You can find these tempting beauties for sale at a number of shops in town (though with astronomical price tags). The best way to gain some insight into their heritage is by viewing the collection at the Nantucket Lightship Basket Museum. Open seasonally. Admission $5. nantucketlightshipbasketmuseum.org

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A CYCLING UTOPIA Family-owned Young’s Bicycle Shop has been renting two-wheelers since 1931. Owner Harvey Young will happily map out a ride to suit anyone but recommends the 20-mile round-trip ride to the adorable yesteryear village of Siasconset, locally known as ’Sconset. ▶ 6 Broad St.; 508-228-1151; youngsbicycleshop.com

GETTING THERE Ride the high-speed catamaran (one-hour) or traditional car-andpassenger ferry (2 hours, 15 minutes) from Hyannis year-round. Additionally, there is seasonal high-speed service from New Bedford and Harwich Port. The interisland ferry runs between Nantucket and Martha’s Vineyard from late May until early October. ▶ nantucketchamber.org/arrive

Nantucket’s airport provides yearround service from Boston, Hyannis, Martha’s Vineyard and White Plains, N.Y. YEAR-ROUND FERRIES FROM HYANNIS Hy-Line Cruises: Daily high-speed ferries year-round, with an additional departure on Friday evening. ▶ 220 Ocean St.; 800-492-8082; hylinecruises.com

The Steamship Authority: Daily traditional and high-speed ferries in high season. ▶ 1 Steamboat Wharf; 508-228-0262; steamshipauthority.com

SEASONAL SERVICE: Seastreak Ferry from New Bedford: operates May 24 through Sept. 4, departs from 49 State Pier. Ventuno’s buratta capellaci with spinach, pistachio and parmigiano bread crumbs ANTOINETTE BRUNO/STARCHEFS

▶ New Bedford; 800-262-8743; seastreak.com

Freedom Cruise Line from Harwich Port, Cape Cod: starts in late May. ▶ 508-432-8999; nantucketislandferry.com

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MASSACHUSETTS | MARTHA’S VINEYARD

Morning Afternoon Evening

DAY ONE

D E ST I N AT I O N

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THE VINEYARD

Spend 48 hours on this beachy East Coast enclave By Frances Katz

W

ITH MILES OF SANDY beaches and plenty of unspoiled green spaces, Martha’s Vineyard is the idyllic New England summer getaway. Bursting with traditional seafood shacks, trendy restaurants, general stores and artisan boutiques, this hotspot can easily

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be a day trip, but if you have two days, you can take more time to enjoy almost everything the island has to offer. The Vineyard is known for its celebrity and presidential visitors, but you don’t need a lot of money to have a wonderful time. In fact, you don’t even need a car. Clocking in at about 96 mostly flat square miles, the layout of the island makes everything easily accessible by foot, bike or moped.

(And if you do suddenly need a car, Uber has come to the island to get you where you need to go.) We recommend making the town of Oak Bluffs your base for a weekend stay. Of the Vineyard towns — Edgartown, Vineyard Haven, Acquinnah, Chilmark and West Tisbury — Oak Bluffs (the primary ferry landing site) has the easiest access to beaches, shops, bars, restaurants and quintessential Vineyard history.

MILES OF BEACHES, COLORFUL COTTAGES Take the Steamship Authority ferry from Woods Hole, Mass., and make sure you’ve packed sun block. Head to the upper deck to enjoy the scenery and get a glimpse of Cape Cod during the 45-minute ferry ride. As you exit the ferry, the Oak Bluffs Town Beach is to your left. Bike or take a shuttle bus down Seaview Avenue, which turns into Beach Road, to find the ideal spot for sunning, swimming and picnicking. Bring your own towels and snacks or stop off in Oak Bluffs (there are shops across the street as you exit the ferry terminal), as nothing is sold on this stretch of beach. The water is cool but pleasant for swimming or collecting seashells in the surf. You’ll pass the Joseph Sylvia State Beach, where Steven Spielberg shot scenes for Jaws and you’ll see kids of all ages jumping off the American Legion Memorial Bridge — much better known as the “Jaws Bridge” seen in the movie. If you’re in the mood — and don’t mind ignoring the signs saying not to do it — jump in at high tide. When you’re ready to head back into Oak Bluffs, cut through Ocean Park and make your way toward one of the most iconic Vineyard sights, the colorful and charming Victorian gingerbread cottages known as the Campground, a community that dates back to the 1800s. The Martha’s Vineyard Camp Meeting Association (mvcma.org) is a private foundation dedicated to preserving the campgrounds and the Tabernacle, which were listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1978. There are organized tours of CO N T I N U E D

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MASSACHUSETTS | MARTHA’S VINEYARD

Gingerbread cottage in Oak Bluffs

CJ RIVARD

the campground and the more than 300 homes, but it’s easy to explore on your own. The owners are often sitting outside and are usually happy to talk about the history of their homes. If you’re there on Aug. 16, be sure to check out one of the most anticipated events of the year — Grand Illumination Night, when homeowners in the campground and all over the island hang colorful Chinese and Japanese lanterns on their cottages. LUNCH AND LIVELINESS If your stomach is rumbling, head to Nancy’s, which overlooks Oak Bluffs Harbor. Enjoy a perfect Martha’s Vineyard lunch of a lobster roll, skinny onion rings and a cold beverage. (Last summer, former first daughter Sasha Obama worked the take-out window.) If you’re feeling a bit more formal, head to the upstairs dining room for succulent lobster ravioli, crab-and-corn-crusted cod and seared salmon. Seafood not your thing? Try Bangkok Thai Cuisine, a popular local spot. For a lively afternoon, head up the road to the Flying Horses Carousel, the oldest operating platform carousel in the country. (Those lucky enough to grab the brass ring can stay on for a free ride!) The attached arcade features vintage games like pinball and whac-a-mole. Walk along Circuit Avenue and check out the many small shops and boutiques. Among the treats are island-made fudge, handmade jewelry and a variety of other handmade items in addition

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to the traditional souvenirs — including the popular black-andwhite “MV” badge for your car. BLACK DOG AND DESSERTS If you’re curious about all those brightly colored T-shirts with the black dogs on them, they are souvenirs of the island’s popular The Black Dog Tavern. The original sandwich shop and restaurant are in Vineyard Haven, about a 10-minute shuttle bus ride from Oak Bluffs. In addition to the bakery, which sldo offers sandwiches and baked goods, there’s a sit-down restaurant with beautiful views of the harbor. The biggest crowds are around back outside the gift shop, which stocks clothing for everyone — including your dog — as well as kitchenware, toys and other items for man’s best friend. Save room for more dessert! Back in Oak Bluffs, hop in line at Martha’s Vineyard Gourmet Café & Bakery, which serves hot, fresh apple fritters, cinnamon rolls, doughnuts and croissants at the “back door” from 7 p.m. to 12:58 a.m. Walk to the beach or Ocean Park to listen to the waves and gaze up at the amazing array of stars. Walk home the long way via the Campground, especially if there is a concert or other event taking place in the Tabernacle.

DAY TWO SCENIC VISTAS AND BREAKFAST TREATS Get up early, grab your camera and head to Ocean Park to take photos of the seashore at first

light and the elegant Victorian mansions that surround the park. While enjoying some quiet time, you might even spot photographers Yann Meersseman and Moira Fitzgerald, who have been photographing the island every morning at first light since 2010. (Get inspiration from their work at vineyardcolors.com.) If you’re looking for a traditional breakfast of eggs, bacon and home fries, head over to Linda Jean’s, a longtime island meeting spot on Circuit Avenue. Or order southern-style biscuits and gravy or Nutella crepes at Biscuits on Lake Avenue. FOCUS ON NATURE Rent a bike from any of the locations near the ferry terminal or take the free shuttle to Edgartown, the heart of the island’s old whaling community. You’ll see former homes of sea captains and import merchants, plus the Martha’s Vineyard Museum, dedicated to the island’s history. But to really get away from it all, says Molly Peach, the Islands Educator at the Trustees of Reservations, spend a day exploring Chappaquiddick Island on the eastern side, just a short $4 ferry ride ($6 if you bring a bike, $12 for a car) from Edgartown. “You can spend a few hours or a few days on Chappy without discovering all it has to offer,” Peach says. The 9 miles of beach offer kayak and stand-up paddleboard rentals and guided kayak tours. Spend time in the Mytoi Garden, a 14-acre Japanese garden designed for contemplation.

MAKE A TRIP OF IT The Black Dog Tavern 20 Beach Street Ext., Vineyard Haven; 508-6939223; theblackdog.com Red Cat Kitchen 14 Kennebec Ave., Oak Bluffs; 508-696-6040; redcatkitchen.com

Dockside Inn A stay includes access to Loomis, the inn’s virtual concierge. 9 Circuit Ave. Extension; 800-245-5979; vineyardinns.com Isabella’s Beach House A bed-and-breakfast with breathtaking ocean views. 83 Seaview Ave.; 800-674-3129; isabellesbeachhouse.com

Summercamp Hotel Previously known as the Wesley Hotel, the newly renovated venue still stocks rocking chairs for relaxing and watching boats. 70 Lake Ave.; 508-693-6611; summercamphotel.com

Cape Poge Wildlife Refuge Explore the preserved land of Chappaquiddick Island. Get there on the Chappy Ferry; check site for hours and prices. chappyferry.com Flying Horses Carousel 33 Lake Ave., Oak Bluffs; 508-693-9481; mvpreservation.org/properties/ flying-horsescarousel Sightseeing tours The Vineyard offers multiple tours. mvy.com/ sightseeing-tours

GETTY IMAGES

PLOT YOUR RETURN TRIP DURING DINNER For your last night on the island, make reservations at the Red Cat Kitchen near the Flying Horses Carousel. The restaurant offers seasonal specialties in a lively, art-filled dining room. After dinner, it’s time to think about getting back to the mainland. The last bus back to Boston and points north leaves Woods Hole at 8 p.m., but check the schedule for any changes or updates. Not able to fit everything in? “You’ll just have to come back year after year,” says Peach.

GETTING THERE If you’re coming from Boston, drive or take the bus from Boston Logan International Airport or Copley Place in Boston’s Back Bay. Because car reservations on the ferry can be difficult to get (reserve several months in advance), leaving your vehicle behind is easiest. Park in one of the many marked lots that provide shuttle service to the Steamship Authority ferry in Woods Hole. Free shuttle buses meet both ferries heading to the island’s major towns, including Oak Bluffs. The ferry runs several times a day; check website for pricing and hours. ▶ 1 Cowdry Rd.; 508-477-8600; steamshipauthority.com FOR MORE INFORMATION Martha’s Vineyard Chamber of Commerce ▶ 24 Beach St., Vineyard Haven; 800-505-4815; mvy.com

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NEW HAMPSHIRE | WHITE MOUNTAINS

A Huttopia glamping site in Quebec

White Mountains Huttopia will open this summer with accommodations ranging from a BYO tent ($30 to $50 per night), to canvas tents and cabins ($80 to $200 per night). Dog-friendly.

HUTTOPIA; GETTY IMAGES

AMPED TO GLAMP Cozy up to nature in style with new glampground in New Hampshire’s White Mountains

By Melanie D.G. Kaplan

B

IRDS CHIRP IN THE morning. A kaleidoscope of sun shines through tree cover. In a dark night sky, stars twinkle to the horizon. For so many reasons, we want to be close to nature. We just don’t always want to be that close. And this is why we love glamping. Glamping is just like it sounds — glamorous camping. Picture high-thread-count

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sheets at night and lattes during the day. While each glamping experience is different, most glampers never need to filter water or forage for their dinner. This summer, an eco-friendly French glamping model arrives in New England with the opening of White Mountains Huttopia in New Hampshire. Based on the success of 40 high-end camping sites in France and Canada, Huttopia is expanding to the United States, betting that American families will love rustic outdoor experi-

ences even more if they come with a toilet. “We do all the work for you,” says Shane Ott, president and CEO of Huttopia North America. “We offer full linen service and provide all the amenities you need.” The new location will open just south of North Conway, N.H., in the White Mountains gateway town of Albany, N.H., on Route 16 near iconic Mount Chocorua, about 140 miles from Boston. Ott, previCO N T I N U E D

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NEW HAMPSHIRE | WHITE MOUNTAINS

A hiker walks along the Rampart rocks near the Carter Notch Hut in the White Mountains.

TIPS FOR FIRST-TIME GLAMPERS

Don’t let the luxe in glamping fool you; you’re still outdoors. Pack bug spray, sunscreen, first-aid supplies and hiking boots.

ously an executive at Kampgrounds of America (KOA), says Huttopia White that based on the Mountains popularity of the White 603-447-3131; Mountain National huttopia.com. Contact: white Forest and the nearby mountains@ Mount Washington huttopia.com Valley for camping and outdoor recreation, North Conway was an ideal setting to enter the U.S. market. Operating with a relatively light footprint, Huttopia’s glampground is set on 50 tree-filled acres, with a lake and streams. “Our idea is not to go in and cut down trees. We build the site around nature,” Ott says. The region offers spectacular scenery and countless ways to experience it, says Rob Burbank, director of media and public affairs at the Appalachian Mountain Club, one of the United States’ oldest outdoor groups. You might even spot moose, black bears or white-tailed deer. Huttopia provides canvas and cabin accommodations, although some bring their own tents. Even the company’s basic tents, pitched on wooden platforms, have an elegant feel, with mattresses and running water. Some have full kitchens, full bathrooms and high-end grills. One of the features at any Huttopia is a main living center, where staff members work to make sure guests aren’t roughing it too much. In the center, guests can enjoy breakfasts, board games and books. They’ll find a retail shop and a full-service bistro with gourmet pizzas and local microbrews. Weekends are packed with activities, including nature walks, bird-watching, cooking classes and local wine-tasting. Trails crisscross the property, so visitors will have no shortage of places to hike, with 1,200 miles of non-motorized trails in the White Mountains. Among the most popular: Mount Washington, elevation 6,288 feet. “On a clear day,” Burbank says, “the views go on and on.” Just make sure to pack warm gear, even in the summer.

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Away from city lights, you’ll find nights blissfully dark, which means you’ll need a flashlight or headlamp to navigate after sunset.

Even when glampsites come with everything — including the kitchen sink — you’ll still need to bring provisions: ingredients for s’mores, hot chocolate for cool evenings, tea for leisurely mornings and food for meals not eaten at area or campground restaurants.

When you don’t have to spend time pitching a tent, you’ll have more time to enjoy nature. Explore birds, flora and fauna; don’t forget binoculars and a bird guide.

DENNIS WELSH

IF YOU WANT TO ROUGH IT The Appalachian Mountain Club, which maintains more than 300 miles of the Appalachian Trail, has eight huts along 56 miles of the trail in New Hampshire’s White Mountains. The oldest dates back to 1888, long before the glamping era. But the huts and bunks do offer some pampering: a mattress, pillow and blankets; running water; guided trips; natural history programs; and communal, home-cooked dinner and breakfast in season. Rates vary for children. ▶ $90 to $135 for AMC members; $109 to $162 for non-members; 603-466-2727; outdoors.org

The Conway Scenic Railroad

The awesome part of glamping — at least at Huttopia — is that if you forget to pack toiletries or snacks, you can conveniently pick them up at the camp store. For those who can’t leave the smartphone behind, Huttopia’s main center will have Wi-Fi.

HUTTOPIA; GETTY IMAGES

DEBBIE HILL

WHAT TO DO With a glampground as your home base, venture out into the Mount Washington Valley for dining, recreation and tax-free shopping. Tour the Weather Discovery Center in North Conway; tee off in the valley’s 11 golf courses; or take a self-guided scenic waterfall tour. The Conway Scenic Railroad leaves for excursions from its historic train station in the center of North Conway. In addition to Huttopia, dozens of campgrounds dot the Mount Washington area, including cabins and cottages at Danforth Bay, near the shores of Ossipee Lake and Eastern Slope Campground, on the Saco River.

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RHODE ISLAND | PROVIDENCE

NICKS ON BROADWAY

E C N E D I V O R P N I E D A M

Chef Derek Wagner oversees the city’s hottest brunch scene at Nicks on Broadway, a bright and bustling West End spot named for original proprietor Nick Sammartino, who debuted his eponymous, all-day diner in 1969. Wagner, a former regular, took the reins in 2002, and now serves seasonal, New American fare. Brunch at Nicks is an institution, but the restaurant is also open (and considerably less crowded) for dinner service, where Wagner’s creative menus are available a la carte or in four- or seven-course tasting menus. ▶ 500 Broadway; 401-421-0286; nicksonbroadway. com

The Dorrance GETTY IMAGES; N. MILLARD/GOPROVIDENCE

Indulgent and local flavors add spice to Rhode Island’s quirky capital By Emily Saladino

C

OBBLESTONED COLLEGE TOWNS ABOUND in New England, but Providence is a soulful standout. Coastal bounty, ethnically diverse and academic populations as well as

urban arts and renewal projects give the city character, as does its residents’ gritty tenacity. (There is no road too narrow nor snowdrift too menacing to dissuade Providence motorists from attempting a three-point turn.) Increasingly, culinary school

Chef Derek Wagner

graduates and creative professionals are setting up shop alongside Providence’s longstanding populations and reinventing the city’s many neighborhoods. Hungry travelers, take heart: Providence is for (food) lovers. CO N T I N U E D MIKE COHEA; EMILY SALADINO

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RHODE ISLAND | PROVIDENCE

WEST SIDE DINER Those hungry for American ingenuity head to West Side Diner, which opened in a landmark art deco dining car in 2013. The prefabricated Kullman dining car — which started out as Poirier’s Diner in 1947 and at one point was in danger of demolition — was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2003. The West Side specializes in all-day breakfast on the weekends. Indulgent waffles topped with whipped cream, fruit and s’mores-style marshmallows are a local favorite. Don’t count on this place for dinner, though; it’s only open until 2 p.m. ▶ 1380 Westminster St.; 401-490-0644; westsidedinerri.com

N. MILLARD/GOPROVIDENCE

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THE DORRANCE Near Downcity’s northern border, you’ll find a jewel box called The Dorrance, a swanky spot with ornate ceilings and art deco chandeliers. Cocktails at The Dorrance are served in elegant crystal, and include If You Like Drinking Negronis, a stiff combination of Rhode Island’s Sons of Liberty True Born gin, plus apertif wine and angostura and mole bitters. ▶ 60 Dorrance St.; 401-521-6000; thedorrance.com BIRCH At Birch, an 18-seat tasting table in Downcity, James Beard Award-nominated chef and native son Benjamin Sukle creates four-course prix fixe dinners that combine elevated technique, local and heritage ingredients and warm hospitality. Reservations are recommended for the intimate, brick-walled space, yet the overall atmosphere is one of a private supper club or dinner party thanks to Sukle and his wife, Heidi, the restaurant’s general manager. Menus change seasonally, and include such carefully sourced fare as raw Rhode Island lobster, local pork with preserved mustard greens and freshly caught monkfish or quahogs. ▶ 200 Washington St.; 401-272-3105; birchrestaurant.com OBERLIN In early 2016, Birch chef Benjamin Sukle opened Oberlin, a casual spot for New American comfort food that includes housemade pastas, polenta and shareable crudos. The space is bright, the crowd is young and the

Hemenway’s N. MILLARD/GOPROVIDENCE

soundtrack ranges from classic Johnny Cash to indie rock group TV on the Radio. “I wanted to do something honest,” explains Sukle of Oberlin’s hearty, comforting pasta and vegetable dishes. In addition to wine, beer and vermouth, Oberlin’s blonde wood bar pours an impressive sake list. ▶ 186 Union St.; 401-588-8755; oberlinrestaurant.com OLNEYVILLE NEW YORK SYSTEM Olneyville New York System is a longtime Providence institution for hot wieners — steamed hot dogs made from preservative-free pork, beef and veal topped with chopped onions, celery salt and a proprietary special sauce. In 2014, the James Beard Foundation honored Olneyville New York System with an America’s Classics Award. “This is original Formica,” says fourthgeneration owner Greg Stevens of the cheerful

tables and long chrome bar at his Olneyville flagship. ▶ 18 Plainfield St.; 401-621-9500; olneyvillenewyork system.com HEMENWAY’S Hemenway’s, a weekend-worthy riverfront restaurant in the appropriately named College Hill neighborhood, is Providence’s premier seafood spot. The menu at the posh raw bar varies seasonally, and includes such local hauls as oysters, cherrystones, littlenecks, crab and baby lobster. ▶ 121 S. Main St.; 401-351-8570; hemenwaysrestaurant. com AL FORNO Al Forno has been at the forefront of Providence’s dining scene since 1980, when Rhode Island School of Design graduates Johanne Killeen and George Germon debuted their Italian-American

menu in a sprawling, brick-walled building in Fox Point. The reputed birthplace of grilled pizza, a beloved local specialty, Al Forno serves thin crust pies large enough for two or three but delicious enough to share with absolutely no one. ▶ 577 S. Water St.; 401-273-9760; alforno.com CAFFE DOLCE VITA Caffe Dolce Vita, a casual dining room run by Italian ex-pat and Providence bon vivant Gianfranco Marrocco, is one of the few places in the city that regularly serves stuffies, a coastal Rhode Island specialty made with spiced, stuffed and baked quahogs. ▶ 59 DePasquale Plaza; 401-331-8240; caffedolcevita.com NORTH Cool kids of all ages convene at North, a hip boite in Federal Hill serving a globetrotting, Asian-influenced

menu and stellar cocktails. The drinks, like the dishes, change seasonally. Helmed by James Mark, an alum of Providence’s Johnson & Wales University and previously of New York City’s Michelin-starred Momofuku Ko, North’s space is tiny, but stiff drinks and congenial staff make fast friends of those awaiting tables. ▶ 3 Luongo Memorial Square; 401-421-1100; foodbynorth.com LOS ANDES RESTAURANT The scene is always swinging at Los Andes Restaurant, an Elmhurst gem with a bustling bar, tented year-round garden and twinkling outdoor patio. Owned by a Lebanese-Bolivian family, Los Andes specializes in Bolivian and Peruvian fare, including ultra-fresh ceviche made with seasonal Rhode Island seafood. ▶ 903 Chalkstone Ave.; 401-649-4911; losandesri.com

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VERMONT

SABIN GRATZ; THINKSTOCK

CHEESE-TASTIC!

Travel Vermont for a taste of everyone’s favorite dairy delight

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By Nancy Monson

I

F YOUR MIND CONJURES up visions of dairy cows when you think of Vermont, it shouldn’t surprise you to learn that the state is fast becoming the Napa Valley of cheese. Vermont cheeses regularly win at international and national competitions, and span the gamut from artisanal cow, sheep and goat’s milk cheeses to mass-produced brands such as Cabot’s. The state is also home to Jasper Hill Farm, one of the premier aging cellars for cheese in the United States. “Vermont cheeses are different from the cheeses from other states,” says Tom Bivins, executive director of the Vermont Cheese Council. “Many of

the most-loved Vermont cheeses are unique, original recipes and styles that don’t fit into any category.” The countryside from top to bottom and east to west is dotted with more than 40 cheese-makers. Many sites are open for tours and tastings only in warmer months, but follow the Vermont Cheese Trail (vtcheese.com) for some standouts that you can visit now. CO N T I N U E D

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VERMONT

TAKE A SLICE Billings Farm & Museum This working dairy farm on the outskirts of the upscale New England town of Woodstock features a museum that highlights Vermont’s agricultural past. Don’t forget to sample Billings Farm Cheddar, made from the milk of Billings’ prize-winning Jersey cows. The farm and museum are open daily through Oct. 31. ▶ 69 Old River Rd.; 802-457-2355; billingsfarm.org Grafton Village Cheese Co. Grafton Cheese has production facilities in Brattleboro and Grafton. While both have viewing areas to watch cheesemaking during the week, you can purchase cheese on site at the Brattleboro Specialty Cheese & Wine Shop, and if you're lucky,

you might even snag the chance to meet a cheesemaker (calls in advance are recommended). In the historic town of Grafton, head less than a mile from the production facility to MKT: Grafton, a quaint general store that sells Grafton Village cheese. Try Grafton's cave-aged Shepsog, made with sheep and cow’s milk; Bear Hill, an alpine-style sheep’s milk cheese; or Truffle Cheddar, a mix of Italian truffle, salt, olive oil and raw milk. ▶ 800-472-3866; graftonvillagecheese.com Boston Post Dairy This family-run farm is located in Enosburg Falls, close to the Canadian border. Viewing windows in the cheese-making facility allow you to see how award-winning goat and cow cheeses, such as

WINE, CIDER AND BEER PAIRINGS Cheese goes well with wine, we all know that — and conveniently, there’s a Vermont Wine Trail if you’re interested (vermontwine. com). But cheese can also complement beer and cider. The key is to balance the flavors so they don’t overwhelm one another. Pairings to try, featuring Vermont-made drinks:

Eleven Brothers and Trés Bonne, are made. ▶ 2061 Sampsonville Rd.; 802-933-2749; bostonpostdairy.com Cabot Creamery Cooperative You’ve probably seen Cabot cheeses in your local supermarket, but the co-op also makes the fine artisanal cheese Cabot Clothbound Cheddar, a delectable, rich-tasting aged cheddar with a crumbly texture and a nutty aroma. Cabot is a cooperative of 1,200 dairy farms and has stores in Waterbury and Quechee, but the main site is in Cabot. There, you can tour the factory and watch the cheese-making process, as well as sample cheddars. ▶ 2878 Main St.; 800-837-4261; cabotcheese.coop

BOSTON POST DAIRY

VERMO ONT CABOT CREAMERY COOPERATIVE

BILLINGS FARM & MUSEUM

GRAFTON VILLAGE CHEESE CO. BRATTLEBORO SPECIALTY CHEESE & WINE SHOP

CHEESE

DRINK

Shelburne Farms’ cow’s milk 2-Year Cheddar

A semi-dry white wine, such as Shelburne Vineyards’ 2014 La Crescent

Boston Post Dairy’s Trés Bonne semihard goat cheese

A hard apple cider, such as Shacksbury Arlo craft cider

Jasper Hill Farm’s Bayley Hazen Blue cow’s-milk blue cheese Spring Brook Farm’s Reading Raclette semi-soft cow’smilk cheese

A fruity red dessert wine, such as Boyden Valley Winery’s Cassis Black Currant or Vermont Ice Red, the first ice wine made in Vermont An India pale ale (IPA), such as Harpoon Brewery’s Harpoon IPA

THINKSTOCK; MAP: MIRANDA PELLICANO

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