Page 1

WHEN MILLENNIALS MOVE BACK HOME

BEST YEARS FALL/WINTER 2017

FABULOUS LIVING AT 50+

9

AMAZING

GIRLFRIEND GETAWAYS!

+

HEALTH & DIET FITNESS RETIREMENT

Fine being ‘myself’

CAREERS


for your skin’s natural protection

Same Great Absorbency. TRY and buy TENA products at CVS and www.CVS.com ®

SAVE $3

TENA® is a registered trademark of SCA Hygiene Products, AB. TENA Intimates is a trademark of SCA Hygiene Products, AB. ©2017 SCA Personal Care, Inc. Consumer: Limit one per purchase as specified. Coupon may not be bought, transferred, sold or reproduced. Any other use is fraudulent. Retailer: SCA PERSONAL CARE INC will reimburse you the face value of this coupon plus $0.08 handling if submitted in compliance with SCA PERSONAL CARE’s Coupon Redemption Policy (copies available upon request). Send coupons and requests to: SCA Personal Care 1266, NCH Marketing Services, P.O. Box 880001, El Paso, TX 88588-0001. Void where prohibited or restricted. Cash value 1/20 cent. Good only in the 50 United States. © SCA PERSONAL CARE INC 2017

on any ONE (1) TENA Intimates product ®

Manufacturer’s coupon

BUY TENA ONLINE at CVS.com/TENA ®

Use this coupon code at checkout; offer valid from 6/1/17 – 10/31/17

Expires: October 31, 2017

CVSTENA

Online offer is valid only on CVS.com. Online offer cannot be combined with CVS Ship & Save program. Limit one coupon per online order.


Nutrition Made Simple No artificial colors, flavors or sweeteners.

Simply 9 Ingredients & Why We Use Them 1 Filtered Water For hydration 2 Brown Rice Syrup Carbohydrates for energy 3 Milk Protein Concentrate High-quality protein for muscle health 4 Canola Oil Naturally rich in Omega-3 ALA 5 Cane Sugar Just the right sweetness 6 Vanilla Extract or Cocoa For flavor 7 Natural Flavor Delicious taste 8 Salt (Just a hint of salt) 9 Gellan Gum Helps keep everything mixed together +25 Vitamins & Minerals Helps you get the nutrients you need

ONLY 9 Ingredients + 25 Vitamins & Minerals Non-GMO† Ingredients †

SGS verified the Nestlé process for manufacturing this product with no GMO ingredients. sgs.com/no-gmo All trademarks are owned by Société des Produits Nestlé S.A., Vevey, Switzerland. © 2017 Nestlé.

10 g

Protein Available at:


DAVID ORECK WANTS YOU TO LIGHT A CANDLE AND RELAX. ODOR ELIMINATING CANDLES ESSENTIAL OIL AND SOY CANDLES EXOTIC SCENTED CANDLES AND MORE...

David Oreck knows clean. So you can relax knowing that David Oreck Candle Company’s candles and wax meltables are made from 100% natural soy and vegetable wax which burn cleaner and 35% longer than candles made with paraffin. America’s cleanest burning candles. Guaranteed!

Call o orr visit our website today for special offers and your FREE Gift with every order! order!

DAVID ORECK CANDLE COMPANY | WWW.PUREAIRCANDLES.COM | 1.800.464.1450

MADE WITH IN THE USA


LABEL HEAD | UP FRONT

BEST YEARS FALL/WINTER 2017

18

ROAD TRIP

Work out hard and rest easy at these spas

LAKE AUSTIN SPA RESORT

FEATURES

26

34

40

46

52 HEALTHY AGING

GO GLUTEN-FREE

The most colorful views from around the country

Get a little bit closer to singer Sheryl Crow

Coping when your adult children move back home

Learn more about the top killer of women

Live a long and happy life with this advice

A foodie with celiac disease suggests substitutes

FALL FOLIAGE

MUSICAL MAMA

FULL HOUSE

HEART DISEASE

56

3


FALL/WINTER 2017

UP FRONT FASHION Rings that make a statement

64

MEDITATION

Find a way to focus that fits your style

8 10 12 14 16

Season-to-season style

BEAUTY Age-appropriate skin care HEALTH

The 10 best vitamins and supplements

ENTERTAINMENT These new musical acts fit your old-school tastes

DEPARTMENT SELF-CARE Meditation for those who can’t sit still

64 70 74 78 80 82 84 86 88 90 96

How to start a journal Get cozy the Danish way with hygge

EXERCISE Exercise programs for any age (or shape)

GIVING

Hula hoops are back Turning charitable impulses into big projects

CAREERS + MONEY Excellent careers for after retirement

RINGS

These baubles have something to say

Understanding health savings accounts

SECOND ACT Great places to retire LAST WORD Discovering a mother’s poetry

ON THE COVER: SHERYL CROW

PHOTO BY: ANDREW NELLES/ THE TENNESSEAN

4

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017

All product prices and availability are subject to change.

GETTY IMAGES; PROVIDED BY TEMPLE ST. CLAIR

8

Take an accurate financial inventory


contributors PREMIUM PUBLICATION EDITORIAL

DIRECTOR Jeanette Barrett-Stokes jbstokes@usatoday.com CREATIVE DIRECTOR Jerald Council jcouncil@usatoday.com

BOB DOERSCHUK Winner of two ASCAP Deems Taylor Awards, Bob has written one book (88: The Giants of Jazz Piano), served as editor of two magazines (Musician and CMA Close Up) and written for USA TODAY, Rolling Stone and many other publications. When not interviewing folks like Paul McCartney, Billy Joel, Bonnie Raitt, Garth Brooks or Sheryl Crow (page 34), he plays solo piano gigs at various Nashville venues. @musiccityscribe

MICHELLE KHOURI A freelance writer focused on travel, arts, culture and society, Michelle hosts The Cultured Podcast, a show designed to inspire listeners with stories about theater, art, travel, design and global customs. Michelle, who offers tips about living the gluten-free life (page 56) is also a former public relations pro and magazine editor who coaches businesses on communication strategies. @michellekhouri

MANAGING EDITOR Michelle Washington mjwashington@usatoday.com ISSUE EDITOR Elizabeth Neus EDITORS Tracy Scott Forson Patricia Kime Sara Schwartz Debbie Williams ISSUE DESIGNER Gina Toole Saunders DESIGNERS Miranda Pellicano Lisa M. Zilka CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Karen Asp, Mary Helen Berg, Bob Doerschuk, Gina Harkins, Michelle Khouri, Cindy Kuzma, Nancy Monson, Adam Stone, Annette Thompson, Stacey Zable

ADVERTISING

VP, ADVERTISING Patrick Burke | (703) 854-5914 pburke@usatoday.com ACCOUNT DIRECTOR Justine Madden | (703) 854-5444 jmadden@usatoday.com

FINANCE

BILLING COORDINATOR Julie Marco

PROVIDED BY THE CONTRIBUTORS

This is a product of

NANCY MONSON A writer, health coach and fiber artist, Nancy is passionate about “creative wellness”— the link between creativity and the pursuit of health and happiness. Her work has appeared in more than 30 national publications, and she’s the author of Craft to Heal: Soothing Your Soul with Sewing, Painting, and Other Pastimes. In this issue, she writes about the value of journaling (page 70) and how to cope when adult children come home (page 40). nancymonson.com

STACEY ZABLE Lucky enough to marry her two passions of writing and travel, Stacey has held senior staff positions at top travel trade publications and has freelanced for many of the industry’s major consumer travel magazines and websites. Stacey has written about numerous destinations around the world. She takes you to the nation’s top fall foliage displays (page 26) and down memory lane via her mother’s writing (page 96). staceyzable.com

Without limiting the rights under copyright reserved herein, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in or reproduced in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form, or by means electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the written consent of USA TODAY. The editors and publisher are not responsible for any unsolicited materials.

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @USATODAYMAGS FACEBOOK Facebook.com/usatodaymags

PRINTED IN THE USA


www.duderanch.org • 866-399-2339 Contact us for that adventure of a lifeƟŵe.

EATON’S RANCH

Wolf, WY For over 137 years we have offered guests a western experience & shared with them a way of life. 7,000 acre dude & cattle ranch offering miles of horseback riding.

1-800-210-1049 www.eatonsranch.com

WHITE STALLION RANCH

THE HIDEOUT LODGE & GUEST RANCH

Shell, WY East of Cody & Yellowstone National Park is a perfect place for active outdoor baby boomers, their family, or friends. Intimate upscale working ranch.

VEE BAR GUEST RANCH

Laramie, WY Open year-round! All-inclusive summer packages are perfect for couples, families & reunions. Come for a ranch-style getaway Enjoy a tailor-made package to suit your needs!

1-800-354-8637 www.thehideout.com

1-800-483-3227 www.veebar.com

BAR W GUEST RANCH

CHEROKEE PARK

Tucson, AZ Enjoy exceptional hospitality and family traditions, while you relax and reconnect with nature, family, friends and serenity. Rated #1 on TripAdvisor in Tucson for 6 years.

WhiteÀsh, MT Experience relaxing Montana hospitality in the heart of Glacier Country. Enjoy exceptional horseback riding and outdoor activities for all ages.

Livermore, CO Voted America’s #1 Dude Ranch in 2017. You’re only as old as you feel so come feel young and refreshed at our authentic western ranch.

1-888-977-2624 www.whitestallion.com

1-866-828-2900 www.thebarw.com

1-970-493-6522 www.cherokeeparkranch.com

ELK MOUNTAIN RANCH

Buena Vista, CO Located in the heart of the Colorado Rockies with off-thebeaten path charm. Unique for its spectacular location, horseback rides of unmatched beauty & a superb menu.

1-800-432-8812 www.elkmtn.com

LATIGO RANCH

Kremmling, CO Latigo is secluded & scenic. Enjoy unforgettable views, highly-acclaimed meals, caring staff & spectacular riding. The Best of Colorado picked Latigo as their best dude ranch in Colorado.

1-800-227-9655

www.latigotrails.com


| BEST YEARS

up Front F A S H I O N 8 | B E A U T Y 12 | H E A L T H 14 | E N T E R T A I N M E N T 16

BEAUTIFUL JOURNEY

GETTY IMAGES

Autumn arrives in a blaze of glory. Take inspiration from the energetic colors and rise to your next occasion in style and good health. Best Years is here to help you along the way.


UP FRONT | FASHION

1

Big, Bold Statements

6

2

Eye-catching dazzle for your digits BY ELIZABETH NEUS

3 5

4

Sunrise ring via Rent the Runway, $10 rental, $78 retail, renttherunway. com

8

2 Sarah Magid

mixed metal ring stack via Rent the Runway, $15 rental, $128 retail, renttherunway. com

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017

3 Luxe cocktail

ring features emerald surrounded by .024-carat diamonds in 14-karat yellow gold. $1,640, annesisteron. com

4 Athena owl ring

makes a real statement with sapphire, emerald, blue moonstone, tourmaline and diamonds. $37,000, templestclair. com

5 Quartz ring is

made of raw crystal that accents a thick, 14-karat goldplated band. $32, bauble bar.com

6 Make Magic

rabbit ring by Kate Spade New York Accessories via Rent the Runway, $15 rental, $98 retail, renttherunway. com

PROVIDED BY THE COMPANIES

1 Marchesa Jewelry


Behind-the-ropes coverage, no matter where you are. Our readers are a different breed of golfer who deserve a unique brand of content – whenever and wherever they want. Now, with the new Golfweek.com, they’ll receive a more robust monthly print magazine, weekly digital editions, e-newsletters, podcasts, and exclusive access to special events. And with comprehensive daily coverage, our fans are never far from the green. Subscribe now and receive $25 towards your next tee-time at teeoff.com.

golfweek.com/subscribe


UP FRONT | FASHION

THINKING AHEAD Layers, neutral colors and heavier textures can take you from summer to fall.

PIECE IT TOGETHER

Clothing that takes you through that awkward seasonal transition BY ELIZABETH NEUS

T

he days are coming when you’ll be freezing in the morning and extremely warm by afternoon — and that’s just outdoors, not even in your overly air-conditioned office. Navigating the fashion curve from summer to fall takes some thought, and we’ve enlisted top fashion experts to help you along the path.

1

If you start with colors that mix and match easily — navy, taupe, gray or black, for example — then changing just a few details can take you from summer to fall. Shelby Goldfaden, a senior associate in MM.LaFleur’s product insight department, suggests sheer or lightweight tights over bare legs, and replacing sandals with pumps. And here’s a surprise: “Suede shoes are now year-round. You wear them in the summer and transition to winter,” she says. “In shopping for shoes, I’ve seen that (many) are suede mules. It’s very interesting.” Pair a transitional dress with a cardigan — or an item that MM.LaFleur calls a “jardigan,” a jacket soft as a sweater but with the sharp cut of a blazer.

1

Nisa dress $195, mmlafleur.com

10

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017

PROVIDED BY MM.LAFLEUR

Hot + Cool Fashion


ADD MORE COLOR

3 2

ADAPT FOR THE SEASON

PROVIDED BY THE COMPANIES

Add more material to your wardrobe, whether that means actual sleeves or a thicker sweater. “Knits can be the perfect layer to add over more summery camis and slip dresses when temperatures cool,” says Kate Dimmock of Amazon Fashion. Late summer is also the perfect time to rotate boots into your shoe collection, she says. “Dip your toes in with ankle boots and then work your way up ... to a pair of midcalf boots.” Or try a long dress. “A midi dress in a vibrant print is a great way to make a bold statement without showing a whole lot of skin,” Dimmock says.

2

Suede boots $129.99, hm.com

3

Morandi 2.0 sweater $265, mmlafleur.com

“Switching to deep, more saturated colors, prints and patterns look forward to fall without being heavy,” says designer Trina Turk, who suggests olive, plum, russet or indigo. “Deep, rich color looks great in sheer fabrications, those with a slight sheen or crisp cottons.” If you’re in a place where suits are still required, wear tropicalweight wool, which isn’t as hot as synthetic material, she says. Pair them with tops in georgette/ cotton shirting or a finegauge knit. As fall sets in, she suggests “moody” florals, polka dots, menswear-inspired plaids or velvet.

4

5

4

Ella Moss Jordyn dress $49.50, amazon.com

5

Lutton pants $248, trinaturk.com

11


UP FRONT | BEAUTY

Secret Weapons Six products that repair, revitalize your skin BY SARA SCHWARTZ

1

The lightweight Avalanche Anti-Aging Peptide Lotion is loaded with age-defying complexes and vitamins A and E to help boost collagen production. $105, freeze247.com

6

La Roche-Posay’s Pigmentclar Eyes helps reduce the look of blue and brown circles, while reflective pigments and caffeine brighten the delicate under-eye area. $42.99,

2

Dermalogica’s Nightly Lip Treatment firms and softens oftenoverlooked lips — all while you’re getting your zzz’s. $49, dermalogica.com

laroche-posay.us

5

keprea.com

12

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017

3

4

The cream-gel texture of Vichy’s Neovadiol Night Compensating Complex works with most skin types to moisturize while tightening skin. $55, vichyusa.com

The lightly textured La Roche-Posay’s Pigmentclar Serum can be used daily to reduce the appearance of dark spots and even tone; it also micro-exfoliates to gently smooth the skin’s surface. $52.99, laroche-posay.us

PROVIDED BY THE COMPANIES

Keprea’s Multi-Active Concentrate Serum contains Boswellia frereana, a species of frankincense found to help diminish fine lines and wrinkles while improving the skin’s radiance and texture. $109.95,


UP FRONT | HEALTH

Give Your Diet a Boost The top 10 supplements you need now BY MARY HELEN BERG

D

ietary supplements can’t replace a healthy diet and lifestyle, but as we age, we may need a little boost to stay in top shape. The bodies of older women don’t absorb or process vitamins and minerals the way they did when they were younger, and require more of some micronutrients to run smoothly, says Alexander Michels, clinical research coordinator for Oregon State University’s Linus Pauling Institute, where scientists study the role of vitamins, minerals and plant chemicals. Supplements can help prevent deficiencies and improve your health. Here are the best to try:

14

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017


CALCIUM

VITAMIN B12

GRAPESEED EXTRACT

Women 50 and older need 1,200 milligrams a day. It: uStrengthens bones uPrevents osteoporosis and fractures uMay prevent heart attacks, strokes and certain types of cancer

“If I have to pick just one vitamin that we need as we age,” B12 is the one, Born says. Older adults have difficulty absorbing B12 from food. It: uPromotes healthy nerves and blood cells uCan help prevent fatigue, weakness, anemia and depression uToo little can cause dementia, confusion and memory problems

Found in grape skins and seeds — byproducts of winemaking — the extract is available in capsule, tablet and liquid form. It: uMay prevent cancer uPromotes healthy cardiovascular system uReduces swelling uLowers blood pressure

VITAMIN D Our bodies make less vitamin D as we age, says Michels. It: uHelps us absorb calcium uMay help prevent cancer, diabetes, immune system conditions and osteoarthritis

MAGNESIUM This multitasking mineral is one of the most important, says Dr. Todd Born, a naturopathic doctor and certified nutrition specialist in Alameda, Calif. It: uHelps control muscle and nerve function uRegulates blood sugar and pressure uPromotes bone growth uIs an essential part of protein and DNA synthesis

OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS

Found in red wine, red grape skins, mulberries, blueberries and peanuts, this substance has been found to prolong life in non-human primates, fish, flies, mice and worms. In humans, it combats: uHeart disease and diabetes uAlzheimer’s disease

TURMERIC “One of my favorite botanicals,” says Born. “It seems as if there isn’t anything that Curcuma longa can’t do.” One 2017 study questions turmeric’s promise as a cure-all, but others show the super-spice, the main flavoring for curry, has the potential for treating: uHigh blood pressure uRheumatoid arthritis uCancer uDiabetes uLupus and arthritis uAlzheimer’s disease

With age, your level of this naturally occuring antioxidant, also known as CoQ10, drops. Studies show it may prevent or treat: uCardiovascular disease uChronic kidney disease

MULTIVITAMINS A new study will test whether multivitamins — and cocoa extracts — prevent cancer and cardiovascular disease in women. Multivitamins: uReduce cancer rates by 8 percent in men, according to a 2012 study of more than 14,000 men age 50 or older uMay prevent dementia and stimulate brain function

Not all supplements are “ready for prime time,” advises Dr. JoAnn Manson, chief of preventive medicine at Harvard Universityaffiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Consult your doctor before adding supplements. Some have side effects or can interfere with medications.

Magnesium, calcium and iron are found in spinach.

Vitamins B6 and C, plus calcium and potassium, are found in kale.

GETTY IMAGES

These are the most widely used natural supplement in the U.S., according to the National Institutes of Health. They: uMay help prevent, treat or lower the risk of heart disease, stroke, breast cancer, arthritis pain and stiffness, diabetes, Alzheimer’s and dementia

RESVERATROL

COENZYME Q10

3


UP FRONT | ENTERTAINMENT

Listen Up Finding new music is an ageless pastime BY SARA SCHWARTZ AND ELIZABETH NEUS

DISCO

In the 19 70s, the b Summe r, anyon ig-voiced diva — e? — wa star for a Donna s the sta faceless r, not a g produce uest r.

COUNTRY

Kenny Rogers and Dolly Parton crossed over to general popularity, but never lost their country roots.

filled, hooke h t d en love If you nd style-driv n and a a r u h t D n sy uran D f pop o it s r 0s B song ’8 ly r a e other . .. bands

SECOND BRITISH INVASION

16

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017

... then c heck ou melodie t the sed s of The uctive 1975 or rhythms the dance of Hot C hip.

sty and is’ hone -boy rr o M n Mare od-old p ated-go the upd uke Bryan kee L f o s g son adition. up the tr

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: THE ASSOCIATED PRESS (2); ANDREW NELLES/USA TODAY NETWORK; JOHN PHILLIPS/GETTY IMAGES; FIN COSTELLO/REDFERNS/GETTY IMAGES

I

t’s easy to get in a rut with music. You like what you like, after all, and if you’re past your early 30s, you’re not likely to change — at least according to a study based on Spotify listening habits. Prove the research wrong and expand your horizons.


ALBUM ROCK

FM radio in the 1970 s roared with the blazing vocals and screaming solos of Led Zeppelin and their brethren.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: BRAD BARKET/GETTY IMAGES; RON RAFFAELLI; ASTRID STAWIARZ/GETTY IMAGES; CINDY ORD/GETTY IMAGES; THE ASSOCIATED PRESS; KEVIN WINTER/GETTY IMAGES; ANTHONY BARBOZA/GETTY IMAGES

at ith-a-be belters-w sza and ie Today’s lK powerfu ing. include tler Ellie Gould n the ge

rn Mode ns io s r e v e the d lu inc -led female ah e Y h a Ye and Yeahs ary G y s e blu r. J k Clar

SINGERSONGWRITERS

Ingri d Mich aelso and K n Edwa athleen rds n carry ow o intell n the igent song w tradi riting tion.

ke omen li Smart w hell set c Joni Mit rd for da the stan ers. storytell musical

If you hung on every rhyme and mix by Grandmaster Flash & The Furious Five or Kurtis Blow ...

HIPHOP

... try the confid ent verses of Jo ey Bada$$ or the message-orient ed beats of Chance the Rapper. 17


WORK. REWARD. REPEAT. These activity-based spa resorts give you a leg up on fitness BY ANNETTE THOMPSON

heck into a retreat to jump-start a wellness program or elevate your fitness level to a new degree on a specialized exercise circuit. After the sweatinduced euphoria, let your body rest with a swoon-worthy spa treatment. When you’ve settled down and unpacked that suitcase full of guilt, treat yourself to one of these rewards. After working and playing hard, you’ll return home feeling better overall, and

PHOTO CREDIT

healthier too.


THE OMNI GROVE PARK INN Asheville, N.C. omnihotels.com/hotels/ asheville-grove-park/spa The spectacular grotto pool at the Grove Park Inn entices you with massaging waterfalls and mineral baths. In the evenings, a drink on the terrace delivers the best sunset view in town. And the biggest bonus of a fall spa trip to Asheville is the view of the mountains’ autumnal coat of golds, oranges and reds. The Inn makes a fine home base to explore this gateway to the Appalachians.

THE CIRCUIT: Go for a long mountain run on the property’s hiking trails. If you’ve got game, play some tennis on the indoor or outdoor courts. Or flex your muscles with a session of myofascial release (to ease muscle tightness) and yoga. Schedule whitewater rafting with the Nantahala Outdoor Center, which maintains an outfitter on-site.

PHOTO CREDIT THE OMNI GROVE PARK INN

THE SPA: Detox with a salt-stone massage, then spend an afternoon in one of 20 pools around the Grove Park’s grotto. You can also head into town to Wake Foot Sanctuary, which invites you to an invigorating foot soak and massage, as does Still Point Wellness, which also lets you float in a saltwater sensory-deprivation tank. THE REWARD: Asheville Wellness Tours will guide you to a local honey bar and other health-minded shops via foot. At the Asheville Salt Cave, you can sink into a “zero-gravity” chair and rebalance your body’s chemicals. Alchemy is an alternative tearoom that includes acupuncture, massage and Chinese medicine on its menu. Or head to one of the galleries in the River Arts District, the Folk Art Center on the Blue Ridge Parkway or the Blue Spiral 1 gallery and fill your luggage with one-of-a-kind art. >

19


Paddle through peaceful Florida waters and enjoy the sunshine.

HAWKS CAY RESORT Duck Key, Fla. hawkscay.com

THE CIRCUIT: Before you head out each day, take in a 7:30 a.m. boot camp class to pump up your muscles for a day on the water. This is the ideal place to work on your stand-up paddleboard chops. For a challenge, sign up for kitesurfing lessons; the flat water is ideal to learn to zip and jump through waves. THE SPA: After those workouts, schedule a Calm Waters Custom Massage that blends Swedish and deep tissue techniques with a hot stone massage. If you get a sunburn having all that fun, the spa’s skin rescue treatment uses chilled stones to apply a cooling gel concocted from coconut oil, passionflower extract and cold-pressed dilo nut oil. THE REWARD: Keep it simple. Order a Skinny Cucumber Lemonade shaker at the Beach Grill and hang out in the Tranquility Pool. When hunger strikes, head to the Angler and Ale and dive into the Island Tuna Crudo, the ceviche of the day or the Treasure Coast Salad. If you’ve just got to see more of the Keys, tootle down the Overseas Highway in a convertible to feel the ocean breezes in your hair.

20

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017

HAWKS CAY RESORT; STEWART COHEN (2); LAKE AUSTIN SPA RESORT

This little spit of land halfway between Miami and Key West delivers fall color the Florida way — with tropical blue waters teeming with neon-colored fish. The spa entices you indoors, but the opportunity to spend a day riding a WaveRunner, fishing for trophies or snorkeling in the aquamarine sea just might win out.


LAKE AUSTIN SPA RESORT Austin, Texas lakeaustin.com This spa believes water is healing and restorative, so most of your time will be spent on and in the water. The moment you arrive in the Texas capital, Lake Austin Spa picks you up and takes you on a 30-minute cruise to the resort in its water taxi. The lushly landscaped property houses guests in low-slung casitas (little cottages) with lake views; you eat all your meals onsite and choose from more than 100 classes and treatments catered to your specific goals.

TERRY VINE PHOTOGRAPHY (2); LAKE AUSTIN SPA RESORT

THE CIRCUIT: Warm fall days mean you can get on the lake and not bake. Choose from water-based boot camp sessions with kayaks, pedalboards or hydrobikes, as well as aqua-fit classes, where balance and strength come into play while you exercise on a sturdy floating mat aboard a paddleboard. THE SPA: Your therapist will meet you in the shallow waters of the Pool Barn for an AquaStretch massage-assisted stretching session. Or simply add assisted stretching to any deep, full-body table massage. Not only will it enhance athletic performance, but stretching, combined with massage, can help lengthen and heal muscles. Space for relaxing chats, a beautiful spa, delicious meals and time on the lake — these activities and more will fill your time at the Lake Austin Spa Resort.

THE REWARD: Start with a cooking class — learn to make ravioli or paella from scratch — and then book a private wine cruise for sundown. Another option: Skip back into town for indie music shows and Tex-Mex flavors along South Congress Avenue. >

21


RED MOUNTAIN RESORT Set into the red rock wilderness of southern Utah, Red Mountain fills your days with fitness classes and challenges, spa treatments and explorations to Zion and Bryce Canyon national parks, as well as nearby Snow Canyon State Park. During the early fall months, daily temperatures can heat up into the low 80s or 90s, with cool refreshing nights. Bring your swimsuit and a jacket, and be prepared for a nighttime star show.

THE CIRCUIT: Pedal a bike through the desert at Kayenta on a gentle 6-mile uphill journey, with a stop at a pottery-filled coffeehouse en route to the Desert Rose Labyrinth and Sculpture Garden. The next day, join a wet hike into Zion National Park. You’ll wade through the Virgin River as 1,000-foot walls, with fluted landforms that look like zebra stripes, narrow into a spectacular canyon. THE SPA: Because you’re in the desert, seek treatments that make use of its indigenous elements. The Adobe Lavender Hydrating Cocoon begins with a gentle exfoliation; your skin is then swathed with local red clay, full of healing minerals that energize tired joints and muscles. The clay is said to speed the healing of bruises while the lavender hydrates. THE REWARD: Bring along a camera as you kayak at sunset on a local lake for Instagram-worthy shots. Or sign up for an intuitive energy reading to create mental and emotional balance. You can even indulge in hypnotic imagery sessions to help change lifestyle behaviors. l

22

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017

Make sure to bring your camera. The views are amazing!

Warm days and cool nights provide a comfortable setting for outdoor activities at the Red Mountain Resort.

AL PAYNE; RED MOUNTAIN RESORT; DAVID PETTIT: ILLUSTRATION; GETTY IMAGES

St. George, Utah redmountainresort.com


Whether you’re looking to live it up or slow it down, life in Louisiana allows you to set your own pace. Discover the advantages of retiring Louisiana style. Š2016 Louisiana Department of Culture, Recreation & Tourism


GOING SOLO It’s OK for women to travel alone

PHOTO CREDIT

BY KAREN ASP

24

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017


GETTY IMAGES

TIPS

ou’ve got the time and money to travel, but your friends and family may not. Or maybe, you just want to go it alone. Turns out, more and more women, for a variety of reasons, are interested in traveling on their own. Janice Waugh, who runs the Solo Traveler website (solotravelerworld.com), has seen a steady uptick in her subscriber base, which is 75 percent women. She thinks it’s because traveling alone has become more socially acceptable. “It’s moved from being a little strange to relatively mainstream,” she says. So what’s the appeal? For starters, you may discover who you really are. “Women are often defined by who’s around them, which can keep (their personalities) constrained,” Waugh says. Plus, whether you have a partner at home or not, when you’re traveling on your own, you have the freedom to do what you want. Solo travel can even be a time of renewal, especially if family and career demands have left you feeling bogged down. You may also be thrust into situations — getting lost in an unfamiliar city, missing a connection with a friend — where you’re forced to overcome obstacles, such as not speaking the language or not having a phone that works in that country. Without a support system, and getting through these trials on your own, can build character. “You come home a stronger, more confident woman,” says Beth Whitman, founder of WanderlustAndLipstick.com and WanderTours, which leads womenonly tours. Stepping out of your comfort zone can be challenging, which is why you should first evaluate your past travel experiences. “If you haven’t traveled much, take it easy and stay within your own culture,” Waugh says. Also, choose a short trip, perhaps four to five days, just to get the feel for traveling. You don’t have to be totally alone; there are tour operators who run trips for solo travelers, including those specifically for women. “That might sound counterintuitive to your intentions, but because you’re leaving behind everybody who defines you, it still counts as solo travel,” Waugh says. The bonus? You might connect with like-minded souls, which could be particularly helpful if you’ve recently gone through a life-changing event such as a divorce or death of a spouse. Follow commonsense rules to stay safe when you do travel. Waugh’s top one? Stay in public places when hanging out with people you’ve just met. If you are concerned about your safety, engage with others. Be rude if necessary. “Women are taught not to be rude, but if somebody’s hassling you, make noise and people will notice,” Waugh says. Also, remember to pack light so you’re not loaded down with items, which makes you a target for thieves, Whitman says. In addition, she always packs a rubber doorstop and places it under her hotel or cruise ship door to keep it from opening easily. Many doors open inward, after all, and in some countries, doors don’t have deadbolts. That can make it easier for somebody to break in, especially when you’re showering or sleeping. Most important, don’t let others talk you out of going it alone. “Ignore the news about how unsafe the world is, because it’s safer than you think,” Whitman says. “Once you start exploring, you realize that, and you get hooked on going alone.”

Here’s how to make your solo venture a successful one:

Step out of your comfort zone

Choose a short trip your first time

Research tour operators who run trips for solo travelers

Always stay in public places when hanging out with new people

Pack light so you’re not loaded down

Don’t let the fears of others discourage you


NORTHEAST ROUTE 100

Travel Vermont from end to end for mind-bending colors.

26

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017


LEAF it all BEHIND THESE TOP ROAD TRIPS FEATURE FALL IN FULL BLOOM BY STACEY ZABLE

THE VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF TOURISM AND MARKETING

The vibrant colors of the season will soon appear across the U.S. as trees start to burst into reds, yellows and oranges. These five routes from across the country provide you with amazing scenic drives that let you make the most of your leaf peeping. Note: Timing for peak colors can vary year to year based on weather conditions. >

27


LEAF IT ALL BEHIND

NORTHEAST ROUTE 100, VERMONT

THE DRIVE: Scenic Route 100 runs nearly all the way through the state, starting along the eastern edge of the Green Mountains in southcentral Vermont and ending near the Canadian border. An ideal route begins in Wilmington, less than 20 miles from the southern border. Drive north to Ludlow (home of Okemo Mountain Resort, okemo.com), then Waitsfield in the Mad River Valley, on through Stowe with the finish line in Jeffersonville. The drive not only features brilliant colors, but also rolling hills, rivers, lakes and ponds, mountain and valley scenic views, forests and charming Vermont towns.

252 MILES

Fall colors are grand in the Appalachians.

SOUTHEAST BLUE RIDGE PARKWAY, NORTH CAROLINA

FOOD STOP: The Trapp Family

BEST VANTAGE POINT: A 3.5-mile stretch through Stowe’s Smugglers’ Notch State Park (vtstateparks.com/ smugglers.html) starts at the Barnes Camp Visitor Center and takes you through a steep and winding pass, providing drivers with top-notch views of autumn’s beauty.

PEAK COLORS TIME FRAME: SEPT.

OCT.

NOV.

Late September through early October

28

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017

THE DRIVE: The Blue Ridge Parkway (nps.gov/blri) cuts through 469 miles of Virginia and North Carolina. The 252-mile stretch within North Carolina starts at the far southwestern edge of the border between the two states and ends between the Cherokee Indian Reservation and Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Drivers are rewarded with views of the colorfilled mountains and landscapes of the Appalachian Highlands. FOOD STOP: The Chalet Restaurant in the Switzerland Inn (switzerlandinn. com) is open for breakfast, lunch and dinner in the quaint community of Little Switzerland at milepost 334. BEST VANTAGE POINT: Thunder Hill Overlook, located at milepost 290.4, north of Blowing Rock, provides a sweeping view of the fall colors.

PEAK COLORS TIME FRAME: SEPT.

OCT.

NOV.

During October, usually from the middle to the end of the month

TRAPP FAMILY LODGE; SKIP SICKLER/THE ASHEVILLE (N.C.) CITIZEN-TIMES

Lodge in Stowe (trappfamily.com) has four restaurants on its 2,500 acres, combining Austrian and Vermont favorites.


Sink your toes in the sands of the Gulf Coast Panama City Beach Resort 17001 Front Beach Road Panama City Beach, FL 32413

Opt for exclusive accommodations near Orlando entertainment Orange Lake Resort 8505 W Irlo Bronson Memorial Highway Kissimmee, FL 34747

More than a place to stay.

Make a splash with a Space Coast escape Cape Canaveral Beach Resort 1000 Shorewood Drive Cape Canaveral, FL 32920

A place to play!

17-MRP-0565

Be spontaneous and stay in sunny Florida on a quick vacation for less, with spacious villas and inviting amenities at your choice of Holiday Inn Club VacationsÂŽ resorts. Save up to 20% on your fun-filled Florida getaway! Call (866) 214-5045 and mention code IDCVR holidayinnclubvacations.com

Switch to island time and relax in luxury Sunset Cove Resort 571 W Elkcam Circle Marco Island, FL 34145


LEAF IT ALL BEHIND

MIDWEST M-22, MICHIGAN

THE DRIVE: The 116-mile M-22, from Manistee to the Leelanau Peninsula, is a scenic highway that parallels Lake Michigan in the northwestern Lower Peninsula. It winds through the lakeshore counties of Manistee, Benzie and Leelanau, and past the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore.

FOOD STOP: Family-friendly Dinghy’s Restaurant & Bar in downtown Frankfort (dinghysrestaurant.com) has been serving comfort food for 20 years. Try one of the six meats cooked on the restaurant’s own smoker using local hardwoods.

BEST VANTAGE POINT: In north Manistee County, you’ll find the Arcadia Overlook, also known as “Inspiration Point.” Drive the 370 feet up to the Overlook parking area, and head up the 120 steps (80 vertical feet) to the top of the lookout for a magnificent vista.

PEAK COLORS TIME FRAME: SEPT.

OCT.

NOV.

DO WALK

Michigan’s fall foliage inspires hikers to take a stroll. Leaf peepers along the M-22 get bonus views of Lake Michigan.

30

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017

JOEY B. LAX-SALINAS; KRISTEN INGLOT

The first half of October


tupelo.net

Remember that time we started a new tradition?

your adventure

awaits

A source of hospitality for generations of families and vacationers, Hardeeville is proud to be the gateway to the Lowcountry and the connection to the islands. No matter what you’ll be doing on your next Lowcountry adventure, you’ll want to stay in the center of the action. A place that’s within 30 minutes of Savannah, Hilton Head Island, Bluffton, and Beaufort. A place that has unique discoveries and treasures of its own. We are Historic Hardeeville and New River. We are southern charm. We are Hardeeville, South Carolina. Where your adventure awaits.

cityofhardeeville.com

Make your perfect vacation memories in Mexico Beach, Florida. F L O R I D A

The Unforgettable Coast

Discover more at MexicoBeach.com ®


LEAF IT ALL BEHIND

DETOUR

PA C I F I C

CASTLE CREEK ROAD, ASPEN, COLORADO

COLUMBIA RIVER HIGHWAY, OREGON

THE DRIVE: The 13-mile Castle Creek Road begins one

THE DRIVE: America’s first scenic highway and

mile south of Aspen and comes to a dead end for cars 2 miles after you pass Ashcroft. Though a relatively short route to drive, there are numerous photo opportunities and places to hike. The road is also a popular cycling route for those who enjoy viewing the stunning Aspen groves from the seats of their bikes.

a National Historic Landmark, the 101-year-old Columbia River Highway traverses approximately 70 miles from Troutdale, just east of Portland, to The Dalles. Here, the views include the Columbia River and Columbia Gorge, filled with colorful fir forests, pines, big-leaf and vine maples, cottonwood and Oregon ash.

FOOD STOP: It’s difficult to say which is better — the setting or the food — at Pine Creek Cookhouse (pinecreekcookhouse.com), a restaurant in a log cabin located at the base of the Elk Mountains. It serves “alpine gourmet food, featuring wild game and fresh fish.”

FOOD STOP: Multnomah Falls Lodge (multnomahfallslodge.com) offers upscale Northwest cuisine with a view of the magnificent Multnomah Falls, with a height of more than 600 feet. BEST VANTAGE POINT: Crown Point, standing 733

BEST VANTAGE POINT: The historic mining ghost town of Ashcroft is the best spot to see peak foliage. It is located at the base of the Elk Mountain Range, surrounded by mountains and the Aspen tree groves.

feet above the river, is a drive-up lookout point that offers beautiful views of the Columbia River Gorge, the river itself and the red, orange and yellow leaves that dominate the region in the fall.

PEAK COLORS TIME FRAME:

PEAK COLORS TIME FRAME:

SEPT.

OCT.

NOV.

Typically the third or fourth weeks of September, lasting approximately two weeks

32

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017

SEPT.

OCT.

NOV.

Mid-September to mid-October

JEREMY SWANSON; SUMIO KOIZUMI/COURTESY OF TRAVEL OREGON

WEST

Oregon’s amazing waterfalls are worth a stop.


A

connected world of comfort, convenience, friendship and fun awaits at Shenandoah

haven for relaxation or recreation every day. Our Lifecare program provides a full continuum of care, all under one roof. We are celebrating our 30th year, and invite you for a “staycation” to meet some residents, tour the campus, and try us on for size. Shenandoah Valley Westminster-Canterbury 300 Westminster-Canterbury Drive Winchester, VA 22603 www.svwc.org | 800.492.9463

Retirement, The Way It Should Be.

To learn more about our vibrant and welcoming community, please call Henry at 800-729-8033. • World-class concerts, golf courses & festivals • International Civil Rights Center & Museum • Revolutionary War landmarks & battlefields • Tons of activities & events for kids & adults • Animal Discovery Zoo with new SciQuarium • More than 500 restaurants • International airport

VisitGreensboroNC.com

Retirement Community 25 Thornton Way, Brunswick, Maine 04011

800 -729-8033 www.ThorntonOaks.com


34

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017

MARK SELIGER; WARNER BROS. RECORDS


S

Being Herself EVERY DAY, SHERYL CROW GETS A LITTLE CLOSER TO FEELING FINE

heryl Crow has had enough. “Everything seems to be hatefilled,” she says, with resignation, regret and a little anger. “Sometimes it feels like not being able to detox from a really bad trip.” So what can a nine-time Grammy Award winner do about it? Make an album. But not just any album. Be Myself, released April 21 by Warner Bros. Records, crackles with Crow’s concerns about life in the here and now. To convey this message, the 55-year-old artist left the country-oriented path she explored four years ago on Feels Like Home. “The country market is a lot different than I thought it would be,” she concedes. “And country music has changed, too: It’s a lot less country and a lot more pop. This is not to slag country, but their songs now are totally sexist. The radio hardly ever plays women. “Granted, my early stuff sounded kind of raw, maybe a little more in the vein of country than it was in pop. But I’d fooled myself into thinking that my roots and my knowledge of country music were why I should be at country radio,” she says. “And I was wrong.” >

BY BOB DOERSCHUK

Be Myself, 2017

35


She reflects for a second and then affirms, “It’s just a bad system. I’m very happy to be out of it.” Clearly, it was time for a reality check, which for Crow meant pulling out and playing her earliest albums for the first time in years. “I was thirsting to get back to how I felt on my second record (Sheryl Crow, 1996), a kind of desperate liberation. That need to feel the innocence of being creative was crucial for me.” Those early days inspired and ignited a phenomenal career for Crow. Since her first explosive single, All I Wanna Do in 1994, she would earn nine Grammys (and 31 nominations) and break the platinum barrier, signifying more than 1 million copies sold, four times. In all, she’s sold 35 million copies of her albums. Her personal life has been just as busy. She has battled health issues, including breast cancer and a brain tumor that proved benign. Charitable work has been a constant, for organizations such as the United Nations’ World Food Programme, Stand Up To Cancer, City Of Hope, the Elton John AIDS

And country music has changed, too: It’s a lot less country and a lot more pop.” SHERYL CROW

Crow and musician Paul Beaubrun play at the Nashville Shines for Haiti concert in 2016.

36

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017

RICK DIAMOND/GETTY IMAGES; KEVIN KANE/WIREIMAGE

Being Herself


Foundation and MusiCares. Her political activities have included outspoken support for Barack Obama’s presidential campaigns and an insistence on touring aboard a bus powered by biodiesel fuel. Over the years, she also found time for relationships with Lance Armstrong, Ryan Seacrest, Owen Wilson and other famous men. That’s enough razzle-dazzle to squeeze the innocence out of anyone. So, working with Jeff Trott and Tchad Blake, two key collaborators on her first releases, she crafted raw, rocky songs that address learning from the passage of time (Long Way Back), consider the benefits of shutting off your cellphone now and then (Roller Skate) and sound a few political alarms (Heartbeat Away). The exhilaration Crow felt during these sessions is implicit in Be Myself. “There’s something really fantastic about being my age,” she says. “I don’t worry about repeating myself or wanting to be a better producer, a better songwriter, a better this or that. On this record, I was like, screw that. Let’s just close the door and not worry about who hears this. “I know I’m not writing for 20-year-olds,” she adds. “I made this record for adults. I don’t worry about getting it on the radio. My first record (Tuesday Night Music Club, >

Crow performs at the 31st annual Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame induction ceremony in Brooklyn in 2016.

37


1993) was so huge that even though I wasn’t writing for the radio, there was this big weight for the second album of, ‘OK, maybe radio could play this, too!’ It was kind of like a curse.” On the other hand, she reflects, “In the old days, you’d sleep during the day and write and record furiously all night because there was something altruistic about making music that could save the world. But I’m feeling a little disillusioned about how much music can really matter these days. Now Jeff and I are just a couple of old dudes in the studio.” Of course it’s hard to keep all-nighter hours when you have two sons to raise. For Be Myself, Crow and her team worked while her sons Wyatt, 10, and Levi, 7, were at school. Once the boys came home, she switched to family mode, which includes acting on some of the themes addressed in her lyrics. As a result, Be Myself marks a crossroads of sorts for Crow. That skepticism about changing the world through song, coupled with the realities of raising two kids, means that her passions to create and to make a difference are still there, though their focus may be more personal. Take, for example, Woo Woo, whose lyrics express the frustrations of sheltering your children and yourself from the toxicities of a reality-show-obsessed world. “It’s basically about how in the past few years, we’ve started using technology to advertise our physical endowments,” she notes. “Branding has taken over artistry. People are uploading pictures of their posteriors onto Twitter and Facebook. What kind of message does that send to kids? It’s a funny, tongue-in-cheek song, but it makes the point that all of these young women in my line of work who profess to be role models are probably doing less than they should for female images. “I don’t like (my sons) turning on pop radio and hearing songs about sex — and that’s all that’s on there, 18-year-olds singing about ‘the taste of you.’ If everything is about branding and we’re branding sex as power, what does that say to little girls and little boys? What does that say about beauty?” She sighs and smiles. “I guess I’m a dinosaur. But I like it.” l

Crow and her sons, Wyatt and Levi, enjoy time at Disney California Adventure Park in 2012; she poses for a portrait in Nashville in 2017.

38

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017

If ... we’re branding sex as power, what does that say to little girls and boys?” SHERYL CROW

PAUL HIFFMEYER/DISNEYLAND RESORT; MARK HUMPHREY/THE ALBUMS TK; OPPOSITE ASSOCIATED PAGE:PRESS; RICK DIAMOND/GETTY GETTY IMAGES IMAGES (2); D DIPASUPAL/FILMMAGIC; PAUL HIFFMAYER/DISNEYLAND RESORT

Being Herself


DISCOGRAPHY & AWARDS

TUESDAY NIGHT MUSIC CLUB 1993 Three Grammys ✪ Record of the Year ✪ Best New Artist ✪ Best Female Pop Vocal Performance SHERYL CROW 1996 Two Grammys ✪ Best Rock Album ✪ Best Female Rock Vocal Performance THE GLOBE SESSIONS 1998 Three Grammys ✪ Best Rock Album ✪ Best Female Rock Vocal Performance, 1999 and 2000 C’MON, C’MON 2002 One Grammy ✪ Best Female Rock Vocal Performance WILDFLOWER 2005 DETOURS and HOME FOR CHRISTMAS 2008 100 MILES FROM MEMPHIS 2010 FEELS LIKE HOME 2013 BE MYSELF 2017 SOURCES: WARNER BROS. RECORDS; THE RECORDING ACADEMY

39


GETTY IMAGES

THe FULL NeST

40

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017


WHEN THE MILLENNIALS MOVE BACK IN, YOU’VE GOT TO SET NEW CO-LIVING RULES BY NANCY MONSON

L

They don’t charge her rent, but expect her to help out with chores and their dog, and to take care of her own laundry, meals and car. They treat her like an adult, try not to nag and don’t offer unsolicited advice. “We recognize that the only way to make this work is to let Maggie have her own life,” says Brayton. There are 75.4 million Millennials — the generation born after the early 1980s through the early 21st century — in the United States, and nearly a third >

GETTY IMAGES

eslie Brayton of Somerville, Mass., is delighted to have her only child, Maggie, 28, back at home. “My daughter has lived abroad and is going to Colombia soon for five months, so I am happy to have her down the hall,” she says. “We have a big house, so we’re not on top of one another.” Maggie, who teaches English as a second language for a nonprofit school, “is a lovely person, and my husband, Greg, and I enjoy having her around, even if we don’t see her much,” Brayton says.

41


Maggie HaganBrayton and her parents, Leslie Brayton and Greg Hagan

are still living with their parents. According to the Pew Research Center, for the first time in 130 years, young adults ages 18 to 34 are more likely to be living at home with their parents than with a romantic partner. That’s an unusual turn of events in the recent history of America, where we have championed the idea of kids becoming independent from parents, reports Julie Lythcott-Haims, former dean of freshmen students at Stanford University and author of How to Raise an Adult: Break Free of the Overparenting Trap and Prepare Your Kid for Success. Maybe so, but the trend isn’t surprising, given the high cost of living, the burdensome college debt and the difficulty of finding a well-paying job that offers solid advancement. Young people are also delaying marriage and may have different priorities. Some have more relaxed, companionable relationships with their parents than the previous generation had with theirs. And living with your parents may just be losing its stigma in America, Lythcott-Haims says. “Living at home can be a smart way to get ahead,” says Richard

42

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017

In 2014, for the first time, more adults ages 18 to 34 lived with their parents than with a spouse or partner. A. Settersten Jr., director of the Hallie E. Ford Center for Healthy Children & Families at Oregon State University’s College of Public Health and Human Sciences and the author of Not Quite Adults: Why 20-Somethings Are Choosing a Slower Path to Adulthood, and Why It’s Good for Everyone. It can allow young adults to offset the costs of higher education, gain experience through low-paying or unpaid internships that keep them from living on their own and saving for the future. And living away from home doesn’t always mean young adults are financially or emotionally independent anyway, he says, because parents are often called on to supplement their children’s incomes. “It comes down to how kids live when

they live at home,” says LythcottHaims. “A 25-year-old should behave like a 25-year-old out in the world, earning income, contributing to expenses and the upkeep of the house and sharing in adult responsibilities. That’s a co-living situation.” Contrast that to a 25-year-old who behaves like a 15-year-old and expects to be waited on by his parents, and you have a case of arrested development. Clearly, living at home can give young adults some financial latitude while they start a career. Jane and Jamie Male of Cortlandt Manor, N.Y., have two Millennials in the house. Daughter Melissa, 28, a content creator who recently started a freelance business, moved back home, along with her dog, following a breakup with her live-in boyfriend a couple of years ago. Son Daniel, 22, is also living at home while he decides on a career path. “I grew up in a family-style home with different generations, so it was natural for us to welcome Melissa and Daniel back home,” says Jane. “I never expected to have an empty nest due to my upbringing and today’s economy. And I want my kids to have the opportunity to experience life, experiment a bit and take trips without worrying about the pressure of paying bills.” Although neither child pays rent, both are expected to contribute to the household in some way. “Daniel is responsible for his car and mowing the lawn, and Melissa helps clean the house. And they both pay their own cellphone bills,” she says. Jane is taking a step-by-step approach to helping her kids become more independent and responsible. “When they were younger, we were in a management phase as parents,” she explains. “That started to transition to a consulting phase when they were in high school, and today we see ourselves as consultants who are there to give advice if

PROVIDED BY THE HAGAN/BRAYTON FAMILY

THe FULL NeST


GETTY IMAGES

they need our help.” That’s a great tactic, according to Lythcott-Haims. “We parents have to remember that we will be gone one day, and we must make sure our kids can fend for themselves,” she says. “Our impulse is to take care of them, but that can be harmful. They need some hardship to be tough and capable, or the world will eat them up. The goal,” she adds, “is to raise an adult, not a child.” For Karen Goodman, a single mom living in Orange, Conn., having her son Michael, 24, move back in last year after he graduated from Berklee College of Music in Boston was a no-brainer. “He said he was thinking of coming home, and I agreed it was a good idea,” she recalls. “He didn’t have a job in Boston beyond his band, and it was hard for him to make his bills. I was living alone, so I welcomed the company.” The adjustment of having him back home has been easy. “Michael’s dad died when he was 12, and we have an unspoken rule that we’ll be there for each other. He is probably one of the best people I know, and he has always been strong, mature and kind. He’s helped me out as much as I’ve helped him,” Goodman says. They’ve never discussed rent, but because he recently got a full-time job, she may ask him to contribute in the near future. Goodman is leery of doing too much for Michael, but she also likes having someone to take care of. His informal responsibilities include taking care of her dog when she goes away or is at work, buying groceries when he can and taking out the garbage. As for the future, Goodman sees herself creating an in-law apartment for herself, with Michael and his family living in the main house. “That’s my plan, at least,” she says, laughing. “I don’t know what his plan is!” l

Living at home is a longer-term arrangement for Millennials than previous generations Of 25- to 35-year-olds in parents’ home, % living at same address one year earlier

91%

Millennials in 2016

86%

Gen Xers in 2000

86%

Late Boomers in 1990

82%

Early Boomers in 1981

83%

Silents in 1964

Millennials are the generation most likely to live at home % of 25- to 35-year-olds living in parents’ home

15% 10% 11%

Millennials in 2016

Gen Xers in 2000

Late Boomers in 1990

8%

Early Boomers in 1981

8%

Silents in 1964

SOURCE: PEW RESEARCH CENTER

43


THe FULL NeST

If Adult Kids Move Home GUIDELINES TO CONSIDER

Connie Thanasoulis-Cerrachio, a cofounder of SixFigureStart, a career coaching company, and co-author of Money Talks: 100 Strategies to Master Tricky Conversations about Money, says, “Moving back home after graduation helps your child save money and buys time, but pitfalls abound.” Here are her tips for a smooth adjustment:

HAVE A PLAN IN PLACE Make sure your kids have a solid grasp on finances whether they are currently working or searching for a job. They should be recording and tracking their expenses and saving for the future.

DECIDE IF YOU WILL COLLECT RENT “Try to avoid a too-comfortable cushion here,” she advises. If you do collect rent, you might put it into a savings account for your children as a gift when they move out.

GIVE THEM HOUSEHOLD CHORES “By divvying up housework,” Thanasoulis-Cerrachio says, “you’ll be teaching them respect, responsibility and an understanding of what it takes to run a home.”

GETTY IMAGES

DISCUSS SCHEDULES “Will your returning child’s schedule easily mesh with others in the household, or will it create stress?” she asks. “Discussing everyone’s schedules, including younger siblings, can only help the situation.”

44

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017


Bring organization into your home.

Get organized and refresh any room in your house with cube organizers from Tidy Living. More than just a bookshelf, the organizers can be used for displaying a wide variety of items. They also pair great with fabric storage bins, which are perfect for any room.

Shoe Storage

Kitchen & Bathroom

Shelves & Racks

Hangers

Laundry & Garment Care

www.tidyliving.com

Wardrobe & Closets

Bins & Containers

1-844-720-TIDY


Matters of Cardiovascular disease kills more women a year than breast cancer

P

hyllis Jones was 2 miles into a 3-mile run in December 2013 when she started feeling nauseous and her skin became clammy — two symptoms that Jones, then 56, found unusual, given that her exercise routine was typically invigorating. She finished the route, but feeling progressively worse, went home, took a shower and retreated to bed. When she didn’t feel better the next day, her husband insisted she see a doctor. It wasn’t until she was hospitalized later that afternoon that she

46

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017

Phyllis Jones poses with Laila Ali, the keynote speaker at the ninth annual Minority Health Summit sponsored by Greenville Health System, in 2015. learned she had had a massive heart attack. She spent more than a month in a coronary care unit in Greenville, S.C., struggling with

heart failure and pneumonia. Now a pacemaker keeps her heart beating. “I was pretty much gone ... and I don’t

remember a thing, except that I didn’t have any of the symptoms I thought were a heart attack — no chest pain, no shortness of breath. I thought I had the flu,” Jones says. Heart disease affects 28.4 million Americans and, despite a significant decline in the mortality rate, remains the leading cause of death each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American Heart Association (AHA). It claimed the lives of 614,348 people in 2014, the most recent CDC statistics available. But while cardiovascular disease is usually

PROVIDED BY GREENVILLE HEALTH SYSTEM

BY PATRICIA KIME


PROVIDED BY DR. JAQUELINE EUBANY

the Heart associated with men, it is an equal opportunity killer: In 2014, 47 percent, or 289,271, of heart disease fatalities were women. That same year, the CDC reported, 280,404 women died of cancer, including 41,213 of breast cancer. The AHA says cardiovascular diseases (including strokes) account for 1 in every 3 deaths among women each year, or one every 80 seconds. Breast cancer? The American Cancer Society puts the chance of a woman dying from it at 1 in 37. “Breast cancer gets a lot of attention — it’s the way it’s marketed. But heart disease and stroke is the number one killer and so many women simply don’t know this,” says Dr. Jacqueline Eubany, an Orange County,

Calif., cardiologist and author of Women and Heart Disease: The Real Story. Sadly, 90 percent of women are living with at least one risk factor for heart disease — high blood pressure, diabetes, high cholesterol, sedentary lifestyle, obesity, unhealthy diet, smoking, family history and age. Yet despite this prevalence, only half of all women know the condition is a serious threat, according to the CDC. Women develop heart disease, on average, 10 years later than men. It’s thought that estrogen has some protective properties, so women don’t tend to develop some heart diseases until they are in perimenopause or menopause, in their early 50s, which could lead to com-

placency or a lack of understanding of the potential to develop it, says Dr. Erin Michos, associate director of preventive cardiology at Johns Hopkins Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease. “Awareness is getting better,” Michos says. “But part of the problem is that earlier studies focused mainly on men, so a lot of what we know of the disease came from studying middleaged white men.” Researchers now know that while some of the causes and symptoms of heart disease are the same for both men and women, there are notable differences. In fact, two-thirds of women who die suddenly from heart disease have no prior symptoms, says the CDC — an indication that the medical >

Cardiologist Jacqueline Eubany is working to make women more aware of their heart attack risk.

64%

of women who die suddenly of coronary heart disease have no previous symptoms. SOURCE: CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION

47


80%

OF HEART DISEASE AND STROKE EVENTS MAY BE PREVENTED BY LIFESTYLE CHANGES AND EDUCATION

56%

OF WOMEN IN 2012 COULD NAME HEART DISEASE AS THE LEADING CAUSE OF DEATH COMPARED WITH 30 PERCENT IN 1997.

SOURCE: AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION

48

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017

community has a long way to go to understanding heart disease in females and educating them on the risk. Heart disease tends to manifest itself in women as ischemia, a term for poor blood flow and oxygen to the heart. The major arteries in a woman’s heart may be clear of plaque, but the smaller coronary blood vessels might not be functioning well, cutting off blood flow to the heart. This problem, known as microvascular disease, does not show up on a cardiac angiography, a test used to detect the source of a heart attack. Men, meanwhile, tend to suffer from coronary heart disease, or coronary artery disease, the more wellknown condition of plaque buildup in the large arteries of the heart. This difference may explain why some women often don’t experience what are considered the classic signs of a heart attack — pain in the chest radiating to the arm, a heaviness in the chest sometimes described as the feeling of an elephant sitting on it. Instead, women’s symptoms, which are common in other health problems, include shortness of breath, extreme fatigue, nausea, upper back or neck pain and indigestion. Such symptoms can be

mistaken for anxiety, acid reflux, stress, a gastrointestinal disorder or, in Jones’ case, the flu, keeping women from taking them seriously and seeing a doctor. “This is why it’s so important for women to get their risk factors screened and treated. They can’t just be so busy taking care of their families and children, and can’t wait to worry about heart disease until they have symptoms because they may not have symptoms until it’s too late,” Michos says. Controlling some risk factors such as family history and age may be beyond a woman’s ability to do, but for the major risk factors — high blood pressure, blood sugar and obesity — dietary changes and medication, plus exercise and forgoing tobacco products can have a marked effect. In fact, if a woman has optimized all her risk factors by age 50, her risk of developing heart disease over the next 30 years is 8 percent. If a woman at 50 has two major risk factors that aren’t well managed, though, her likelihood of developing heart disease jumps to 50 percent, according to statistics cited by Michos. To maintain a healthy heart, cardiologists recommend women follow the AHA’s guidelines for exercise: at least 150 min-

GETTY IMAGES

MATTERS OF THE HEART


utes of moderate exercise (walking briskly, gardening, leisurely cycling, doubles tennis) or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise (running, heavy yard work, hiking uphill, swimming laps) per week; eating a diet rich in brightly colored fruits and vegetables and managing any risk factors with medication, if needed. Eubany and Michos say the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) eating plan,

developed by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, and the popular Mediterranean diet (both of which emphasize fruits, vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy, nuts and lean white meats and fish) are great heart-healthy options. Michos eats a plant-based diet that includes low-fat dairy and fish a couple of times a week. “Women really can cut their risk of developing

heart disease by 80 percent ... if they live a healthy lifestyle,” Eubany says. “They are in control of their destiny.” Even for those over age 50 who have led a lessthan-healthful lifestyle, “it’s never too late to start,” Michos says. She advises women to see their doctors, learn their numbers (weight, blood pressure, cholesterol and blood-sugar levels) and take steps to manage them.

“The best intervention is prevention,” Michos says. Jones, 60, said her heart attack was a wake-up call to revamp her diet and take time to smell the roses. “Manage your stress. Have a plan for eating well. Find time to have friends. Have a girlfriends’ night out to talk about whatever is on your mind,” she says. “And find time to exercise. That’s critical. I don’t think I would be here if it weren’t for exercise.” l

Risk factors Many risk factors for heart disease are the same in women and men, but a woman’s health history may hold a few gender-specific clues. Dr. Erin Michos, a cardiologist with Johns Hopkins Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease, says women should tell their doctors if they have had the following conditions:

PRE-ECLAMPSIA OR GESTATIONAL DIABETES

Women over age 45 may think their pregnancy history is irrelevant, but Michos says patients should share their experience with their physicians if they had high blood pressure or elevated blood-sugar levels while pregnant. “Pregnancy acts as a stress test that in these cases, failed. The pregnancy

unmasked the body’s inability to handle certain stressors,” says Michos, who adds that gestational diabetes and pre-eclampsia are known risk factors for cardiovascular disease. In fact, women with pre-eclampsia are nearly four times more likely to develop high blood pressure later and those with gestational diabetes have up to a 60 percent chance they will develop Type II diabetes later in life, according to the National Institutes of Health.

POLYCYSTIC OVARIAN SYNDROME

Women with this condition, caused by a hormonal imbalance that results in more male sex hormones — androgens — being released by a woman’s ovaries than typical, are twice as likely to

develop plaque buildup in their arteries (atherosclerosis). Atherosclerosis is a major risk factor for a heart attack.

AUTOIMMUNE DISORDERS

Many autoimmune disorders, including lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, cause systemic inflammation, a known risk factor for heart disease. In fact, women with lupus — 90 percent of lupus patients are female — are three times more likely to have a fatal heart attack than those without it. And heart disease and stroke are leading causes of death in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. “If you have any type of inflammation, you should be seeking regular care, to include monitoring your cardiovascular system,” Michos says.

49


MATTERS OF THE HEART

Doctors agree that diets laden with fresh fruit and veggies are best for heart health, but you can still eat meat. The American Heart Association suggests these tasty recipes.

EYE-OF-ROUND ROAST AU JUS Serves 8 Roast: 2 lb. eye-of-round roast, all visible fat removed 1 tsp. olive oil ½ cup water ⅛ tsp. salt Rub: 1 tsp. coarsely ground pepper 1 tsp. chili powder ½ tsp. garlic powder ½ tsp. onion powder ¼ tsp. salt Directions: Preheat the oven to 325°F. In a small bowl, stir together the rub ingredients. Sprinkle over both sides of the beef. Using your fingertips, gently press the rub so it adheres to the beef. Heat a medium ovenproof skillet over medium-high heat. Add the oil, swirling to coat the bottom. Cook the beef for 8 minutes, or until seared

50

on all sides, turning every 2 minutes. Leave in the skillet. Roast for 40 minutes, or until the beef registers 145°F on an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part. Transfer to a cutting board and let stand for 10 minutes before slicing. Add ½ cup water to the pan drippings. Bring to a boil over high heat, scraping to dislodge any browned bits. Boil for 1 to 2 minutes, or until the liquid is reduced to about 2 tablespoons, stirring constantly. Remove from the heat. Stir in the remaining ⅛ teaspoon salt. Slice the beef diagonally across the grain. Arrange the slices on a serving platter. Drizzle with the reduction. Nutritional info: Per serving: 145 calories, 4 g total fat, 1.5 g saturated fat, 1 g carbohydrates, 25 g protein, 145 mg sodium, 47 mg cholesterol

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017

Serves 6 2 medium dried bay leaves 6 cups water 8 oz. dried black beans, rinsed, drained 2 medium carrots (chopped) Cooking spray ½ cup dry white wine (regular or non-alcoholic) 1 ½ tsp. dried fennel seeds, crushed crushed 4 medium garlic cloves, crushed and minced 8 oz. dried Great Northern beans or other dried white beans, rinsed, drained 1 large green bell pepper, chopped ¼ cup light or dark molasses 1 large onion, chopped ½ to ¾ tsp. crushed red pepper flakes 3 medium ribs of celery ½ tsp. salt ½ dried thyme, crushed 16 oz. canned, no-salt-added tomato sauce 1 ¼ cups fat-free, low-sodium vegetable broth Directions: In a Dutch oven, stir together

the water and beans. Bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat and simmer for 5 minutes. Remove from the heat. Let stand, covered, for 1 hour. Or, put the water and beans in a large bowl. Let stand, covered, for 6 to 12 hours. With either method, drain the beans in a colander, rinse and drain again. Set aside. When the beans are ready, dry the Dutch oven and lightly spray with cooking spray. Cook the celery, carrots, bell pepper, onion and garlic over medium heat for 20 minutes, or until tender, stirring occasionally. Stir in the remaining ingredients and the beans. Increase the heat to high and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer, covered, for 2 ½ to 3 hours, or until the beans are tender, adding water if necessary and stirring occasionally. Discard the bay leaves before serving the stew. Nutritional info: Per serving: 359 calories, 1 g fat, 0 g saturated fat, 68 g carbohydrates, 13 g dietary fiber, 26 g sugar, 18 g protein, 0 mg cholesterol, 275 mg sodium

AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION

Recipes

FRENCH-STYLE BEAN STEW


MARILYN MARI LYN DEPL L DEPLATO A O AT KIMBERLY L TADD LY T TADDEO ADDEO Meagan Walker MATTHEW MCCARTHY

DAVE BUCK

DARRYL COLLING KRISTA TA GR T OW GROW

PAIGE PA P AIIGE M A MECKLER ECKLER

JOE RUSSELL Liz Mattingly

RACHAEL COHEN OHEN NICOLE OLE REINARD

Debbie Pollina

KAREN GROBE

KATIE KA KA ATIE TIE HAZEL

Andrea Berki Berki-Nnuji -Nnuji -Nnuji

KRISTEN LOPEZ

KENNETH WAYNE LINDSAY

MATT LOW

Lillian Selby ALESSANDRO RENZI STEVEN OLEWNICK

AMANDA DA LUMADUE DA UMADUE

Alexa Godwin

LAUREN UREN NEDWICK

Mary Cooke NOLAN WHIPPLE JEFF PAPPALARDO RACHEL WILLIAMS

JAMEISHA BROWN Malissa Bowman MARCIA RICH

KARI MASLAK

HEATHER ATHER HARGIS A MARY KROLL

T.J. SHARPE K KA ATIE A TIE BRIGGS KATIE BRETT PERLA ERICA COLE

Mary Kate Sidoti

Here’s to all those who make medicine better. We’d like to recognize all the men and women who take part in clinical research. You not only advance knowledge about disease, you also improve medical treatments for generations to come. For more information about clinical research, please visit CISCRP.org. A sincere thanks to all the medical heroes out there from these organizations:


MATTERS OF THE HEART

Lucy Rose Fischer, a researcher on aging, became an example of her own work once she retired, switching gears to become an artist.

52

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017


Long, happy lives How to stay healthy throughout the great years to come BY GINA HARKINS

SID KONIKOFF

L

ucy Rose Fischer spent much of her life studying aging, but not even decades of academic research fully prepared the retired gerontologist for getting older herself. “Theoretically, I knew that people were living longer,” she says. “But what’s really amazing to me is that there is a whole (new) life that starts.” Many women are expected to live into their 80s, which means a chance >

53


MATTERS OF THE HEART

have all this experience behind you that you’re able to use.”

Fischer illustrated and wrote a book on aging after her retirement titled I’m New at Being Old.

84

MILLION PEOPLE WILL BE 65 AND OLDER BY THE YEAR 2050 SOURCE: U.S. CENSUS BUREAU

54

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017

at starting new hobbies or watching their grandchildren — and even greatgrandchildren — grow up. That kind of longevity is still a relatively new concept, and the health care and social systems haven’t quite caught up. “We’re having more years of good health, but also having more years of various chronic conditions,” says Andrew Scharlach, a professor of aging in the University of California-Berkeley’s School of Social Welfare. “We are changing individually much more quickly

than our physical and social environments are.” Even though Fischer, 72, of St. Louis Park, Minn., says she doesn’t love everything about aging, she’s still finding life after retirement to be creatively rewarding. She’s able to focus on her love of creating painted-glass art, and she wrote and illustrated a book about aging called I’m New at Being Old. “In a way, it feels like starting over,” she says. “But the difference between being 15 and 60 when you’re starting a new stage in life is that you

An aging population doesn’t come without challenges. U.S. Census Bureau data shows that by the year 2050, nearly 84 million people will be 65 and older. Many in that population will face the risk of chronic diseases, especially as people live long enough to develop them. One in 10 people over age 65 have Alzheimer’s, for example, according to the Alzheimer’s Association, and while overall cancer rates have declined, cancer rates still rise with age, according to the National Cancer Institute. Scharlach says this could weigh on the American health care system, which is not equipped to deal with long-term conditions on a large scale. The Baby Boomer population is aging, he said, but many physicians don’t have experience treating older adults. Access to medical professionals is also on the decline, Scharlach adds, since some communities don’t have enough doctors and nurses, or people can’t afford the high cost of treatment. That’s what people like Grisel Rodríguez-Morales, a health promotion and disease prevention manager at Chicago’s Rush University Medical Center, are trying to

LUCY ROSE FISCHER

A CHANGING SOCIETY


STEPHANIE KEITH/GETTY IMAGES

change. Her team helps give people the tools they need to “age successfully,” she says, by holding seminars about how to manage their health conditions. “As providers, this is new to many of us,” she says. “As the aging population continues to grow, we want to make sure that we … are thinking not only about health, but health within the context of aging.” That requires not only informing doctors, nurses and other health care providers about the needs of aging adults, but family members and friends, too. That way, they understand that something like depression, for example, is not a normal part of aging, she says. “If you saw an 18- or 20-year-old who didn’t want to do anything, you wouldn’t think twice about immediately taking them to the doctor,” Rodríguez-Morales says. “So if you see an older adult, why not do the same thing instead of just saying, ‘Well, they’re old.’” As the older population continues to grow, Scharlach says it’s vital that people see beyond age. Americans are slowly starting to value older generations, he says, but there’s still a long way to go. “Having popular images that reflect aging as it really is and provide a sense that we

can age well and age fully will go a long way,” he adds. “It’s about seeing that 80-year-old not simply about what they can’t do, but who they are.” One of the things Fischer did when she retired was to quit dyeing her hair. Once she accepted her silver hair, she grew to like the look — along with the tiny crinkles around her eyes. “There is a kind of focus on always trying to look younger,” she says, “but you can be vital at 72 and be beautiful.” When she was studying aging, Fischer and her colleagues at HealthPartners, a Minnesota-based nonprofit health care organization, developed the ALIVE model. The acronym stands for five healthy aspects of aging: activity, learning, intimacy, vitality and engagement. Now she tries to apply the model to her own life. Fischer stays active by hiking with her husband and walking her dog. She considers continuing education an important way to exercise her brain. She maintains close, intimate relationships with friends of all ages. Her artwork and positive attitude give her life vitality, and she remains engaged in her wider community and society. Healthy and happy aging requires a real investment, Scharlach says. Many people

plan carefully for their financial futures, he says, but fail to devote time and effort to other aspects of their lives, like Fischer does with her ALIVE method. “We have to take care of our body, our mind, our relationships,” Scharlach says. “There’s that old saying, ‘If I had known I was going to live this long, I would’ve taken better care of myself.’ There’s enormous truth to those words.” l

Relationships with people of different ages, especially those who are younger, can help the brain stay active as you grow older.

55


Searching for

Substitutes A celiac’s guide to going gluten-free

GETTY IMAGES

BY MICHELLE KHOURI

I

WAS DIAGNOSED WITH CELIAC DISEASE IN 2012, AND THE NUTRITIONAL journey that ensued was nothing short of Odyssean. I pored over books, downloaded apps that help to weed out ingredients with gluten, avoided dining out and spent hours searching for gluten-free recipes. >

57


CANYON BAKEHOUSE

are now using products containing more nutrientdense gluten-free grains — such as

quinoa, amaranth, millet, buckwheat or fonio — to increase nutrient density of gluten-free products.

— Dr. Amy Burkhart, registered dietitian with celiac disease

58

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017

1 in 100

CANYON BAKEHOUSE

Many manufacturers

The serious autoimmune diners. In 2015, Vox.com’s Julia disorder — estimated to affect 1 in Belluz offered a fascinating glimpse 100 Americans — causes people’s into diet trends with heat maps immune systems to act up whenof Google searches for diet terms, ever they eat gluten, a protein including “gluten-free diet,” found predominately in between 2006 and wheat, barley, rye, oat 2015. The increase is Celiac and even in surprising visually staggering. disease affects foods, like soy sauce. Represented by the When someone with color purple, glutenceliac disease ingests free searches merely Americans food with gluten, it freckle the 2006 map, — CELIAC SUPPORT causes damage to but dominate more ASSOCIATION the small intestine, than 80 percent of the preventing the absorption 2015 map. of nutrients. According to the Restaurants around the nonprofit Celiac Support Associaworld reflect this skyrocketing tion, common symptoms include trend by readily offering gluten-free joint pain, anemia, diarrhea, dishes on their regular menus, or constipation, fatigue and irritability. by warning patrons about possible Over time, if a gluten-free diet isn’t cross-contamination in the kitchen. adhered to, additional health issues Today, it seems easier than ever to can occur, making it important for avoid wheat’s infamous protein. But someone with celiac disease to it’s important to separate fact from maintain a lifelong and strict diet. urban legend, especially when it Thankfully, it’s become a comes to nutrition. And while celiac different world for gluten-free disease specialists agree a biological


PROVIDED BY THE COMPANIES: PURE BREAD, TAYLOR OWINGS FOR SALLY’S GLUTEN FREE BAKERY

difference exists between celiac disease and non-celiac wheat sensitivity — namely, patients with the latter react only to wheat and not to all gluten-containing grains — the specifics surrounding this non-celiac reaction to wheat remains an elusive mystery to researchers. “There are two things about being on a gluten-free diet,” says Dr. Peter H.R. Green, director of Columbia University’s renowned Celiac Disease Center. The easiest part is knowing what to avoid, he says. “The most difficult thing is knowing what to eat.” Dr. Amy Burkhart, a Napa, Calif.-based medical doctor and registered dietitian who specializes in celiac disease and non-wheat gluten sensitivity, recommends eating glutenfree substitutes made with nutrient-rich ingredients. “Many manufacturers are now using products containing more nutrient-dense glutenfree grains — such as quinoa, amaranth, millet, buckwheat or fonio — to increase nutrient density of gluten-free products,” says Burkhart. She has celiac disease, and is the mother of a child with it as well. Going gluten-free still remains no easy task. In my experience, the mere act of finding a suitable sliced-bread substitute has been costly and elusive — I tried over half a dozen brands before I found my favorite, Pure Knead, carried in Kroger stores in parts of the South. I like it even though it doesn’t quite replicate wheat bread’s airy texture and elasticity, and costs twice as much as a loaf of regular bread. I still haven’t found a satisfying substitute for New York-style pizza. And don’t even get me started on baking your own loaf. For that, I consulted two experts to help me navigate the complexities of gluten-free baking. Gerard Nudo and his husband Gary McElroy own Mediterranea, a gluten-free restaurant in Atlanta’s Grant Park neighborhood. The restaurant opened earlier this year, and offers a decadent menu brimming with focaccia, orzo, flatbread pizza and a score of other gluten-substituting delights. The restaurant also features a completely gluten-free bakery helmed by Nudo, who studied pastry making at the Institute of Culinary Education (ICE) in New York City. When McElroy was diagnosed with celiac disease 13 years ago, Nudo decided to study the fundamentals of baking at ICE so he could create gluten-free alternatives of his favorite baked goods. >

FINDING A

New Brand

These gluten-free products work well as substitutes for the original. Not all companies ship to or are available in all parts of the U.S. BREAD, BAGELS, BUNS AND OTHER BAKED GOODS

Canyon Bakehouse canyonglutenfree.com

BAKING MIXES

Breads from Anna breadsfromanna.com COOKIES

O’Doughs odoughs.com

Goodie Girl Mint Slims goodiegirlcookies.com

Pure Knead pureknead.com

PASTAS

Bionaturae bionaturae.com Sally’s Gluten Free Bakery sallysglutenfreebakery.com

PIZZA

DeLallo delallo.com

Against the Grain Gourmet againstthegraingourmet.com

Freschetta freschetta.com

BAKING FLOURS

Bob’s Red Mill bobsredmill.com

59


DINING OUT

Tips

Know your GF ingredients before you go:

“That foundation, learning how to do things with wheat flour, helped to lay the groundwork — to know this is how you do things with this kind of dough, and now this is how you make it with this kind of flour,” Nudo says. Even for an expert like Nudo, whose gluten-free cranberry scones and cheddar biscuits leave me hungry for more, trial and error are the norm. That’s because the number of gluten-free flour options is astounding. Oat, almond, tapioca, coconut, millet and quinoa flours are just a few of the go-tos for glutenfree bakers. Having so many options makes the process extremely complex and results in a lot of experimentation before you find the right mix for your recipe. Some of the flours don’t even work in particular recipes; the more bitter-tasting ones shouldn’t be used for baking, for example. To further complicate things, the simplicity of using wheat flour as a multipurpose ingredient doesn’t apply when it comes to baking with gluten-free flours. Instead, flours must be combined and then complemented by binders, which add the volume and texture that wheat flour creates naturally. They also come in a multitude of forms — egg,

60

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017

flaxseed, xanthan gum and others. “A lot of my baking ends up being a chemistry experiment,” says Rucha Purohit, an avid gluten-free baker who sells her home-baked goods to family, friends and word-of-mouth fans she meets through online gluten-free groups. “I try to avoid any flour blends that are mostly white rice flour, (which is naturally gluten-free) because it creates such a dense product that you can tell is gluten-free the moment you try it.” Instead, Purohit recommends baking cakes and cookies using a one-to-one mixture of oat flour, for sturdiness, and almond flour, for moistness. However, unless you have the patience of a saint and the curiosity of a chemist, I recommend skipping at-home gluten-free baking and buying brands recommended by experts (see page 59). A team at Columbia University’s Celiac Disease Center, led by nutritionist Anne Lee, recently conducted a study that shows gluten-free products are 130 percent to 200 percent more expensive than their gluten-containing counterparts. With that kind of price tag, you may as well pay for someone else to get it right. Bon appetit! l

Ask for tamari, which is gluten-free soy sauce, or bring your own. Remind your server that corn, rice and dairy are naturally free of gluten; many don’t know that, and unwittingly limit their suggestions as a result. Opt for these international cuisines, which use little to no wheat flour, plus ice, potatoes and fresh vegetables are prominent: Indian (from all regions); Vietnamese; Cambodian; French; Colombian; Mexican; Peruvian; Spanish; Brazilian; Greek; Spanish; Thai (avoid dishes with soy or ask for tamari); Japanese. Be wary of these cuisines: Korean; Chinese (nearly all made with soy sauce); Italian; Soul/Southern food; Irish; British; German.

MEDITERRANEA

FLATBREAD PIZZA AT MEDITERRANEA

Be wary of sauces, especially roux (often thickened with gluten) and many Asian sauces (which often contain soy sauce, which has gluten, to the surprise of many new gluten-free eaters)


DELICIOUSLY REDUCE OR ELIMINATE ADDED AND HIDDEN SUGARS WITH ZERO-CALORIE SWEETLEAF® The American Heart Association recommends a daily added sugar limit of 36 grams/150 calories for men, and 25 grams/100 calories for woman and children over two years old.

CERTIFIED

PALEO

Drop in

flavor and sweetness to food and

drinks

NO SUGARS

NO CALORIES

Squeeze

into still or sparkling water

Sprinkle

in food, drinks, and recipes

NON-GLYCEMIC RESPONSE

BUY: www.ShopSweetLeaf.com, health food and grocery stores, or online retailers

Drop in

flavor and sweetness to food and

drinks

NO ARTIFICIAL INGREDIENTS

Find all of SweetLeaf’s delicious products at

www.SweetLeaf.com


Irresistibly entertaining.

Download our free app, now with virtual reality. Experience exclusive awards season access, the hottest celeb trends, and the juiciest moments in pop culture.


| BEST YEARS

LIVE WELL

GETTY IMAGES

S E L F - C A R E 64 | E X E R C I S E 78 | G I V I N G 82 | C A R E E R S + M O N E Y 84 | S E C O N D A C T 90 | L A S T W O R D 96


SELF CARE

Your Moment of Zen There’s a form of meditation for every personality

GETTY IMAGES

BY MARY HELEN BERG

64

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017


S

tressed? Depressed? Can’t sleep? In pain? The ancient practice of meditation may be able to help. The multitasking powerhouse eases a host of health concerns and can even protect your brain from damage due to aging as it helps you to focus more clearly on the moment and become more mindful of how your thoughts and feelings are affecting you. And while your doctor is unlikely to prescribe it as a cure for cancer, tens of thousands of studies prove “the effectiveness of mindfulness as a means to improving mental health, well-being and relationships,” says Emiliana Simon-Thomas, science director A mandala for the Univerprovides a sity of Californiafocal point Berkeley’s Greater as you meditate. Good Science Center.

What Are You Waiting For? If the idea of sitting cross-legged with your eyes closed for minutes on end sounds like torture, don’t despair. Meditation takes many forms — and they’re all beneficial, says Sara Lazar, an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School who has spent 18 years studying the practice. >

65


SELF CARE it 20 minutes twice a day.

Meditation on the Menu Mindfulness can be practiced anywhere, any time, even at lunch. With mindful eating, you focus on the presentation, smell, texture and taste of your food, breathing between bites. Research shows that mindful eating benefits people with diabetes and eating disorders. “Often we eat without realizing that we’ve already sated our appetite, that we’re not chewing our food enough to get the nutrients we need, that we’re eating out of anxiety,” Goldstein says. “Eating meditation can really enhance your understanding of your relationship to food.”

Mindful Motion

Guru Guide Guided meditation offers a teacher’s support, either in person or through an audio recording. The instructor leads the process and helps you focus on scenes to visualize or themes such as healing, gratitude or creativity.

66

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017

“Get some basic instruction in meditation no matter what form you’re going to follow,” recommends Carla Goldstein, spokeswoman for the Omega Institute in Rhinebeck, N.Y., which calls itself the nation’s foremost educational retreat center. “You can consult leading experts just by going onto their websites.”

Say Om Mantra meditations focus on the repetition of a sound, word or phrase. Choose a mantra, sit comfortably, breathe deeply and repeat the word, silently or aloud, for five to 10 minutes. If your mind wanders, gently return to the mantra. If you use Transcendental Meditation, a certified teacher will assign you a mantra, and you’ll practice with

The motions of tai chi are a physical form of meditation.

Clean Dishes, Clear Mind Zen master Thich Nhat Hanh taught that any chore performed with focused attention becomes a mindfulness meditation. “If while we are washing dishes, we think only of the cup of tea that awaits us, thus hurrying to get the dishes out of the way as they were a nuisance, then we are not ‘washing the dishes to wash the dishes,’” the Buddhist monk wrote in his book The Miracle of Mindfulness. “If we can’t wash the dishes, chances are we won’t be able to drink our tea either.” l

GETTY IMAGES

“Find one that fits your personality,” suggests Lazar, who leads a neuroscience research lab on meditation and yoga. “Some people love chanting and some people hate it. You’ve got to find what works for you.” If you need handholding, try a guided meditation. Can’t sit still? Maybe walking meditation will be your thing. There’s a practice to suit almost anyone seeking a moment of Zen.

Moving meditations use physical activity to create awareness and increase the mind’s ability to focus. Practice a walking meditation on a labyrinth or in your home. Use deliberate breaths and movement; consciously lift and place the foot with each step. The Chinese martial arts of qi gong and tai chi are moving meditations that repeat patterns of graceful, slow-motion postures. Added benefit: a 2012 study shows that tai chi practice boosts brain volume and memory.


Moving is the best medicine. Keeping active and losing weight are just two of the ways that you can fight osteoarthritis pain. In fact, for every pound you lose, that’s four pounds less pressure on each knee. For information on managing pain, go to fightarthritispain.org.


SELF CARE

Between calendar notifications and intrusive messaging platforms, you might believe smartphones contribute to your daily stress levels. That same device, however, can help nudge you to take much-needed breaks throughout the day, with the help of meditation and mindfulness apps. Here are five examples (available for both iOS and Android, unless otherwise specified):

Simple Habit is an on-demand meditation platform built for busy people. With 5-minute lessons, the app features more than 1,000 meditations guided by teachers from around the world. For a more tailored lesson, specify the cause of your stress — for example, tap Tough Day or Big Event. More than 50 sessions are free; upgrade to a premium version for $11.99 per month or $99.99 per year.

68

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017

Calm: Meditation to Relax, Focus & Sleep Better is a meditation and mindfulness app with guided sessions in lengths ranging from 3 to 25 minutes, with content designed for beginners, as well as intermediate and advanced users. Track your progress with elements such as daily streaks or a tally of time spent meditating. Free content gets you started; subscriptions are $12.99 per month or $59.99 per year.

Your “gym membership for the mind,” Headspace wants to teach you how to meditate in just a few minutes a day. This app (also available on Amazon and the web) features an easy interface. A free beginner series called “Take10” — 10 sessions, each 10 minutes, over 10 days — uses proven meditation and mindfulness techniques. Headspace offers subscriptions for $12.99 per month or $94.99 per year.

Designed for “fidgety skeptics,” 10% Happier offers clear and simple meditation lessons. Led by New York Times bestselling author and ABC news anchor Dan Harris — who suffered an on-air panic attack — the app (iOS, web) features quick meditations by respected teachers. 10% Happier Free offers free access to a 7-session introductory course, with new content added monthly. Get more content for $9.99 per month or $79.99 per year.

Built into the latest Apple Watch operating system is Breathe, Apple’s own app that encourages you to relax, focus and (you guessed it), breathe. You’ll feel a slight tap on your wrist every 4 hours, and when you glance down at the screen the app will ask you to start a session, if you’re able to. A summary screen, with heart rate info, is shown at the end. — Marc Saltzman

GETTY IMAGES; PROVIDED BY THE COMPANIES

TAKE A BREATHER WITH MEDITATION APPS


SELF-CARE

Journaling at Midlife Putting your life on paper can give you a sense of clarity BY NANCY MONSON

C

onfession time: I have kept a journal since I was a teenager. I would never want anyone else to read what I’ve written, but when I look back on those pages, it helps me remember not only the details of my life, but also how I felt about people and circumstances. And it helps me see things in a new light and from a more seasoned perspective. Maybe you have thought of journaling at some point in your life, but never got around to it or felt you weren’t up to the task. Well, now’s the time to pick up your pen and start writing! According to Gina Carroll, author of A Story That Matters: A Gratifying Approach to Writing About Your Life, journaling at midlife is an ideal way to work through important life events or come to terms with your past.

Getting Started

PHOTO CREDIT

You can start journaling simply by writing down significant things that happen to you and how you feel about them.

70

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017


GETTY IMAGES

ART JOURNAL Journaling doesn’t always mean writing. In fact, it can even be considered an “art.” Try doodling in the margins or adding background color to bring your pages to life.

71


SELF-CARE

JOURNALING 101:

u Decide if you prefer to

write longhand or on the computer. If you take the handwritten route, buy yourself a lovely journal that you will enjoy writing in.

u Create a ritual to

72

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017

you need to do or the same phrase written over and over. They may even contain doodles and drawings. Do what it takes to break up your mental logjam.

Journaling Benefits “It’s wonderful to have a creative outlet like journaling to provide structure, habit and ritual to your life,” particularly if you’re retired, notes Carroll. Creative outlets also provide an emotional release, she says: “There is something magical and enduring about the written word.” Although you don’t have to share your journaling, Carroll actually advocates writing with the intention of passing your life stories on to others through bound or self-published books, a blog or other outlets. “Writing to share your stories gives journaling a sense of urgency and purpose,” she says. “Your story is important to your family. ... Your story is the beginning of their story.” l

u Set up a regular time

to journal (ideally, daily) and commit to that schedule.

u Pick a writing spot, so

your brain knows that when you go there, it’s time to get working.

u Let the first draft

flow without correction or perfectionism. If you plan to share the story, you can always edit later. – Nancy Monson GETTY IMAGES

Or you can do a life review, looking back at the ups and downs of your lifetime. Actress Jane Fonda, author of Prime Time: Making the Most of All of Your Life, found doing a life review liberating. In 2011, she told USA TODAY, “The rap on me was there was no ‘there’ there. I was pretty much what my husbands wanted me to be. But when I did my life review, preparing for my 60s and writing my memoir, there were themes that ran through my life. … I saw who I was, as opposed to who my husbands wanted me to be. I could own who I was.” Another option, particularly if you feel overwhelmed or blocked, is to do “morning pages,” three pages of longhand, stream-of-consciousness writings to access your creativity. These pages, the brainchild of creativity expert Julia Cameron, author of The Artist’s Way, are for your eyes only. They may be a jumbled mess, a laundry list of things

get into a thoughtful journaling mindset. Make yourself a cup of coffee or tea, light a candle or watch the sun come up before writing.


Share Curiosity. Read Together. w w w. r e a d . g o v


SELF-CARE

Create a Hygge-filled Life The Danes might hold the secret to happiness for all of us BY KAREN ASP

74

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017

GETTY IMAGES

T

ravel to Denmark, and it’s not out of the question you’d hear something like this: Put on your hyggebukser, settle into your hyggekrog and have a hyggesnak with a loved one. Confused? Of course, until you realize that Denmark’s cultural DNA is driven by something called hygge. “Hygge (pronounced hue-guh) may be to Danes what freedom is to Americans,” says Meik Wiking, author of The Little Book of Hygge and CEO of the Happiness Research Institute in Copenhagen. “It’s also something that we seek out, as we plan for hyggelige (comfortable) times and reminisce about them after.”


How hygge benefits you

GETTY IMAGES

ships,” Wiking says, adding that Although hygge has been hygge fosters a special way of described as “the art of creatbeing together with loved ones. ing intimacy,” and “cocoa by Hygge also promotes gratitude candlelight,” there’s an easier by emphasizing the savoring of way to understand it. “The true simple pleasures and making essence of hygge is the pursuit the most of the moment. Studies of everyday happiness, and it’s have shown that people who feel basically like a hug without the grateful aren’t only happier than physical touch,” Wiking says. those who don’t feel grateful, “You’re focusing on the small but are also more helpful and things that really matter.” forgiving and less materialistic, Some of the key ingredients of Wiking says. hygge are togetherness, relaxFinally, the focus on the ation, indulgence, presence and everyday gives hygge its ultimate comfort, which is why it should happiness boost. As Wiking be no surprise that the biggest explains, it’s the closest you can benefit of hygge is arrive to happiness happiness. Start with after coming home togetherness, for from a long day’s instance. work on a cold rainy COZY UP “When happiday. “Hygge is about To find out why ness researchers making the most some societanalyze the common of what you have ies are happier denominators among in abundance: the than others, those who consider everyday,” he says. visit the Happithemselves happy, a ness Research Institute, pattern emerges that Add more hygge happiness these people have to your life research meaningful and posiFortunately, you institute.com tive social relationdon’t have to move

to Denmark to live a hygge-filled life. No matter where you live, you can add hygge to your day. A good place to start? With candlelight. The University of Richmond in Virginia plans to adopt Danish ways of life — hygge included — during its International Education Week this November. A candlelit walk across campus will be one of the main events. “It’s important for everybody, not just our students, to learn how to take deep pleasure from genuinely simple things,” says Martha Merritt, the school’s dean of international education, adding that too many Americans feel guilty about doing pleasurable things. “We need to learn how to feel great about sitting down with a good book or listening to a guitar concert and not thinking this time is borrowed from something else, like work, that’s more virtuous.” To follow suit, just light a few candles wherever you are. Wiking suggests adding candles to a hygge “emergency kit” that should be complete with highquality chocolate, tea, a blanket and your favorite book. You can also find new ways to be together with family and friends. For example, when Wiking wanted to see his friends more frequently, he suggested they form a food club. To maximize hygge, they cook together so nobody has to host and be the only chef. “That’s where the hygge is,” he says. Of course, now that you’re versed in hygge, you’ll know what to do when you arrive in Denmark and hear that funny sentence. You’ll simply slip into comfy pants you wouldn’t wear in public (your hyggebukser), settle into your favorite nook (hyggekrog) and have that cozy chat (hyggesnak) with a loved one. Consider yourself a hygge master after that.

75


SELF-CARE

PREPARE FOR HYGGE Danish author Meik Wiking suggests an “emergency kit” for times when you need the cozy feeling of hygge. We provide some suggestions.

1 Chunky knit GoGo

1

hoodie sweater provides warmth and softness. $475,

freepeople.com

2 Soy candles by

5

Kristin Hinrichs crackle softly as they burn.

$18, uncommon goods.com 4

3 Jumbo shale knit

pouf works as an ottoman, seat or a cozy visual. $199, cb2.com

4 Handloomed 2

marled basketweave throws are perfect for cuddling. $79,

westelm.com

5 The primary

$12.75, amazon.com

3

76

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017

PROVIDED BY THE COMPANIES

text on hygge is The Little Book of Hygge, by Meik Wiking.


EXERCISE

Step Forward to Fitness The new exercise rules apply to you — even if you’ve never worked out a day in your life

F

orget everything you think you know about exercise: that it has to hurt to be effective, that only the young and slim can shimmy into Spandex and sweat. These days, health experts know the perks of working out extend throughout adulthood. Starting a fitness routine now,

78

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017

even if you’ve never had one, can bust stress, strengthen your heart, boost your brain and give you a longer, happier life. “No matter what the question is, the answer is exercise,” says Debra Atkinson, author of You Still Got It, Girl! The After 50 Fitness Formula For Women. Here’s how to add its magic powers to your life:

GETTY IMAGES

BY CINDY KUZMA


Jennifer Long

THEN

NOW

Fran Creasy

Make it fun. The government recommends two and a half hours of heart-pumping aerobic activity per week, plus two days’ worth of muscle-strengthening moves. But don’t stress about what’s optimal. Instead, pick something that excites you — that way, you’re far more likely to stick with it, Atkinson says. If you have fond memories of lighting up the dance floor, find a ballroom class. Water lovers, consider swimming. Paulette Harrison joined a gym in Lancaster, S.C., at age 50 because she noticed happy people outdoors. Nine years later, she’s still going. “After each workout, I had more positive energy,” she says. “I knew it was something I could and would do for the rest of my life.”

Start at your existing level ... Jump into a super-intense boot camp, and you’ll likely land in the doctor’s office. Instead, start with what feels possible and build up. In other words, walk — even if it’s just around the block — before you run, advises Atlanta-based exercise physiologist and running coach Janet Hamilton. (Tip: If you already have health problems, get your doctor’s OK first.)

Iowa City resident Jennifer Long, 63, started slowly. In 2009, she had high blood pressure and felt breathless on short strolls. So she started walking regularly; this year, she’ll run a 10K and compete in both the 400- and 800-meter dash in the national Senior Games, an Olympic-style competition for people 50 and older. “I am probably the strongest I’ve been my entire life,” she says.

PROVIDED BY JENNIFER LONG; ACTS RETIREMENT-LIFE COMMUNITIES (2)

... then challenge yourself.

THEN

NOW

Hire a coach.

Keep setting new goals as your body — and mind — grow stronger, Atkinson says. For instance, Long aims to improve her race times and tackle her first triathlon. “I’m always asking: Can I do it a little bit better than the last time?” she says. “The sky’s the limit, in my eyes.”

Succeed because of — not despite — obstacles. Fran Creasy, 77, has two knee replacements, rods in her back and arthritis. But thanks to the wellness coach at her Columbus, N.C.-based retirement community, Tryon Estates, she has a weightlifting, cycling

and water aerobics routine that has helped her drop 75 pounds in the past decade. “Don’t use your age as an excuse,” she says. “Strength training has been amazing in helping manage my pain.”

Consider a trainer, attend a class or ask a fitness-minded friend for help. However you approach it, investing some time or resources in instruction early on pays off in a routine that’s safe, healthy and sustainable. “You can turn it over to someone else rather than randomly trying this or that,” Atkinson says.

79


EXERCISE

Circle of life This is not your childhood hula hoop

Hollie Owens, a certified hoop instructor, combines dance and gymnastics with a full-body workout involving hula hoops.

80

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017

SCOTT UTTERBACK/THE (LOUISVILLE, KY.) COURIER-JOURNAL

BY KIRBY ADAMS


T

he hula hoop is back, but don’t call it that. Today, the gyrationgenerating toy is referred to simply as a “hoop,” and if you are into “hooping,” you know it’s much more than a lightweight plastic plaything you spin in the driveway. Super hoopers, like Hollie Owens of Clarksville, Ind., combine dance and gymnastics with a full-body workout to make hooping look easy. But wait — before you dig through your garage in search of your childhood toy, here’s a little history about how the world of “hooping” has changed. The hula hoop got its start in the United States in the late 1950s. A couple of friends, Richard Knerr and Arthur “Spud” Melin of the Wham-O company, got the idea after watching schoolchildren in Australia playing with bamboo “exercise hoops” in gym class. The men trademarked the — HOLLIE name “Hula Hoop,” and Wham-O began manufacturing the toy out of plastic tubing. Wham-O sold 25 million Hula Hoops in four months at $1.98 each. The popularity of the Hula Hoop faded in the ’60s, but 40 years later, the band String Cheese Incident made it cool for a new generation. The musicians gave hoops to fans so they’d move to the music, and the craze was reborn. The exercise value of hooping is worth singing and dancing about. “I have lost 60 pounds,” says Owens, a certified hoop instructor. “I eat better. I feel better. Everything is a little brighter in my life since I started hooping.” The American Council on Exercise reports that an hour of hooping can burn more than 400 calories — although that could rise to as much as 600 calories per hour when your arms and legs are also engaged. It’s also great for your abs. Along the banks of the Ohio River in Louisville this summer, Owens gathered at a concert with some of her fellow hooping buddies. As live music

played, they began twirling their hoops, adding dance movements and fastpaced tricks, swinging the hoops in the air above their heads and letting them zip back down to their waists. At one point, Owens gracefully lowered her chest to the ground, arched her back and lifted one leg — toe pointed toward the sky — all the while spinning the hoop, which appeared to float from her torso up to her ankle. “There is a state of flow when everything goes away and you’re in the zone, in your hoop, in the music,” says Owens. “Flow,” a tranquil state of mind, comes from more than just twirling hoops — it also results from the total concentration required to perform tricks. Joining Owens at Waterfront Park were jugglers, hoopers, a guy spinning poi balls (unlit fireballs on thin rope) and 24-year-old John Mark Hummel, who spun a 5-foot OWENS aluminum staff over the back of his neck, tossed it in the air and gracefully caught it. Modern hoops can be large and heavy compared with the Wham-O models of the ’60s, which make it easier for beginners to keep the rotation flowing. (They’re also more expensive; weighted exercise models average between $20 and $30.) “I have several senior students who picked up the skill right off the bat,” Owens says. You can learn by buying a hoop and watching YouTube (a search for “hooping” will get you more than 770,000 results) or through classes. On her Facebook page (facebook.com/HoopMedicine), Owens posts how-to videos, hooping class locations and hoops for sale in all colors and sizes. The best piece of advice is to just pick up a hoop and give it a twirl. “A year from tomorrow you’ll wish you started today,” Hummel says. — Kirby Adams writes for The (Louisville, Ky.) Courier-Journal.

GETTY IMAGES

“Everything is a little brighter in my life since I started hooping.”

81


GIVING

Humanitarian Efforts Even small attempts to give can turn into something big BY CINDY KUZMA

Y 82

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017

ou’ve spent years amassing experience, a network and resources. Now, use them to change the world. Here’s advice from four women who’ve prioritized philanthropy and encourage you to do the same:

PROVIDED BY CAROLINE GATES ANDERSON

Volunteers for BloomAgain Bklyn prepare unsold flowers for reuse in new arrangements.


LET BIG IDEAS BLOOM

PROVIDED BY CAROLINE GATES ANDERSON; PROVIDED BY CAT CORA; JEFF CROSBY; PROVIDED BY PAULA DEZZUTTI HEWLETTE

After retiring from publishing, Caroline Gates Anderson rekindled her passion for floral design. Soon, she noticed how long flowers from Trader Joe’s lasted with proper care — and learned unsold blooms went to waste. Three years ago, Anderson, 67, founded BloomAgainBklyn (bloomagain bklyn.org) in her Brooklyn, N.Y., neighborhood to give unsold or once-used flowers a second life. It turns discards from local grocery stores and florists into displays that bring joy to seniors, domestic violence survivors and others. Each year, about 300 volunteers of all ages and backgrounds create the arrangements. Both giver and recipient benefit from the interaction and the flowers’ therapeutic powers. “This little seed of an idea has blossomed on so many levels,” she says.

LEVERAGE YOUR SKILLS

IGNITE YOUR PASSION

MAKE A FINANCIAL CASE

Chef Cat Cora — best known as the first female resident Iron Chef on Food Network’s Iron Chef America — spends her days surrounded by food. As a result, she’s moved to aid those with none. For more than 12 years, her nonprofit Chefs for Humanity (chefsforhumanity. org) has marshaled culinary resources for disaster response. After Hurricane Katrina, damaged restaurants and casinos had large volumes of food that had to be cooked quickly. The organization deployed chefs to turn the food into meals for the displaced and first responders. “Everyone has a knowledge of something that’s useful,” says Cora, 50, of Santa Barbara, Calif. “Use that to give back.”

Cindy Crosby always lived close to nature, so she felt apprehensive about moving to the Chicago suburbs 20 years ago. It turned out that her Glen Ellyn, Ill., home was just steps from the 1,700-acre Morton Arboretum (mortonarb.org). Now, the 56-year-old freelance writer spends 200 volunteer hours a year caring for and educating people about the tallgrass prairie preserved at the arboretum. Inspired, she recently completed a master’s degree and a book, The Tallgrass Prairie: An Introduction. Crosby says her unpaid hours feel energizing, not burdensome: “When you’re working in your sweet spot, your gratitude expands. It brings me tremendous joy.”

In 2011, Paula “Pixie” Dezzutti Hewlette, 54, had a vision: a company that combined charity with celebration. Now, Local Choice Spirits — her boutique alcohol company in Charleston, S.C. — gives $2 per bottle sold through its #PourItForward initiative (localchoicespirits.com/ pouritforward) to community organizations. This type of cause marketing has become essential to profitability, says the powerhouse mother of nine. “The greatest chance of sustainable revenue will come from the point where a company shifts to something bigger than themselves,” she says. “You can call that philanthropy, or just smart business.”

83


CAREERS + MONEY

Reboot Your Résumé Five post-retirement careers to consider BY DEBRA AUERBACH

S

GETTY IMAGES

ome workers picture retirement as a time to take that dream vacation, spend more time with family or pick up a new hobby. Others, however, look at retirement as a time to pursue a second career. They may seek out a role that’s a scaled-back version of their current job, or they may choose a fresh start. Either way, many types of jobs are a good fit for mature workers and can provide fulfillment, enrichment — and a paycheck.

84

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017


FIVE CAREER OPTIONS TO CONSIDER FOR WORKERS NEARING RETIREMENT:

1

RÉSUMÉ WRITER

Jessica Holbrook Hernandez, president and CEO of Great Résumés Fast (greatresumesfast.com), says that a worker who wants to make an impact after retirement should consider becoming a résumé writer. “The career experience that you’ve gained, years of leadership and industry expertise are a great combination for an executive résumé writer,” she says. “If you love to write, you should consider looking into certification as a résumé writer. There are many different certification organizations — and even online training programs — that can turn good writers into great résumé writers. Helping others pursue their own career dreams is a wonderful way to make an impact post-retirement.”

2

VIRTUAL ASSISTANT

Computer-savvy workers may want to consider virtual assisting — remotely conducting administrative, clerical or other requested tasks for clients. “They can work for an agency or can run their own virtual assistant practice if they wish to go into business for themselves,” says Holly Kile, author of Virtual Team Builder for Coaches and founder of Greenwood, Ind.-based HJK Global Solutions (hjkglobal.biz). “Virtual assisting offers flexibility in work hours and the ability to work from home or on the road for those who travel, making it an ideal choice for someone nearing traditional retirement age.”

GETTY IMAGES

5

3

BLOGGER

Just because you’re not a mom or a foodie doesn’t mean you can’t blog — anyone who can tell a good story and knows how to promote themselves online can find and develop an audience. “If you have some skills as a writer, (blogging) makes a great career option, as it allows you to make your own schedule and write about what you know and enjoy,” suggests Susan Joyce, owner and operator of Job-Hunt.org, a site that provides job searching tips. “If your blog is successful, this can even lead to writing or editing opportunities with other publications.”

4

ENTREPRENEUR

Entrepreneurship can seem risky for those just starting a career, but workers nearing retirement may be more comfortable taking a risk and following a passion. A small startup may be the way to begin. “It’s never too late to pursue a business idea of your own,” Joyce says. “Like blogging, being an entrepreneur allows you to work how and when you work best. This flexibility is great for retirees looking for a change. "Whether your business idea leads you to Shark Tank or Etsy, entrepreneurship can be a fun, rewarding option for mature workers," she says.

TEACHER

Another great way for mature workers to use their experience — and give back to the community — is through teaching or mentoring. “Sometimes, a person may teach or work at a university. In other cases, a person may actually teach in a prison, helping inmates to further their education,” says Angela Copeland, a career coach and owner of Copeland Coaching in Memphis (copelandcoaching.com). While some additional schooling may be required, teaching is a rewarding way to spend retirement. Teach.org, a nonprofit organization led by Microsoft and the U.S. Department of Education, can provide a guide on where to start. — Debra Auerbach is a writer for the Advice & Resources section on CareerBuilder.com. She researches and writes about job search strategy, career management, hiring trends and workplace issues.

85


CAREERS + MONEY

Women in their 50s need to make sure their finances are in order BY ADAM STONE

86

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017

themselves and their aging parents,” says Amy Jamrog, a wealth management advisor with The Jamrog Group, which works with Northwestern Mutual in Holyoke, Mass. “It’s a very complicated time for even the most financially savvy people.” To manage that complexity, it helps to break down financial planning into its main components.

Balancing the dollars It may be time, for example, to adjust where and how retirement savings are getting socked away. For a younger person, it makes sense to save as much as possible pre-tax. As a person looks ahead toward retirement, it may make more sense to move to a Roth IRA, something that costs a bit in taxes upfront but pays out tax-free down the road.

GETTY IMAGES

Follow the Money

W

hen Sherri Cultra and her husband Michael bought a retirement home last year, the Rockford, Ill., schoolteacher realized it was time to take a financial inventory. “We had to look at the overall picture: How would this impact our plans? When can we retire if we do that? Under what circumstances?” says Cultra, 59. She’s still a few years away from retirement, but that makes it the right time to crunch the numbers — to look at what she has, estimate future earnings and consider what she’ll need over the long haul. For women in their 50s, some consider it a financial face lift. “It’s a time in life where there are many competing goals in terms of dollars, in terms of time that women have available to continue earning. They are in between taking care of their kids,


pay off the mortgage, to continue to live comfortably without that second salary? If there are kids still in college, will the insurance cover those expenses as well?

Marital matters

“The shift is from an accumulation mentality — save! save! save! — to a distribution strategy, planning for how the money will pay out when you need it,” Jamrog says.

Clear the debt Women may feel pressured to save in their 50s, especially if they entered the workforce late or took time off during their careers and feel like they are making up for lost time. But it’s equally important to clear debt. “Once you retire and are on a fixed income, that debt is going to be a drag on your lifestyle,” says Sally Balch Hurme, author of Get the Most Out of Retirement. Mortgage debt does come with a tax benefit, so it’s not imperative that it be paid off before retirement. But for those carrying credit card debt or even student loan debt from their kids’ educations, it makes sense to wipe that slate clean.

Who benefits? Women should review the beneficiaries of their wills, insurance plans and trusts. “If there are grandchildren now who you didn’t include the first time, you may want to revisit that,” says Kimberly Foss, founder of Empyrion Wealth Management in Roseville, Calif. Maybe a beneficiary has died, a child has become estranged, or there’s an in-law who should not inherit. Maybe none of this was true when the will was written, but that’s the reason for the midlife financial checkup: Things change. It’s time to make adjustments.

Life insurance While reviewing beneficiaries, it’s also a good time to take a look at the terms of your life insurance. Perhaps things have changed? If a spouse were to die, would there be enough money to

Marriage and divorce complicate women’s finances. The divorce rate for people over 50 has doubled in the U.S. since 1990 and tripled for those over 65, the Pew Research Center finds. “In theory, divorce cuts everything in half for everyone, but in fact, women get the short end of the stick because they have been (in and) out of the workforce. And because we live longer, it’s a double whammy,” Foss says. A divorced woman will have an extra hurdle, as she’ll be looking at a single-income retirement while also likely dealing with the economic fallout of the split, which tends to leave women worse off financially. At the same time, some of those who laid their plans figuring they would never get married — for instance, lesbians — now find matrimony a viable option. That too calls for a financial review. Just as for straight couples, gay couples need to look at the tax implications of filing a joint return, instead of filing single. They may also need to review their wills and other documents to reflect their changed status. Everyone should review their finances from time to time. But Cultra feels a particular obligation to keep her numbers current. “I decided years ago to be a stay-at-home mom and that changed my ability to earn. When you are out of the workforce for 20 years, it drastically impacts your choices,” she says. “What happens if I survive my husband? What happens if I don’t have his income? It greatly affects how I view our finances.” l

87


CAREERS + MONEY

Saving for Your Health Here’s how to navigate those new accounts that help you pay your medical bills BY ELIZABETH NEUS

88

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017

don’t even know what to ask,” says Paul Fronstin, director of the health research and education program at the Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI), who has sat in on meetings whereworkers learn about HSAs. Don’t know where to start? Here’s a helpful primer:

How do I put money into my HSA? It’s similar to the way you contribute to your 401(k). The money is automatically deducted from your paycheck before taxes are taken out (so you also get a tax break). You decide how much to contribute; the yearly maximum is $3,350 for people with individual coverage and $6,750

for those with family coverage. If you’re 55 or older, you can save an additional $1,000 per year. Some employers also make contributions to your HSA; make sure you know when those occur so you know how much money will be in your account at any given time. The contribution could come in a lump sum at the beginning of the year, or more likely, on a monthly basis.

When can I take money out of my HSA? Whenever necessary, as long as you’re paying for something defined as a medical expense by IRS Publication 502. This list includes the expected, such as doctors’ visits or emergency care,

GETTY IMAGES

M

ore than 22 million Americans — 14 percent of those with private insurance — have enrolled in health care plans that include a special savings account known as an HSA that covers some of their medical expenses and is designed to save money. But these health savings accounts are so new to most consumers, with 85 percent of them having been opened since 2011, that most people still don’t quite understand them. They’re often confused with another, different health benefit, the flexible spending account, or FSA. “The employees who are being told about this new health plan


but also things that often aren’t covered by insurance, such as eyeglasses, chiropractic care, service animal care and breast pumps for nursing mothers. You can either pay the provider directly with a debit card linked to your HSA, or you can pay out of pocket and get reimbursed from the HSA later. As long as it’s being used for a medical expense, the payment to you is tax-free.

Is this the only health coverage I get?

GETTY IMAGES

No. Most HSAs are combined with high-deductible insurance plans that have a minimum deductible of $1,300 for individuals and $2,600 for families. The average family deductible, however, is about $3,000 and can be as high as $6,000, says Dr. Stephen Neeleman, founder and vice chairman of Health Equity, one of the largest HSA managers in the U.S. This combo is known as a consumer-driven health plan (CDHP). The plans also limit how much of your non-HSA money you have to spend. After you hit the deductible, you either pay only a percentage of the cost until you reach that out-of-pocket limit, or the procedure may be fully covered. On average, HSA owners spent $1,748 in 2015, the most recent figures available, according to EBRI’s HSA Database.

What if I don’t have a lot of money in my HSA when someone gets sick? “You have to wait until it comes in,” says Fronstin, who

agrees that this is a quandary for many people. “The hardest thing is (when) people get slammed early in the year before they have money in the account.” Many health care consumers are still used to FSAs, which required enrollees to spend all of the money saved within the plan year or it would go back to their employers. So the mindset of having to get instantly reimbursed remains. But, he says, because your HSA money stays in the account until you spend it, that’s not necessary; you can let the money build before you use it. Save your receipts and use your HSA to reimburse yourself later when there’s more money in the account. Tip: You can spend the HSA money on anyone in your immediate family — you, your spouse or your dependents — even if they are not covered by your insurance plan.

How much money do people usually have in an HSA at any given time? EBRI’s HSA Database finds that the average balance at the end of 2015 was about $1,844, and that the amount varied by age. People younger than 25 had about $759 in their HSAs, while people over 65 had about $3,623. Older workers tend to make more money and tend to save more in the first place, Fronstin says.

I liked the predictability of my copays. What’s the point of all of this? HSAs are supposed to make consumers more aware of how much medical care actually costs and to encourage them

to seek out less expensive care. “We’re in an era where people are having more engagement with their health care dollars, weighing the highest-quality and most cost-effective options,” says Cathryn Donaldson, director of communications for America’s Health Insurance Plans, the national association for health care coverage companies. “It’s a great opportunity for consumers.” Not a simple one, though. “I’m an expert and I learn something new every day,” says Fronstin, who has his own HSA. Most health plans that include HSAs have online calculators to help you estimate how much a specific doctor might charge for a procedure, or how much a prescription may cost, before you actually seek treatment. And you may not even have to pay that full amount. Most insurance plans only pay the doctor part of his full charge; your bill is based only on what the insurance company pays the doctor.

So does it work? EBRI says it might: The organization released a report May 25 that found that more people who belonged to a CDHP had asked about whether care was covered by the plan before getting it or asked for a generic, rather than a name-brand drug, than those who did not. And the Kaiser Family Foundation’s 2016 report on employer health benefits found that premiums for people in CDHPs with a savings option were far lower than all other kinds of plans, with individuals paying about $943 per year and families paying $4,289. (The average for all plans is $1,129 for individuals and $5,306 for families.)

89


SECOND ACT

Talk About Retiring Before You Do It What to consider when choosing the next chapter in your life BY GINA HARKINS

K

erry Hannon loves the country. Her husband prefers the city. That has led to some tough talks about where the two will retire — but she urges couples not to shy away from those conversations. “We force ourselves at least once a year to have this talk to see where are we right now, what might work, and if there is room

90

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017

for compromise,” says Hannon, 56, the author of a dozen books about finance and retirement, including Money Confidence: Really Smart Financial Moves for Newly Single Women. Choosing the right retirement location can be intimidating. With fewer Americans retiring with cushy pensions, there’s far more to consider than sunshine and golf courses. >

READY TO RETIRE? MAKE SURE YOU HAVE ENOUGH CASH As employees approach retirement age, many become eager to trade in the office chair for a La-Z-Boy recliner. But retiring too early can be a major financial mistake: If you retire without enough funds to keep you going for the rest of your life, you’ll either have to scrape up another job, drastically adjust your lifestyle or both. Here’s a simple process to determine whether you have enough money saved to cut and run: 1 ESTIMATE YOUR ANNUAL EXPENSES This is easy to calculate if you are already tracking your monthly expenses. Just remove any that won’t be a factor during retirement, add in enough to pay for planned retirement activities (e.g., cruises), multiply by 12 — and there’s your annual estimate. If you don’t have such a budget, you can get a quick-and-dirty estimate by choosing a percentage of your current income based on your plans for retired life. If you’ll have no housing expenses (e.g., your mortgage is paid off) and you expect to live fairly simply, you can probably get by with 70 percent of your working income. If you plan to spend your retirement years traveling around the world and living it up, you may need as much as 100 percent of your working income — or more! — to finance your retirement dreams. Keep in mind that one >

DON EMMERT/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

Bankrate ranks Maine as one of the top locations to retire; low cost of living has become more important than weather.


community

Discover your

IMAGINE A NEIGHBORHOOD WHERE YOU KNOW YOUR NEIGHBORS. Imagine exploring horticulture, running a marathon, learning photography or traveling internationally on sponsored trips. If the ideas of opportunity, living with purpose, and community appeal to you — welcome to Sycamore Springs. Embrace your future today at SYCAMORESPRINGS.ORG, a new concept in retirement living!


SECOND ACT

expense likely to increase during retirement is health care. Fidelity’s Retiree Health Care Cost Estimate calculated that an average 65-year old couple who retired in 2016 would need $260,000 saved just for medical expenses.

“I think what people are looking to get out of retirement has changed over the last few years,” says Claes Bell, an editor at the personalfinance website Bankrate.com. “There’s a real concern among people that they’re going to outlive their savings and (that) things like medical bills and long-term care are going to zap their wealth quickly.” In Bankrate’s latest ranking of the best states for retirement, New Hampshire, Colorado and Maine take the top three spots, beating out traditional locales for the 50-plus crowd such as Florida and Arizona. The more than 1,000 people surveyed listed factors that included cost of

92

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017

TOP THREE STATES RANKED BEST FOR RETIREMENT

New Hampshire

Colorado

Maine SOURCE: BANKRATE

living and quality medical care far higher than weather, Bell says. Such practical factors — including transportation and good support networks — should be high on every woman’s checklist, says Cindy Hounsell, the president of the Women’s Institute for a Secure Retirement, a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit that helps educate women about retirement options. Women tend to outlive men, she says, so they should be near or within reach of family and friends, and look for communities with agencies that assist the senior population. Finding a place with the right amenities or updating your home to make it >

3 CALCULATE YOUR MINIMUM INCOME FROM SAVINGS Take the amount you calculated as your “other” income and subtract it from the annual expenses figure. The result is the minimum amount you’ll need to produce from your retirement savings accounts. 4 ADD UP YOUR CURRENT RETIREMENT SAVINGS Include any money in accounts earmarked for retirement (IRAs, 401(k)s, etc.). If you have money in an HSA account, you can include that, too; once you hit official retirement age, you’ll be able to take those funds out penalty-free for any purpose, not just medical expenses. >

GETTY IMAGES

New Hampshire’s scenic beauty appeals to people who are planning retirement.

2 ADD UP YOUR OTHER SOURCES OF RETIREMENT INCOME Most retirees will receive Social Security benefits; find the exact amount you’ll be receiving on your annual Social Security statement. Other potential sources of income include pensions, real estate rental properties, business ownerships and so on. When calculating income from potentially variable sources such as rental properties, be pessimistic. It’s better to be pleasantly surprised, rather than unpleasantly surprised, given what’s at stake.


The Outer Banks

®

OF NORTH CAROLINA Hatteras Island, NC

A A R P ’s # 1 B e st B e ac h P ic k 2 0 1 7

The OBX has a way of speaking to people. A chain of barrier islands, connected by the elements. An open canvas that lets the imagination roam freely. Nothing to get in the way of you being you. Get in touch with us.

877-629-4386

AmericasFirstBeach.com

Don’t Let This Moment

SAVOR THE SEASONS

inUpcountry South Carolina |

ANDERSON OCONEE

|

CHEROKEE PICKENS

|

|

PASS YOU BY

Antietam Battlefield • C&O Canal Harpers Ferry • Appalachian Trail Potomac Heritage National Scenic Trail

GREENVILLE

S PA R TA N B U R G

E

njoy the blooming Dogwoods and Azaleas in Spring. In Summer, explore waterfalls, rivers and lakes.Take a drive along scenic byways for the fabulous Fall foliage. Spend a weekend in a cozy cabin during Winter. Whenever you choose to visit, the Upcountry will be Perfectly Seasoned for you! Perfectly Seasoned

UpcountrySC.com | 800.849.4766 | FREE Visitors Guide

Call or visit us online to get a free Visitor’s Guide!

888-257-2600 • visithagerstown.com


SECOND ACT

Today’s retirement communities feature lots of activities and events, such as this “secret supper” held in Loveland, Colo.

5 DECIDE ON A WITHDRAWAL RATE If you want to retire at 65, you might choose a withdrawal percentage of 3 percent to keep your accounts producing for your lifetime without cutting into your capital. If you plan to hold off on retiring until 70, you might be able to get away with a withdrawal rate of 5 percent or even 6 percent. Choose a percentage that will let you sleep at night. If you tend to worry about money, stick with a more conservative withdrawal percentage.

retiree-friendly can take time, so Hannon suggests having a five-year plan. If you’re interested in staying in your current house, bring in a home-modification professional to see what adjustments you might need to age in place safely. If you want to move, allow yourself plenty of time for research. “Go test the waters,” Hannon says. “Take vacations there. See if you can do extended visits. … Move there and rent something before you buy. Really make sure you’re going to fit into the fabric of that community.” All three experts agree that being financially fit is key to a happy retirement. If you’re on the hunt for a new house, ditch the ego. Retirees likely don’t need massive homes, and cutting housing costs can slash your monthly budget. Be on the lookout for one-story homes or houses

94

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017

with master bedrooms on the first floor, making it easier for you to keep your home as you age. As for locations, Hannon says college towns have a lot to offer. Universities have good health centers and the constant influx of students in college towns makes them nearly recession-proof. And for women interested in continuing to work, there are also typically lots of small businesses. Places like Asheville, N.C.; Greenville, S.C.; and Boulder, Colo., offer lower costs of living than larger cities. Midsize cities such as Pittsburgh also tend to have fun things to do, too, which Bell says is important for this generation of retirees. “The Boomers are interested in music, theater and all those sorts of cultural amenities,” he says. “So having those locally is going to be important.” l

7 COMPARE YOUR REQUIREMENTS WITH YOUR REALITY Compare your annual withdrawals number to the amount of required savings income you’ve estimated. If the withdrawals are lower, then you don’t have enough saved to guarantee you’ll meet your income needs in retirement. If the shortfall is small, you may be able to tweak the numbers just a little bit to make it work. Or you may find that if you put off retirement by just a few years, you’ll be able to easily produce enough income for your needs. l

— Wendy Connick writes for The Motley Fool, a USA TODAY content partner for financial news and analysis.

ERIKA MOORE/THE FORT COLLINS COLORADOAN

6 CALCULATE YOUR ANNUAL WITHDRAWALS Multiply your current savings number by the withdrawal percentage number. The result is the amount you can safely take out of your retirement savings accounts every year.


YOUR

TROPICALOASIS AWAITS

Welcome to Island Life

EXCLUSIVE OFFER FOR USA TODAY READERS! Enjoy 20% OFF our regular rates and receive daily breakfast for two by using promo code “USA50.” Plus, receive a coupon book with over $250 in savings at resort outlets; enjoy family activities, restaurant savings, golf, spa services and merchandise, and more.

855.337.9019 | SouthSeas.com

#SouthSeas

Offer is subject to availability. Resort fee and taxes additional.

Alaska Vacations Sightseeing, Rail Tours, Multi-Day Packages and more!

Historic Home Tours | Shopping | Dining Farmers Market | Outdoor Recreation Festivals & Events | Historic Downtown Tennessee Williams Home & Welcome Center | 300 Main St. 800.920.3533 | 662.329.1191 | VisitColumbusMS.org

The best in Alaska Vacations for over 70 years! * Restrictions apply. See website for details.

graylinealaska.com • 1.800.544.2206


Stacey and her mom Eileen in 2012; Eileen in her mid20s, below.

Poems by Eileen A mother’s written words resonate through time BY STACEY ZABLE

A

s a teen, I was looking for something in my mother’s nightstand when I came across a black binder with the words “Poems by Eileen” written on it in her handwriting. Inside were countless stories written in rhyme marking birthdays, anniversaries and friendships, as well as one longer story, Two Girls on the Loose. They were written by my mom when she was a single woman in her 20s, after she and her sister had left upstate New York to live in New Haven, Conn., and then New York City. At the time, the most striking finding was that my mother was a gifted writer. My own love of writing was just beginning to take seed. I even wrote similar stories in rhyme, and yet Mom never told me that she was also a writer. When I asked, she acted surprised, as though it had never crossed her mind that this might be something to share. I’m not sure she ever told

96

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2017

SISTER CHARLOTTE (1956) So enjoy all your gifts and never mind It’s not so old, you know, being 29! I might reach that age some fine day — Of course, it will be when I’m old and gray. FROM A BIRTHDAY POEM EILEEN MORRIS WROTE FOR HER SISTER CHARLOTTE

me how she felt about my discovery. At the time, I was too young to appreciate the pictures her words painted of a young woman and her closest friends discovering adulthood during the 1950s. They told of such new freedoms as finding an apartment and job, going to dances and dating, and the excitement of the first of Mom’s friends to marry and have a baby. As I grew as both a woman and a writer, I often thought of her writing. It was something that connected me to her — and I liked to hope she felt the same. My mom passed away in December, and while packing up her things, my sister and I were on a mission to rediscover the binder of poems. We longed to hear our mother’s voice again, even through written verse. Hidden within multiple boxes, “Poems by Eileen” emerged. My sister and I re-read them now as women who have lived our own early adulthood and better appreciate her journey. I’ve shown it to my own daughters. The binder is a precious gift that provides insight into the woman she was. Her writing is the one concrete thing she left that was 100 percent her. In her stories, she was not Dad’s wife or our mom. She was Eileen Morris. Eileen’s adventures told tales of someone extraordinary. She was pleased to be a wife and mother, but I like to think that she, like every woman, still wanted to be known as an individual.

PROVIDED BY STACEY ZABLE; GETTY IMAGES

LAST WORD


KEEP LIFE SIMPLE

Lotus Yoga available at:


T R E AT YO U R S E L F A A R P M E M B E R S E N J O Y M O R E E X C L U S I V E R E WA R D S . Get more out of your next trip—and enjoy these AARP member benefits: • • • • •

Complimentary car class upgrade* Free additional driver Discounted GPS for $6.99/day 24-hour roadside assistance Plus, more exclusive discounts and benefits

Enjoy up to 30% off base rates plus a complimentary weekday rental with coupon # TUGA043. To reserve call Avis at 1-800-331-1800 or visit avis.com/aarpUSAToday Not an AARP member, visit avis.com/aarpmembership to enroll in order to take advantage of this offer.

Avis is the exclusive car rental provider of AARP members.

AARP member benefits are provided by third parties, not by AARP or its affiliates. Providers pay royalty fees to AARP for the use of its intellectual property. These fees are used for the general purposes of AARP. Some provider offers are subject to change and may have restrictions. Please contact the provider directly for details. Terms and conditions apply. Visit avis.com/aarp for more information. * Subject to availability. ©2017 Avis Rent A Car System, LLC

Best Years  
Best Years