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HOW TO STAY ACTIVE, ENGAGED & HAPPY

BEST YEARS FABULOUS LIVING AT 50+

FALL/WINTER 2016

BRUNCH: FUN, FOOD & FRIENDS

4

GREAT

GOLF

GETAWAYS

Holly Robinson Peete ACTOR, AUTHOR, ADVOCATE ­—­ AMAZING! PLUS

5 CLASSIC STYLES FOR EVERY CLOSET

DIG FOR YOUR FAMILY ROOTS

LUXURY SPAS TAKE TO THE HIGH SEAS


FEEL GOOD

EVERY DAY

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YOU SERVED YOUR COUNTRY. NOW CALL PARADISE HOME.

FLORIDA WORKS FOR VETERANS

You can’t beat Florida’s beautiful beaches, warm climate and recreation-filled lifestyle. Forbes’ Top 10 Beaches in America ranking includes five Florida beaches, and the state’s Everglades and natural springs provide abundant hunting and fishing opportunities.

For more reasons why Florida is the right choice visit veteransflorida.org/why-florida


BEST YEARS FALL/WINTER 2016

RESEARCH YOUR ROOTS

DNA testing makes learning your heritage a breeze

FEATURES

36

42 LIKE A ROCK

POST-CANCER CALMING

RECONNECTING OVER BRUNCH

Tailored subscription boxes for every taste right at your door

Actress Holly Robinson Peete’s resilience runs deep

Music, dance and yoga ease women after treatment

Host an afternoon they’ll be talking about for years

THINKSTOCK

SPECIAL DELIVERY

48

54

3


UP FRONT

68 TEE TIME

These golf destinations create connections on and off the course

BEAUTY & STYLE Nature-inspired fragrances for fall

8 12 14 16 18 22 25 28

Five investment pieces worth every penny Makeup tips that keep you gorgeous at any age

WELLNESS Dark chocolate might keep the doctor away

SELF

You can’t age out of getting vaccines Tips to summon the sandman Nine women share what brings them joy Authors share their recently loved books

DEPARTMENTS TASTE

64 66 74 80 85 88 90 92 96

TRAVEL

Rosé belongs in your rotation all year long Cruise ship spas that rival their landlubber cousins

LIFESTYLE Communities that tout adventure and fun

HEALTH

GOOD FIT

What to pair with your crisp, white shirt

ON THE COVER: Holly Robinson Peete PHOTO BY MARTA ELENA

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BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2016

Joint replacements don’t have to sideline you Starting a new career later in life can pay off

FINANCE Is your financial adviser working for you? The latest car tech inside the newest models

LAST WORD A writer finds that the physical benefits of hiking come secondary

All product prices and availability are subject to change.

REYNOLDS PLANTATION; JERALD COUNCIL

10

CAREER

Bacteria in our bellies hold keys to good health


contributors PREMIUM PUBLICATION EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Jeanette Barrett-Stokes jbstokes@usatoday.com CREATIVE DIRECTOR Jerald Council jcouncil@usatoday.com MANAGING EDITOR Michelle Washington mjwashington@usatoday.com

MARY HELEN BERG “Holly Robinson Peete is a force of nature,” says L.A.based Berg, who interviewed the actress/author/advocate for our cover story (page 42). “She’s always in motion, never stops fighting for her family or for issues she believes in, and she does it all with a healthy dose of humor.”

ANNETTE THOMPSON The Birmingham, Ala.-based freelancer counts herself lucky to live in the South, where she hits the fairways every weekend. For this issue, she wrote about great golfing destinations (page 68). “Georgia’s Reynolds Plantation is like a candy shop. With six distinctive courses, I want to sample each one.”

EDITORS Elizabeth Neus Hannah Prince Sara Schwartz Tracy L. Scott DESIGNERS Miranda Pellicano Gina Toole Saunders Ashleigh Webb Lisa M. Zilka CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Margaux Anbouba, Karen Asp, Katie Kelly Bell, Mary Helen Berg, Adam Hadhazy, Allison Hatfield, Jodi Helmer, Kate Parham Kordsmeier, Cindy Kuzma, Janene Mascarella, Nancy Monson, Peggy J. Noonan, Annette Thompson, Kristi Valentini, Suzanne Wright

ADVERTISING

VP, ADVERTISING Patrick Burke | (703) 854-5914 pburke@usatoday.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Justine Goodwin | (703) 854-5444 jgoodwin@usatoday.com

COURTESY OF THE CONTRIBUTORS

FINANCE

KAREN ASP Sloppy kisses from dogs, mountain hikes and farmers markets all make this Indiana-based journalist happy. So, too, does getting immersed in a good book, which is why she was ecstatic when best-selling novelist Jodi Picoult agreed to participate in her happiness feature (page 25), for which nine high-profile women weighed in on what makes them happy. Picoult “couldn’t have been more gracious about sharing her insight.”

LAUREN A. ROTHMAN The founder of fashion consulting firm Styleauteur believes first impressions count, and for our fashion story (page 10), she handpicked 25 items to give your crisp, white button-down an extra wow factor. “If you’re searching for the perfect balance between trendy and classic, pair absolutely anything with a white buttondown this fall,” she says. Her book, Style Bible: What to Wear to Work, helps readers avoid fashion faux pas. She is based in Washington, D.C.

BILLING COORDINATOR Julie Marco

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5


KEEP LIFE SIMPLE

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| BEST YEARS

up Front B E A U T Y & S T Y L E 8 | W E L L N E S S 16 | S E L F 25

FIND YOUR BLISS We spend a lot of time taking care of others, so this issue of Best Years is dedicated to improving your own health and wellness.

“Happiness is letting go and being unrestricted. Freedom to dream, imagine and do. ... Find joy in the unexpected.” - Sheila E., iconic drummer, actress, author and musician

ROB SHANAHAN

FOR MORE REASONS TO BE HAPPY, FLIP TO PAGE 25.

3


UP FRONT | BEAUTY + STYLE

Into the Woods Nature-inspired scents for autumn BY SARA SCHWARTZ

R

oaring bonfires, decadent desserts and crisp, brisk days are just three reasons to fall for fall. Five more: these fragrances, which feature earthy, warm notes and remind us of the calmer season that follows a sweltering summer.

musk, 1 Warm vanilla and

cashmere woods balance black jasmine and bergamot blossom in Tocca’s Margaux. $68,

tocca.com

2 Lollia’s Dream

features white tea, linden, bergamot and honeysuckle.

1

$55, lollialife.com 2

pep3 Pink percorns

mingle with a spicy woodland base and the vanilla aroma of the tonka bean in Laboratory Perfume’s Tonka. $95,

5

beautyhabit. com

4 InaptlyDasein’s 4

3

named Autumn, coffee takes center stage, with an assist from incense, amber and cinnamon. $95,

daseinfragrance. com

and rhubarb unify violet, cedarwood, patchouli and sandalwood in Illume’s Chanterelle Moss. $27,

illumecandles. com

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BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2016

JERALD COUNCIL; STYLED BY LISA M. ZILKA

5 Eucalyptus, lavender


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UP FRONT | BEAUTY & STYLE

Shirt Shifts

1

8

Three distinct looks starring a classic BY SARA SCHWARTZ PHOTOS BY JERALD COUNCIL

T

he next time you’re standing in front of your closet, puzzled by what to pair with those amazing maroon pants that still have the tag on them, grab that crisp, white button-down. The classic staple goes with “absolutely everything,” says Lauren A. Rothman (pictured above), a fashion, style and trend expert based in Washington, D.C. “It’s an ageless, timeless piece.” The founder of fashion consulting firm Styleauteur and author of Style Bible: What to Wear to Work regularly works with clients to help them learn how to show off their shapes, which is why she loves a good white button-down. “It works on so many body types,” she says. “Style has nothing to do with age; it has to do with body type. If you couldn’t wear it at 40, you probably can’t wear it at 50. So it’s really not about age, but understanding your figure and how to accentuate and show it off.” To prove the shirt’s versatility, Rothman put together three looks that start with the Aaron long-sleeve classic shirt by Lauren Ralph Lauren ($69.50, Lord & Taylor) as a base.

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BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2016

7

3 6

2

5

4

WORK 1 Alfani zip-trim textured black vest, $109.50, Macy’s 2 Calvin Klein stretch belt, $36, Lord & Taylor 3 Everyday ankle pants, $98, Ann Taylor 4 Salvatore Ferragamo Scotty Rock studded velvet loafers, $675, Bloomingdale’s 5 Furla medium Fantasia tote, $328, Bloomingdale’s 6 INC International Concepts goldtone and jet colorblock hinged bangle bracelet, $34.50, Macy’s 7 Lauren Ralph Lauren gold-tone stud earrings, $24, Lord & Taylor 8 Kate Spade New York statement pendant necklace, $198, Lord & Taylor


BEAUTY & STYLE | UP FRONT

1 4

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6

1 7 3

2

6 2

5

8

8 7

4

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EVENING

WEEKEND

1 Calvin Klein distressed faux-leather moto jacket. $129.50, Macy’s 2 Bronze chevron skirt by Hunter Bell via Rent the Runway, rental $75, retail $460, renttherunway.com 3 Kate Spade New York Charm glitter heels, $325, Lord & Taylor 4 Reflection necklace by Lulu Frost via Rent the Runway, rental $65, retail $475, renttherunway.com 5 Robert Lee Morris SOHO silver-plated crystal stud earrings, $28, Lord & Taylor 6 Gold dogwood bloom ring by Slate and Willow via Rent the Runway, rental $10, retail $25, renttherunway.com 7 Indigo mirrored pyramid brake hinge bracelet by Alexis Bittar via Rent the Runway, rental $30, retail $175, renttherunway.com 8 Milly Party Box clutch, $295, Bloomingdale’s

1 Hobbs London Laurie Waterfall coat, $355, Bloomingdale’s 2 NYDJ Millie pull-on jeans, $110, Lord & Taylor 3 Houndstooth sweater scarf, $98, Ann Taylor 4 Vince Camuto Winiveer suede fringed sandals, $119, Lord & Taylor 5 Salem ring by Kenneth Jay Lane via Rent the Runway, rental $20, retail $180, renttherunway.com 6 Chanel sunglasses, $405, Bloomingdale’s 7 Charter Club gold-tone multicolor chain link necklace, $49.50, Macy’s 8 Drew crossbody bag by Chloe, $1,850, Bloomingdales

11


UP FRONT | BEAUTY & STYLE

CASHMERE TURTLENECK OR CREWNECK SWEATER

Choose featherweight cashmere or cashmere/silk blends for easy layering. Cleaning cashmere professionally will extend its life. Mixed-stitch wool/cashmere poncho, $98, orvis.com 

CLASSIC COAT — A TAILORED TRADITION

In colder climates, a cashmere bathrobe-style coat or a long shearling make sense. In warmer areas, opt for a lightweight trench, blazer or kneelength, single-breasted topcoat. Catherine blazer, $699, alchemydetroit.com

Worth Every Penny These splurge pieces are closet essentials BY JANENE MASCARELLA

AN OVERSIZED LEATHER TOTE OR SHOULDER BAG

A structured tote can take you from Monday morning to Friday happy hour and everything in between. If you’re tired of canvas and leather, opt for durable felt. Parker crossbody tote, $95, mrktstore.com

NOTHING BASIC ABOUT A LITTLE BLACK DRESS

The LBD will never go out of style. Look for a seasonless fabric such as silk or lightweight wool and one that can be worn day or night. Try a sleeveless sheath, a fit-and-flare silhouette with sleeves or a wrap shape.  Carmel dress, $825, senzatempofashion.com

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BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2016

IF THE (PERFECT) SHOE FITS

Pointy-toe leather or textured pumps pair with anything in your closet. SJP by Sarah Jessica Parker velvet pumps, $350, bloomingdales.com 

COURTESY OF THE COMPANIES

B

uying high-quality pieces you love is indeed a good investment, says Brooke Jaffe, operating vice president of fashion direction for women’s ready-to-wear at Bloomingdale’s. “The value and nostalgia of owning something you’ll enjoy wearing for years is priceless,” she says. “The pieces that define my wardrobe are higher-quality items with luxe fabric and detailed craftsmanship (that) have kept them looking great over time.” Cindy Weber-Cleary, former fashion director of InStyle magazine, agrees. “I would rather own fewer clothes of better quality than a lot of clothes of so-so quality. And I don’t hesitate to wear my special items often,” says Weber-Cleary, who is also the co-founder of Apprécier, a shopping website featuring the latest curated clothing, accessories and fashion trends.


UP FRONT | BEAUTY & STYLE

Gorgeous At Any Age Makeup tips and tricks that let you flaunt your phenomenal self

E

ach decade of life brings a new kind of beautiful, says Cindy Joseph, CEO of the cosmetic line BOOM! by Cindy Joseph. The makeup artist-turned-model says women over 50 do a disservice to themselves by trying to achieve the mythical state of “agelessness.” “Ageless sounds like a blank slate with no indication of a life lived, character revealed or unique features. I prefer to use the term ‘ageful,’ ” she says. “My 65-yearold face tells a story — the story of my life. My wrinkles, silver hair and sun spots indicate I have been busy having fun and living a rich and passionate life. I think my

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BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2016

features are badges of honor I earned!” When buying makeup, Joseph says a big mistake women often make is sticking to the same brand, colors and textures they might have used decades ago. To start fresh, skip the powders and heavy foundations. After the age of 50, the skin has more texture, so powder and heavy, dry foundations only accentuate that. When it comes to applying your makeup, less is more. “It allows the woman to stand out rather than the makeup. For a natural look, stay away from dark eyeshadow, strong lip colors or heavily penciled eyebrows,” Joseph explains. “Stick with soft lines, dewy skin and subtle color.”

THINKSTOCK

BY JANENE MASCARELLA


BEAUTY & STYLE | UP FRONT

AN EXPERT’S GUIDE TO GORGEOUS Rebecca Perkins, co-founder and head makeup artist at Rouge New York, a New York City makeup salon, shows how to use cosmetics (shown on the model, right) to look your best.

1

Begin with your eyes. Often, there will be some shadow, liner or mascara to be cleaned up, so if you do the foundation first, you’ll end up having to redo it. Use a concealer across the eyelid as a base. Brush on the tiniest bit of powder.

2

Sweep blush in the outer corner and the crease to give the eyelid some dimension.

3

MICHAEL CROOK FOR ROUGE NEW YORK; PRODUCTS COURTESY OF THE COMPANIES

Use a black eye pencil to create a thin line right above the lash line. Add two or three coats of mascara. Alternate eyes to let makeup set between each coat. Fill in brows using a fine brow pencil.

GET THE LOOK

4

Mature skin tends to be drier, so get double duty from a tinted moisturizer that offers a good amount of coverage. It gives you a smooth, glowing complexion without feeling makeup-y. If you want more coverage, use a light foundation — it won’t settle into fine lines.

5

Dab concealer in the inner and outer corners of the eye. This brightens without being so heavy that it settles into fine lines.

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Using one finger, dot a cream blush on the apples of the cheek for a dewy, bright complexion.

Rebecca Perkins' top product picks:

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Sweep a bit of illuminating cream on top of the cheekbone for that final glow.

8

Use a sheer lipstick in a neutral color a few shades darker than your natural lips. If your lipstick tends to bleed, use an invisible liner before applying color.

9

Finish with a spritz of mist to set the makeup.

Kimiko Hydrating Tint SPF 20, $43, kimiko beauty.com

Becca Cosmetics Perfect Skin Mineral Powder Foundation, $40, lord andtaylor.com

Kevyn Aucoin Beauty The Eye Pencil Primatif eyeliner, $26, nordstrom. com

L’oréal Voluminous mascara, $7.29, loreal parisusa.com

Julie Hewett Cheekie: cheek & lip shine, $24, julie hewett.net

Easily take the look from daytime to a universally flattering nighttime effect using these steps:

READY TO GO BOLD?

1

1

3

Add a sweep of gel liner

Curl your lashes

Reapply your lipstick,

to the inner top and bottom lash line and smudge it out a bit.

Amazing Cosmetics Amazing Concealer, $42, amazing cosmetics.com

before adding a few additional coats of mascara.

then top it off with a nude gloss that’s not too sticky and you’re ready to go.

15


UP FRONT | WELLNESS

Harper Macaw 77 percent dark chocolate $9 for 2.1 ounces harpermacaw.com

Undone 72 percent dark chocolate with Himalayan pink salt $8 for 2 ounces undonechocolate.com

Taza Chocolate 95 percent dark chocolate $5 for 2.5 ounces tazachocolate.com

Twigg & Co 70 percent dark chocolate with gogi berries and coconut $5.50 for 1.5 ounces cacaoatlanta.com

After Dark Go ahead and give in to your chocolate cravings — it’s healthy

R

esearch continues to add to the growing body of evidence that dark chocolate offers a bevy of healthful benefits. Cocoa beans are good sources of flavonoids, part of a group of antioxidants that have been shown to help protect against heart disease, drop insulin levels and even instill calm. An ounce a day just might keep the doctor away.

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BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2016

JERALD COUNCIL

BY SARA SCHWARTZ


Whether you’re looking to live it up or slow it down, life in Louisiana allows you to set your own pace. Discover the advantages of retiring Louisiana style. Š2016 Louisiana Department of Culture, Recreation & Tourism


UP FRONT | WELLNESS

A Shot of Good Health Vaccines are essential for adults, too

V

accines aren’t just for kids. After age 50, it’s important to be current on four key vaccinations: flu, pneumonia, shingles and Tdap, which protects against tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis (whooping cough). All of these illnesses can cause serious and possibly deadly health complications, says Dr. Sean Leng, associate professor of medicine in the division of geriatric medicine at Johns Hopkins University. Vaccines, Leng adds, can prevent these illnesses or lessen their severity. For instance, people ages 50 to 64 account for 13 percent of the more than 200,000 yearly hospitalizations linked to the flu. Pneumococcal pneumonia — the type prevented by vaccine — accounts for more than one-third of all

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BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2016

adult cases of pneumonia. “Vaccines provide important protection for adults over 50, whose immune systems are more frail and less able to fend off infectious diseases,” says Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious disease specialist at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that adults be vaccinated to reduce the chance of contracting a serious disease from those around us. This also helps to protect those who can’t get vaccinated — pregnant women, babies too young for shots and people with weakened immune systems. Of the vaccines recommended for adults, the flu shot is perhaps the most confusing of the bunch. The composition of the vaccine

THINKSTOCK

BY JODI HELMER


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UP FRONT | WELLNESS

recommended for adults 65 and older since the 1980s; the Food and Drug Administration approved a version in 2011 for those age 50 and older, but it is still not on the regular vaccination schedule for healthy adults. The shingles vaccine is a relatively new addition to the list, available for adults older than 60 since 2006. Shingles is a painful viral infection that causes a blistering rash. If you’ve had chickenpox, you’re susceptible to shingles — and the CDC says that most adults over 40 have had chickenpox. Tdap is a single vaccine — most familiar from childhood — that protects against tetanus, diphtheria and whooping cough. Diphtheria is a contagious bacterial infection that is extremely rare in the U.S.; tetanus is rare as

Vaccine

ADULT VACCINA TION GUIDE

well, but the deadly infection can enter the body through a simple cut or wound, and doctors recommend regular boosters to protect against it. Whooping cough can be a life-threatening disease in children, and the CDC recommends that adults be vaccinated to protect youngsters from the contagious respiratory illness. Federal law requires health insurance plans to cover these four vaccines for adults. If you’re older than 65, Schaffner says, Medicare Part B will pay for the flu and pneumonia vaccines. Some Medicare Part D plans may pay for the shingles and Tdap vaccines (you can check yours at medicare.gov/ coverage). “We need all of the protection we can get to fend off infectious diseases,” Schaffner says.

WHERE TO START It’s never been easier to get current on your immunizations. Start by making an appointment with your doctor to review your immunization history. If you’re feeling more spur-of-themoment, Walgreens allows walk-ins and gives patients the option to track their immunization history. And CVS Health announced this summer that patients could use a smartphone, computer or tablet to go online and reserve a place in line at any area MinuteClinic. The option will be expanded to Targetbased clinics later this year.

When to get it

Why get it

Possible side effects

Flu

Yearly, at the beginning of flu season (generally in October)

Flu complications include ear infections; pneumonia; muscle, heart or brain inflammation; worsening of chronic conditions

Mild soreness or swelling at injection site; low-grade fever

Pneumococcal pneumonia

Age 65; second dose six to 12 months later

Pneumonia complications include bacterial meningitis and blood infections

Mild soreness or swelling at injection site; muscle or joint aches; fever; chills; headache and nausea

Shingles

Age 60, even if you’ve already had shingles

Prevents infection that results in painful skin rash

Mild soreness or swelling at injection site; headache

Tdap

Every 10 years

Prevents dangerous bacterial infections; protects children against whooping cough (more severe for them than for adults)

Mild soreness or swelling at injection site; low-grade fever

(tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis/ whooping cough)

SOURCE: CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION

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BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2016

THINKSTOCK

is updated each year to provide protection against the strains of the ever-changing virus predicted to be most common that season — which is why a new shot is necessary every year. But the way the shot itself works has been improved: ▶A “high-dose” flu shot that provides four times as much vaccine as the conventional flu shot is available for patients over 65. A study published in The New England Journal of Medicine in 2014 found that the vaccine provided 24 percent better protection than a conventional flu shot. ▶A second option contains an adjuvant, an ingredient that stimulates the immune system to fight the flu virus. This is also recommended for people 65 and older. The pneumococcal pneumonia vaccine has been


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UP FRONT | WELLNESS

Cool off. A bedroom 65 temperature around 65 degrees can help keep hot flashes at bay, says Robert Oexman, a chiropractor, sleep researcher and director of the Sleep to Live Institute in Mebane, N.C. If you still wake up scorching, keep an iced washcloth bedside to cool the back of your neck, Harris suggests.

Five ways to get a good night’s rest BY CINDY KUZMA

T

he older you are, the more difficult it can be to get a good night’s sleep. And if you’re a woman, it can be even more challenging. In the National Sleep Foundation’s latest annual Sleep Health Index, 56 percent of women (versus 48 percent of men) reported trouble staying asleep one or more nights a week. If you’re among them, don’t stress — that only makes sleep more elusive, says Shelby Harris, director of the Behavioral Sleep Medicine Program at Montefiore Medical Center in New York. Instead, try these tips to summon the sandman.

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BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2016

Sheet up. Sleep next to someone? Use separate topsheets and blankets. You and your bedmate will stay at the right temperature — and never wake up with stolen covers again, Oexman says. Moisture-wicking bedding (starting at $149, sheex.com) can help stave off night sweats. Make noise. Don’t let creaky floorboards or loud neighbors disrupt the precious sleep you do get. Use a fan, machine or a free app like White Noise (tmsoft. com) for a background of consistent, soothing sound. Another idea: the bedtime story. Drew Ackerman’s popular podcast, Sleep With Me (sleep withmepodcast.com), lulls listeners to sleep. Let go. Stick to a consistent bedtime, even if that means leaving dirty dishes or unanswered emails for the morning. “Making time for sleep only helps one to be more productive in life during the day,” Harris says.

THINKSTOCK

Sleep Tight

Power down. Turn off phones, tablets and other devices an hour before bedtime. Blue light from screens blocks the sleepregulating hormone melatonin — and scrolling through social media feeds creates anxiety, Harris notes.


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SELF | UP FRONT

Reason to Smile Aging brings greater happiness BY KAREN ASP

A

ging often gets a bad rap, but research has shown upsides to getting older, including increased happiness. In a survey of more than 3,000 adults by Parade magazine and the Cleveland Clinic, 71 percent said they felt happiest after turning 40, most in their 50s. This makes sense, particularly when considering the meaning of happiness. “It’s not about being giddy, but rather having purpose, meaning and connections in life,” says Elizabeth Lombardo, a clinical psychologist in Chicago and author of Better Than Perfect. As people age,

they focus more on the contributions they can make and the interactions they have, all of which improve feelings of happiness. More good news? “Although there’s some genetic component to happiness, it’s largely a skill that with practice, you can improve,” Lombardo says. The key is focusing on gratitude. “While this doesn’t mean you should deny problems or believe everything’s perfect, you need to see the good and bad in every situation,” Lombardo says. Read how these influential women find happiness:

Joanna Going, Age 53 Actress, Kingdom, House of Cards and Mad Men

What makes me happiest revolves around my daughter, Stella: the sound of her singing at the top of her lungs, her genuine delight and well-earned pride in her accomplishments, her kindness, her peaceful, sleeping face. Raising a child is hard and exhausting and joyful and painful. And then there are moments of such simple, unexpected and acute happiness. I’m 12 years in, and it’s corny to say, but I have known moments of happiness as Stella’s mother that could never have been matched any other way.”

Arianna Huffington, Age 66

PETER YANG; BROOKE MASON

Co-founder of The Huffington Post and author of The Sleep Revolution

Sleep is a gateway to living a happy life. Once I started giving sleep the respect it deserves, my life improved in every way. Now, instead of waking up with the sense that I have to trudge through activities, I wake up feeling joyful about the day’s possibilities.”

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UP FRONT | SELF

Jodi Picoult, Age 50

DENISE AUSTIN, AGE 59

Best-selling author of 26 books, including her newest, Small Great Things

Fitness industry pioneer

It all begins with my family, who make me feel so happy. To see my two sweet daughters’ faces when they are happy gives me deep joy and pure contentment. To kiss my husband goodnight makes me feel blessed and loved. Eating amazing food makes me happy. The feeling of being fit and healthy is happiness. To hug my friends and family makes me happy. All of these combined makes me wake up with a smile.”

It wasn’t that long ago that I was a mom with three kids under 4 and didn’t have five minutes to myself. Yet, now that the kids are grown, our time together is rare. I treasure the moments I have with my whole family — just talking, eating or playing a board game — there’s nothing else like it.”

Co-founder of HALL Wines in Napa, Calif., vintner and co-author of A Perfect Score

Smelling the vineyard during summer and the cellar during harvest, watching the coastal fog blow into the Napa Valley in the mornings, walking through our winery grounds as visitors sip wine, share stories and laugh — there are so many impressions each day that give me joy.”

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CLOCKWISE: DEBORAH FEINGOLD; KEITH MUNYAN; JUSTINE DI FEDE/HALL

Kathryn Hall, Ag e 69


SELF | UP FRONT

Shohreh Aghdashloo, Age 64 Actress and the first Iranian woman to win an Emmy

CLOCKWISE: NBC/SYFY; ARIEL INTERNATIONAL; ANN HEPWORTH/BEST FRIENDS ANIMAL SOCIETY; PGA OF AMERICA

My grandmother would always say, ‘Surrender and you will be happy.’ ... It wasn’t until I was a bit older, until the Iranian revolution, until I had driven thousands of miles away, that I began to understand. I found myself in London with nothing. I was walking toward the pawn shop to sell what I had for my tuition and I heard my grandmother’s voice, ‘Surrender and you will be happy. Surrender to the bigger picture, for the world is not just about you.’ I am happy, for I have surrendered.”

Mellody Hobson, Age 47 President of Ariel Investments in Chicago

Happiness is watching my 3-year-old daughter discover the world without cynicism, malice or disdain. So much can be learned from a child.”

Suzy Whaley, Age 49

FAITH MALONEY, AGE 72

PGA Secretary (first woman elected as an officer of the PGA) and first woman since Babe Zaharias in 1945 to qualify for an event on the PGA tour

Co-founder and animal care consultant for Best Friends Animal Society in Kanab, Utah

Golf is a family affair in our house, as my husband, Bill, and I are PGA professionals and our two daughters have grown up playing golf. Nothing makes me happier than spending an afternoon on the course together — no interruptions or distractions — having fun as a family.”

Happiness is waking up to see Shade’s one good eye gazing back at me. Shade is a dog who survived being abandoned in the middle of nowhere. To me, Shade represents all unwanted dogs that don’t have a home of their own. These are the dogs (and cats) we at Best Friends fight for every day.”

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UP FRONT | SELF

Page Turners Five author-adored books to expand your imagination BY SARA SCHWARTZ

CHARLIE JANE ANDERS

ELIN HILDERBRAND

DANA SPIOTTA

CATHLEEN SCHINE

DIANE WILLIAMS

“Every Heart a Doorway by Seanan McGuire rocked my world. This book will make you look at classic fantasy tales and fables a whole new way, and its unique characters might just take up permanent residence in your head. What do you do after you come home from a fantasy world? Turns out there’s a special school for that.”

“One of the books that brightened up the winter of 2016 for me was Janice Y.K. Lee’s novel The Expatriates. I loved Lee’s novel The Piano Teacher, about Hong Kong during the Japanese occupation, but I enjoyed this contemporary tale of Americans living in Hong Kong even more. Writing about an exotic, unfamiliar world is one thing, but what I adored was the gripping storyline and the compelling characters.”

“I could not put down Marisa Silver’s new book, Little Nothing. It is a wild, witty and mesmerizing tale that plays with the dissidence of bodies and the transcendence of longing. Marisa Silver writes beautiful, seductive prose that always manages to be both wise and fleet; her inventive, weirdly romantic novel is compassionate and moving in wonderfully surprising ways.”

“I picked up The Sport of Kings thinking it was a novel about horse racing and discovered one of the most astonishing writers I’ve read in many years. The wild beauty, searing intelligence and wrenching empathy of C.E. Morgan’s prose is breathtaking. This novel, about racing and race and the history of our country, is simply a masterpiece.”

“I keep a photo portrait on my writing desk of a young, but aged, Iris Murdoch. She implores me to keep working. She is on her knees on the floor in front of a rumpled bed. She is rumpled. Her expression is feral and determined or is that gentleness, wisdom and pain that I see? I had to have Living on Paper: Letters From Iris Murdoch 1934-1995, edited by Avril Horner and Anne Rowe.”

– Anders is the author of multiple short stories and two novels, including her most recent, All the Birds in the Sky

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– Hilderbrand is the author of 20 books, including her most recent, Winter Storms

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2016

– Spiotta is the author of four books, including her most recent, Innocents and Others

– Schine is the author of 10 books, including her most recent, They May Not Mean To, But They Do

– Williams is the author of eight books, including her most recent, Fine, Fine, Fine, Fine, Fine

THNKSTOCK; TRISTAN CRANE; NINA SUBIN; JESSICA MARX; KAREN TAPIA; BILL HAYWARD; BOOKS COURTESY OF THE PUBLISHERS

It’s no secret that to be a great writer, you need to be a great reader. We reached out to some female authors with newly published books to hear what they’ve loved reading recently.


@SusanPage

SHE SEPARATES THE FACTS FROM THE FARCE. In a world of twisted words and endless spin, award-winning Washington Bureau Chief Susan Page makes sense of the nonsense.

usatoday.com/susanpage NEWS

SPORTS

LIFE

MONEY

TECH

Smarter. Faster. More Colorful.

TRAVEL

OPINION

WEATHER


It’s easier than ever to trace your ancestral roots

PHOTO CREDIT THINKSTOCK

BY NANCY MONSON

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erhaps you have a hankering to find out whether you’re related to Cleopatra or the British royal family. Or maybe your curiosity to research your own past was spurred after watching TV shows like Who Do You Think You Are? and Genealogy Roadshow. While there have always been amateur genealogists among us digging through dusty records or begging grandma for family stories, the trend seems to be on the uptick today — reflecting a desire that often becomes more acute as we age, retire or see our parents pass away. (One of the most prominent genealogy websites, ancestry.com, has

PHOTO CREDIT THINKSTOCK; THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY

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Immigrants seated in the Great Hall of the U.S. Immigration Station at Ellis Island in the early 1900s. Many ancestry searches begin with Ellis Island records.

2 million paying subscribers, while myheritage.com reports having 80 million registered users.) Whatever the impetus, the hunt today has primarily gone online, with a big assist from DNA testing. “Everyone has this longing to understand who they are and where they come from,” says Crista Cowan, corporate genealogist for ancestry.com.

Understanding DNA Testing Since 2000, more than 30 companies have started offering

If you go back enough generations, it appears we are all remotely related to one another anyway! (There are only so many ancestors in the world, after all.)

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FAMILY TREE TRACKING If you’ve always wanted to be an amateur sleuth, researching your family tree can be the perfect way to play detective. Follow these tips:

The writer’s maternal grandmother, Alice Hirschfield, and her three sisters, maiden name Wiszner, in 1955. They were all born in New York City, as were their parents, but their maternal grandfather was born in Ireland.

direct-to-consumer genetic testing to trace users’ ancestry, with prices ranging from $99 to upwards of $300. From a swab of cells from your cheek or a vial of your saliva, some of the tests check the DNA you inherited from your mother — called mitochondrial DNA — while others test the DNA you received from your father’s line — called Y-chromosome DNA. Then, they compare your genetic material with reference populations from all over the world. But because you receive half your DNA from your mother and half from your father, the most cutting-edge tests look at your whole DNA sequence, providing more information and a better sense of your family relations. Despite the advances in DNA technology, the estimates of your genetic ancestry are just that. None of the companies provide solid numbers on how likely your results are to be accurate (although they do give ranges to suggest how far off ethnicity estimates could be). And if you go back enough

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2. Craft a family tree on ancestry.com or myheritage.com and share it with your relatives to help fill in the blanks. 3. Take advantage of national, regional and local genealogical societies and online resources, both free and paid. (See “Starting Points” on page 34.) 4. Purchase a DNA test and encourage other family members to do the same. You get two results on ancestry.com’s DNA test, according to Crista Cowan: a breakdown by percentage of your ethnic heritage plus links to potential relatives you can contact for assistance with filling in pieces of your family

puzzle. If your parents and siblings do the test, they’ll have matches you don’t because their DNA is slightly different, which can be used to further parse your lineage. 5. Hire a professional genealogist if you don’t have the time or desire to search yourself. “It can totally consume you to follow your heritage,” says Anne-Marie Burke, a retired interior designer who used vacation days to visit local genealogical and historical societies. You can find a researcher through the Association for Professional Genealogists (apgen. org), ProGenealogists (progenealogists.com) or LegacyTree Genealogists (legacytree.com/ myheritage).

COURTESY OF NANCY MONSON

1. Look through your stash of family photos and documents, and ask relatives to chip in with their own artifacts and stories. “Start from what you know and work backwards,” advises Jordan Jones, the president of the National Genealogical Society.


generations, it appears we are all remotely related to one another anyway! (There are only so many ancestors in the world, after all.) While that means you should take your DNA results with a grain of salt, testing may actually help you correct some misconceptions. Take Suzi Ballenger, 58, a Rhode Island-based fiber artist who was convinced that she had some Native American blood in

THINKSTOCK; THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY

her, despite her grandmother’s protestations that they were of German ancestry.

“I wondered why my skin would get so tan in the summer, and why, when I let my hair down, it was so dark that people would always ask me if I was Native American,” she says. But when she had a DNA

Genealogy research is emotional, fascinating, intellectually stimulating — and addictive.

The title on this image that ran in The New York Times in 1905 read, “Hungarian Gypsies all of whom were deported.” Despite a litany of Ellis Island guidelines for immigrants, the number denied entry was quite low.

test performed, she was shocked to find she is 53 percent Western European, 20 percent Scandinavian and 17 percent Irish and 10 percent other. “I’m Scandinavian — a Viking,” she says with a laugh, noting that “looks can be so deceiving.” Spurred by my own curiosity, I took ancestry.com’s DNA test, too (ancestry.com supplied a complimentary one). My breakdown came back 41 percent Scandinavian, 23 percent

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STARTING POINTS

ANCESTRY.COM $99 for DNA saliva test; $189 for one-year subscription to U.S. records; $299 to access world records for a year. You can build your family tree for free on this site. To search through public records, access ancestry.com through an institutional account at a public library or purchase a private subscription.

European Jewish, 17 percent Irish and a mish-mash of other ethnicities. No big surprises there, but it was comforting to confirm what I already knew from talking with my parents. I shared my results with my sister, Linda, who already had an ancestry.com account, and we merged family trees. We knew that our paternal grandfather, Helge Peckel, had come from Norway. By looking through Ellis Island passenger manifests, we were able to find that he arrived March 1, 1921, on the ship Stavangerfjord at age 17. We also knew that our paternal grandmother, Ida, was of Finnish descent and had also bravely immigrated to America

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MYHERITAGE.COM $199 for DNA saliva test; other DNA tests available. You can build your family tree for free, and do basic research through MyHeritage’s SuperSearch engine for $119.40 for the first year. GENEALOGY.COM This free research site provides articles and forums to help you in your search. NATIONAL GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY ngsgenealogy.org $65 per year This membership

organization offers educational materials, online tutorials and an annual conference to educate people on how to do ancestral research. THE STATUE OF LIBERTY/ELLIS ISLAND FOUNDATION libertyellisfoundation. org/genealogy This National Monument’s Web pages give free tips on researching your genealogy and grant access to passenger manifests.

by herself. She met and married Peckel, even though they couldn’t totally understand each other. (It turns out Norwegian and Finnish are very different languages.) On our mother’s side, we found that our great- and great-greatgrandparents came from Germany and Ireland prior to the opening of Ellis Island in 1892. By searching ancestry.com’s 17 billion census records, birth, death and marriage certificates, and military and court records, and relying on hints the website provided based on the information we supplied, it was fairly easy to trace all sides of our family. We found that our roots as New Yorkers go back at least three generations, if not more.

The writer’s paternal grandfather, Helge Peckel from Norway, at her parents’ wedding in New York City in 1955. Peckel came through Ellis Island in 1921 at age 17.

Genealogy Pros and Cons Genealogy research is emotional, fascinating, intellectually stimulating — and addictive. But it’s not all happy surprises.

THINKSTOCK; COURTESY OF NANCY MONSON

There are a bevy of websites to help get you started finding more about your family tree. Here’s a sampling.


THINKSTOCK; COURTESY OF THE NICKERSON FAMILY ASSOCIATION

VISITING ELLIS ISLAND Today, 100 million Americans can trace their roots to New York City’s Ellis Island, making it a must-see for all budding genealogists. Standing at the top of the stairs in the Great Hall, you can almost hear the din of foreign tongues and the shuffle of feet. And it’s hard not to feel a chill as you follow in the steps of the 12 million people who were processed here between 1892 and 1924. An audio tour of the island’s facilities takes you through the obstacle course of mental, physical, legal and social evaluations these steerage passengers faced before being admitted to America. Ellis Island Tours: Statue Cruises; 877-523-9849; statuecruises.com

A Nickerson Family Association reunion in 2015 in Plymouth, Mass. The group, established in 1897, holds large family reunions every fall on the East Coast.

People need to mentally prepare for potentially upsetting findings: Your relatives may have been slave owners or criminals, or you may have a family history of a devastating illness such as Huntington’s disease. Or you may discover you are of Ashkenazi Jewish heritage, which means you have an increased risk for breast and other cancers. “Any time you go looking in closets, you should be ready to find skeletons,” warns Jordan Jones, president of the National Genealogical Society. “But remember, you have no responsibility for what your relatives did in the past.” Still, the upside of researching your roots can be exciting and tangible. For Anne-Marie Burke, 63, a retired interior designer from North Easton, Mass., tracing her lineage led her to a larger family than she had ever imagined. “I was adopted, and I had always listened to other people tell the story of their families, and I wanted to find my

story,” she recalls. She knew her birth mother’s maiden name was Gagnon, and with the help of the American-French Genealogical Society in Woonsocket, R.I., she searched back to her ancestors in France. Through her maternal grandmother, Matilda Newell, she found a connection to Stephen Hopkins and Thomas Rogers, both Pilgrims who came to America in 1620 on the Mayflower. She also learned that she was a descendant of William Nickerson, who arrived in America in 1656 from England and founded the town of Chatham on Cape Cod. Today, Burke is a member of the Nickerson Family Association, established in 1897, which holds a large reunion on the East Coast every autumn. “We all call each other cousin, and I feel totally connected and rooted to this lineage,” she says. “I am a Nickerson, and it gives me a sense of belonging in the world.”

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Stitch Fix stylists select five items to send based on a buyer’s online profile.

Joy BY KRISTI VALENTINI

BOX

THINKSTOCK; STITCH FIX

in the


THERE ARE TOO FEW GOOD SURPRISES IN LIFE. THE SOLUTION? SCHEDULING UNEXPECTED BOMBSHELLS OF FUN — IN THE FORM OF GOURMET MEALS, NEW OUTFITS AND MORE — DELIVERED TO YOUR DOOR. mailbox full of bills, campaign fliers and real estate advertisements isn’t something you’d meet with smiles and glee. Fortunately, you can easily turn checking the mail into the best part of the day by giving yourself the gift of subscription boxes. Luxurious hair care, the latest young-adult books, toys and treats for your pet, or really anything that your heart desires — you have no idea what exactly is in the package. That grab-bag factor is at the heart of what has made subscription boxes one of the fastest-growing segments of retail. “You’re basically unwrapping a gift to yourself. I think there’s a lot of pure enjoyment in that,” says Liz Cadman, founder of mysubscriptionaddiction.com, a website that tracks, reviews and offers deals on subscription boxes. Cadman has seen the boom in boxes grow from 200 to 2,000 on her website’s directory over the last four years. She points to big brands such as Adidas, Target and Sephora entering the market to prove that, thus far, there really is no end in sight.

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How it works

ay you feel stuck in a beauty rut, but aren’t sure whether you can pull off the season’s periwinkle eyeliner. By signing up for Birchbox (birchbox. com), often credited with igniting the subscription box trend, you can try out a bunch of trendy, high-end beauty products for $10 a month. That’s how

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Cadman’s obsession began. “I absolutely loved getting my Birchbox in the mail. I called it my gateway box. For me, subscription boxes push me out of my comfort zone, especially when it comes to beauty or fashion.” Boxes aren’t limited to just those categories; though. There’s seemingly a box for every interest, lifestyle and age group.

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THINKSTOCK; BLUE APRON

JOY IN THE BOX

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Pay, eat, love

KITCHEN TABLE PASSPORT; THINKSTOCK

Blue Apron provides every ingredient for dinner, down to the herbs and spices.

ooking can be a chore. Luckily, for those burned out on the same old same old, there are hundreds of meal-related subscription boxes for every taste. A popular one is Blue Apron, which launched in 2012 and delivers all the ingredients, including fresh produce and dairy, as well as the directions you need to make seasonal meals from scratch. You’ll find new favorites such as lemongrass chicken burgers without having to hunt for a recipe or push a grocery cart around (from $59.94, blueapron.com). For the ecoconscious concerned about the massive amounts of packaging, the items are all recyclable and can even be mailed, free of charge, back to Blue Apron. For globe-trotting foodies, Kitchen Table Passport makes a night in feel like a mini-vacation. “We like the idea of giving people a flavor, literally and figuratively, of a country every month. Many of us in the U.S. don’t get to travel as much as we want — whether it’s money or time or whatever — so we want

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to bring the world to people at home,” explains co-founder Lisa Howe. Her company pulls together a recipe and spices, mementos, music, pictures and information from a different region each month based on places she or her business partner have traveled. “A lot of the fun of putting the boxes together is reliving when I got to travel there and sharing that with other people.” For subscriber Linda Dooley, 67, from Austin, Kitchen Table Passport (from $24.95, kitchen tablepassport.com) boxes create a special date night for her and her husband. And often, she’s surprised by how much she likes what’s inside. The Russia box was delivered with the country’s signature wooden nesting dolls, a hand-painted spoon and a questionable recipe. “The recipe from Russia sounded awful. It had five or six different meats in it, and I’m not a big meat eater. I went ahead and made it, and all the flavors blended together. It was delicious.”

Kitchen Table Passport helps to bring international tastes to your dinner table.

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JOY IN THE BOX

class reunion can strike fear into the heart of any woman, whether she’s a savvy shopper or not. Wouldn’t it be nice to have a fashion expert in your corner? That’s why Mary Schaeffer, 57, from Macungie, Pa., plans to order another Stitch Fix box (style.stitchfix. com). Her daughterin-law gave her the first one as a gift after Schaeffer lost 55 pounds. “I was the one to always wear black pants with everything because I was always overweight and didn’t spend money on clothes. Ordering a Stitch Fix box was a good opportunity to get some fashionable clothes and understand how things go together,” says Schaeffer. After Schaeffer completed a style profile online, a stylist selected five items for her to try out at home. “It was so much fun to open the box. I went in the room to try everything on. I kept two items — one of which was a studded top I would never have picked out but ended up liking.”

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She returned the other three items in the prepaid shipping bag. (The service charges a $20 styling fee, which you can use toward the items you purchase. Deliveries are scheduled whenever you like.) Similar to Schaeffer’s closet neglect, many women’s lingerie drawer could use some love. “Underclub helps you make steady upgrades to your underwear drawer over time,” says Katie Fritts, founder of the subscription box service that sends one pair of panties a month to customers. She explains how the monthly arrival turns a task that can be a hassle into a delight: “There’s so many brands out there, and it’s hard to know which ones are going to work for you. We figure out which styles fit best with which body types.” At $19.95 pre-paid per month for a year, or $24.95 month-tomonth (underclub.co), it may seem a little expensive, but keep in mind that you’re paying not only for designer brands, but for Underclub’s ability to find you the perfect pair.

BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2016

Stitch Fix carries an array of apparel, shoes and accessories.

THINKSTOCK; STITCH FIX

Look like an A-lister


GET THE MOST BANG FROM YOUR BOX

Boomerluxe features products created by womenowned businesses.

Discover new favorites

ne of the benefits of being a box subscriber is you often get to try out new products, sometimes exclusive ones, before anyone else. That can be especially exciting if the box is tailored to what makes you, well, you. For example, outdoorsy types can get their fix with Cairn contents including headlamps, freeze-dried cheesecake bites and fire starters ($25, getcairn.com). There’s a box that celebrates single women, SinglesSwag (from $24.99, singlesswag.com), and even one for Baby Boomers called Boomerluxe, which Dawn Yager, 57, from Toronto, appreciates. “It’s a wonderful thing to focus on women our age, because the older you get, the more you’re overlooked, that’s for sure.” Yager, who has received six installments

1 Start out with a lower-priced box so if it turns out it’s not for you, it’s not much of a loss.

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BOOMERLUXE; SINGLESSWAG; THINKSTOCK

With thousands of subscription boxes, it’s difficult to choose. Avoid getting a box of disappointment by following these tips from Liz Cadman, founder of the subscription box review site My Subscription Addiction.

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SinglesSwag items include books, beauty products and accessories. from Boomerluxe (starting at $34.99, boomerluxe. com), loves peeling open her box to find novelties such as a silver, mustache-shaped purse and beauty products created by woman-owned businesses. “I receive them at work. All the women crowd around to see what I got. So that makes it more exciting. And sometimes I give stuff away. I’m very popular,” she says, laughing. Seana O’Neill, Boomerluxe’s co-founder, says she works to give women a unique box of goodies. “We go after products that are special, have a twist for women our age — geared toward our needs for skin care and colors we’re comfortable wearing.” Although subscription boxes can be given as a gift, most women are buying them for themselves, which makes sense, says O’Neill. “Boomer women are no longer carpooling. They’re empty-nesters or near it. They have climbed the corporate ladder and raised great children. Now they have the confidence and sensibility to say, ‘Now it’s about me.’ ”

Research what typically is included so you lessen the chance of being disappointed.

3 Look for boxes that offer a high value. For example, BeautyFIX (beautyfix.com) is a box of full- and deluxe-size items guaranteed to be worth $100 or more, but the subscription costs $24.95. Even if you only like half the items, you still get a good deal.

4 If you receive items you don’t want, gift them or trade them for other box goodies in the My Subscription Addiction’s swapping forum (swap.mysubscription addiction.com).

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COURTESY OF OWN: OPRAH WINFREY NETWORK/PHOTOGRAPHER KWAKU ALSTON

Full house: Holly Robinson Peete and her family are the stars of For Peete’s Sake, a docu-series.


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Holly Robinson Peete shares her family’s challenges and triumphs with the world BY MARY HELEN BERG

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eeking a quiet refuge inside her Southern California home, Holly Robinson Peete retreats to her bedroom to take a call, but as usual, she finds she’s not alone. Two dogs and her youngest son want to snuggle with her in bed. A third dog, too big to join them, camps on the floor below. This kind of crowd, and the chaos that comes with it, is the norm for Robinson Peete, 52, a longtime actress, author and health advocate. As mother to four kids ages 11 to 19, including a teen with autism, she often feels more like a “hot mommy mess” than like her famous public persona. A television crew recently added to the din, turning the already hectic Peete family home into the set of For Peete’s Sake, an OWN: Oprah Winfrey Network docu-series that will air its second season in early 2017. The show tracks Robinson Peete (Chicago Fire, Mike & Molly, Hangin’ with Mr. Cooper, 21 Jump Street) and her husband, former NFL quarterback Rodney Peete, as they navigate celebrity life, serious health concerns and a complex household that includes a new roommate

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— Robinson Peete’s opinionated, tattooed 80-year-old mother (and former manager), Dolores Robinson. The show keeps the “real” in reality television, Robinson Peete says, depicting moments both funny and fierce. For example, one scene from the first season catches Robinson Peete uncorking a wine bottle with her teeth when she is desperate for a glass. In the second episode she schools RJ, her 19-year-old special-needs son, on how a young, black man must act if stopped by the police. Her nightmare, she says, is that RJ’s autism would prevent him from understanding critical cues from officers. Not every family member jumped at the chance to do the show, Robinson Peete concedes. The kids worried that publicly exposing private family flaws might cause friction that would divide their tight unit. But Robinson Peete assured them that they would survive the spotlight

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and help others in the process. “We have issues, we have problems that we resolve together and there’s a value in showing and sharing that, especially when it comes to our special-needs son,” she says. In the show, she openly shares RJ’s challenges and triumphs, as well as other family health issues that have shaped her life. Robinson Peete’s dad, Matt Robinson, now deceased, suffered from Parkinson’s disease for two decades; Rodney may face brain trauma from too many hits on the field; RJ’s twin sister, Ryan, has attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, known as ADHD; and all four kids, including younger brothers Robinson and Roman, have allergies, some so severe that Robinson Peete stashes EpiPens throughout the house. Even Harriet, the family’s autism service dog, recently underwent eye surgery. How does she handle it all? Sometimes, a quick getaway with Rodney in the “shaggin’ wagon,” aka the family car, provides a little respite and precious privacy. And she jokes that she has a secret for dealing with her kids: “I try hard to

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Holly’s father, Matt Robinson, originated the role of Gordon on Sesame Street, left. When he was 46, he was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. “I took care of him until the very end, but it was so, so, so, so hard,”she says.

embarrass them. It’s fun and it’s so easy — just dance.” But ultimately, when your life is this full, she says, “You have to be a superwoman, because that’s your job.” Robinson Peete first donned her superhero cape when her father at 46 was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, a degenerative brain disorder. A show business veteran, Robinson was a producer and writer on The Cosby Show and originated

the role of Gordon on Sesame Street. Simultaneously caring for him and her then- infant twins thrust Robinson Peete into the “sandwich generation.” Coping with her father’s disease was “financially, emotionally draining,” Robinson Peete recalls, “I’m glad I did it, and I took care of him until the very end, but it was so, so, so, so hard.” Families with fewer resources would be hit even harder, she realized, and Rodney urged her to share her expertise, telling her, “You have a big mouth; you should use it for good.” So in 1997, the Peetes co-founded the nonprofit Hollyrod Foundation, which provides financial and emotional support to under-

COURTESY OF HOLLY ROBINSON PEETE

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served families affected by Parkinson’s disease and autism. But her experience with her father’s chronic illness didn’t fortify Robinson Peete for the heartbreak of RJ’s diagnosis of autism, a disorder affecting at least 1 in 68 children, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (A recent government survey of 12,000 parents suggests a higher incidence of 1 in 45.) Boys are affected by autism five times as often as girls. At 2 years old, RJ stopped connecting with his twin sister, while she continued to hit developmental milestones on target. Then came the “Never Day.” A developmental pediatrician predicted that RJ would never speak and “was never going to pretty much do anything or be anything,” Robinson Peete says. “The Never Day was the worst day because we had absolutely no hope.” Robinson Peete “sobbed for about 30 days straight,” mourning the future she’d previously imagined for her son. The diagnosis created a deep rift with Rodney, who struggled to overcome his own grief. But with autism, parents don’t have the luxury of mourning for long, Robinson Peete says. “It’s OK to feel sorry for yourself, but then you have to roll up your sleeves and get to work because you have a very small window of time where you can get an early intervention and that’s going to give your kid the best chance of success.” Today, RJ not only speaks, but in the season premiere of For Peete’s Sake, he says that he “never stops talking.” His mom is his hero, along with the late rapper Tupac Shakur. And he recently landed his first real job as a clubhouse attendant for the Los Angeles Dodgers, which prompted accolades from mom: “He’s so cute in his Dodger blue.” But even superheroes sometimes have very human doubts and Robinson Peete feels guilty that RJ didn’t see specialists earlier. “To this day, I am haunted by that one year when my kid was 2, and I knew it. My mommy gut was telling me that something was off with him,” she says. “I still look at this kid and go, ‘I wonder who he would be if I had got him that early intervention between 2 and 3.’” Another source of regret: She was so absorbed with RJ’s needs that she didn’t realize that her daughter had ADHD until she was 12. Robinson Peete knew Ryan could be distracted and had some social conflicts at school, but she

COURTESY OF THE COMPANIES

“We have issues, we have problems that we resolve together and there’s a value in showing and sharing that.”

Peete’s

B O O K S H E L F Holly Robinson Peete and her family have penned several books about how autism and Parkinson’s have touched their lives.

My Brother Charlie By Denene Millner, Holly Robinson Peete and Ryan Elizabeth Peete, 2010 An NAACP Image Award winner that features a young boy with autism from the perspective of his big sister. Not My Boy! A Father, a Son, and One Family’s Journey with Autism By Rodney Peete, 2010 A father’s personal journey as he struggles to accept his son’s autism. Proud Hands: Personal Victories with Parkinson’s Introduction by Holly Robinson Peete, 2007 A collection of inspirational stories from Parkinson’s patients and caregivers. Same But Different: Teen Life on the Autism Express By Holly Robinson Peete, Ryan Elizabeth Peete and RJ Peete, 2016 Peete and her twins provide an intimate look at what it’s like to live with autism during adolescence.

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didn’t recognize these as red flags. “I’m embarrassed. I thought she was being stubborn,” she says. Now, the family faces another potential health challenge and Robinson Peete vows to be proactive. A recent MRI exam revealed that Rodney, 50, has brain lesions that may indicate chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a degenerative disease caused by repetitive head trauma. So far he shows no symptoms (the disease can only be diagnosed posthumously), but the finding is disturbing. Rodney has already lost friends Holly and and teammates to Rodney CTE. co-founded “If this is somethe Hollyrod thing we’re going to Foundation, which helps be dealing with down support the line, then I need families to know everything affected by about it and we’re Parkinson’s going to attack that and autism.

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COURTESY OF OWN: OPRAH WINFREY NETWORK/PHOTOGRAPHER KWAKU ALSTON

“You have a very small window of time where you can get an early intervention and that’s going to give your kid the best chance of success.”


Peete’s

P R E PA R E D N E S S P O I N T S As a national spokeswoman and advocate for Parkinson’s and autism, Holly Robinson Peete has a few survival tips for families facing health challenges. GET ORGANIZED

Top left, Holly and her sons at the Children Mending Hearts fundraiser. Top, at a Red Nose Day event for Walgreens. Left, Holly, Rodney and Super Kid honoree Vincent Stover at the Autism Speaks and HollyRod Foundation Super Kid Honors 2015.

Make a nightly list of goals for the next day. Otherwise, “it just becomes crazy chaos — which it usually ends up becoming anyway.” BUILD A TEAM

In addition to family support, look to friends, school community and “anyone willing to advocate for your kid,” especially with a special-needs child. RESEARCH

“Not everything online is going to be right, but you’re at least going to arm yourself with information and be an advocate for yourself.”

CHARLEY GALLAY/GETTY IMAGES; DAVID BUCHAN/GETTY IMAGES; ANDREW H. WALKER/GETTY IMAGES

CARE FOR YOURSELF

just like we did Parkinson’s and autism,” she says. The Peetes have joined a Harvard University effort to study the health concerns of former football players. With so many balls in the air, sometimes you drop some and that’s OK, Robinson Peete says: “Tomorrow’s another day to get it right.” But successful juggling requires taking care of yourself and being organized, she says, so she wakes at 5 a.m. to exercise and grab an hour alone. Dreams of a private “mom cave” were nixed when she moved Dolores into the former guest house. So, for now, her dining room still serves as “the war room” to prep for a 600-person fundraiser to support her “fifth child,” the Hollyrod

Foundation. Especially during fundraiser season, Robinson Peete relies on the family quarterback to get in the game. “I tell my kids, ‘Don’t look at me. I don’t want to solve any problems. Go see your daddy.’ ” One recent day’s very long to-do list included calls to beg celebrity pals to attend a gown fitting, a trip to her production offices — oh, and the constant pledge to bring down her stress level. “The bottom line is I’m the CEO of this joint,” she says. “I have to keep myself healthy. To not keep myself healthy and to not stay up on everything … is a disservice to my family.”

“If you don’t put yourself No. 1, you’re not going to be physically and emotionally capable of handling it all. ... Schedule that time ... even if it’s once a week.” Additional resources:

Hollyrod Foundation hollyrod.org Autism Speaks autismspeaks.org Doug Flutie Jr. Foundation for Autism flutiefoundation.org Parkinson’s Disease Foundation pdf.org National Parkinson Foundation parkinson.org The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research michaeljfox.org

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ALTERNATIVE THERAPIES HELP WOMEN COPE WITH BREAST CANCER TREATMENT BY PEGGY J. NOONAN

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reast cancer care has come a long way. Treatment is much less devastating than it used to be, but it’s still rough on patients. Many women have found that incorporating alternative health practices such as yoga, massage and acupuncture that are not part of standard medical treatments has helped them cope with the physical and emotional woes that accompany cancer care. “The main goal of all these complementary therapies is to try to minimize the side effects of treatment,” says Dr. Ricardo Alvarez, director of cancer research at Cancer Treatment Centers of America Southeastern Regional Medical Center in Newnan, Ga. For example, he says oncology massage helps lymphedema (swelling after lymph node removal) and acupuncture helps

neurotoxicity (damage to the nervous system) related to radiation or chemotherapy. Using complementary and alternative medicine, or CAM, gives people a greater sense of control over their care, says Dr. Larry Cripe, an oncologist and founder of the CompleteLife Program at Indiana University Health Simon Cancer Center. CAM users tend to be less distressed, depressed and anxious than patients who don’t use CAM as they go through treatment, he says. Many CAM therapies have shown promise in helping people cope with the disease and do better “in the survivorship phase.” Breast surgeon Dr. Radha Iyengar, medical director of the Breast Center at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Allen, supports patients's use of complementary therapies, adding they are “a great adjunct when used appropriately with the traditional therapies.”

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COMPLEMENTARY CARE

Retraining the Brain

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aren Reynolds, a corporate trainer based in Atlanta, was diagnosed with stage 2 breast cancer four days after her birthday in 2014. After undergoing surgery, chemotherapy and radiation, she wanted to help her body heal. “I was really open to just anything that

would help me,” Reynolds says. “I took advantage of the holistic approach to taking care of the whole body,” not just removing the cancer, at Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Southeastern Regional Medical Center in Atlanta. Rehabilitation oncology — physical and occupational

therapies that help people recover strength, balance and functioning abilities during or after cancer treatment — helped Reynolds fight back from “chemo brain,” a side effect that sapped her cognitive skills and memory. Therapists helped Reynolds develop solutions to improve her memory, such as

getting and staying organized, adopting a new way to take notes and using brain game apps to keep her mind engaged. Her recent mammogram shows “everything looks good,” she says. “I am in remission and I’m happy about that. Now it’s just a matter of continuing ... on this path.”

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hysical therapy is great for helping people regain balance, but many don’t stick with their program because it’s hard work. Dance, on the other hand, is fun and gives people a more pleasant way to practice the same basic skills that PT uses, such as side-to-side weight transfer and walking forward and backward. Kathleen Hall learned just how much dancing could help after treatment. Her first bout with breast cancer began in October 2011. After she participated in a cancer drug clinical trial and had a right breast mastectomy, everything seemed fine. Eighteen months later, her cancer came

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BEST YEARS I FALL / WINTER 2016

back. The Asheville, Ohio, woman had radiation and chemotherapy. For complementary care, she chose yoga and swimming through the JamesCare for Life program at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Care Center. When OSU launched a new study using Argentine tango to improve balance and reduce fall risk in cancer patients, Hall signed up. “I love to dance.” As many as 70 percent of chemotherapy patients develop peripheral neuropathy — loss of feeling in their extremities that affects their balance, gait and risk of falling. The tango study was designed to help cancer

patients improve their balance and reduce their risk of falling. “We chose Argentine tango because it had already been shown to improve balance in Parkinson’s disease,” explains researcher Lise Worthen-Chaudhari, a physical rehabilitation specialist at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center’s Neurological Institute. Unlike the dramatic “rose in the teeth” American version of tango, Argentine tango is “just walking forwards and backwards, side to side (and) a little bit of improvisation” with a partner, to music, Worthen-Chaudhari says. “Movement is medicine.”

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Movement is Medicine


American adults paid

$28.3 billion in 2012 in

out-of-pocket costs for alternative and complementary therapies such as supplements, meditation, chiropractic care and yoga, according to the latest National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health survey. Nearly

‘Yoga has changed my life’

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ancer can cause worry, lost sleep and instill fears of recurrence, says Carmon Weaver Hicks, a psychology and sociology teacher in Indianapolis, whose breast cancer metastasized to her bones. One way she staves off the mental intrusions is through meditation and yoga. Every three weeks, Weaver Hicks has infusion therapy at Indiana University Health. Oncology-trained yoga therapist Stella Snyder helps each patient practice relaxation techniques during infusion to make treatment more bearable. When

Snyder saw how much those techniques helped Weaver Hicks, she suggested trying yoga, too. Gentle chair-yoga classes focus on mind, breathing and meditation practices to fight fatigue, “the No. 1 side effect” of cancer treatment, Snyder says. Practicing yoga eases stress, which can help immune function, increase feelings of vitality and well-being and calm the anxiety patients feel about treatments. Weaver Hicks loved it: “Yoga has changed my life in really positive ways.”

$15 billion of that total

paid for visits to complementary practitioners, about a third of what adults pay out-of-pocket to see conventional practitioners.

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COMPLEMENTARY CARE

Natural Medicines are ‘the Way to Go’

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at Garlit Bucher, a resources consultant who lives in Sherman, Texas, says her breast cancer diagnosis “was a shock,” but didn’t come as a complete surprise because both her parents died of cancer. Bucher understood that while going through chemotherapy, she needed to be the healthiest patient she could be by practicing good nutrition, living in wellness and going through the breast cancer experience with a positive attitude. She relied on the inspirational songs that she grew up with in Peru and Ecuador to give her peace and help her feel relaxed and empowered. Bucher has traveled all over the world teaching massage and relaxation techniques to people who have experienced tragedies. “I tend to stop breathing in a crisis,” Bucher says, but adds that “meditational rhythmic music that paces my breathing” helps her stay calm.

‘I Feel Fantastic’

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uided imagery, a relaxation technique directed by a therapist or an audio recording, can help people focus on positive mental images that promote relaxation, lessen pain and reduce problem symptoms. (It can also be self-directed.) Studies show it may give a temporary boost in total immune system cells, reduce depression and increase a sense of well-being, according to the nonprofit organization breastcancer.org. Laura Squillace of Southfield, Mich., was working with an advertising agency when she and her sister were diagnosed with breast cancer in 2011. Both sisters carried the BRCA1 gene linked to more

aggressive cancer and both went through treatment. While Squillace was having surgery at Beaumont Health in Royal Oak, Mich., her sister bought a guided imagery CD on healing at the hospital’s integrative medicine department. It “sounds crazy” but it works, Squillace says, adding it’s a “way to slow your breath down, slow your mind down and go to a place where you can focus.” Guided imagery specialist Gail Evo, Beaumont’s director of integrative medicine, also created a CD for Squillace using images to help relax. Squillace passed the five-year survival mark in September. “I have had no recurrence and I feel fantastic.”

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hyllis Trimble, of Russellville, Ark., a budget officer with the U.S. Forest Service, was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2013. After surgery, chemotherapy and radiation, Trimble’s surgeon told her complementary therapies “work really well together” when paired with conventional treatments. Her program included physical therapy, acupuncture, massage, chiropractic and spiritual support. “She was right,” Trimble says. “It really made a big difference.” One of the first people she and her husband saw was a naturopath. “He took the time to make us feel comfortable with using supplements,” she says. He recommended an inhaler that stopped smell-triggered nausea and to take supplements after learning she was allergic to the medicine normally used to treat hot flashes caused by chemotherapy. If you do plan on taking supplements, loop in your doctor and oncology team. While dietary supplements such as vitamins, amino acids, powders and liquids can be beneficial, they can also involve risks, according to the Food and Drug Administration and the National Institutes of Health’s Office of Dietary Supplements. Some can affect how your body uses treatment medicines by reducing the drug’s effectiveness or increasing adverse effects. Trimble’s naturopath provided alternatives and for that she is thankful. “I had a few challenges there,” Trimble says, but she’s convinced natural medicines are “the way to go.”

Musical Therapy


Ballers: The Complete First Season Available on Blu-ray , DVD and Digital HD. TM

Š2016 Home Box Office, Inc. All rights reserved. HBOŽ and related service marks are the property of Home Box Office, Inc.


B Y K AT E P A R H A M K O R D S M E I E R

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ILLUSTRATION BY ASHLEIGH CORRIN; THINKSTOCK

Who says you need an elaborate girlfriends’ getaway to stay connected?


Connecting is more important than impressing with your entertaining prowess, says Shasta Nelson, CEO of girlfriend circles.com.

RICK ASHLEY; THINKSTOCK

e all know how important it is to make time for our friends, but sometimes leaving our homes (and our families!) for a girlfriends’ getaway just isn’t in the cards. Fortunately, you don’t have to travel far. “What counts is being together — no matter where you are — and making the time together memorable,” says Darcy Miller, author of Celebrate Everything! Fun Ideas to Bring Your Parties to Life. Enter the girlfriends’ brunch. “When it comes to spending time with my closest girlfriends, you can’t beat an intimate gathering at home,” says

Camille Styles, lifestyle blogger and author of Camille Styles Entertaining: Inspired Gatherings and Effortless Style. The most important thing to remember about hosting? “It does not have to be perfect,” assures Erin Smalley, co-author of Grown-Up Girlfriends: Finding and Keeping Real Friends in the Real World. “As women, we long for that connection.”

MIX & MINGLE Don’t let a lack of a cohesive group stop you. “As our life stages evolve and our interests expand, we often find ourselves with a large, disparate network of girlfriends who don’t know one another but should,” says Ellen Miller, author of The One Year Book of Inspiration for Girlfriends. “I’ve hosted parties designed to bring my friends from the far corners of my life together, and it was easy to get into a rhythm because each person had heard something wonderful about the other.”

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BATCH THE COCKTAILS

“There’s something about letting guests help themselves to the food that creates a relaxed vibe,” says Styles. A buffet setup or family-style platters is a great informal icebreaker for friends who haven’t seen one another in a while — or are just meeting — to mingle and chat, adds Darcy Miller.

Shasta Nelson, second from left, connects with friends in May at her San Francisco home.

DO A DIY BAR A fun twist on potluck meals is a do-ityourself bar. The host can make the base, like pancakes, and guests can bring toppings, like chocolate chips or fruit. A DIY pizza, breakfast taco or salad bar works the same way, says Darcy Miller.

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PICK A THEME Let whatever your friends have in common inspire the tone of the gathering, suggests Darcy Miller. For example, if you all studied abroad in France, serve crepes and croissants. Or be more casual, suggests Smalley, whose get-togethers had themes such as Lebanese, Chinese and fondue. For Shasta Nelson, CEO of girlfriendcircles. com, a friendship community, and author of Frientimacy: How to Deepen Friendship for Lifelong Health and Happiness, a slumber party theme stands out. “It was so fun to see (the host) open the door wearing her slippers and handing us a hot cup of coffee.”

PREP THE NIGHT BEFORE “It’s no fun for anyone if the hostess is wigged out about what’s bubbling over in the oven,” says Ellen Miller. So plan for dishes that you can easily prepare the night before or that can be served at room temperature, such as breakfast casseroles, quiches, frittatas and pastries. Or consider buying pre-made dishes such as salads, fruit trays and crudités platters to reduce time and labor. “When my budget allows, I opt for catering — my guests feel like royalty as the servers pass trays and fill glasses," she adds.

RICK ASHLEY; ILLUSTRATIONS BY ASHLEIGH CORRIN

KEEP IT CASUAL

Mix up a pitcher or punch bowl of your favorite cocktail in advance (and stash a backup in the fridge) so you don’t have to play bartender all

day, says Styles. “A self-serve bar doubles as a beautiful focal point when stocked with pretty carafes.” Sangria, bloody marys, Irish coffees and mimosas are great for brunch.


EMBRACE THE POTLUCK Even better than prepping everything yourself the night before is making the brunch a group effort. There are ways to make it feel more special than a tired potluck — try creating a challenge, such as everyone’s dish must have red

ILLUSTRATIONS BY ASHLEIGH CORRIN; THINKSTOCK

IDEAS TO HELP YOU CONNECT More important than impressing with your entertaining prowess is simply connecting. “I’ve watched far too many women either not invite people over because they are intimidated, or women who get so caught up throwing a perfect event that they end up not really being present to the relation-

in it or must include a locally grown item, suggests Nelson. “Giving everyone a role helps them feel more shared ownership in the event.” Or ask guests to bring their favorite pies, says Darcy Miller. “This way you’ll have a nice mix of sweet and savory, and your buffet table will look totally decadent.”

ships,” says Shasta Nelson. “It’s way more important to create meaningful conversation.” CREATE A PLAYLIST. “A custom playlist adds a signature sound to the party, whether it’s songs from high school or college, or one put together by each guest sending one song,” says Darcy Miller. PLAY GAMES. Games are a great way to start conversation and bond. Prepare

When it comes to spending time with my closest girlfriends, you can’t beat an intimate gathering at home."

KEEP THE DÉCOR SIMPLE If you feel the need to decorate (which absolutely isn’t required), pick a color and use it in flowers, napkins and dessert, such as pink tulips and strawberry ice cream, suggests Darcy Miller. The same goes for favors. “Get a few potted plants that you can incorporate into your tablescape and give to friends as a takeaway.” Styles recommends mini succulents in terra-cotta pots.

— Camille Styles, lifestyle blogger and author of Camille Styles Entertaining: Inspired Gatherings and Effortless Style

some reconnection questions like, “What’s the best thing (or the most challenging) that’s happened in the last year?” says Erin Smalley, who also encourages women to share what they’re grateful for. Nelson recommends games like Two Truths and a Lie. PAIR WOMEN TOGETHER. Another way to get people talking is to pair them up to help with kitchen duties, suggests Ellen Miller.

MAKE SOMETHING TOGETHER. Nothing brings people together like a group project. “One group of my friends used to convene every December to make hot fudge sauce together for Christmas gifts,” says Smalley. Ellen Miller recalls a memorable Easter: "I had our guests decorate bunny cakes for our kids; you would have thought we were in preschool based on the squeals of delight at our handiwork."

PLAN FOR NEXT TIME. If meeting regularly, Darcy Miller recommends filling out prediction cards (i.e., Will she get that promotion? Take that trip?). “Each time, it will be easier to get the conversation flowing as you read the predictions, laugh and tell stories,” she says.


MOLLY WINTERS

RECIPES BY CAMILLE ST YLES


BLT BRUNCH FRITTATA Serves 4 A frittata is every savvy hostess' secret weapon. A few sautéed veggies, eggs, a sprinkle of cheese on top, and then it all magically melds together in the oven while you’re freed up to hang out with your guests and drink mimosas. Ingredients 5 3 2 ¼ 1 3 1 2 6 1

eggs egg whites Leaves from 4 sprigs of fresh thyme T. milk cup plus 1 T. goat cheese, divided tsp. extra-virgin olive oil green onions, sliced on diagonal garlic clove, minced heirloom tomatoes and a few cherry tomatoes, the more colorful the better! slices cooked bacon, cut into ½-inch pieces bunch basil, half julienned, half whole leaves Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Directions 1. Preheat broiler. In a medium bowl, whisk together eggs, whites, thyme, julienned basil, milk, salt, pepper and ¼ cup goat cheese. Set aside. 2. In a large cast-iron or non-stick skillet, heat olive oil over medium heat. Sauté onions and garlic for about 1 minute until it becomes fragrant, then add egg mixture.

KATE LESUEUR

3. Use a spatula to gently lift edges of egg and allow runny part to make contact with the pan. When the edges start to feel set, add tomato slices in concentric circles and top with bacon and remaining tablespoon of goat cheese. 4. Place under broiler and let cook until puffy and golden brown. Serve warm or at room temperature, topped with torn basil leaves.

STRAWBERRY AND BANANA SMOOTHIE BOWL Serves 2 The smoothie bowl is a colorful brunch idea that’s as easy as setting out toppings and letting everyone build their own.

Ingredients 2 1 1 1½

medium bananas, frozen and sliced cup frozen strawberries large spoonful of almond butter cups almond milk

Directions In a blender, add the bananas, strawberries, almond butter and almond milk. Blend until smooth and pour into bowls. Top with fruits, nuts and seeds of your choice. Try hemp seeds, granola, edible flowers and honey, too.

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‘WHAT’S UP DOC?’ CARROTGINGER COCKTAIL Serves 1 Ingredients 1½ ounces coconut rum ½ ounce silver rum 1 ounce fresh squeezed carrot juice (or Odwalla carrot juice) ½ ounce fresh squeezed lime juice ¼ ounce simple syrup (or agave syrup) 2 slices of peeled ginger (size of a nickel) Directions 1. Muddle ginger in the bottom of a cocktail shaker mixing glass.

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Non-alcoholic version: Replace the rum with 11/2 ounces lemonade and 1/2 ounce Coco Lopez coconut milk. Top off with 3/4 ounce of soda water.

KATE ZIMMERMAN

MAKE IT A MOCKTAIL This drink is just as good sans alcohol, says Camille Styles, who adapted the recipe from one that expert mixologist Kelly Dallas concocted for her at Solbar in Napa Valley, Calif.

2. Add remaining ingredients and shake hard with ice. Double strain (to remove ginger) into a highball glass over ice and garnish with carrot greens, lime zest or carrot ribbons.


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Our National Parks The National Mall welcomes millions every year, but what they see is hardly welcoming.

It welcomes the world to our most significant monuments and memorials. But like many national parks, the National Mall in Washington, D.C., desperately needs our help, including $350 million in federal funding for maintenance, repairs, and preservation. You can help with a simple letter. Visit NPCA.org/mall. Or call 1-800-NAT PARK.


| BEST YEARS

LIVE WELL

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TRAVEL

This wine style belongs in your rotation all year long BY KATIE KELLY BELL

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eople often think of rosé as just a summer wine, but given its palatepleasing versatility and food-friendly qualities, it’s the best wine style for year-round drinking. Sommeliers even talk it up for Thanksgiving because it can handle the main course and any leftovers better than other wines. Rosé, which means “pink” in French, is a dry wine style that can be made from any red grape variety. The color comes from brief contact with the skins. It blends the freshness of a white wine with the character of a red wine, making it superversatile and suitable for sipping or pairing with food. Indeed, rosé is having a global moment; French producers report that exports from Provence (the iconic region for rosé wine production) have increased by double digits, with a 58 percent increase in sales volume in 2015 alone. Following France’s lead, producers across the globe are getting into the rosé game, emulating the aromatic, mouth watering and elegantly styled wines of Provence. Despite the global competition, the wines of Provence remain the standard-bearer for style and quality. These rosés are made intentionally — meaning that the grapes are cultivated specifically to be made into rosé — as opposed to rosés that are made

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1 Autumn flavors A rosé will beautifully balance the texture of rich autumn soups such as butternut squash. 2 All things Mediterranean Rosé’s zesty, refreshing qualities pair beautifully with the very things that are cultivated in Provence: olives, herbs and seafood. Try it with pizza, seafood stew or grilled fish with olive tapenade. 3 Thanksgiving dinner The freshness and acidity in rosé will play well with just about every dish at the table, especially stuffing, sweet potato casserole and green beans.

CHÂTEAU MIRAVAL

Rosé Renaissance

FABULOUS ROSÉ FOOD PAIRINGS


TASTE as a byproduct or first-press during red wine production. This is not to say these byproduct rosés are bad wines, but there is a difference in cultivation and production, and many say that can influence taste and quality. Fortunately, the days of cloying and dull rosé wines are behind us, and because of producers such as Château Miraval, the Provencal estate owned by Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie, the focus is now on exceptional quality. Several years ago, in an effort to maximize the estate’s potential, the couple invited Marc Perrin, a French winemaker with a centuries-old family history in wine production, to consult on Miraval’s winemaking process. According to Perrin, the estate is home to some of the most “incredible and diverse soils” in Provence. He was so enamored with the potential of the estate that he agreed to partner with them on the winemaking, rather than just consult. “I felt an immediate connection with the Jolie-Pitts,” he says. “We share a passion for quality, for the obsessive search for the best, so we get along very well together.”

The flagship wine, Miraval Rosé Côtes de Provence, is one of four wines (and the only rosé) that is produced on the organically farmed estate. So what should you look for when walking up the wine aisle? For starters, seek out producers who focus on making rosé as a pimary product. Says Perrin, “Other wine regions think of red or white wine first and rosé as just a byproduct or a leftover. In Provence, rosé is first in everything — from the cultivation to the winemaking equipment (presses, fermentation tanks, etc.); it is all designed to make beautiful rosé.” Look for wines with delicate pinkish hues that are made from the traditional Provencal grapes: cinsault, grenache and mouvedre. True Provencal rosé is light in color and aromatic, with mineral and saline notes that lend it a savory aspect. Think of the tangy lushness of good sherbet or the aromatics of fresh-cut roses and you get the mouth watering sensation that is rosé. Rosé is “more than just a drink,” Perrin says. “A wine is always more than that. For me, rosé is a one-way trip to Provence.”

Rosé is having a global moment; French producers report that exports from Provence have risen by double digits, with a 58 percent increase in sales volume in 2015 alone.

Château Miraval’s rosé, Miraval Rosé Côtes de Provence, is the only rosé produced at the French estate.

COURTESY OF THE COMPANIES; THINKSTOCK

Winresy to T 2015 CLIF FAMILY ROSÉ OF GRENACHE Made from 100 percent grenache grapes, the wine shows watermelon and citrus. $24

2015 MIRAVAL ROSÉ CÔTES DE PROVENCE Perrin blends four grapes, which yields a gorgeous wine with delicate pink hues, aromas of rose petal and raspberry and brilliant savory freshness. $22

2015 ELOUAN ROSÉ This is a new wine from Meiomi winemaker Joe Wagner. Grapes are sourced from three regions along Oregon’s coast — the Willamette, Umqua and Rogue valleys. $22

WHISPERING ANGEL CAVES D’ESCLANS This Provencal wine is rich with aromas of nectarine and peaches. It’s utterly fresh, crisp and delightful. $16 to $19

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TRAVEL

Relax at Sea Cruise ships provide a luxury spa experience BY FRAN GOLDEN

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I

n the early days of cruise ships, the spa was often no more than a dark, cramped room off the beauty parlor, with a massage as the only option. Even the famed Golden Door spa aboard the Queen Elizabeth 2 in the 1980s was just a windowless space in the middle of the ship, says cruise journalist/historian Peter Knego. But soon, shipboard spas began to increase in popularity, and by the mid-1990s, an upscale spa was an expected amenity. Celebrity Cruises’ Century-class ships and their expansive spas, for example, helped make the words “thalassotherapy pool” part of the cruise lexicon — particularly once the 115,000-gallon saltwater pools were outfitted with bubbling jets. Today, spa fans will discover a delightful world where cruise ship spas rival their land-based cousins with the added benefit,

in many cases, of ocean views. Steiner Leisure, a spa-service provider, operates spas on more than 150 cruise ships and 18 cruise lines, while the famous Canyon Ranch spa network runs SpaClubs at Sea for the Queen Mary 2, Oceania Cruises, Regent Seven Seas and Celebrity Cruises. On the newest and largest ships, you’ll find dozens of spa treatment rooms, relaxation lounges and changing areas that include saunas and steam rooms. “Thermal suites” are in vogue — oases of calm that contain a variety of environments so that you can relax in desert-style heat or lush, tropical warmth. Spa menus often feature a wealth of relaxing body and skin care treatments. The menu at the Canyon Ranch Spa & Salon on the Queen Mary 2, for example, has more than 80 services available, from facials for

CUNARD LINE

Queen Mary 2’s hydrotherapy pool


men and women to skin detoxifiers. Some massages at Aurea Spas on MSC Cruises incorporate seashells. Viking Ocean Cruises’ Viking Star features the Snow Grotto, based on a Scandinavian tradition of mixing exposure to hot and cold temperatures to invigorate you. On one of the newest Princess Cruises ships, the Regal Princess, the massive Lotus Spa is centrally located near the restaurants and dining areas and includes hot stone therapy, ocean wraps and acupuncture treatments. Some cruise lines make the spa the destination. Book a Samsara cabin or suite on a Costa Cruises ship and get unlimited access to the spa facilities, plus special spa-related amenities in the rooms. Many of Norwegian Cruise Line’s ships offer suites designed for easy access to the spa facilities, which include salt therapy chambers. Celebrity

Cruises’ AquaClass staterooms not only offer access to the spa’s Persian Garden thermal suite, but guarantee a seat at the ship’s exclusive restaurant, Blu. For those willing to spend quite a few dollars, luxury line Regent Seven Seas’ Seven Seas Explorer provides what the company calls “the most luxurious cruise suite ever”: the $10,000-per-night, 4,443-square-foot suite with two bedrooms, a sprawling living room and its own private spa retreat with personal sauna, steam room and treatment area. — Contributing: Gene Sloan

MSC Cruises’ Aurea Spas ▶ msccruisesusa.com/ en-us/cruise-information /on-board.aspx Canyon Ranch SpaClubs at Sea ▶ canyonranch destinations.com/sea Celebrity Cruises’ AquaClass staterooms ▶ celebritycruises.com/ onboard-celebrity/ staterooms-aqua-classstateroom

MSC Cruises’ Aurea spa

WHAT TO KNOW Before you take to the waters, keep these tips and etiquette pointers in mind: RESERVATIONS Cruise lines prefer that passengers book spa treatments before boarding. If you’re unsure, check out the spa when you first board so there will be time to make reservations. LOCKER ROOMS Most spas provide locker rooms to store items. You are typically given a robe. Many spas ask that you be nude for massages, but undress to a state you’re comfortable with. SERVICE During the massage, some therapists will speak in low tones or not at all, but others can be quite chatty. If this distracts from your experience, it’s perfectly OK to ask for silence. SALES PITCH In many spas, therapists are also salespeople. They may recommend expensive take-home products. Buy the products if you want, but don’t feel pressured to purchase. AARON SAUNDERS; THINKSTOCK

Onboard Spas

GRATUITIES An automatic 15 percent gratuity may be added. If a tip is not included, therapists do expect one in cash or added to your shipboard account — it’s part of their salary.

Costa Cruises’ Samsara suites ▶ costacruise.com Norwegian Cruise Line’s spa suites ▶ ncl.com/whycruise-norwegian/ cruise-accommodations Princess Cruises’ Lotus Spa ▶ princess.com/learn/ onboard/activities/ lotus_spa_fitness Queen Mary 2 ▶ cunard.com Regent Seven Seas’ Regent Suite ▶ rssc.com/ships/ seven_seas_explorer The Onboard Spa by Steiner ▶ steinerleisure.com Viking Star’s The Spa ▶ vikingcruises.com/ oceans/ships/vikingstar/index.html

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Teeing Off for a Great Vacation These golf destinations build together time on and off the course

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et’s face it, golf takes time. When we were juggling careers and families, a half-day game was out of the question. But now, we’ve earned it — as well as that 19th hole lounge and spa at memorable golf courses. One way to elevate your game is through the Executive Women’s Golf Association (EWGA), which provides learning opportunities, competition and social outlets for everyone from beginners to the

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single-digit handicapper. “Golf is an important game for women,” says Pam Swensen, EWGA’s CEO. “It is a useful skill for business, and just as important, a wonderful sport for a lifetime that can be played with family and friends in locales around the world.” Whether you’re hitting the links with your partner or planning a golfing girlfriends’ getaway, these resorts will please even the pickiest of players.

REYNOLDS PLANTATION

BY ANNETTE THOMPSON


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REYNOLDS PLANTATION Lake Oconee, Ga. | reynoldslakeoconee.com

REYNOLDS PLANTATION; MONARCH BEACH RESORT

Halfway between Augusta and Atlanta, the silver waters of Lake Oconee lap against a golf mecca boasting rolling courses lined with tall Georgia pines. A chic resort as well as quaint golf cottages line trimmed fairways. Nearby, the historic villages of Greensboro, Madison and Washington welcome antiquing and dining breaks. When the sun goes down and the day cools, just try to count all the stars and the reasons to stay. ▶ Golf: Six separate courses challenge and reward precision. If you’ve ever seen The Masters, you’ll recognize the lush woodlands. Hazards hide along dogwoods and azaleas, and canted greens putt like emerald glass. Don’t expect an old boys’ network either. “We

have an active couples program,” says Mark Lammi, vice president of golf operations. “Most of our events are for couples.” ▶ Accommodations: Choose from luxe rooms at The Ritz-Carlton, which includes five dining options. Or stay in one of the two neighborhoods of spacious frame rental cottages or tidy condominiums. ▶ Downtime: The lake’s 374 miles of shoreline offer exciting fishing along with swimming and water skiing. Don’t miss the spa at the Ritz, where you can indulge in The Georgian, a sweet tea body exfoliation followed by a red clay body cocoon. Be sure to gift your guy with a Single Malt Shave to start a smooth night out, followed by a cocktail at the Linger Longer Steakhouse.

2 MONARCH BEACH RESORT Dana Point, Calif. | monarchbeach resort.com/orange-county-golf Sand and golf go well together here — and not just in the bunkers. With a SoCal coastal vibe, this destination matches five stars with a laid-back beach. It’s all about attentive service, from the private pristine shore to dinners overlooking the Pacific. When not golfing, schedule whale-watching excursions or simply spend a morning exploring tidal pools. ▶ Golf: One of the few oceanfront courses in the state, these links don’t beat you up. The design keeps you focused with tight fairways, dramatic sloping greens and ocean views along the bluffs. Hire a forecaddie to share each hole’s nuances and read pesky putts. ▶ Accommodations: The renovated hotel soothes with a palette of cool blues, greens and crisp whites. Indulge in Fili D’oro linens and Laboratoire Remède bath products. Enjoy five new restaurants that pair stunning views with chefcreated meals — or order on your private patio. ▶ Downtime: The signature beach butler service takes care of your needs so you can bury your toes in the sand. Sign up for a surf lesson or rent a paddleboard. Fitness classes welcome group sweating, or hike and bike the trails instead. You’ll also find a spanking new Miraval spa.

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TRAVEL

3 KESWICK HALL AND GOLF CLUB Keswick, Va. | keswick.com More than 100 years ago, this Italianate villa was carved into the historic hunt and wine country at the base of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Today, Keswick Hall is a boutique featuring sumptuous lodgings, top-notch golf and a vibrant local scene. Nearby Charlottesville is rich in galleries and theaters, where top names in blues, rock and classical music perform. Local wineries garner worldwide acclaim. ▶ Golf: Pete Dye’s Full Cry layout is the most recent reworking of the original 1948 course. Dye once famously said, “No one goes out of his way to play an easy golf course.” But no one likes to get bludgeoned, either. Blending challenging shots with traditional open-fronted, approachable greens, Full Cry rewards all handicaps. ▶ Accommodations: The 48 private guest rooms still reflect their previous owner. Lord Bernard Ashley, husband to designer Laura Ashley, built the hotel and filled it with heirloom sideboards, paintings, busts and plush furnishings and attached it to the elegant 1912 north wing. ▶ Downtime: The grounds include a stunning pool, croquet, nature trails, an on-site vineyard and elegant gardens. Schedule a day steeped in history with tours of the estates of presidents Thomas Jefferson, James Madison and James Monroe.

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OMNI BARTON CREEK Austin | omnihotels.com/hotels/austin-barton-creek

Boot-stomping live music, serene lakes, miles of bike and footpaths and the colorful Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center beckon you to Austin city limits each year. Golfers settle into this over-the-top resort in Texas Hill Country on the edge of town that’s complete with four courses, full amenities and spectacular sunsets. Warm winters make a go-to off-season resort. ▶ Golf: Pick from four different courses, each with distinct character. With six tees on each hole, long-ball hitters and shorter games both make use of the fairways amid natural limestone caverns, waterfalls and cliffs. A naturalist’s haven, the courses host ample wildlife, earning a

Certified Audubon Signature Sanctuary designation. ▶ Accommodations: There’s not much that’s country-fied here except for the ease of the living. The resort’s high-rise hotels feature Texas-grand rooms and the finest Deep South hospitality. ▶ Downtime: Yes, Austin may be just down the road, but you may not want to leave the resort’s wine and s’mores at an evening fire pit or a local artisan brew in Barton’s Lounge. Several on-site boutiques tempt shoppers with designer brands, while the Three Springs Spa caters to tired swings with a golf ball massage. Be sure to challenge your sweetie to a game of miniature golf, too — and, remember, putting is the key to the game.

KESWICK HALL AND GOLF CLUB; OMNI BARTON CREEK

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VISIT Bartlesville OKLAHOMA Festivals and fun. Grand historic homes. Birthplace of America’s greatest playwright, Tennessee Williams. Run or bike along the scenic Riverwalk, winding around and over the Tombigbee River. Shop, dine, and savor in the ultimate Southern experience.

NOVEMBER 3-5, 2016 • Antiques Show & Sale OKLAHOMA INDIAN SUMMER WOOLAROC • OIL BARONS FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT’S PRICE TOWER

Bartlesville Convention & Visitors Bureau • 800-364-8708

YEAR-ROUND Daily Historic Home Tours OCTOBER 20-22 Eudora Welty Writers’ Symposium MARCH 30-APRIL 8, 2017 77th Annual Spring Pilgrimag Go to www.visitcolumbusms.org for all event listings. Tennessee Williams Home & Welcome Center • 800-920-3533

SAVOR THE SEASONS

inUpcountry South Carolina

ANDERSON

|

CHEROKEE PICKENS

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|

GREENVILLE

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OCONEE

S PA R TA N B U R G

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looming Dogwoods and Azaleas announce the arrival of Spring. In Summer, explore waterfalls, cruise freshwater lakes, and challenge the rapids of the National Wild & Scenic Chattooga River. Fall is harvest time for crisp apples and a gigantic display of breathtaking foliage as you meander the scenic byways. A Winter visit to hike trails with unobstructed views of the Blue Ridge Mountains is a wonderful weekend getaway. No matter when you visit, you’ll find that the Upcountry is Perfectly Seasoned!

Alaska Vacations Sightseeing, Rail Tours, Multi-Day Packages and more! Offering the best in Alaska vacations for nearly 70 years.

* Restrictions apply. See website for details.

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Perfectly Seasoned

graylinealaska.com • 1.800.544.2206


TRAVEL

To a Tee Golfer-approved gear to improve your game BY ANNETTE THOMPSON

▲ BIG MAX GOLF AUTOFOLD FF

Burn calories by pushing this lightweight cart around 18 holes. The fold-flat technology makes the cart easy to store and transport, leaving plenty of room for clubs and gear in the trunk of any car. $299.99,

▲ GALVIN GREEN AMBER GORE-TEX JACKET

Don’t let the weather ruin your game. Totally waterproof, the Amber’s mesh lining adds extra comfort and breathability, while the tailored color blocking down the sides creates a feminine look.

bigmaxusa.com

$278, golfsupport.com ▲ PREMIUM GOLF BALLS

Some of the most comfortable golf shoes made, the ECCO Biom Hybrid 2 Lites are handcrafted from rich, supple leather and boast a sleek, low-profile frame and molded traction bars for superior grip. $190, eccousa.com

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Prices start at $4.99 for a dozen balls, lostgolfballs.com

▼ VOICE CADDIE GOLF GPS CLIP

Voice Caddie VC300 clips to your hat or belt and measures the distance to the front, middle and back of the green at more than 40,000 courses worldwide. $129.99, voicecaddie.com

COURTESY OF THE COMPANIES

▲ ECCO BIOM HYBRID 2 LITES

Don’t spend a fortune on balls. Instead buy from lostgolfballs.com, the leading seller of preowned golf balls in the world. The company offers name-brand products and performance at up to half off manufacturers’ pricing. If pink is your color, check out the “Pink Mix” bucket filled with golf balls with makes and models from top companies, including Bridgestone, Callaway, Srixon, Titleist and more.


Remember the time we found the perfect little beach town? Your good time SOUTH CAROLINA

awaits

Hardeeville is proud to be the connection to the islands and a source of hospitality for generations of vacationers. No matter what you’ll be doing on your next Lowcountry adventure, you’ll want to stay in the center of the action. A place that’s within 30 minutes of Savannah, Hilton Head Island, Bluffton, and Beaufort. A place that has s ome fun of its own. We are Historic Hardeeville and New River. We are southern charm. We are Hardeeville, South Carolina. Where your adventure awaits. Make your perfect vacation memories in Mexico Beach, Florida. Discover a place to remember and request a free Visitor’s Guide at mexicobeach.com.

cityofhardeeville.com

Live the Lifestyle Before You Buy. COME STAY & PLAY WITH US AT ON TOP OF THE WORLD

3 DAY/2 NIGHT STAY ONLY

$204*

On Top of the World, Ocala’s Premier Active Adult Community in Ocala, FL Enjoy over 250,000 square feet of air-conditioned recreational fun! Plus over 160,000 square feet of outdoor amenities. New Single-Family Homes from the $150’s - $300’s Call us at 866.228.5878 | OnTopoftheWorld.com 8447 SW 99th St. Rd. Ocala, Florida 34481 *At least one guest must be 55 years of age or older to participate in our World Tour Adventure. All guests must be at least 18 years of age. A tour with one of our knowledgeable sales professionals is required. Accommodations are limited and available on a first come, first served basis. A World Tour is $204.00 and is subject to sales tax. Offer can be withdrawn at any time. On Top of the World Communities Inc., Ocala, Florida a 55+ community. On Top of the World Communities reserves the right to change or withdraw any offer at any time. Prices, features and specifications are subject to change without notice. #11542-7/16


LIFESTYLE

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Living It Up These active adult communities cater to your interests and lifestyle BY MARGAUX ANBOUBA

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ho says having fun is only for the young? Active-living communities around the nation are proving that the 55-and-up crowd is not only craving entertainment and adventure, but also a place to relax and recharge. And thanks to a competitive selection of communities, you can have it all — so why wouldn’t you?

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An easygoing yet active lifestyle is the biggest draw of the central Florida community On Top of the World. “Our residents like to joke that if you’re bored here, it’s because you don’t want to do anything,” says Linda Massarella-Aiosa, the director of marketing. “The property is 14,000 acres, and so while there’s a great neighborhood feel, people are also able to have their space to relax.” These wide-open spaces in Ocala include a 14-acre field designated as a “flying zone” for model aircraft enthusiasts and stables for equestrian riding and boarding. And for those looking to take a trip, On Top of the World is near Orlando and Tampa, where you can find everything from amusement parks and sports teams to top-tier hospitals and medical care.

ON TOP OF THE WORLD COMMUNITIES

ON TOP OF THE WORLD


Your

Dream Home is Waiting!

Your Life. Your Community. Your Home. From coast to coast, we have a neighborhood for you! Find a place to call home in a community with great amenities and activities. Enjoy athletic clubs, dances, social gatherings, sparkling swimming pools, sports courts, and so much more. Whether you are looking for a new or preowned home, we have plenty to choose from! Join us the second Saturday of each month for our national monthly open houses or call to schedule your own private tour.

Live in Mesa, AZ

Live in Sarasota, FL

Live in Palm Springs, CA

Book a tour online at

MyMHCommunity.com Call for more information (855) 336-8905


LIFESTYLE

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2

LAGUNA WOODS VILLAGE

It’s always sunny in Laguna Beach, and that is one of the many bonuses of living at this seaside community in Southern California. “Laguna Woods Village is the largest community in California,” says Heather Rasmussen, head of marketing. “The whole community is situated in rolling hills, and it’s all very natural-feeling. The weather is so beautiful that people like to get out and hike, golf or spend time at the beach.” A mere 20 minutes away from

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Laguna Beach proper, residents are able to live the resort life with the comfort of a large city nearby. Regardless of your hobby (golf, horseback riding, ceramics), there are amenities on-site to help you cultivate your talents. And for those of you looking to downsize your collection of cars, the entire community is routed for golf carts. A bonus: This private, gated community has its own security force, ensuring the comfort and safety of its residents.

It’s Vegas, baby! Located just minutes from downtown Las Vegas and the famed Strip, Sun City Summerlin seamlessly fuses the retired life with all the action and excitement of Sin City. “The year-round recreation climate means residents are able to take full advantage of all of our amenities,” says executive director Paul Henderson. “Everybody here loves to stay active.” Think three golf courses, 12 tennis courts, pickleball courts, five pools and more. Roughly 12,500 people call this community, nestled against the Spring Mountain Range at an altitude of 3,000 feet, home. And while an occasional trip to the Strip is necessary, don’t think that’s all Nevada has to offer. Nearby attractions such as the Atomic Testing Museum and the Madame Tussauds wax museum will keep you more than entertained, and Nevada, nearby Arizona, California and Utah offer multiple state parks and endless adventures.

COURTESY OF SUN CITY SUMMERLIN; MARK RABINOWICH

SUN CITY SUMMERLIN


SO EXCITING PEOPLE CAN’T WAIT... Envision yourself living where the idea of community is more than a distant memory. A place where you actually know your neighbors. Where you support each other and interact positively while sharing a vested interest. Whether your interest is in the well-being of your neighborhood or the global community. Welcome to Sycamore Springs! Designed to be small neighborhoods where people can have the privacy they want, but also engage in the meaningful relationships they desire. Visit SycamoreSprings.net!

Under Construction for adults 55 and over. Embrace Your Future - Today!


LIFESTYLE

SPECIALIZED SPOTS Looking for a community to further nurture your interests and passions? These tailored communities are a good place to start.

LAKE WEIR PRESERVE Ocklawaha, Fla. This community is filled with adults who love their big toys — RVs, boats, classic cars, motorcycles, ATVs and just about anything else you can think of. And with central Florida’s ideal weather, there isn’t a better place to feel the wind in your hair or the sea at your back. ▶ lakeweirliving.com

NOHO SENIOR ARTS COLONY North Hollywood, Calif. Located in the vibrant North Hollywood Arts District, this community is ideal for those craving an apartment lifestyle with an artsy bent. Amenities are geared toward artists, thespians, writers and the like, so you can expect a lot of creative energy. ▶ nohoseniorartscolony.com

LASELL VILLAGE A laser focus on education is just one of the aspects that sets Lasell Village apart. In this community located on the Lasell College campus and just 10 miles from Boston, the option of continuing your education isn’t just a perk of living here — it’s a requirement. And with such course offerings as Book Production and SelfPublishing, History and Theory of the Best-Loved Symphonies and Notable Trials in U.S. History, we imagine you won’t have a difficult time finding something that interests you. ▶ lasellvillage.org

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COURTESY OF NOHO SENIOR ARTS COLONY

Newton, Mass.


Aging doesn’t mean Avid travelers. Asbury residents. Watch Ron and Pam’s story and redefine your expectations of retirement communities. Visit Asbury.org/ActiveAging.

Asbury.org/Contact-Us | 301-250-2100 | Active retirement living in Maryland, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and Oklahoma.


HEALTH

Without enough healthy bacteria in the gut to keep it in check, C. difficile can quickly grow out of control and cause major health issues.

Gut Instinct The bacteria in our bellies might hold the key to a better life

A

healthy gastrointestinal tract is estimated to host millions of bacteria. It seems that with each new study, we learn much more about how gut bacteria are running the show in our bodies. And when those bacteria get out of whack, the imbalance can contribute to a multitude of maladies, including obesity, rheumatoid arthritis, asthma or worse. Microbes are tiny organisms — bacteria, viruses, fungi and protozoa — that live all around,

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on and in us. Some cause disease; others are essential to life. A community of microbes is called a microbiome, and the human microbiome — particularly the collection that lives in the gut, which extends from your mouth to the end of your lower intestine — influences our health (or lack thereof) in myriad ways. It determines how well our immune system works and how well our bodies process the food we eat and even whether we feel happy or sad. Scientists had estimated that

there were about 500 species or strains of bacteria in a human belly, but a study by Stanford University researchers published in late 2008 found at least 5,600 separate species of bacteria living in the gut. That prompted doctors and researchers to take a closer look at what happens in our bellies and how it affects what happens elsewhere in the body. The diversity of gut bacteria is enormously important to our overall health, says Zach Bush, an internal medicine physician who co-fonded and serves as CEO

CDC/ JAMES ARCHER

BY ALLISON HATFIELD


of Biomic Sciences, a developer of soil-derived supplements in Charlottesville, Va. To thrive longterm, every ecosystem needs a biologically diverse community, and the human microbiome is no different. When bacterial diversity in the gut is balanced, our bodies function optimally, Bush says. We strengthen or weaken that diversity with the foods we eat and the medicines we take, as evidenced in a study published earlier this year in the journal Science.

University, an infectious diseases physician at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System in California and a member of the team that conducted the Stanford study. He notes that there have been many disease outbreaks, such as E. coli and listeria, associated with the contamination of organic produce. “My strong recommendation,

Eating to Good Health

THINKSTOCK

Beneficial Bacteria One thing that messes with our gut flora is bacteria overkill, according to Josh Axe, a doctor of natural medicine and clinical nutritionist. His book, Eat Dirt, claims that the obsession with cleanliness has left us vulnerable to illness — the very thing it was intended to prevent. Referred to by scientists and doctors as “the hygiene hypothesis,” the idea is that by over-sanitizing our environments, we have prevented exposure to stimuli that benefit our immune system and thus made ourselves vulnerable to a range of health problems. An easy step is to stop using antibacterial soaps and hand sanitizers that contain triclosan, an antimicrobial agent that kills bacteria indiscriminately, so the good germs go out with the bad. Another possible step? As Axe’s book suggests, it could be ingesting a little soil, which even the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has acknowledged could boost immunity. This doesn’t mean that you should replace your smoothie with a scoop of earth. Axe says to stop scrubbing produce completely clean because this removes the soil-based organisms (SBOs) that are thought to be beneficial to gut health. But not everyone believes in eating unwashed produce. David Relman is a professor at Stanford

Relman notes that water does remove some soil-based organisms, which are indeed beneficial for plants. “But there are no good data to suggest that they are beneficial for humans,” he says. Bottom line: Unless you know exactly where your organic (or any) produce came from and how the soil in which it was grown was treated, it’s probably safest to wash it well.

5,600 The number of separate species of bacteria living in the gut, according to a 2008 study by Stanford University researchers and what I do in this circumstance, is to wash them!” he says. “On the other hand, in the case of homegrown vegetables and produce, if one has control over the growing conditions and is certain that there hasn’t been fecal contamination or use of harmful chemicals, then the risks are much less, and the benefits of washing also less.” And what about the SBOs?

That you’re eating organic produce is a good start. A diet that aims to balance gut bacteria could bring about health benefits, including reduction of allergies, increase in energy, ability to maintain healthy weight and even calming irritable bowel syndrome. Refined flours and sugars, as well as industrial seed oils (corn, cottonseed, safflower, soybean, etc.), are on the negative side of that equation. Whole grains and organic fruits and vegetables are on the positive side, appearing to support the growth and activity of beneficial microbes. Mice fed fiber-rich foods have been shown to develop “good” gut bacteria. “In general, it appears that diets high in simple sugars and low in fiber encourage the gut microbial communities to become depleted in organisms that perform important functions for the human host, and enriched for organisms that are associated with host inflammation,” Relman says. Food that contains probiotics — substances that many believe to stimulate the growth of micro-organisms — such as yogurt and sauerkraut, as well as probiotic supplements, are also purported to be beneficial to gut bacteria, but the research hasn’t proven that yet. “Some probiotic strains are helpful to some humans under some circumstances for specific purposes,” Relman says. “But

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HEALTH

Harmless strains of Escherichia coli (E. coli) are part of the normal flora of the gut, but some types can cause serious food poisoning in their hosts.

When Nothing Else Helps In the most extreme cases of microbiome imbalance — in particular, a condition called C. difficile colitis — it might be time to break out the big guns: a fecal transplant. Though an unsavory topic for many, it’s been proven to wipe out C. diff, a bacterium that can cause symptoms ranging from diarrhea to life-threatening inflammation of the colon better than the typical round of antibiotics. In her 2003 book, Gulp, author Mary Roach detailed the procedure, which was first documented in fourth-century China, according to the Fecal Transplant Foundation, but is still relatively rare in the U.S. The process involves taking a healthy person’s stool, diluting it with saline and other solutions and giving it to another patient, typically via colonoscopy, endoscopy or enema. There are also fecal transplant pills available by prescription. Less invasive, the pills are also somewhat less effective. Roach, who confesses to being a “longtime casual dirt eater” and not washing “carrots or anything from the grocery,” says she’s seen firsthand how a fecal transplant can dramatically improve someone’s quality of life (in much the same way chronic diarrhea can dramatically diminish it). She adds that if she were afflicted with C. diff or another debilitating bowel condition, she’d absolutely undergo a fecal transplant.

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A fecal transplant is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for only those who suffer recurrent C. diff infections. The cost for a fecal transplant via colonoscopy runs in the neighborhood of $3,000. Not all insurance companies cover the expense, and some might cover the colonoscopy but not all the donor and recipient testing required beforehand. A 30-pill regimen is more affordable, around $535 at openbiome.org. A fecal transplant accomplishes something that probiotics cannot do, says Roach, who was told while researching Gulp that in serious cases, using “probiotics is like trying to raise the sea level with a teacup.” Bush agrees, adding that fecal transplants “were developed because probiotics don’t offer enough complexity. You need thousands and thousands of bacteria species, and probiotics offer only a tiny fraction of that.”

HEALTHY FOOD Whole grains and organic fruits and vegetables support the growth and activity of beneficial microbes.

NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ALLERGY AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES

not all strains are equal, nor are all people and circumstances the same. Same deal with fermented foods: Some may be helpful for some people under certain circumstances, but not all are beneficial to all under all circumstances.”


Every day you suffer from chronic back pain is another day you can’t get back. And with every treatment that falls short, more of your days, and dreams, pass you by. Don’t let pain steal another day. Ask about COOLIEF* Cooled Radiofrequency Treatment, a minimally invasive and non-surgical outpatient procedure that targets the nerves that cause chronic back pain. Studies have demonstrated that radiofrequency treatment can provide up to 24 months of relief from chronic back pain.

Reimagine your future. Visit myCOOLIEFUSA.com to find a COOLIEF-trained physician near you. *Registered Trademark or Trademark of Halyard Health, Inc. or its affliates. © 2016 HYH. All rights reserved.

Cooled Radiofrequency Treatment


HEALTH

Joint Adventures Nearly 1 million Americans receive new hips or knees each year — and many are determined to put them to good use BY CINDY KUZMA

ROB CARLIN

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r. Deborah DeMarco started running marathons during medical school. She eventually completed seven, training with friends and her dog, a collie who could log up to 10 miles. “I identified myself as a runner — I thought I would run to my grave,” says DeMarco, 60, a rheumatologist at UMass Memorial Medical Center in Worcester, Mass. But around 2005, DeMarco’s right knee began to ache. Eventually, pain kept her awake and she could barely walk her dog, let alone run. She tried over-thecounter pain medications, physical therapy and injections with both steroids and jointlubricating fluids to treat her osteoarthritis, which she attributes to genetics, not her marathon habit. Studies have shown that runners have a lower risk of developing the disease. When those When pain treatments sidelined stopped working, Deborah DeMarco carefully DeMarco, she had considered her knee options, then replacement joined the more surgery on than 700,000 her right knee. Americans

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HEALTH

who enter the operating room yearly and come out with new knees. An additional 300,000 each year have hip replacements. Rates of both surgeries have more than doubled in recent decades. “Within the next 10 years, there may not be enough operating rooms and surgeons to manage the demand,” says Dr. Ira Kirschenbaum, chairman of the department of orthopedic surgery at Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center in New York. Obesity may play a role because extra pounds increase the risk of arthritis. Kirschenbaum also cites age and sports injuries at an early age. Fractures or tears in ligaments or other soft tissues in your 20s and 30s increase the risk of pain that may lead to surgery.

Another reason for the rise? Patients aren’t slowing down. Gail Pistello, 55, of Downers Grove, Ill., taught middle-school physical education until retiring this year, played softball, did triathlons and golfed: “I’ve always been a mover.” But by age 50, hip pain had sidelined Pistello completely. “The pain is unbelievable — the throbbing. You just can’t get comfortable or sleep,” she says. The decision to have a hip replacement was an easy one. She had the procedure in 2012, and today, she’s resting better, back to biking and playing golf and aims for 15,000 steps daily (the equivalent of about 7.5 miles).

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As for DeMarco, most doctors advise against distance running or other high-impact activities after surgery to preserve the life of the joint. So she transitioned to cycling, completing a 164-mile charity ride 18 months after her surgery. Then there’s Linda Radocaj, 54, of Williamsport, Pa. Since having both hips replaced in 2006, she’s climbed 12 “fourteeners” — 14,000-foot mountain peaks — and knocks out four to five CrossFit workouts each week. She can’t squat quite as low as she used to and chooses not to run, but otherwise, the artificial joints haven’t slowed her down. “I want to continue to do everything I can do,” she says. “I’m trying to defy age.”

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After a hip replacement, Gail Pistello is back to biking and skiing.

Be Realistic About Recovery Replacing worn-down joints with devices made of metal and hard plastic often serves as “a lifechanging procedure for the good,” says Pistello’s surgeon, Dr. Scott Sporer of Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush in Chicago. But it’s not a quick fix, he warns. Sporer and Kirschenbaum both advise patients to exhaust all their non-surgical options first, such as weight loss, medications and physical therapy. The longer you can delay surgery, the lower

your odds of having to replace the joint again, they say. And while you wait, scientists are developing new treatment options, including pain-relieving injections and betterconstructed joints that last 20 years or even longer. Now, many new joints are modular, meaning they come in more than one piece — if one portion wears out, surgery to fix it may be less invasive than replacing the entire joint, Sporer says. Some manufacturers also now produce gender-specific knees, which may provide

COURTESY LINDA RADOCAJ; COURTESY GAIL PISTELLO

Active Aspirations

CrossFit and climbing are a big part of Linda Radocaj’s life after having both hips replaced in 2006. “I want to continue to do everything I can do.”


Knee replacement surgery gave Cheryl Cherry back a range of motion, allowing her to win medals in the National Senior Games.

NATIONAL SENIOR GAMES: THINKSTOCK

a better fit. And improvements in anesthetics and pain medication during and after surgery, along with minimally invasive techniques, may make recovery more bearable. Still, like all surgeries, joint replacements have risks. These include infections, blood clots, pain and trouble with the actual devices. Sometimes, manufacturers issue recalls on the implants. That doesn’t mean you immediately need to replace them, but they may require close monitoring. Patients also should enter surgery aware of the rehab requirements. You’ll likely spend a few days in the hospital and up to six weeks at home. Returning to full activity can take three to six months, or longer. And while being fit eases recovery, significant effort needs to go into physical therapy. “I tell all my patients it’s a 50-50 thing,” Sporer says. He puts the knee in, but only they can build supporting muscle and restore function.

Fitter and Faster Than Ever Maintaining an active lifestyle can reduce your risk of needing a joint replacement in the first place. For one thing, it

IS JOINT REPLACEMENT RIGHT FOR YOU? “No one needs a joint replacement. People can benefit from surgery in the right situations,” says Dr. Ira Kirschenbaum, a New York-based orthopedic surgeon. You might be a good candidate if: uPain limits your life. uYou have documented arthritis or another serious condition affecting the joint. uOther treatments have failed. controls your weight, which reduces arthritis risk, Sporer says. For another, strengthening the muscles around your joints decreases the stress across them. However, genetics and luck also play a role. Breast cancer survivor and former runner Cheryl Cherry, 67, of Clermont, Fla., says she underwent a knee replacement in 2005 when she could no longer exercise. She tackled physical therapy with an athlete’s fervor. Because of excess scar tissue, she required two additional procedures — and an extra

year of rehab — to regain full motion in her knee. The return of motion in the joint “gave me my life back,” Cherry says. She also started cycling, purchasing her first road bike at age 63. Last year, she won gold and silver medals in cycling races at the National Senior Games in Minnesota. “Our bodies were meant to move,” she says. And if joint replacement surgery helps you stay active, she believes it should be seriously considered. “It will be the best thing you’ve ever done, if you really are determined.”

uYou’re prepared to work hard in physical therapy. uYou don’t have other health problems, such as current infections or uncontrolled diabetes, that make surgery too risky. uYou can take time off from work or other activities for about six weeks after surgery. uYou have someone who can help you with personal care during recovery.

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CAREER

Worth the Risk Sometimes it pays to start a new career later in life BY MARY LORENZ

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THINKSTOCK

ver dream of leaving it all behind to open a bed-andbreakfast in Vermont? Got a hunch you’d make one heck of a Hollywood screenwriter? Many of us fantasize about quitting our jobs to pursue passion projects, but the idea of starting from scratch in a completely new career can be terrifying — particularly if you have already been in the workforce for years. Changing careers later in life, however, is not uncommon. And as many people can attest, the risks of actually going for something you have always dreamed about can be well worth the rewards. Whether you’ve lost that loving feeling for your current job or just can’t shake the idea that there’s something else out there for you, it’s never too late to change careers. Consider these tips before you do.  

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CAREER

TIP #1 FIND YOUR MOTIVATION.

THINKSTOCK

Before you decide to change careers, ask yourself what is motivating your decision. “When job seekers are just running away from a bad career or work situation without understanding their motivation, they not only set themselves up for being in the same situation in a few years, but their lack of enthusiasm will come through in the interview process,” says Leila Hock, a career strategy coach and founder Alignment Coaching.   TIP #2 BE FLEXIBLE. “Many employers are reticent to hire ‘older workers’ — and particularly those who do not have the experience in their particular field — for a full-time job,” says Art Koff, founder of RetiredBrains, an information resource for older adults. He suggests seeking work on a project basis, part time or seasonally. Whether you’re retired already or just looking to add to your skillset, starting small is a good way to get in the door and gain experience.

TIP #3 DO YOUR HOMEWORK. The only way to truly know whether a career change is right for you is to actually do it. But the next best thing is talking to those who have. Tap into your personal and professional contacts to “network like crazy,” says Lynne Sarikas, director of the Graduate Career Center at Northeastern University in Boston. “This is a great way to learn how others have made similar career transitions and to learn about the various roles in your desired field and the key skills (necessary) for success.” TIP #4 KNOW YOUR DEAL-BREAKERS. Switching careers often means making compromises. Ask yourself what you are willing to sacrifice to

make your dreams possible, advises Whitney Johnson, author of Disrupt Yourself: Putting the Power of Disruptive Innovation to Work. For example, are you willing to work part time or on a contract or freelance basis? Are you willing to fill an entry-level role? Can you afford to take a pay cut? Are you willing to take classes to gain necessary skills? “Identify where you might make the change you want on terms that would work for you,” Johnson says. TIP #5 DON’T SELL YOURSELF SHORT. Switching to a career in a field in which you have little to no experience can be tough, and it’s easy to get discouraged. But as someone new to the field, you have a lot to offer, so use that to your advantage. “Focus on your transferrable skills,” Sarikas says.

“Don’t focus on the part of the job description you haven’t done before. ... Focus on your passion for the work and the skills and experience you bring to the table. Sell the hiring manager on the unique strengths and perspectives you bring to the position.” TIP #6 FOCUS ON THE REWARDS, NOT THE RISKS. “When you are later in your career, it can be scary to try to make a change and start over again,” Hock says. Instead of focusing on what you might lose, concentrate on everything you will gain, from increased satisfaction to new experiences. Most importantly, remember that you’ve already proved you have what it takes to sustain a career. “Focus on what has helped you succeed thus far and how that will propel you in your next career.” — Mary Lorenz is a writer for the Advice & Resources section on careerbuilder.com. She researches and writes about job-search strategy, management, hiring trends and workplace issues.

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FINANCE

Trust Me Five signs your financial adviser is working in your best interests

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any of us need a little outside help when it comes to investing and planning for the future, and that’s where financial advisers come into play. According to the Certified Financial Planner Board, consumer use of financial advisers increased from 28 percent in 2010 to 40 percent in 2015, yet 63 percent of people still believe that current laws don’t do enough to protect them from shady investment practices. And in a 2016 study examining more than 1 million

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records, roughly 7 percent of financial advisers had documented instances of misconduct ranging from negligence to fraud. In other words, there are a lot of bad eggs, and getting stuck with a dishonest adviser could mean losing hard-earned money to fees as well as exposing yourself to more risk than you’re comfortable taking on. Thankfully, there are plenty of financial advisers who know what it means to operate with integrity. Here are five positive signs to look for:

THINKSTOCK

BY MAURIE BACKMAN


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THINKSTOCK

1

YOU UNDERSTAND WHAT FEES YOU’RE PAYING

Financial advisers have to make money, and they can do that in several ways. Some earn commission based on the investments they sell. Others earn a fee that’s calculated as a percentage of assets under management. There are also advisers who take a hybrid approach that combines the two. Many people prefer fee-based advisers to commissionbased, because their fees are somewhat linked to their accounts’ performance (meaning when you do well, your adviser does well). Furthermore, commission-based advisers are often tempted to push certain investments over others because they come with a higher commission. But in reality, it almost doesn’t matter what your adviser’s compensation structure is as long as he or she is completely open and honest about it. If you’re well aware of how much you’re paying your adviser, it means you’re dealing with someone who believes in transparency.

YOUR ADVISER TALKS OPENLY ABOUT RISK

Most investments come with a degree of risk, and it’s almost always the case that the higher the risk, the higher the reward. Any adviser who tries to downplay the risks associated with investing is effectively doing wrong by his or her clients. A good adviser will not only talk about risk, but run numbers showing you what you stand to gain and lose in different market scenarios.

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3

YOUR ADVISER TRIES TO EDUCATE YOU ABOUT INVESTING

Some advisers tend to throw around buzzwords and investment speak, either to show off or to come across as experts. And those people may very well be experts, but that doesn’t necessarily translate to trustworthiness. A good adviser won’t just try to sell you a certain stock or mutual fund; he or she will explain your options in detail and encourage you to learn more about what each one entails.

YOUR ADVISER REMEMBERS YOUR GOALS (AND CARES ABOUT THEM)

There’s no one-size-fits-all approach to investing, nor is there some magic universal savings target you should aim to have reached by a certain age. Your adviser’s job is to take the time to understand your personal goals and craft a financial plan that works to achieve them. If your adviser seems cognizant of these goals when making recommendations, it’s a sign that he or she is not only listening, but is also working with your best interests in mind. Ideally, your financial adviser will be someone you turn to for guidance through various stages of your life. If something about your adviser just doesn’t seem right or you’re not comfortable voicing your concerns about your assets’ performance, you shouldn’t hesitate to make a change. After all, to an extent, your financial future is in your adviser’s hands, and you deserve to feel 100 percent comfortable that you’ve found the right person for the job.

5

YOUR ADVISER ASKS TO MEET REGULARLY TO REVIEW YOUR PORTFOLIO

Some advisers have a tendency to meet with their clients only when they have new investments to push, or are looking to talk their clients into investing more money. But a trustworthy adviser is one who proactively invites you to discuss your investments, review his or her performance and talk through any concerns you might have.

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FINANCE

Tech and safety upgrades further prove it’s a pleasure to drive BY ADAM HADHAZY

W

ith each passing model year, cars become more tricked out with safety and luxury features. Many automakers have placed big bets on the public’s appetite for these technologies, especially in models marketed to sophisticated and wealthier drivers. Still, deciding which features might be right for you can be challenging. “It’s a delicate balance with these features of being helpful, but not to the point of being overwhelming,” says Jessica Caldwell, director of pricing and industry analysis at longtime automotive resource Edmunds.com. To help you sort through what’s out there, here are three car models that showcase the latest, best-fit-for-you tech on the road today.

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With Premium 3 Package, starting at $58,450 With the kids out of the house and some extra cash to spend, maybe it’s time for a car just for you. The SLC300 luxury coupe from MercedesBenz fits the bill. A particularly handy newer feature available in this car, as well as others featured here, is Apple CarPlay. Via a jack and a downloaded app, Apple CarPlay lets owners integrate their iPhones with the vehicle’s center console touch screen. The screen displays the familiar icons from the phone and conveys much of the device’s functionality. “It’s just a simplified, car-centered version of your phone,” says Kelsey

Mays, senior consumer affairs editor for Cars. com. Drivers can listen to music from their iPhones, compose text messages with their voices or use navigation programs such as Apple Maps. (The SLC series does not yet have Android Auto for Android-based phones, but look for that as soon as Mercedes rolls the technology through its model line.) Among its loads of other conveniences, the SLC300 also has headlights that courteously and automatically dim for oncoming traffic but brighten fully when cruising in the countryside.

MERCEDES-BENZ

Joyrides

2017 Mercedes-Benz SLC300


TALK TO ME Apple CarPlay lets owners integrate their iPhones with all three car models.

2017 Cadillac CT6

GM

2.0L Turbo Luxury, starting at $58,395 Many industry experts say the most popular cars for the over-50 set are premium domestic brands such as Lincoln, Buick and Cadillac. A standout in this pack, still made right in Detroit: the latest Cadillac Touring 6, or CT6, luxury sedan. It’s the first vehicle that lets drivers switch a traditional rear-view mirror to a “rear camera mirror.” Live video from a rearmounted camera streams into this mirror, which doubles as a screen. The driver’s field of vision expands 300 percent, removing obstructions from headrests, back-seat passengers, the roof and rear columns. These rearcamera mirrors topped a list of 37 up-and-coming car features in which drivers over 50 expressed interest as part of the recent J.D. Power 2016 U.S. Tech Choice Study. The new CT6 can come with numerous other

safety features, including rear cross-traffic and side blind-zone alerts. Courtesy of radar beamed from its rear corners, the CT6 can sense if another vehicle is approaching from the side when backing out of a parking space or is lurking unseen in an adjacent road lane.

Colored icons appear in the backup camera or side-view mirror to warn CT6 drivers about the hazard. So that everyone on board can have highspeed Internet for their mobile devices, the CT6 can serve as its own Wi-Fi hot spot as well.

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2016 Volvo XC70 T5 AWD Classic Platinum, starting at $49,115

FULL CONTROL The XC70’s configurable digital instrument panel gives drivers optimal control.

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Many of us recall the boxy Volvos of yore, famous for their safety ratings. Flashing forward, the Swedish automaker has kept its reputation for safety while streamlining its models’ angular design. Volvo’s XC70 has emerged as a winner in the over-50 demographic, which has taken a liking to compact and crossover SUVs. They’re a breeze to get in and out of because of their high, but not-toohigh, ground clearances. And easy access to an ample trunk and superior visibility make crossovers ideal for weekend adventures, carting around the grandkids or antiquing.

The XC70 comes with Volvo’s innovative IntelliSafe package, with safety features not yet available from competitors. Intersection braking technology, for instance, senses if a collision is imminent as your car enters an intersection, braking automatically to lessen or avoid impact. The XC70’s Driver Alert Control can discern when its operator is getting drowsy, because of a front-mounted camera that monitors the alignment of steering wheel movements with road markings. A Rest Stop Guidance function can then supply navigation to the nearest cup of coffee if you’re feeling drowsy.

VOLVO

FINANCE


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LAST WORD

Take a Hike One woman finds solutions and solace on the trail BY SUZANNE WRIGHT

I

came late to hiking. Sure, I sometimes strolled in urban parks and I ran for a time in my 20s. But it wasn’t until I moved to Arizona five years ago that the trail became a trusted place to work through temporary turmoil and life-changing issues. Hiking is good exercise, for sure; my thighs have grown strong and my stamina is the best it’s ever been. But the physical benefits are secondary. I hike to gain clarity of thought. When I’m seized by panic, struggling with fatigue or overwhelmed by a situation, I hit the trail. I’ve found that by climbing

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mountains, I can sometimes move mountains. When I learned that my mother had Alzheimer’s and would need to move into an assisted-living facility, I hiked silently as tears slipped down my cheeks. When a client was unreasonable, I hiked out my frustration. When the end of a long friendship loomed, I hiked. When I had a major work success, I celebrated with a hike. I’ve hiked at sunrise, at midday, at twilight and under a full moon. I’ve hiked in autumn when the cottonwoods glow golden, on Christmas Day, in spring when the cactus flowers explode in neon bloom and while late summer rains filled the desert air. I repeatedly hike the same trail, yet it is never the same. I’ve become highly attuned to the nuances, able to differentiate the sound of a lizard skittering in dry brush from the clatter of deer hooves on granite. I know the cry of the cactus wren.

Often I see bighorn sheep, bobcats, coyotes, foxes, jackrabbits, rattlesnakes and roadrunners. Other times, I just see evidence of their presence. All of us, whether we are two- or four-legged or winged, are making our way. The trail is like life: Sometimes it ascends sharply into loose rock or descends into a lush riparian oasis. Sometimes the sun warms your face; sometimes a flash flood stops you in your tracks. Whatever the trail brings, by the time I unlace my boots, I’m soothed both physically and emotionally. Sometimes a problem has been solved, sometimes not. But I always feel better after a hike. — Suzanne Wright is a writer based in Tucson. When she’s not hiking, she spends her downtime traveling and watching episodes of Arrested Development and Flight of the Conchords.

COURTESY OF SUZANNE WRIGHT; THINKSTOCK

HERE COMES THE SUN Prickly pear cactus bear fruit midsummer at Spur Cross Ranch Conservation Area in Cave Creek, Ariz.


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Suffering from Chronic Knee Pain? One Woman’s Search for a Non-Surgical Alternative for Relief and How it May Help You Brenda Grigsby, a 59-year-old grandmother of three from Anderson, South Carolina, is the kind of person who is always in motion – but that became a challenge when she developed chronic pain in her knee.

Living with chronic pain

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Brenda’s knee was in a state of constant throbbing. Sometimes, she felt it would give out as she was walking. She dealt with the pain for more than 10 years, convinced it was all just part of the natural aging process. At times, the pain was so severe, she could barely walk. To help manage her pain, Brenda took medication daily and even tried pain cream, but nothing fully alleviated her pain. Brenda’s pain also disrupted her sleep. “It slowed me down immensely,” said Brenda. “For about six to eight months, I would wake up in the middle of the night because of the pain.”

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Is COOLIEF* Cooled RF right for you? How does it work? COOLIEF* Cooled RF is a minimally invasive, outpatient treatment that uses cooled radiofrequency technology to safely treat chronic pain by targeting the sensory nerves causing pain. Where can I receive it? COOLIEF* Cooled RF must be administered by a trained physician. To find a COOLIEF* Cooled RF trained physician near you, visit myCoolief.com/find-a-physician. Is it covered by insurance? Based on a patient’s unique condition, insurance coverage will vary by insurance carrier. Patients should check with their physician to find out if COOLIEF* Cooled RF is covered for their particular medical needs. Consult a COOLIEF* Cooled RF trained physician to determine if COOLIEF* Cooled RF is right for you. For additional information, visit myCoolief.com.

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