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31 FLAVORS CELEBRATING YEAR 31

LAURIE CAIRD


31 Flavors To celebrate my 31st birthday, I decided to make 31 flavors of ice cream during my 31st year. As I started telling people about my plan, an overwhelming number of people expressed interest in “helping” me by “reviewing” the flavors in the project. This was really great, because I was not particularly interested in eating 31 pints of ice cream by myself. And, it was a fantastic way to involve as many people as possible. (Free homemade ice cream? Count me in!) This also gave me the opportunity to make special flavors to honor other people’s birthdays and celebratory occasions. During the 31 Flavors project, we celebrated Matt’s birthday with an ice cream sundae, Sean’s PhD, a Caird un-birthday party, and savory ice creams that were featured in an Epic Veg Time tasting menu.

A huge thank you to all those who participated in the 31 Flavors project! Matt Bramlage • Rebecca Gorton • Orion Auld • Christine Nolan • Paul Dickinson • Lori Durako • Jessica Brooks Hope Scheid • Sean Gerrish • Sarah Iles • Sam Jordan • Ted Curran • Leah Curran • Lori Phillips • Becca Rufer Danny Mozzetti • Jamie Winslow-Mozzetti • Greg Westin • Melissa Borja • Bea Borja-Westin • Michael McPhee • Leigh Riley Brooke Cargile • Christine Fetterhoff • Gail Caird • Steve Caird • eh! Steve Caird • Kelly Schwartz • Lenny Eskin Carolyn Zola • Dima Kumets • The Scheid Family and Friends • Sara Boedecker-Johnston


This is not a cookbook This is a log of what happened during the 31 Flavors project, including both success stories and failed experiments. This book is designed to be a record of those experiences, and is meant as a starting place for you to develop your own ideas of how the ice creams should be made. Maybe you'll figure out how to make that Horchata Rice Cream really kick ass. Maybe you will be pleased that there is an inadvertant popsicle recipe in here. Take it and run.

Basic components Most ice creams consist of a successful frozen emulsion of five basic components:

Ice crystals Created when the water-content in the base starts to freeze; they put the “ice” in “ice cream”, giving solidity and body. The size of the ice crystals largely determines how fine, or grainy, the ice cream eventually turns out. The smaller the ice crystal, the smoother the ice cream.

Fat Often in the form of butter (milk) fat; adds richness, stabilizes the base mix, improves density and the smoothness of texture and generally increases the depth of flavor.

Sugar This could include various sugars, honey or syrups. Sugar adds sweetness but also improves texture and body. Sweeteners lower the freezing point of the overall mixture, ensuring that the ice cream does not freeze rock-solid.

Air The invisible (and cheapest) ingredient in ice cream. The tiny air cells whipped into the base mix are largely responsible for the general consistency of ice cream, and greatly affect texture and volume.


Techniques Freezing Forming the appropriate ice crystals is critical to making the perfect frozen treat. In order to keep everything from just becoming a flavored ice cube, the mixture needs to include elements that prevent complete freezing. Among these are sugar, fat and alcohol. Without any of them, you'll get a popsicle, which is what happened in the case of the Grapefruit, Carrot, and Ginger Juice.

Nappe Nappe describes the ability of the a liquid to "coat the back of a spoon". When making a custard of any kind, you'll know that it has thickened enough when you can wipe your finger across the back of a custard-coated wooden spoon and leave a clean trail that doesn't fill in.

Just under a boil This one is tricky. One of the methods used in this book requires almost boiling the cream mixture. But don't actually boil it, otherwise it will curdle and separate, resulting in a less than desirable texture.

Vanilla beans and seeds Place the vanilla bean on a work surface. Using a small, sharp knife, cut the bean in half lengthwise. Using the knife tip, scrape the seeds from the vanilla bean. The fresher the bean, the easier this will be.


Roasted Jarrahdale Pumpkin, Caramel & Toasted Pecan Based on Jeni’s Roasted Pumpkin 5-Spice Ice Cream My excitement about heritage squash resulted in an impulse purchase of an enormous blue-skinned Jarrahdale pumpkin. This seemed like a good way to kick off the 31 Flavors project.

1 Jarrahdale pumpkin, 2–3 pounds (¾ cup puree) 2 cups whole milk 1 tablespoon + 1 teaspoon tapioca flour 3 tablespoons cream cheese, softened ¼ teaspoon sea salt ¼ cup honey 1 ¼ cup heavy cream ⅔ cup packed light brown sugar 2 tablespoons organic light corn syrup ½ tablespoon Chinese 5-spice powder ½ teaspoon cinnamon ⅛ teaspoon cloves ⅛ teaspoon mace ⅛ teaspoon allspice ⅛ teaspoon nutmeg Caramel sauce (recipe on page 32) Toasted pecans, chopped

Preheat the oven to 400˚ F Cut the pumpkin in half and remove the seeds and membranes. Place the halves cut side down on a baking sheet and roast for 30–40 minutes until soft when pierced with a fork. Let cool slightly. Scoop the flesh into a food processor and puree until completely smooth. Measure out ¾ cup for the ice cream; reserve the rest of the puree for another use*. Mix about 2 tablespoons of the milk with the tapioca flour in a small bowl to make a smooth slurry. Spread the cream cheese and salt in a medium bowl until smooth. Add the pumpkin puree and honey and whisk until smooth. Combine the remaining milk, cream, sugar, corn syrup and spices in a 4-quart saucepan, bring just under a boil. Remove from the heat and gradually whisk in the tapioca flour slurry. Bring the mixture back up to just under a boil over medium-high heat and cook, stirring with a wooden spoon, until slightly thickened and nappe is achieved. Remove from heat. Gradually whisk the hot milk mixture into the pumpkin mixture until smooth. Allow mixture to cool, then cover and keep in the refrigerator for at least 6 hours. Churn the mixture according to your ice cream maker’s instructions. As you are packing it for the freezer, add the caramel sauce (either homemade or store-bought) and chopped toasted pecans in a little at a time, not stirring too much. You want there to be pockets of caramel and pecans.

*Leftover pumpkin puree ideas Soup, pasta sauce, mixed in with mashed root vegetables, pumpkin pie filling


Black Sesame Coconut Based on Golubka’s Black Sesame Ice Cream I made this one for two reasons. First, for some reason I had an industrial quantity of sesame seeds. Secondly, I thought it would be fun to make a gray ice cream. I wish that the sesame flavor were stronger, but this was well-received despite the coconut competing with the sesame.

In a bowl, mix together ¼ cup coconut milk and arrowroot powder, making a slurry.

2 cans full fat organic coconut milk

In a medium sized pan, combine the rest of the milk, sugar and salt and bring to a boil. Lower the heat, stir in the arrowroot/xanthan slurry and simmer for 1–2 minutes, stirring constantly. Remove from heat.

teaspoon xanthan gum

Mix in the black sesame seed paste thoroughly. Let the mixture cool completely at room temperature, then refrigerate for at least 6 hours.

2 tablespoons arrowroot powder or ½

½ cup coconut sugar pinch of salt 4 tablespoons black sesame paste

Churn the mixture according to your ice cream maker’s instructions.

Black Sesame Paste Toast the black sesame seeds in a dry frying pan over medium heat, shaking the pan often. Remove from heat immediately as you start smelling the toasted seeds. Grind the seeds in a coffee grinder or mortar and pestle. Mix in the honey until a paste forms.

½ cup black sesame seeds ½ cup star thistle honey


Blood Orange Sorbet Based on Dave Lebovitz’s Blood Orange Sorbet I find blood oranges fascinating. And I had never made a proper sorbet. And that color! My first round of flavors was an attempt to display a wide array of colors and this fit in perfectly.

3 cups blood orange juice ¼ cup + 2 tablespoons sugar 2 tablespoons organic light corn syrup

Put the sugar and corn syrup in a small, nonreactive saucepan. Add just enough juice to saturate it very well. Heat, stirring frequently, until the sugar is completely dissolved. Stir the sugar back into the reserved juice. Let the mixture cool completely at room temperature, then refrigerate for at least 6 hours. Churn the mixture according to your ice cream maker’s instructions.

Blood Orange + Hot Pepper Sorbet Inspired by Wild Poppy’s Blood Orange Chili soda It’s hot! It’s cold! What is happening?! I tasted this soda at The Fancy Food Show in San Francisco, and thought it would make a really interesting sorbet flavor. This was a riff on the sorbet above, that gave me an excuse to use my favorite hot pepper flakes. It was everything I hoped it would be. 4½ cups blood orange juice ½ cup organic cane sugar 3 tablespoons organic light corn syrup 3 teaspoons Allstar Organics Hot Pepper Flakes 2 teaspoons Gran Marnier

Put the hot pepper flakes, sugar and corn syrup in a small, nonreactive saucepan. Add just enough juice to saturate it very well. Heat, stirring frequently, until the sugar is completely dissolved. Stir the sugar back into the reserved blood orange juice. Stir in the Gran Marnier. Let the mixture cool completely at room temperature, then refrigerate for at least 6 hours. Churn the mixture according to your ice cream maker’s instructions.


Beet with Mascarpone and Orange Zest Based on Jeni’s Beet Ice Cream with Mascarpone, Orange Zest, and Poppy Seeds. I’m kind of obsessed with Joy the Baker’s Chocolate Beet Cake with Beet Cream Cheese Frosting. As advertised, it doesn’t taste like a salad, and makes the most outrageously magenta frosting. It truly looks like an obscene amount of food coloring, but it’s all from the beets. When I saw this recipe, I knew the color would be amazing, and the vegetable-as-dessert element always appreals to me.

Preheat the oven to 450˚ F

2 medium red beets

Wrap the beets in foil and bake until very soft, about 1 hour..

2 tablespoons sugar

Let the beets cool slightly, then peel them while they are still warm. Cut into chunks and puree in a food processor.

1 tablespoon + 1 teaspoon tapioca flour

Combine ½ cup of the warm beet puree with the sugar, reserving the remaining puree for another use*. Set aside to cool.

1 ¼ cup heavy cream

Mix about 2 tablespoons of the milk with the tapioca flour in a small bowl to make a smooth slurry.

2 tablespoons organic light corn syrup

Spread the cream cheese and salt in a medium bowl until smooth. Combine the remaining milk, the cream, sugar, corn syrup and orange zest in a 4-quart saucepan, bring just under a boil. Remove from the heat and gradually whisk in the tapioca flour slurry. Bring the mixture back up to just under a boil over medium-high heat and cook, stirring with a wooden spoon, until slightly thickened and nappe is achieved. Remove from heat. Gradually whisk the hot milk mixture into the mascarpone mixture and beets until smooth. Allow mixture to cool, and then cover and keep in the refrigerator for at least 6 hours. Remove the orange zest and churn according to your ice cream maker’s instructions.

*Leftover beet puree ideas Soup, pasta sauce, mixed in with mashed root vegetables

2 cups whole milk

2 ounces (¼ cup) mascarpone cheese ½ teaspoon sea salt

⅔ cup organic cane sugar [true story: make sure it’s sugar, not salt]

zest of 1 orange, using a vegetable peeler to create wide strips


Chocolate Orange Based on Jeni’s The Darkest Chocolate Ice Cream in the World A classic flavor combination. A sure-fire crowd-pleaser. Something on the more normal end so as to not scare my lovely 31 Flavors participants too early on in the process. Made extra special by including Matt’s homemade Bramlage dark milk chocolate (bean to bar in our very own kitchen). I would definitely make this again.

2 cups Straus whole milk 1 tablespoon + 1 teaspoon tapioca flour 1 ½ ounces (3 tablespoons) cream cheese, softened ⅛ teaspoon sea salt zest from one orange 1 cup heavy cream ½ cup organic cane sugar 2 tablespoons organic light corn syrup ¼ cup Gran Marnier

Chocolate Syrup ½ cup unsweetened Valhrona cocoa powder ½ cup brewed coffee [Bicycle Coffee Co, Medium Roast from Asobagri Coop, Huehuetenango, Guatemala. Mayacert Certified Organic] ½ cup sugar 1 ½ ounces Bramlage 57% Dark Milk chocolate, finely chopped zest from one orange

Combine cocoa, coffee and sugar in a small saucepan, bring to a boil over medium heat, stirring to dissolve the sugar, and boil for 30 seconds. Remove from the heat, add the chocolate and orange zest and let stand for 5 minutes. Stir the syrup until smooth. Set aside.

Mix about 2 tablespoons of the milk with the tapioca flour in a small bowl to make a smooth slurry. Whisk the cream cheese, warm chocolate syrup, orange zest and salt in a medium bowl until smooth. Combine the remaining milk, the cream, sugar, corn syrup and orange zest in a 4-quart saucepan, bring just under a boil. Remove from the heat and gradually whisk in the tapioca flour slurry. Bring the mixture back up to just under a boil over medium-high heat and cook, stirring with a wooden spoon, until slightly thickened and nappe is achieved. Remove from heat. Gradually whisk the hot milk mixture into the cream cheese mixture until smooth. Allow mixture to cool, and then cover and keep in the refrigerator for at least 6 hours. Churn according to your ice cream maker’s instructions.


Blackberry Cocoa Sorbet Based on Martha Stewart’s Blackberry Cocoa Sorbet This was fantastic. I decided it was a perfect use for this rare red Dutch process cocoa that was an impulse buy on a particularly harrowing grocery shopping expedition.

Bring sugar and the water to a simmer in a small pan, stirring. Remove from heat; whisk in cocoa. Transfer syrup to metal bowl; chill, about 40 minutes. Puree berries, lemon juice, and syrup in blender in 2 batches until smooth. Strain through a fine sieve, discarding seeds. Refrigerate for at least 6 hours, then churn the mixture according to your ice cream maker’s instructions.

1 ¼ cups organic cane sugar 1 cup water 2 tablespoons E. Guittard Cocoa Rouge (unsweetened rare red Dutch process cocoa) 1 ½ pounds blackberries, rinsed 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice


Avocado Based on Avocado Gelado, via Food 52 Another nontraditional dessert flavor with an intriguing color. I am usually partial to leaving avocado well alone, eating it with a spoon and a little salt. However, I loved this, and would definitely make it again. As an ice cream, it is creamy and retains its slightly fruity taste despite being frozen.

2 cups Straus whole milk 4 organic, pasture-raised egg yolks 1 vanilla bean 1 cup organic cane sugar 2 cups perfectly ripe organic avocado cut in about ½” cubes juice from 1 large organic lemon 1 cup Straus heavy cream

Cut a slit down the vanilla bean. Put it in a saucepan and add the milk. Bring to a simmer, then turn off the heat and let it cool/infuse for at least 30 minutes, until the milk is cooled to at least room tempperature (if you have something to do you can stick it in the fridge and continue later) Take the vanilla bean out and use a paring knife to scrape out all of the little seeds - put those back into the milk. Add the pod back in too - you don’t want to waste one iota of that great flavor. Whisk in the egg yolks and sugar, then gently bring it back to a simmer, whisking until slightly thickened and nappe is achieved. Let the mixture cool completely at room temperature. Measure your avocado then squeeze the lemon over it. Put it in the blender with the cream, then get the custard out. Fish out that vanilla bean and scrape off the custard - finally, sadly, discard it. Add the custard into the blender too and blend the whole thing until it is very smooth. Refrigerate for at least 6 hours, then churn the mixture according to your ice cream maker’s instructions.


Roasted Pistachio Based on Jeni’s Roasted Pistachio Ice Cream I have loved pistachio ice cream since the first time I tasted it when we lived in Italy. This recipe is no gelato, but is definitely delicious. This was Matt’s favorite of the 31 flavors.

Preheat the oven to 350˚ F Spread all of the pistachios out on a baking sheet and toast them in the oven for 10-12 minutes, until fragrant and just starting to brown.

½ cup shelled pistachios, plus ¼ cup to mix in before freezing 2 cups Straus whole milk 1 tablespoon + 1 teaspoon tapioca flour

Remove from the oven and pulverize ½ cup of the pistachios in a food processor until they become a smooth paste.

1 ½ ounces (3 tablespoons) cream cheese, softened

Mix about 2 tablespoons of milk with the tapioca flour in a small bowl until smooth.

1 ¼ cups Straus heavy cream

Whisk the cream cheese, pistachio paste and salt in a medium bowl until smooth.

2 tablespoons organic light corn syrup

Combine the remaining milk, the cream, sugar and corn syrup in a 4-quart saucepan, bring just under a boil. Remove from the heat and gradually whisk in the tapioca flour slurry. Bring the mixture back up to just under a boil over medium-high heat and cook, stirring with a wooden spoon, until slightly thickened and nappe is achieved. Remove from heat. Gradually whisk the hot milk mixture into the cream cheese mixture until smooth. Stir in the almond extract, if using. Allow mixture to cool, and then cover and keep in the refrigerator for at least 6 hours. Churn according to your ice cream maker’s instructions. As you pack for freezing, stir in the remaining pistachios.

½ teaspoon sea salt

⅔ cup organic cane sugar

½ teaspoon almond extract [next time, I would try omitting the extract]


Vernal Equinox 31 Flavors Potluck & Pickup Party March 31 Lori Durako • Michael McPhee • Leigh Riley • Becca Rufer • Sarah Iles • Sean Gerrish • Matt Bramlage • Seth Horrigan


Saffron Olive Oil with Burnt Orange Caramel Based on Stefani McGuinness’ Olive Oil Saffron with Burnt Orange Caramel, via Food52 I was interested in trying an olive oil-based ice cream and this just sounded too awesome not to try. It was worth the effort and cost of ingredients and ended up being one of the highlights of the project.

2 cups Straus whole milk 1 tablespoon + 1 teaspoon tapioca flour 1 ½ ounces cream cheese ¼ teaspoon sea salt 1 cup Straus heavy cream ½ cup organic cane sugar 2 tablespoons organic light corn syrup ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil slightly less than 1 teaspoon crushed saffron threads [I used Morton and Bassett - 2 mini canisters]

Burnt Orange-Caramel ½ cup strained, freshly squeezed Cara Cara orange juice ½ cup organic cane sugar 1 pinch sea salt ½ cup Straus heavy cream

Combine the strained, fresh squeezed orange juice, the sugar, and salt to a sauce pan over medium-high heat. I used about one and a half oranges. Boil the mixture until the sugar and orange juice thicken and turn honey-colored, about 8–10 minutes. Still on the burner, add the cream and stir to combine, about 30 seconds. Remove from the heat and let cool completely.

Mix about 2 tablespoons of the milk with the cornstarch in a small bowl to make slurry. Whisk the cream cheese and salt in a bowl. Fill a large bowl with ice water. Mix the remaining milk, cream, sugar, and corn syrup in a large saucepan, bring to just under a boil over medium-high heat, and boil for 4 minutes. Remove from the heat and whisk in the cornstarch-milk mixture. Bring the mixture back to just under a boil, until thickened slightly and nappe is achieved. Remove from the heat. Gradually whisk the hot milk mixture into the cream cheese until smooth. Add the olive oil until well blended. Crush the saffron threads between your fingers into the mixture and stir to distribute the threads. Let the mixture cool completely at room temperature, then refrigerate for at least 6 hours. Churn the mixture according to your ice cream maker’s instructions. Pack the ice cream into a storage container, alternating layers with the Burnt Orange-Caramel Sauce. Work quickly, or the caramel sauce will start to sink. Press a sheet of parchment directly against the surface, and seal with an airtight lid. Freeze in the coldest part of the freezer until firm, at least 4 hours.


Banana Curry Based on Scoop Adventures’ Banana Curry Ice Cream I kept coming across banana as a primary frozen dessert element. The addition of curry in this recipe caught my attention, so it had to be done. My only disappointment was that this didn’t make very much. The small quantity was nice because it allowed me to make more room for the next batch of ice cream, but I’d likely double this if I made it again. I’d also make my own yellow curry powder from whole spices.

Preheat oven to 400˚ F Prepare bananas and toss them with the brown sugar and butter in a small (2-quart) baking dish. Bake for 40 minutes, stirring once during baking, until the bananas are browned and cooked through. Scrape contents of the dish (bananas and the thick sugar syrup) into a blender or food processor. Add the milk, sugar, vanilla, lemon juice, salt, and curry powder, and puree until smooth. Let the mixture cool completely at room temperature, then refrigerate for at least 6 hours. Churn the mixture according to your ice cream maker’s instructions.

3 medium-sized ripe organic bananas, sliced into ½ inch pieces 1/3 cup packed light brown sugar 1 tablespoon Straus butter, cut into small pieces 1 ½ cups Straus whole milk 2 tablespoons organic cane sugar ½ teaspoon vanilla extract 1 ½ teaspoons freshly squeezed lemon juice ¼ teaspoon course salt 1 ½ teaspoon yellow curry powder


Grapefruit, Carrot, and Ginger Juice That’s right, don’t make this into sorbet at all. Lesson learned: you need to add sugar or alcohol to a sorbet so that it doesn’t freeze into a popsicle. If a popsicle is what you're looking for, freeze the mixture below, though I found that the grapefruit and ginger flavors were lost when frozen. I ended up melting it back into juice and drinking it that way. Really fantastic as juice!

6 chopped grapefruits (peel and pith removed) 15 chopped organic carrots [I used ones from our CSA and a few more from the grocery store] 3 inches fresh ginger, peeled and chopped

Press the grapefruits, carrots and ginger through a juice extractor. Stir and serve immediately.


Roasted Strawberry Based on Jeni’s Roasted Strawberry & Buttermilk Ice Cream I really wish I had stuck to the recipe and used buttermilk. Instead I tried substituting yogurt, and the tang didn’t really match the smooth flavor of the roasted strawberry. There's always next time!

Mix about 2 tablespoons of milk with the tapioca flour in a small bowl until smooth.

1 ½ cups Straus whole milk

Whisk the cream cheese and salt in a medium bowl until smooth.

2 ounces (4 tablespoons) cream cheese, softened

Combine the remaining milk, the cream, sugar and corn syrup in a 4-quart saucepan, bring just under a boil. Remove from the heat and gradually whisk in the tapioca flour slurry.

⅛ teaspoon sea salt

Bring the mixture back up to just under a boil over medium-high heat and cook, stirring with a wooden spoon, until slightly thickened and nappe is achieved. Remove from heat. Gradually whisk the hot milk mixture into the cream cheese mixture until smooth. Add the reserved strawberry puree and the yogurt (or buttermilk) and stir well. Let the mixture cool completely at room temperature, then refrigerate for at least 6 hours. Churn the mixture according to your ice cream maker’s instructions.

2 tablespoons tapioca flour

1 ¼ cups Straus heavy cream ⅔ cup vanilla sugar 2 tablespoons organic light corn syrup 1 cup strawberry puree ½ cup organic yogurt [next time I would use homemade buttermilk, as the original recipe lists]

Roasted Strawberries 1 pint farmer’s market strawberries, hulled and sliced ½ inch thick ⅓ cup vanilla sugar 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

Preheat the oven to 375˚ F Combine the strawberries with the vanilla sugar in an 8-inch square baking dish, stirring gently to mix well. Roast for 8+ minutes, until just soft, or to your desired level of roast. Let cool slightly. Puree the berries in a food processor with the lemon juice. Measure 1 cup of puree and reserve the rest for another use. [It sort of becomes Jello-like on its own when chilled due to the natural pectin content. Kind of cool.]


Dark Chocolate Based on Jeni’s The Darkest Chocolate Ice Cream in the World This was for Seth Horrigan, who adores dark chocolate.

2 cups Straus whole milk 1 tablespoon + 1 teaspoon tapioca flour

Mix about 2 tablespoons of the milk with the tapioca flour in a small bowl to make a smooth slurry.

1 ½ ounces (3 tablespoons) cream cheese, softened

Whisk the cream cheese, warm chocolate syrup and salt in a medium bowl until smooth.

chocolate syrup (recipe below)

Combine the remaining milk, the cream, sugar, and corn syrup in a 4-quart saucepan, bring just under a boil. Remove from the heat and gradually whisk in the tapioca flour slurry.

⅛ teaspoon sea salt 1 cup heavy cream ½ cup organic cane sugar 2 tablespoons organic light corn syrup

Bring the mixture back up to just under a boil over medium-high heat and cook, stirring with a wooden spoon, until slightly thickened and nappe is achieved. Remove from heat. Gradually whisk the hot milk mixture into the cream cheese mixture until smooth. Allow mixture to cool, and then cover and keep in the refrigerator for at least 6 hours.

Chocolate Syrup ½ cup unsweetened Valhrona cocoa powder ½ cup brewed coffee [Philz’s New Manhattan] ½ cup sugar 1 ½ ounces Callebaut dark chocolate, finely chopped Combine cocoa, coffee and sugar in a small saucepan, bring to a boil over medium heat, stirring to dissolve the sugar, and boil for 30 seconds. Remove from the heat, add the chocolate and let stand for 5 minutes. Stir the syrup until smooth. Set aside.

Churn according to your ice cream maker’s instructions.


Vanilla Based on Williams-Sonoma’s Classic Vanilla Bean Ice Cream This was one of the first ice creams I ever made when we first got the attachment for our KitchenAid mixer. If you think vanilla is ho-hum, or just a vehicle for toppings, you haven’t had good vanilla ice cream. This is one of those that will keep you from using “vanilla” to mean “plain” ever again.

Pour the cream into a heavy saucepan. Place the vanilla bean on a work surface. Using a small, sharp knife, cut the bean in half lengthwise. Using the knife tip, scrape the seeds from the vanilla bean, then add the seeds and bean halves to the cream. Bring to a simmer over medium-high heat. Remove from the heat, cover and let stand for 30 minutes. Return the saucepan to the stovetop over mediumhigh heat and bring to a simmer. Meanwhile, in a heatproof bowl, whisk together the sugar and egg yolks until blended. Form a kitchen towel into a ring and place the bowl on top to prevent it from moving. Gradually pour the hot half-and-half mixture into the yolk mixture, whisking constantly. Return the mixture to the same saucepan and place over medium-low heat. Cook, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon, until the custard achieves nappe. Do not allow the custard to boil. Pour the custard through a medium-mesh sieve set over a clean bowl. (Sometimes I do, sometimes I don't. You'll get a more consistent texture if you do.) Let the mixture cool completely at room temperature, then refrigerate for at least 6 hours. Churn the mixture according to your ice cream maker’s instructions.

3 cups Straus heavy cream 1 Morton & Bassett vanilla bean ¾ cup organic cane sugar 6 organic, pasture-raised egg yolks


Banana Split Matt commissioned a from-scratch (I mean all-the-way from scratch) banana split instead of a cake for his birthday, allowing us to celebrate both of our birthdays at the same time. Using the Roasted Strawberry, Vanilla and Dark Chocolate ice creams. Was it worth it? I think the photo in the middle says it all.

Caramelized Pineapple

Dice a fresh pineapple, and sauté in brown sugar over medium-high heat until slightly soft and caramelized. The proportions are up to you, as you may want more or less pineapple on your sundae, and each pineapple has a different sweetness level.

Chocolate Syrup (See the recipe accompanying Dark Chocolate ice cream.) Sliced Fresh Strawberries Whipped Cream Unsalted Roasted Peanuts Maraschino Cherries

1 cup Luxardo + ¼ cup sugar + 1 tablespoon Meyer lemon juice + ½ teaspoon almond extract + 1 cup fresh pitted cherries Combine Luxardo, sugar, lemon juice and almond extract in a saucepan and heat until the sugar has dissolved. Stir in the cherries and remove from the heat. Set aside until cooled. Transfer everything to a glass jar and refrigerate for at least two days before using. Maraschino cherries will keep for several months, but not if you gobble them all up on ice cream or drink them in Manhattans.


Dark Chocolate Coconut Based on A Couple Cooks’ Dark Chocolate Coconut Ice Cream A dark chocolate ice cream for the lactose intolerant using coconut milk. It was lovely, even for those who are fans of dairy.

14-ounce can full-fat organic coconut milk 14-ounce can organic light coconut milk ½ cup star thistle honey 1 ¼ cup E. Guittard Cocoa Rouge (unsweetened rare red Dutch process cocoa) ¼ teaspoon Morton & Bassett cinnamon Pinch kosher salt

In a medium bowl, whisk together 2 cans coconut milk and ½ cup honey. Whisk in ⅓ cup cocoa powder until it is fully integrated (it will take about one minute to mix in). Then mix in the remaining cocoa powder. Add cinnamon and salt. Refrigerate the mixture for at least 6 hours. Churn the mixture according to your ice cream maker’s instructions.


Horchata Rice Cream Experiment time! Anyone who has had the pleasure of imbibing a perfect horchata knows the smooth yet grainy consistency this Spanish and Latin American drink has. We got excited about bringing this dairy-free idea to frozen form: smooth with bits of texture inside. Using what I learned about bananas as an ice cream element, and my accidental popsicle experiment, I tried using both banana and the fat from almond butter to concoct this flavor. I’d like to revisit this using brown rice, and brown rice syrup to help create a smoother texture and a more in-depth flavor. This one has potential, but needs more work. Place all ingredients in the blender and puree for 10– 15 seconds or until the mixture looks like a smoothie.

1 cup organic rice milk

Refrigerate the mixture for at least 6 hours.

4 ½ tablespoons almond butter

Churn the mixture according to your ice cream maker’s instructions.

¼ teaspoon + ⅛ teaspoon Morton & Bassett cinnamon

1 banana

¾ cup cooked rice [next time I'd try less than half, and try brown rice]


Picnic-up Day June 2 (Off the Grid Presidio) Matt Bramlage • Rebecca Gorton • Orion Auld • Sam Jordan


Cashew Cream Based on Ramified’s Raw Cashew Ice Cream Another nut butter experiment, developed for Christine Nolan. This one was very successful, and I wish the recipe made more. It seems like there are so many opportunities to riff on this one. 1 cup toasted cashews ½ cup plus 2 tablespoons rice milk ¼ cup cashew butter 3 tablespoons amber agave nectar Pinch of sea salt

In a high speed blender or food processor, grind nuts to a powder. You want to get them as finely ground as possible, to ensure a smooth and creamy texture in the end product. Add in the rice milk, cashew butter, and agave nectar, blending well. The mixture should have kind of a velvety consistency, with no lumps or graininess. Refrigerate the mixture for at least 6 hours. Churn the mixture according to your ice cream maker’s instructions.

Sauvignon Blanc & Olallieberry Sorbet Based on Scoop Adventures’ White & Blackberry Sorbet An experiment using alcohol to prevent inadvertant popsicles. I intended to use blackberries, but every time I’ve gone to the Mountain View farmers' market during blackberry season, there’s one farm that always convinces me to purchase ollallieberries instead. Ollallieberries are slightly more tart than blackberries, and have a very short season, which makes them a treat whenever you can find them. 1 cup organic cane sugar ¾ cup water 1 bottle (750 ml) Roche Winery Sauvignon Blanc 3 cups fresh farmers market olallieberries

Place sugar, water, and wine into a medium saucepan and bring to a boil. Allow mixture to boil for one minute, stirring to dissolve the sugar. Remove from the heat and add the blackberries. Cover and let steep for 1 hour. Pour the mixture through a fine mesh sieve or strainer set over a medium bowl, and then use a rubber spatula to mash the berries and push the juice through the sieve. Keep pressing until you are left with only seeds and the juice stops running. You can also use a food mill fitted with a fine disk. Let the mixture cool completely at room temperature, then refrigerate for at least 6 hours. Churn the mixture according to your ice cream maker’s instructions.


Strawberry-Chia Margarita Sorbet Based on Navitas Naturals’ Strawberry-Chia Margarita Sorbet Navitas Naturals sells all kinds of interesting seeds, berries and powders. I wanted a reason to play with them. This one appealed to me because we were brewing our own kombucha, so had it readily available. The idea of including the chia seeds was to create a nod toward strawberry seeds, but I found them a little awkward.

In a blender, process the strawberries, kombucha, tequila, agave, citrus juice, and maqui powder into a smooth mixture. Add the chia seeds, and blend briefly just to mix, but leave the chia seeds whole.

2 cups farmers market strawberries ¾ cup homemade kombucha ⅓ cup Don Eduardo Silver Tequila

Refrigerate the mixture for at least 6 hours.

slightly less than ⅓ cup amber agave nectar

Churn the mixture according to your ice cream maker’s instructions.

⅓ cup fresh citrus juice (2 limes and half a lemon)

Seriously contemplate putting it into a margarita glass and call it quits. Decide that it doesn’t count as an “ice cream” if you don’t actually freeze it.

1 tablespoon Navitas Naturals Maqui Powder

Freeze for 4–6 hours, or overnight, until frozen through.

2 tablespoons Navitas Naturals Chia Seeds


Honey Peanut Butter Caramel Based on The Kitchy Kitchen’s Honey Peanut Butter Sea Salt Ice Cream With Caramel Sauce Not that any of these recipes are particularly healthy, but this one was by far the most decadent, highest calorie ice cream. This was much-loved by the 31 Flavors taste testers, particularly our 4 year old member. 3 egg yolks 1 ½ cups Straus heavy cream 1 ½ cups Straus milk ½ cup organic brown sugar, packed ¾ cup honey roasted peanut butter (freshly ground from honey roasted peanuts) 2 tablespoons honey Pinch of sea salt, plus more to taste 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Heat one cup of the heavy cream in a sauce pan until simmering. Add the sugar to melt. In a separate bowl, whisk the egg yolks. Add a little of the hot cream and whisk to combine. Add a little more, then pour the contents of the bowl into the pan and stir until thickened and nappe is achieved. Remove from heat. Off the heat, add the peanut butter, sea salt, honey, and vanilla, stirring to combine. Taste and add more sea salt or honey to taste. Let the mixture cool completely at room temperature, then refrigerate for at least 6 hours. Whisk in the additional cream and milk, give it a taste, and adjust the salt and honey levels. Churn according to your ice cream maker’s instructions.

Caramel Sauce 1 cup organic cane sugar 4 oz unsalted Straus butter ¾ cup Straus heavy cream 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

For the caramel sauce, heat the sugar in a saucepan over medium heat, until the sugar turns golden. Stir until all of the sugar is dissolved and just starting to turn a lovely amber color. Remove from heat and add the butter, and stir to combine. Careful, it’ll foam up. Then add the heavy cream and vanilla extract, stirring to combine. Pour the caramel into a glass jar and store in the fridge for up to two weeks.

As you are packing the ice cream for the freezer, stir in some caramel sauce (left).


Summer Solstice 31 Flavors Potluck & Pickup Party June 21 at 5:04 PM Matt Bramlage • Hope Scheid • Brooke Cargile • Lori Durako • Jamie Winslow-Mozzetti • Danny Mozzetti


Caesar Ice Cream Based on Jeni’s Olive Oil Ice Cream with Sea-Salted Pepitas So, this happened. As part of a tasting menu extravaganza focused on vegetables, we prepared a frozen lettuce salad. Frozen wedges of iceberg lettuce paired with frozen dressing and croutons. This ice cream is pretty weird on its own, but was absolutely perfect in the dish for which it was created. It has since been used to accompany tomatoes, and melted down for a more typical salad dressing. In case you are feeling adventurous...

Anchovy Bacon ½ cup + 2 tablespoons olive oil 10 anchovies, chopped

2 cups Straus whole milk 2 tablespoon tapioca flour 1 ½ ounces cream cheese ¼ teaspoon sea salt 1 cup Straus heavy cream 2 tablespoons organic cane sugar 2 tablespoons organic light corn syrup ¼ cup + 2 tablespoons anchovy-infused extra virgin olive oil (from previous step) Juice of 1 lemon

¾ cup shaved Parmigiano Reggiano

Heat oil over medium heat, and then add the anchovies. Let them crisp until browned. Remove crisped anchovies from the oil and set aside. Reserve the oil for the ice cream base.

Mix about ¼ cup of the milk with the tapioca flour in a small bowl to make slurry. Whisk the cream cheese and salt in a bowl. Fill a large bowl with ice water. Mix the remaining milk, cream, sugar, and corn syrup in a large saucepan, bring to just under a boil over medium-high heat, for 4 minutes. Remove from the heat and whisk in the cornstarch-milk mixture. Bring the mixture back to just under a boil, until thickened slightly and nappe is achieved. Remove from the heat. Gradually whisk the hot milk mixture into the cream cheese until smooth. Add the olive oil and lemon juice until well blended. Let the mixture cool completely at room temperature, then refrigerate for at least 6 hours. Churn the mixture according to your ice cream maker’s instructions. Pack the ice cream into a storage container, layering anchovy bacon and curls of Parmigiano Reggiano.


Tomato Basil with Balsamic Vinegar Based on Zaika Zabardast’s Balsamic Roasted Tomato-Basil Ice Cream I had been wanting to make another savory ice cream, and found an excuse to make this as part of a vegetable-centric tasting menu dinner party.

Preheat oven to 350˚ F. Cut tomatoes in half and toss them with balsamic vinegar and olive oil. Arrange tomatoes in an 8x8 baking pan. Sprinkle with a pinch of salt (about ½ teaspoon) and roast for 30 minutes or more to concentrate the flavors. Remove from oven and let cool completely. While your tomatoes are roasting in oven, you can prepare the ice cream base. In a small bowl, mix tapioca flour with ¼ cup milk and keep it aside. In a medium saucepan, whisk together remaining milk, heavy cream, sugar, and salt. Add vanilla to milk mixture. Add basil leaves and bring it to just under a boil over medium heat. When it comes to just under a boil, cook it for 5 more minutes and then add tapioca flour mixture while stirring continuously. Cook until slightly thickened and nappe is achieved. Remove from heat. While it is cooling down, purée those roasted cherry tomatoes. When milk mixture is almost at room temperature, strain the mixture through a fine sieve. Use back of your spoon to extract all the juices before discarding basil. Add the pureed tomatoes to the milk mixture, sending them through a sieve, to remove the seeds and skin. Refrigerate at least 6 hours. Churn the mixture according to your ice cream maker’s instructions.

2 pounds of farmers market heirloom tomatoes, cubed (enough to fill an 8x8 pan half full) 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 3 tablespoons Zingerman’s Aceto Balsamico di Modena (Vecchia Dispensa’s 10-Year Aged Balsamic Vinegar) 1 substantial pinch of salt to sprinkle over tomatoes while roasting ½ cup Basil leaves packed 1 ½ cups of low-fat Straus organic milk (I used 2%) 1 ½ cups Straus heavy cream ⅔ cup organic cane sugar ½ teaspoon sea salt 2 tablespoons tapioca flour 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract


Epic Veg Time August 2 Matt Bramlage • Rebecca Gorton • Orion Auld • Lenny Eskin • Carolyn Zola • Dima Kumets


Riesling-Poached Pear with Chai Spices Based on gabsimonelouise’s Pear Vanilla Sorbet via Food52 This just sounded so refreshing, and sorbet was very popular with the 31 Flavors crowd.

4 ripe, but firm, medium-sized organic pears ½ cup organic riesling ½ cup water ½ cup organic cane sugar 1 vanilla bean ½ teaspoon cinnamon ¼ teaspoon cardamom 1 teaspoon fresh organic lemon juice

Core the pears and cut into 1-inch dice. No need to peel them. Put them in a pot with the riesling. Cook over medium heat until soft and mashable, 10–15 minutes. Meanwhile, cut the vanilla bean in half lengthwise and scrape the seeds into a saucepan. Put water, sugar, vanilla bean, cinnamon and cardamom into the saucepan. Bring to a boil and stir until sugar is dissolved. Remove from heat. Remove vanilla bean from saucepan and place into a large bowl. Pour the sugar/water mixture, lemon juice and the cooked pear mixture into a blender and blend until smooth, then pour into the large bowl. Let the mixture cool completely at room temperature, then refrigerate for at least 6 hours. .Once chilled, remove vanilla bean from the bottom of the bowl. Churn the mixture according to your ice cream maker’s instructions.


Chocolate Mint Based on Dave Lebovitz’s The Perfect Scoop Trick! There’s not actually any chocolate in this ice cream, but instead is a mint ice cream made using chocolate mint, an herb in the mint family, that gives just a hint of chocolate flavor.

In a medium saucepan, warm the milk, sugar, 1 cup (250 ml) heavy cream, salt, and chocolate mint.

1 cup Straus whole milk

Once the mixture is hot and steaming, remove from heat, cover, and let stand for an hour to infuse the mint flavor.

2 cups Straus heavy cream

Remove the mint with a strainer, then press down with a spatula firmly to extract as much mint flavor and color as possible. (You can also use well-washed hands to do it as well, making sure the mixture isn’t too hot to safely handle.) Once the flavor is squeezed out, discard the mint. Pour the remaining heavy cream into a large bowl and set the strainer over the top. Rewarm the infused milk. In a separate bowl, whisk together the egg yolks, then slowly pour some of the warm mint mixture into the yolks, whisking constantly, then scrape the warmed yolks back into the saucepan. Cook the custard, stirring constantly with a heatproof spatula, until the mixture thickens and nappe is achieved. Immediately strain the mixture into the cream, then stir the mixture over an ice bath until cool. Let the mixture cool completely at room temperature, then refrigerate for at least 6 hours. Churn the mixture according to your ice cream maker’s instructions.

¾ cup organic cane sugar

pinch of sea salt 2 cups packed fresh chocolate mint leaves 5 large organic, pasture-raised egg yolks


Celery Rum Raisin Based on Jeni’s Celery Ice Cream with Candied Ginger and Rum-Plumped Golden Raisins I’m not a fan of raisins. Especially not cooked raisins. But maybe rum-soaked ones that are frozen? Also, I had way too much celery on hand. 2 cups Straus whole milk 1 tablespoon + 1 teaspoon tapioca flour 1 ½ ounces cream cheese, softened ⅛ teaspoon sea salt 1 ¼ cup Straus heavy cream 2/3 cup organic cane sugar 2 tablespoons organic light corn syrup 5 ribs of celery, plus their leaves, finely chopped Rum Plumped Raisins (below) 2 tablespoons finely diced candied ginger

Rum Plumped Raisins 1 cup golden raisins ½ cup water 2 tablespoons Kraken rum ½ cup sugar

Put the raisins in a heatproof bowl. Combine water, rum and sugar in a small saucepan and bring to a boil, stirring to dissolve the sugar. Pour the syrup over the raisins and let cool to room temperature. Refrigerate until chilled.

Mix about 2 tablespoons of the milk with the tapioca flour in a small bowl to make a smooth slurry. Whisk the cream cheese, warm chocolate syrup and salt in a medium bowl until smooth. Combine the remaining milk, the cream, sugar, and corn syrup in a 4-quart saucepan, bring just under a boil. Remove from the heat and gradually whisk in the tapioca flour slurry. Bring the mixture back up to just under a boil over medium-high heat and cook, stirring with a wooden spoon, until slightly thickened and nappe is achieved. Remove from heat. Gradually whisk the hot milk mixture into the cream cheese mixture until smooth. Stir in celery. Allow mixture to cool, and then cover and keep in the refrigerator for at least 6 hours to steep. Churn according to your ice cream maker’s instructions. As you are packing for the freezer, fold in the raisins and ginger as you go.


Influenza Rx Based on Jeni’s Influenza Rx (now called Hot Toddy) A home remedy for the sniffles reinvented as dessert? Yes, please!

Combine the orange and lemon juices, sugar, honey, ginger and pepper flakes in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil, stirring to dissolve the sugar. Remove from the heat. Add the pepper vodka and bourbon.

2 cups fresh organic orange juice (from 5–6 oranges)

Let the mixture cool completely at room temperature, then refrigerate for at least 6 hours.

⅔ cup organic cane sugar

Churn the mixture according to your ice cream maker’s instructions.

handful of finely diced candied ginger [or ¼ teaspoon ground ginger like you were supposed to]

1/3 cup fresh organic lemon juice (from 2 lemons)

⅓ cup honey

1 tablespoon Allstar Organics pepper flakes Two eyedroppers full of vodka infused with Allstar Organics pepper flakes (1–2 teaspoons?) ¼ cup Bulleit bourbon


Roasted Pineapple Ice Cream with Mascarpone and Black Pepper Based on Apt. 2B Baking Co.’s Roasted Pineapple Ice Cream with Mascarpone and Black Pepper This peaked my interest with every word in the title. Roasted pineapple! Mascarpone! Black Pepper?! It might not be the first flavor that comes to mind, but it was really great and will likely stay in the rotation.

Roasted Pineapple Puree adapted from The Last Course by Claudia Fleming

1 cup organic cane sugar 1 medium pineapple, peeled, cored and cut into eight rings 1 vanilla bean, split lengthwise, seeds scraped pinch sea salt 1 tablespoon Bulleit bourbon 1 ounce unsalted Straus butter

Preheat oven to 375˚ F In a large skillet, combine the sugar and ¼ cup water. Cook the sugar and water, swirling the pan occasionally until the mixture is a deep amber caramel 5–7 minutes. Add the vanilla bean seeds and salt and stir gently to distribute them then add the pineapple slices and vanilla bean pod. Slide the pan into the oven and cook until the pineapple is tender and translucent, basting every 10 minutes. When the pineapple is cooked, remove the slices from the liquid and set aside. Put the skillet full of juices over medium heat, add the bourbon and simmer gently until the mixture has reduced by half, then whisk in the butter off of the heat. Reserve the liquid for serving. When the pineapple slices are cool enough to handle, pulse in a blender or food processor until they are chopped into very small pieces, but not completely liquid.

1 14 ounce can organic sweetened condensed milk 4 ounces mascarpone cheese 2 cups Straus heavy cream ¼ teaspoon sea salt ¼ teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper

In a large bowl, whisk together the condensed milk, mascarpone, salt and pepper. In a separate large bowl whip the heavy cream to stiff peaks. With a rubber spatula, gently fold the whipped cream into the condensed milk mixture.


To Assemble You’ll need a wide, shallow glass or metal pan, roughly 9x9 inches Black Pepper Ice Cream Base Roasted Pineapple Puree freshly cracked black pepper Pour 1/3 of the black pepper ice cream base into the baking dish and smooth to even it. Dollop heaping tablespoons of the roasted pineapple mixture on the surface, about 1’’ apart. Top with ½ of the remaining ice cream base, dollop with roasted pineapple, then finally top with the remaining ice cream base. If you have a bit of extra pineapple puree, just eat it! It’s delicious on it’s own. Smooth the top to cover most of the pineapple, then using a knife or toothpick, gently swirl the pineapple and base together. Be careful not to mix too much, you just want to create pockets of pineapple in each scoop. Crack a bit of fresh black pepper over the surface and freeze at least 4 hours before serving. Serve with the reserved and gently warmed pineapple caramel.


Bourbon Vanilla with Pecan Dust Based on Williams-Sonoma’s Classic Vanilla Bean Ice Cream My parents sent me a bag of Zingerman’s Pecan Dust accompanied by a suggestion to use it as a mix-in to vanilla ice cream and a little bourbon. Why not just construct an entire ice cream with these elements? I did add quite a lot of bourbon...enough to keep the ice cream from ever freezing entirely. You could take this out of the freezer and scoop it immediately.

3 cups Straus heavy cream 1 Morton & Bassett vanilla bean ¾ cup organic cane sugar 6 organic, pasture-raised egg yolks ⅓ cup Bulleit bourbon Zingerman’s Pecan Dust

Pour the half-and-half into a heavy saucepan. Place the vanilla bean on a work surface. Using a small, sharp knife, cut the bean in half lengthwise. Using the knife tip, scrape the seeds from the vanilla bean, then add the seeds and bean halves to the half-and-half. Bring to a simmer over medium-high heat. Remove from the heat, cover and let stand for 30 minutes. Return the saucepan to the stovetop over mediumhigh heat and bring to a simmer. Meanwhile, in a heatproof bowl, whisk together the sugar and egg yolks until blended. Form a kitchen towel into a ring and place the bowl on top to prevent it from moving. Gradually pour the hot cream mixture into the yolk mixture, whisking constantly. Return the mixture to the same saucepan and place over medium-low heat. Cook, stirring constantly until slightly thickened and nappe is achieved. Do not allow the custard to boil. Pour the custard through a medium-mesh sieve set over a clean bowl. Stir in the bourbon. Let the mixture cool completely at room temperature, then refrigerate for at least 6 hours. Churn the mixture according to your ice cream maker’s instructions. As you pack for the freezer, layer in Zingerman’s Pecan Dust.


Michigan Malt Based on Brown-Eyed Baker’s Vanilla Ice Cream, Philadelphia Style We visited Michigan in late October, after my dad’s birthday, before mine, and a month before my mom’s. My brother was also visiting, so I decided we should have a collective unbirthday party. My dad loves malted milk and Matt homebrews, which made this a really fun collaboration.

Mix about 2 tablespoons of the milk with the tapioca flour in a small bowl to make a smooth slurry.

1 tablespoon + 1 teaspoon corn starch

Pour remaining milk and cream into a medium saucepan and add the sugar and salt. Warm over medium heat, stirring, until the sugar is dissolved.

¾ cup sugar

Whisk in the corn starch slurry. Heat until slightly thickened and nappe is achieved. Remove from heat and stir in malt. Chill the mixture thoroughly in the refrigerator. When ready to churn, remove the vanilla bean, rinsing and reserving it for another use, and then freeze the mixture in your ice cream maker according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

2 cups heavy cream and 1 cup whole milk

Pinch of salt 1 ⅔ cup malt [brewed and concentrated using Michigan Caramel 15L, Michigan 2 Row Barley, and Chocolate Malt]


Mean, Median, à la Mode Based on Brown Eyed-Baker’s Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Ice Cream Cookie dough ice cream to celebrate Dr. Gerrish’s PhD.

1 cup Straus whole milk ¾ cup organic cane sugar 2 cups Straus heavy cream, divided Pinch of sea salt 6 organic, pasture-raised egg yolks 2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Warm the milk, sugar, 1 cup of the heavy cream and the salt in a medium saucepan over low heat, stirring until the sugar is dissolved, then increase the heat to medium. Pour the remaining 1 cup heavy cream into a large bowl and place a fine-mesh sieve on top. Whisk the egg yolks in a medium bowl. Once the milk mixture begins to simmer around the edges, slowly pour it into the egg yolks, whisking constantly. Scrape the mixture back into the saucepan. Place the saucepan over medium heat and stir constantly with a rubber spatula, being sure to scrape the bottom of the pan as you stir, until the mixture thickens and nappe is achieved.

Cookie Dough ½ cup Straus unsalted butter, at room temperature ½ cup organic light brown sugar ¼ cup organic cane sugar 2 tablespoons Straus heavy cream ½ teaspoon vanilla extract ¼ teaspoon sea salt ¾ cup organic all-purpose flour ½ cup miniature semisweet chocolate chips

Combine the butter and both sugars in a mixing bowl and beat on medium speed until light and fluffy, 2–3 minutes. Add the cream, vanilla and salt, and mix for another minute or so, until combined. Scrape the sides of the bowl, then reduce the mixer speed to low and gradually add the flour, mixing just until incorporated. Using a rubber spatula, stir in the chocolate chips. Refrigerate for at least 30 minutes, or up to 2 days.

Pour the custard through the fine-mesh sieve and stir it into the cream. Stir in the vanilla extract, and place the bowl over an ice bath. Stir occasionally, until the mixture is cool. Let the mixture cool completely at room temperature, then refrigerate for at least 6 hours. Just before churning the ice cream, scoop the cookie dough into ½-teaspoon to 1 teaspoon-sized balls and place on a plate or parchment-lined baking sheet and place in the freezer. Churn the mixture according to your ice cream maker’s instructions. When you're finished churning, fold in the chunks of cookie dough and transfer to an airtight container. Freeze until firm, at least 4 hours.


For Mean, Median, Ă la Mode presentation Milkshake, piece of chocolate and a scoop of cookie dough ice cream


Marshmallows Based on Dave Lebovitz’s Homemade Marshmallow Recipe, adapted from The Great Book of Chocolate If you make a lot of custard-based ice creams in a row, you end up with an awful lot of egg whites. Luckily, you can freeze them for future use so you can play with them later. 2 envelopes (17g) powdered gelatin or 17g sheet gelatin (8 to 10 sheets) ½ cup (125ml) + ⅓ cup (80ml) cold water 1 cup (200g) sugar ⅓ cup (100g) light corn syrup 4 large egg whites (½ cup, 110g), at room temperature pinch of salt 2 teaspoons vanilla extract or 1 teaspoon vanilla paste

Marshmallow Dust

One part corn starch (or potato starch), one part powdered sugar (about 1 cup, 140g, each)

In a small bowl, sprinkle the gelatin over the ½ cup (125ml) of cold water to dissolve and soften. If using leaf gelatin, soak the leaves in about 2 cups (500ml) cold water. In a small saucepan fitted with a candy thermometer, mix the sugar and corn syrup with ⅓ cup (80ml) of water. Place over medium-to-high heat. (Note that you will use this saucepan twice, to make the syrup and melt the gelatin, eliminating the need to wash it between uses).

In the bowl of an electric mixer, pour in the egg whites and beat on low speed until frothy. Add the pinch of salt. When the syrup reaches about 210ºF (99ºC), increase the speed of the mixer to high and beat the whites until they are thick and fluffy. When the syrup reaches 245ºF (118ºC), while the mixer is running on high speed, slowly pour the hot syrup into the whites, pouring so that the syrup does not fall on the whisk since some of the syrup will splatter and stick to the sides of the bowl. Scrape the gelatin and water into the pan that you used for the syrup, or put the gelatin sheets and 2 tablespoons of the water into the pan and swirl it to dissolve. (There should still be residual heat left in the pan from making the syrup in it to dissolve it). Pour the liquified gelatin slowly into the whites as they are whipping. Add the vanilla extract or paste and continue to whip for 5 minutes, until the mixture is feels completely cool when you touch the outside of the bowl. Dust a baking sheet evenly and completely with a generous layer of the marshmallow mixture. (I use a sifter to do this.) Make sure there are absolutely no bare spots. Use a spatula to spread the marshmallows in a layer on the pan. Allow to dry for at least 4 hours, preferably overnight, uncovered.


Put about 1 cup (140g) of the marshmallow mixture into a large bowl. Dust the top of the marshmallows with some of the marshmallow mixture. Use a pizza cutter or scissors (dusted as well with the marshmallow mixture) to cut the marshmallows into any size or shape pieces that you’d like and toss the marshmallows in the marshmallow mixture. Shake the marshmallows vigorously in a wire strainer to remove the excess powder. Alternatively, you can dust a baking sheet and put scoops of the marshmallow on it, and let them cool.


Editors: Laurie Caird, Matt Bramlage Photos: Laurie Caird Layout design: Studio Five Two Fonts used: Klinic Slab, Gotham

Š 2015 Laurie Caird, Sunnyvale, CA.

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any manner without permission. All images are Š the artists, reproduced with their kind permission.


31 Flavors  

Documenting the celebration of 31 years with 31 frozen desserts.

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