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BOUNDLESS HOW BIG CAN YOU THINK?


“USC Marshall is built on the core principles of entrepreneurial thinking and globalization.” JAMES G. ELLIS, DEAN USC MARSHALL SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

» The Lloyd Greif Center for Entrepreneurial Studies is a proud part of the Marshall School of Business

at the University of Southern California. USC Marshall is internationally recognized for its emphasis on entrepreneurship and innovation, social responsibility, and path-breaking research — it ranks 10th in research among North American business schools. Marshall offers its nearly 7,000 undergraduate and graduate students a unique world view and unparalleled global experiential opportunities.


G THE ENTREPRENEURIAL INSTINCT

the mindset

INVENTIVE & LIMITLESS

» WHERE OTHERS SEE RISK, YOU SEE OPPORTUNITY Forget status quo. You thrive on change. You imagine new possibilities: solutions, products, the next big idea.

Pursuing your concept isn’t a choice; it’s an intense belief that follows you everywhere. Trust that instinct. Feed it. Embolden your vision with creativity, feedback, and an agile, adaptive approach. Whether you’re launching a new venture, joining an emerging business, or advancing in a Fortune 500 company, you’ve come to the right place. At the USC Marshall Lloyd Greif Center for Entrepreneurial Studies, you learn a mindset that will set you apart and better position you to impact the world.

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THE GREIF EXPERIENCE LLOYD GREIF CENTER FOR ENTREPRENEURIAL STUDIES USC MARSHALL SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

» CREATE. TEST. ITERATE. Entrepreneurship is an art form and a science. Beginning with a blank canvas, the

entrepreneur makes a unique and authentic work of art, benefiting from the wisdom of those who have gone before. That’s why we’ve developed a program that’s original, experiential, adaptive — and builds on decades of research and best practices. In the proving ground for disruptive ideas, we push you to try new things: courses, methodologies, theories. Leap across boundaries as digital meets gaming meets cinema meets social enterprise. Our curriculum and research are global in perspective and rooted in the strengths of our Southern California communities. There are no limits on your imagination or potential.

It’s my belief that businesses are the greatest platforms for change    The next generation of leaders must advocate for all stakeholders — community, the environment — not just for shareholders.” MARC BENIOFF CHAIRMAN & CEO, SALESFORCE ALUMNI ENTREPRENEUR OF THE YEAR 2004 2


VISION & LEADERSHIP

WE TEACH SKILL SET AND MINDSET With some 80 course sections taught by 30+ professors and practitioners, you’ll learn the skills, frameworks, and methodologies to approach and solve large problems in a rapid, iterative way. And you’ll gain a critical toolkit that helps you achieve ambitious goals and break through barriers. That kit includes the lean start-up model, which values continuous innovation and teaches you to develop a minimum viable product. The result: you begin the process of “doing” as quickly as possible. The pace is swift, expectations high, but that’s what you expect of yourself.

   in the world. — employees, customers,

Benioff (BS ’86) founded > Marc Salesforce in 1999 with a vision to create a different kind of enterprise software company, with a new technology model based in the cloud, a new pay-as-you-go business model, and a new, integrated corporate philanthropy model. Under his leadership, Salesforce has grown from a groundbreaking idea into a Fortune 500 company, the fastest-growing top 10 software company, and the largest CRM company. For its revolutionary approach, Salesforce has been named one of the World’s Most Innovative Companies six years in a row by Forbes, one of Fortune’s World’s Most Admired Companies in the software industry four years in a row, and a Fortune Best Company to Work For eight years in a row.

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brandon beck & marc merrill CO-FOUNDERS AND CO-CEOS, RIOT GAMES ALUMNI ENTREPRENEURS OF THE YEAR 2015

WHAT MAKES A GREAT WORKPLACE? 

have a vision you truly believe in,  with challenging the status quo. 

Brandon Beck and Marc Merrill met as undergraduates at USC and launched Riot Games in 2006 with the goal of becoming the most player-focused game company in the world. Riot Games released its acclaimed debut title, League of Legends, in 2009. Today, it’s played by over 100 million players every month (and growing). The company is headquartered in West Los Angeles, with offices around the globe. Fortune magazine has ranked Riot Games among the 100 best companies to work for.

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WORLD-CLASS ACCESS LLOYD GREIF CENTER FOR ENTREPRENEURIAL STUDIES USC MARSHALL SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

  Culture is the invisible glue that drives team chemistry and helps people maximize potential.  BEST ADVICE  If you   do n’t let anyone tell you it can’t happen. It’s important to cultivate resilience and push through all the friction that comes RIOT STANDS FOR  Delivering incredible experiences. Our obsessive focus on serving players drives innovation. 

» SERIOUS ACCESS. SERIOUS RESULTS The Greif Center is located in the heart of Los Angeles, one of the world’s most vibrant business centers and the U.S. gateway to the Pacific Rim. The Southern California region, from Santa Barbara to San Diego, is home to several important technology clusters, including media and entertainment, aerospace, biotech, AR/VR, and transportation. We offer our students unique connections to Hollywood, new media, content providers, tech leaders, finance, and more. As a Greif student, you enjoy access to a world-class faculty who offer in-depth experience and leadership across industries and businesses, and who often become mentors and advocates to accelerate your ideas. Our program is guided by our 50+ member Advisory Council, a Who’s Who in business, entrepreneurship, tech, and entertainment.

TROJAN FAMILY: LIFELONG AND WORLDWIDE The moment you arrive at USC, you become a member of the Trojan Family — where everyone’s got your back. This extraordinary alumni community of more than 380,000 Trojans spans the world, forming an influential global network you will rely on throughout your career. “Fight On!”

AND THIS ALL TAKES PLACE IN A CITY THAT HAS:

75 miles of coastline  225 languages  284 sunny days a year 5


blazing the academic path

» OUR CURRICULUM On both the undergraduate and graduate levels, our curriculum is based on a fundamental three-course sequence that takes students from opportunity recognition to customer discovery to launch. Choose from a wide range of complementary, specialized courses — so you experience a program tailored to your interests and objectives.

#3

UNDERGRADUATE ENTREPRENEURSHIP PROGRAM (U.S. News & World Report, 2015-16)

#9

GRADUATE ENTREPRENEURSHIP PROGRAM

1.

(U.S. News & World Report, 2015-16)

#4

GRADUATE ENTREPRENEURSHIP PROGRAM (Financial Times, 2015)

“Entrepreneurship can’t be taught in the traditional educational format. It requires getting out there and learning by doing. It is a contact sport. HELENA YLI-RENKO DIRECTOR, LLOYD GREIF CENTER ORFALEA DIRECTOR’S CHAIR IN ENTREPRENEURSHIP 6

opportunity recognition Entrepreneurial Mindset Decision Making Under Uncertainty

2.


CUSTOMIZED CURRICULUM LLOYD GREIF CENTER FOR ENTREPRENEURIAL STUDIES USC MARSHALL SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

3. feasibility analysis Customer Discovery Proof of Concept

venture initiation Launching and Scaling Your Startup

DEGREES & PROGRAMS Undergraduate Certificate in Entrepreneurship 7 Interdisciplinary Minors: Entrepreneurship Game Entrepreneurship Innovation: The Digital Entrepreneur Media Economics & Entrepreneurship Performance Science Social Entrepreneurship Technology Commercialization Graduate 3 MBA Concentrations: Entrepreneurship and Venture Management Technology Commercialization Entrepreneurship and Operations 2 Specialized Masters: Entrepreneurship and Innovation Social Entrepreneurship Modules: Executive MBA, Master of Medical Management, Master of Business for Veterans Certificate in Technology Commercialization

SPECIALIZED COURSES Undergraduate Digital Playbook for Entrepreneurs Digital Startup Launchpad Entertainment Entrepreneurship Entrepreneurial Family Business Entrepreneurial Mindset: Taking the Leap Founder’s Dilemmas Global Entrepreneurship Growth Hacking: Scaling Startups Management of Small Businesses Social Entrepreneurship Social Innovation Design Lab Technology Entrepreneurship Venture Management Graduate Acquiring a Business Cases in New Venture Management Corporate Entrepreneurship eCommerce and Social Media Feasibility Analysis for Social Ventures Founder’s Dilemmas Investing in Impact Ventures Investing in New Ventures Life Sciences Entrepreneurship Media & Entertainment Social Entrepreneurship Social Innovation Design Technology Commercialization Technology Feasibility

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SPECIALIZED MASTERS LLOYD GREIF CENTER FOR ENTREPRENEURIAL STUDIES USC MARSHALL SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

» ACCELERATED PROGRAMS Our highly experiential programs let you fast track your career, whether you want to launch the newest headline-making startup or bring added value to your employer. The Greif Center’s immersive

master’s programs can be completed over one year, full time, or two years, part time — making them short-term investments with a long-term payoff.

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP Solving world problems is no longer solely the province of policy professionals and social workers. Today’s complex problems require business acumen and leadership to drive sustainable change. Social entrepreneurs are leading for-profit and non-profit organizations that offer innovative market-based solutions to problems in education, healthcare, poverty, and the environment. These enterprises and programs — from global microfinance to mission-based pharmaceutical companies to local workforce development — follow business best practices while holding social mission as their driving force. With an MS in Social Entrepreneurship, you will experience a business education geared to the unique aspects of social impact and be prepared to become a leader in the field. You will develop the acumen to balance head and heart as you embark on a career with meaning and attack pressing global challenges.

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ready. set. launch.

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND INNOVATION offers individuals with a passion for entrepreneurship the critical skills and knowledge needed to start a new company or pursue a career in corporate venturing and technology commercialization. In this collaborative, 12-month program, you will develop a sophisticated understanding of entrepreneurial decision making, business model formation and evaluation, product development and execution strategies, team formation and growth, and launching and financing a new venture — a complete toolkit for the future. Students from all academic interests and disciplines are welcome. This integrated business curriculum helps you thrive in a competitive marketplace and is a powerful complement to degrees in such fields as engineering, life sciences, communications, and cinema.

GRADUATE Learn to take a new technology to market. Gain insights into the full commercialization process: invention, product CERTIFICATE IN development, technical and market feasibility analysis, intellectual property, business design, and venture funding. TECHNOLOGY COMMERCIALIZATION Link theory and practice through internships and projects. 9


WILL FERRELL

TAKE THE LEAP to learn from world-changing entrepreneurs, creatives, and outliers, such as the founders of Siri, Square, Box, The Honest Co., Dollar Shave Club, Proactiv, WestJet, plus Mark Cuban, Quincy Jones, Anthony Robbins, Cindy Crawford, and Gary Vaynerchuk. The conversations — led by Professor David Belasco — are candid, poignant, and powerful. Only at USC can you be inspired by John Legend . . . taught by Gloria Steinem . . . coached by Pete Carroll . . . and laugh with alumnus Will Ferrell conducting the Trojan Marching Band. 10


CREATIVE MINDSET LLOYD GREIF CENTER FOR ENTREPRENEURIAL STUDIES USC MARSHALL SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

““You don’t have to follow everyone else’s rules. You can grab the ones that work and make your own path. QUINCY JONES ENTERTAINMENT MOGUL

WILL FERRELL & PETE CARROLL

CINDY CRAWFORD

JESSICA ALBA

GLORIA STEINEM

TROY CARTER

MARK CUBAN & DAVID BELASCO

PEAK PERFORMANCE With the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts, and Sciences, the Greif Center has launched a Minor in Performance Science to teach the science, best practices, and applied processes for optimizing human performance — individually and within organizations. The innovative curriculum combines courses in business, psychology, neuroscience, and biology and was developed with a renowned high-performance psychologist and a Super Bowl-winning coach. It’s all part of thinking bigger in your career and life.

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the entrepreneurial ecosystem @USC VAST. MULTILAYERED. POWERFUL.

>> UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

INCUBATE@USC.EDU  ONE COMPREHENSIVE PORTAL

» FROM THE CORE The Lloyd Greif Center for Entrepreneurial Studies sits at the center of an energetic and growing

fueling, start-up launching, brain-expanding world of education, resources, inspiration, and opportunity. Welcome.

>> SILICON BEACH: LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA

#2 INNOVATION & ENTREPRENEURSHIP HUB IN U.S. 3rd STRONGEST STARTUP ECOSYSTEM IN THE WORLD

HOME TO APPROXIMATELY  8,300 ACTIVE TECH STARTUPS

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LLOYD GREIF CENTER FOR ENTREPRENEURIAL STUDIES >> USC MARSHALL SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

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aaron levie CEO & CO-FOUNDER, BOX ALUMNI ENTREPRENEUR OF THE YEAR 2014

WHAT DOES IT TAKE TO LAUNCH? 

deeply passionate about what  make sure we’re always operat  changing in their worlds.  That 

Aaron Levie developed Box — a fastgrowing enterprise content platform —  while at USC. In 2005, he and friend Dylan Smith launched the company as CEO and CFO, and Levie left school. Since then, Box has helped businesses of all sizes, including a Who’s Who of Fortune 500 firms, be more competitive, collaborative and productive, managing data across any device, anywhere. Levie has been named to Forbes’ 30 Under 30 and Fortune’s 40 Under 40, and as Inc.’s Entrepreneur of the Year.

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VENTURE COMPETITIONS LLOYD GREIF CENTER FOR ENTREPRENEURIAL STUDIES USC MARSHALL SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

 Fundamentally you have to believe something other people don’t believe.  WHERE’S THE SPARK?  You have to be innately and you’re going after. Make sure you’re doing something you can be continually excited about.  DESCRIBE YOUR ROLE.  My job is to   ing as a start-up; we’re always thinking about new trends emerging, always working with our best customers to learn what’s same level of hunger and drive and entrepreneurship we had at four employees continues at 1,350.

» CASH & CONNECTIONS Annual venture competitions offer student and alumni entrepreneurs more than $300,000

in prize money and, more importantly, access to investors and connectors to drive their ideas forward. The Greif Center hosts and supports various competitions and gatherings, including: New Venture Seed Competition Contestants refine pitches through workshops; finals are judged by venture capitalists, angel investors, and entrepreneurs. Hosted and funded by the Greif Center. Total prizes: $50,000. University Venturing and Angel Summit Sponsored by the Greif Center, it attracts top ventures from nine Southern California universities, who present to more than a dozen angel investment groups. Women in Business Competition The USC Marshall Graduate Women in Business Competition invites teams of women MBA students to pitch new business ideas before a panel of experts. Total prizes: $40,000. Stevens Innovator Showcase Students from all disciplines showcase their businesses and prototypes during Trojan Family Weekend. The most promising concepts compete for cash awards. Total prizes: $25,000. Maseeh Prize Competition (with USC Viterbi) The focus is solving global problems in energy, health, education, safety, and the environment — and giving engineering students valuable business skills. Total prizes: $50,000. The Min Family Engineering Social Entrepreneurship Challenge (with USC Viterbi) USC students use innovative engineering and technology to develop sustainable, effective solutions to global problems. Total prizes: $50,000. The Real Deal @USC (with USC Viterbi) Spotlighting USC and L.A., and partially funded through USC’s National Science Foundation I-Corps grant, students make pitches Shark Tank-style for equity investments. Mayor’s Cup Civic Challenge Students and faculty from all L.A. colleges compete to solve some of the City’s most pressing problems. Supported by The Mayor’s Office of Budget and Innovation and the Greif Center. Grand prize: $25,000. 15


SOCIAL ENTERPRISE

» TARGETING SOCIETAL CHALLENGES The first and leading program of its kind at a major university, the

Brittingham Social Enterprise Lab empowers the next generation of social entrepreneurs and business leaders to tackle and solve large societal challenges through profitable and mission-based businesses. Students learn from thought leaders and entrepreneurs who have done it in the real world, including Adlai Wertman, founding director; esteemed researcher Jill Kickul; Jessica Jackley, visionary founder of kiva.org; and Abby Fifer Mandell, executive director. Undergraduate students can minor in Social Entrepreneurship, while graduate students can study an MBA concentration in Sustainability, Society and Business, earn an MS in Social Entrepreneurship, or complete a Certificate in Sustainability and Business.

SUSTAINABLE INVESTING  Suzana Amoes (MS, Social Entrepreneur­

Terra Limpa’s solution: increase private

ship ‘16) is a co-founder of Terra Limpa, an

investments to create a new class of

impact investment fund that won the 2016

smallholder farmers. “The time to restore

Morgan Stanley Sustainable Investing

Angola’s agricultural legacy is now,”

Challenge. The problem: with Angola’s land says Amoes, “through investments with covered in up to 20 million landmines,

transformative impact on the livelihoods

the country imports 80% of its food.

of people.”

FOOD WASTE WARRIOR  Forty percent of food in the U.S. goes to waste. Kaitlin Mogentale (BS, Environmental Studies ‘15) is determined to change this statistic. While a senior at USC, she got the idea for Pulp Pantry, a progressive food enterprise that works with commercial juiceries to turn organic produce and nut pulp into tasty, healthy, snacks. Kaitlin, who earned a Minor in Social Entrepreneurship, credits USC with giving her confidence and resources. “You don’t get what you don’t ask for,” she tells budding entrepreneurs.

“To really make an impact, you need a community. KAITLIN MOGENTALE BS ’15 16


INCUBATORS LLOYD GREIF CENTER FOR ENTREPRENEURIAL STUDIES USC MARSHALL SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

» WHERE STARTUPS GET THEIR START This is where creators, stakeholders, and investors come together to make things happen. Within Greif and USC, incubators and accelerators include:

Marshall/Greif Incubator This program helps entrepreneurs go from feasibility and development to customer discovery, business model, team building, and investment preparation. The incubator also provides work space for ventures. Blackstone LaunchPad USC This accelerator provides early-stage student entrepreneurs with the tools, coaching, and mentors to transform ideas into new ventures. It is funded by the Blackstone Charitable Foundation, operated by the Greif Center, and housed at USC Marshall. Viterbi Startup Garage Located in the heart of Silicon Beach in Marina del Rey, the Garage is an accelerator and workspace for student engineering teams to access mentors, procure capital, and launch tech-based companies. D-Health Lab Innovators in healthcare IT get access to stakeholders and technology to rapidly take ideas from concept to pilot. Mentors include veteran healthcare practitioners, senior administrators, and entrepreneurs. Hacker House This community of builders, doers, and entrepreneurs at USC Viterbi connects students who share the hacker mindset. Its Venture Incubation Program includes dedicated access to space, mentorship, and technology. Crunch Accelerator Student teams learn the secrets of a successful startup, including how to determine your minimum viable brand, motivate customers, share your story, and design your competitive advantage.

> For more, visit incubate.usc.edu, a central destination for entrepreneurs at USC.

FUTURE ENTREPRENEURS

The Greif Center’s partnership with the Network for Teaching Entrepreneurship (NFTE) brings entrepreneurship education to inner-city middle and high schools. Greif students mentor NFTE students and serve as judges in NFTE venture competitions. The Center also hosts NFTE’s annual Transform LA Youth Entrepreneurship Conference. 17


CASES & RESEARCH LLOYD GREIF CENTER FOR ENTREPRENEURIAL STUDIES USC MARSHALL SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

S C G -­‐5 0 3  

J u l y 1 5 ,   2 0 1 4   J E R E M Y   B .   D A N N  

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EJREIRCE KMI M Y    B .   D A N N   H E L E N A   Y L I -­‐ R E N K O  

Hive Lighting:     Hive  GLreen   ighting:     The   Solution   for  Hollywood?   The  Green  Solution  for  Hollywood?   E R I C   K I M  

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obert Rutherford sat in the conference room of the LA Cleantech Incubator, observing the early morning light flooding through the window. It cast a soft natural glow on the respected cleantech venture capitalist on the room other of side of LA the Cleantech table. “Our lights willobserving recreate the obert Rutherford sat in theseated conference the Incubator, the same light you see flowing through through this window at half the energy of our competitors,” said early morning light flooding the window. It cast a softcost natural glow on the respected Rutherford. “Plasma bulbcapitalist technology is the future of side greenoflighting solutions.” The cleantech venture seated on the other the table. “Our lights willinvestor recreatewas the familiar withyou the see technology, but needed assurance products even be accepted same light flowing through thismore window at halfthat theHive energy cost ofwould our competitors,” said into the Hollywood lighting market thatisRutherford to lighting disrupt. solutions.” Rutherford,The Cofounder Rutherford. “Plasma bulb technology the future sought of green investor and was President of Hive hadbut been working tirelessly withthat his Hive team products to prepare for the 2012 familiar with the Lighting, technology, needed more assurance would even beCinegear accepted Expo—still about six months away—where his company would introduce their full line-up of plasma into the Hollywood lighting market that Rutherford sought to disrupt. Rutherford, Cofounder and film-set lights. HeLighting, was determined toworking show investors that Hive was not for justthe another fleeting President of Hive had been tirelessly with his Lighting team to prepare 2012 Cinegear startup, but about a company well-positioned to exploit some major cross-industry opportunities. Expo—still six months away—where his company would introduce their full line-up of plasma film-set lights. He was determined to show investors that Hive Lighting was not just another fleeting Rutherford, as confident as he was startup, but a company well-positioned to exploit some major cross-industry opportunities. about his product, wondered if filmmakers in Hollywood were to adopt Rutherford, as ready confident as the he new was technology that wondered Hive Lighting was about his product, if filmmakers bringing to market. filmmaking in Hollywood were readyThe to adopt the new challenge his team attempting to solve technology that was Hive Lighting was was formidable—technologically and bringing to market. The filmmaking logistically. recreate the light bathing challenge hisTo team was attempting to solve the room, productions was conference formidable—technologically and required expensive crews equipped with thousand-watt lightlogistically. bulbs, reflectors, cables,the generators, and To recreate light bathing support stands. Rutherford grinned slightly, reflecting upon all the struggles he room, had gone productions through to the conference create a solution that could eliminate the need for much ofbulbs, the cabling and cables, generators neededand to required expensive crews equipped with thousand-watt light reflectors, generators, distribute the power for traditional theatrical He couldhe only people support stands. Rutherford grinnedenergy-hungry slightly, reflecting upon lights. all the struggles hadhope gonethat through to within industrythat would alsoeliminate take note of andofdecide to purchase Hive’s lights. create the a solution could thethese needbenefits for much the cabling and generators needed to distribute the power for traditional energy-hungry theatrical lights. He could only hope that people It 3was early 2012 and Rutherford believed that his opportunity to enter the market was closing.     within the industry would also take note of these benefits and decide to purchase Hive’s lights. -­‐5 1 Lighting had already spent much of its $170,000 seed money raised from friends, family, and SC GHive 1 5   1 ,   2 0 b e r   early-stage angel investors. Rutherford and his co-founder Jon Miller felt the pressure to build a m e c It was   early 2012 and Rutherford believed that his opportunity to enter the market was closing. De sustainable business. Thespent entrepreneurs facingseed several major and operational Hive Lighting had already much of itswere $170,000 money raisedstrategic from friends, family, and questions as they tried to decide how to make a splash at upcoming trade shows and win purchases early-stage 1 3     angel investors. Rutherford and his co-founder Jon Miller felt the pressure to build a G -­‐5industry SC from pros. TheThe reception of Hive’s were technology the Cinegear would critical to 5   business. sustainable entrepreneurs facing atseveral major Expo strategic andbeoperational ,   2 0 1 b e r   1 theasfuture of thetocompany since the industry’s tastemakers would be and in attendance. If questions they tried decide how to make a splash top at upcoming trade shows win purchases D e c e m shaping Rutherford and pros. Miller The could get someofhigh profile, big-ticket utilize theirbe technology, from industry reception Hive’s technology at productions the CinegeartoExpo would critical to Rutherford Hive’s story might justindustry’s include a classic “Hollywood ending.” shaping thethought future that of the company since the top tastemakers would be in attendance. If Rutherford and Miller could get some high profile, big-ticket productions to utilize their technology, Rutherford thought that Hive’s story might just include a classic “Hollywood ending.”

» CASE COLLECTION The Greif Entrepreneurship Case Collection focuses on entrepreneurs and innovators creating the new

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Restaurants On  The  Run:     Restaurants   n  The  R  un:     A  Founder’s  O Journey   A  Founder’s  Journey     M E G A N   S T R A W T H E R  

M M

ichael Caito strode briskly down the hall of his Lake Forest, California office to his company’s main conference room, eager to meet with his primary investor, Rowland Day, for a quarterly statusbriskly update. In just years, Restaurants the Run office (ROTR) ichael Caito strode down the eight hall of his Lake Forest, on California to had his grown intocompany’s a mult-million business. Theeager company had with beenhis featured in ainvestor, front-page story ofDay, the maindollar conference room, to meet primary Rowland business section in the Losstatus Angeles Times In hadjust andeight madeyears, Inc. Magazine’s 1999 the(ROTR) 500 fastestfor a quarterly update. Restaurants on list the of Run had growing small companies in America. grown into a mult-million dollar business. The company had been featured in a front-page story of the business section in the Los Angeles Times had and made Inc. Magazine’s 1999 list of the 500 fastestMichael didcompanies not want to Day waiting; he was genuinely excited growing small inkeep America. to talk with his investor and advisor about anticipated business growth during the did “dot-com boom,” theDay addition of he new Michael not want to keep waiting; wascustomer genuinelyaccounts excited and and the integration a few recently to talkemployees, with his investor and advisor aboutofanticipated businessacquired growth companies. After giving Day the a “bird’s-eye view” the status quo at during the “dot-com boom,” addition of new ofcustomer accounts ROTR, Michael lobbed in anintegration additional question Day: “So…how do and employees, and the of a fewto recently acquired you think I’mAfter doing?” companies. giving Day a “bird’s-eye view” of the status quo at ROTR, Michael lobbed in an additional question to Day: “So…how do responded, “Michael, if you were the CEO of a youDay thinkcandidly I’m doing?” publicly-traded company, I would fire you. If I were the majority shareholder, I’d can ya. If I was“Michael, a venture if capitalist, I’d fire Day candidly responded, you were the you.” CEO of a publicly-traded company, I would fire you. If I were the majority Michael quickly thataDay’s unanticipated comment was not shareholder, I’d canrealized ya. If I was venture capitalist, I’d fire you.” a bad joke – in fact, the words stung as if a cold bucket of ice was thrown in his face. He sat at the table in shock as countless thoughts raced throughcomment his head.was Day’s Michael quickly realized that Day’s unanticipated not remark seemed to have come ill – intention, butwords how was this what make awithout bad joke in fact, the stung as opinion if a coldformed bucket and of ice wasexactly throwndrove in hisDay face.to He sat such at thea bold statement? all, most of Day’s experience large, multi-national corporations – did table in shock as After countless thoughts raced throughinvolved his head. Day’s remark seemed to have come he reallyillunderstand whathow it took grow a successful Daydrove correct in to hismake observation without intention, but was to this opinion formed start-up? and whatWas exactly Day such a that perhaps Michael currently the skills necessary as multi-national a CEO to take his company to the bold statement? Afterdid all,not most of Day’shave experience involved large, corporations – did next level? Would heeding from an ainvestor’s perspective squash the creative spirit of ROTR, he really understand what itadvice took to grow successful start-up? Was Day correct in his observation or did Day have a point? Michael was have unsure how necessary to proceedas—a both thishis investor andtowith that perhaps Michael did not currently theofskills CEO with to take company the the company as a whole. next level? Would heeding advice from an investor’s perspective squash the creative spirit of ROTR, or did Day have a point? Michael was unsure of how to proceed — both with this investor and with the company as a whole.

Getting ROTR  Running  

Getting ROTR   Running   An  Emerging   Industry     Services (RDS) industry was virtually nonexistent in the early 1990s. The Restaurant Delivery

An Emerging   While restaurantIndustry   chains offered delivery services directly to their consumers, there was no dominant

G -­‐5 1offered 6 industry playerS Cthat an intermediated food delivery service from multiple to The Restaurant Delivery Services (RDS) industry was virtually nonexistent in therestaurants early 1990s. J a n u a r y   1 ,   2 0 1 6   While restaurant chains offered delivery services directly to their consumers, there was no dominant industry player that offered an intermediated food delivery service from multiple restaurants to  

J E R E M Y B .   D A N N  

Tradition and  Transition  at  the       Harvard  Business  Review    

T

he final check of the table of contents required an extra level of focus from Adi Ignatius. It seemed like he had been discussing these articles and reading portions of them for months— and he had. The in-depth management thought pieces from top academics and business leaders usually took months or even a year to develop. A few of the articles in the current issue began their long development processes right when he started his tenure as Editor-in-Chief of the Harvard Business Review (HBR) in January 2009, about 10 months before.

at  Ado

international markets, spanning a wide range of businesses and industries such as space tourism, entertainment, social media, and digital health wearables.

live with our students.” Janu

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a r y   1 2 ,   2 0   1 5   hey wan Adobe dered in slow Sys commer tems’ offi ly to the larg ce kickoff e, high meeting ce specialist. tower. An this had authorit -ceilinged con for a maj As the y on sou the pote ference crowd ntial to or new pro of 40 roo nd m mix duct dev assembl on ing. A turn into The Ado ed, the typograp the ground a kick-off elopmen be emp badge floor of hy des meeting t effort. Howroom began loye thre igner. to for 40 quite fam e days befo es—ranging new pro ever, if all wen take on the An efrom a re—all ous with Adobe air of ducts. noted 20-yea t acco in the a the brig facilitie rding r halls of to plan cardboa s ht red veteran to Adobe’s , rd con around the San Jos boxes arra a newbie who Adobe tainers world. yed on e, Cali the stag just received fornia investig team-membe held the tool The headqu e. The her acce ate bus rs wou s arters build ld use the and, indeboxes had bec ss new ven iness opp to ortu ome next seve ed, in tures many from scra nities and other capital. ral weeks— tch over the includin g som e seed Behind the red shirted box Mark innova Randall es was the tion , the crea blac program and tor of kthis intrapr “kick-st —“Kickbox” eneursh (an ama art” technici and lgamatio ip “bo an atta n mount ched a x”). A sou of nea lavalier nd employe rby. This e Kickbox microphon e crowd es and, pote ntially, session wou to Randall’s even as with oth Adobe shirt as ld be reco the Kickbox film crew a er com program continu panies. rded so that videographe ed r che . I thin program! Eager it could Somewh to adjust k that’s to get be sha cked a cam sound star ere in pretty era on Randall cool.” this roo and lighting ted, Randall red with oth a , Vice er Ado m is the Kickbox started leve Preside be to add thousa ls. “Hello, nt for ress the the pote program alm and wel ndth pers ost two Creativity com on to of associat ntial of a go thro e to the new pro years before Adobe’s Dig ed with ugh our Randall with ital duct or most larg service a simple pre Media Busines e com interact called on par panies. mise: without s Unit, ions and ticip par Dra ants to having ticipants had dev innova tion init adapt plan get pro wing from to go eloped the prin through would learn duc iative, s the how to ciples were grat swiftly. Ran ts in fron the kind of t of cust of the A half test dall ified by “lean star ome pro the high and David glitches -minute into tup” mov cesses Wadhw rs quickly, . levels his intr learn Randall He started ement, of volu ani, the oductio from his nteer par , exe declare in a manner spiel again— n, Randall ticipatio cutive spo early user d to the was cut and was nso n in the film crewespecially app off by halted programr of the the film rop , “OK, . let’s get riate for once more a crew due a savv few this roll ing! We’ y veteran seconds late to some tech r. Kee in the nical ll fix ever n med to ything in pos ia software kick off, t!” industry ,

be Syste

Cases feature change makers from Southern California and

in our classrooms when these entrepreneurs discuss their stories

After checking out about a minute of the online segment, Ignatius returned to his final review of JEREM Y B .   D next month’s HBR. He examined the issue’s masthead—which listed all of the editorial, design and A N N   business staff positions—but realized there had been no changes since the month before. As he clicked and closed the window displaying the masthead, he couldn’t help but wonder, in the rapidly evolving media landscape, how much the organization would change within five or ten years…or even within one year.

oxing”

world through Harvard Business Publishing.

Jeremy Dann, Case Program Director, “but the real magic happens

However, the Tweet and the online video segment weren’t created by editorial or public relations staff members reporting to him; they were developed by the team at harvardbusiness.org. This was a sister organization of HBR within Harvard Business School Publishing (HBSP), the umbrella organization that published and marketed HBR, prominent business books, case studies, corporate training tools and other Harvard-branded business content. HBSP’s CEO David Wan had made bringing in experienced outside talent from the digital media world a priority as he oversaw the development of the group. The external hires were charged with crafting online content that was complementary to other HBSP media properties and also for creating their own independent media platforms. Group “veterans” and founding members Josh Macht and Eric Hellweg had built a team of 21 since the inception just three years before.

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The cases are available for educators and students around the

“We’re proud when other schools adopt our case studies,” says

As he moved on to his pre-publication review of the executive summary section of HBR, his mobile phone lit up and chirped, the telltale sign of a new Tweet. He examined the 140-character Twitter message, which just happened to originate about 100 feet from where he sat. The Tweet highlighted a link to an online video interview with an executive whose company was featured in the previous month’s edition of HBR. Ignatius nodded in approval; he thought this video segment could complement the original article’s coverage and deepen the reader’s understanding of the leadership challenges the executive faced in managing a rapidly evolving organization.

“Kickb

products, technologies, and organizations that remake industries.

ms

Think innovation. There always is a better way to solve a problem. There is no value in following the path of others — you’re simply going to be battling established competitors on their turf.” STEVEN MEDNICK GREIF CENTER PROFESSOR

18


1997

1998

» RESEARCHING THE BIG QUESTIONS The Greif Center fosters, promotes, and honors important research in entrepreneurship, with such initiatives as:

2007

The Greif Research Impact Award confers a $5,000 prize on the researcher/s

MILESTONES IN GREIF CENTER HISTORY

1971

1ST GRADUATE PROGRAM FOR ENTREPRENEURIAL STUDIES IN U.S.

1ST U.S. UNIVERSITY WITH ENTREPRENEURSHIP CENTER ENDOWED BY ALUMNUS

ALUMNUS PAUL ORFALEA ENDOWS DIRECTOR’S CHAIR IN ENTREPRENEURSHIP

GREIF CENTER #1 ENTREPRENEURSHIP PROGRAM IN U.S. PRINCETON REVIEW

who published the most cited entrepreneurship article six years earlier in a top management and entrepreneurship journal. The Greif Faculty and Doctoral Student Research Awards recognize USC Marshall faculty and doctoral students for outstanding research in entrepreneurship.

2013

The Greif Entrepreneurship Research Seminars bring leading researchers to USC

GREIF CENTER RANKED #2 NATIONWIDE U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT

to discuss their most recent work. The Social Entrepreneurship Conference draws scholars to discuss themes in emerging social entrepreneurship research.

2014

PROF. KATHLEEN ALLEN ENTREPRENEURSHIP EDUCATOR OF THE YEAR BY USASBE

2016

GREIF CENTER MOVES INTO JILL AND FRANK FERTITTA HALL

The West Coast Entrepreneurship Research Symposium invites researchers from around the globe to stimulate new ideas and form collaborations.

19


shannon gans CEO & CO-FOUNDER, NEW DEAL STUDIOS ALUMNI ENTREPRENEUR OF THE YEAR 2000

BEST ADVICE FOR ENTREPRENEURS? 

and inspiring others — and, in  we adjusted and huge opportun 

Shannon Gans (BS ’95) wrote the business plan for New Deal Studios while a senior at USC and launched it after graduation with her partners. New Deal has become a leader in special effects and virtual reality, involved in such high-profile films as Inception, The Departed, The Dark Knight Rises, and Interstellar, which won an Oscar® for Best Visual Effects. Her current startup is Jon Stewart’s new animated show on HBO, where she serves as Executive Producer and COO.

20


SPOTLIGHT: EXCELLENCE LLOYD GREIF CENTER FOR ENTREPRENEURIAL STUDIES USC MARSHALL SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

  Never doubt yourself. Your gut is stronger and more reliable than you think. Trust it.  WHAT MOVES YOU?  Helping, empowering, the process, doing the same for myself.  CRITICAL SKILL  Being adaptive, willing to change. When our industry made a seismic shift,   ities came our way.  WHAT LESSON DID YOU TAKE FROM USC?  Think big and go after your dreams. Have the courage to be bold.

» CELEBRATING ACHIEVEMENT The Greif Center spotlights excellence with two annual awards: Entrepreneur

of the Year and Alumni Entrepreneur of the Year. The recipients celebrate the entrepreneurial spirit and its power to transform society. A select list of past honorees: Entrepreneur of the Year

Alumni Entrepreneur of the Year

Thomas Barrack, Colony Capital

Brandon Beck, Marc Merrill, Riot Games

Janice Bryant-Howroyd, Act I

Christopher Cabrera, Xactly

Scott Cook, Intuit

Kim Camarella-Khanbeigi, Kiyonna

Mark Cuban, Broadcast.com, Dallas Mavericks

Chris DeWolfe, MySpace, Jam City

Sky Dayton, Earthlink

Shannon Gans, New Deal Studios

Robert Greenberg, Skechers USA

Anthony Geisler, LA Boxing, Club Pilates

Lloyd Greif, Greif & Co.

Marco Giannini, Dogswell

Wayne Huizenga, Waste Management,

James Hart, Star Software, Senn Delaney

Blockbuster, AutoNation

Girish Jhunjhnuwala, Hind Group

Marcia Israel, Judy’s

Thomas Knapp, Club Sportswear

Steve Jobs, Apple, Pixar

Aaron Levie, Box

Ray Kroc, McDonald’s

Paul Orfalea, Kinko’s

Pamela Lopker, QAD

Craig Pollard, Cancer for College

George Rathmann, Amgen

Michael Singer, Cherokee Uniforms

Fred Rosen, Ticketmaster

Fred and Michael Uytengsu, Alaska Milk,

Howard Schultz, Starbucks

Brookstone Holdings

21


THOUGHT LEADERS LLOYD GREIF CENTER FOR ENTREPRENEURIAL STUDIES USC MARSHALL SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

■ ANTHONY BORQUEZ

■ ADLAI WERTMAN

■ PAI-LING YIN

» AN ENTREPRENEURIAL FACULTY Our faculty are thought leaders, doers, and creators. They are academics, entre-

preneurs, and domain experts, transforming how entrepreneurship in taught and business is done. Meet a few of them.

anthony borquez  AR/VR, GAMING

CEO of Chrysalis, an L.A. non-profit devoted to helping

Anthony Borquez is an expert at building and scaling

the homeless find and keep jobs. “With problems getting

creative tech businesses. He is Founder and CEO of

bigger, you need to teach business skills to those going

Grab, a leader in augmented and virtual reality. He also

into the world of social change.”

founded Blue Label Games and co-founded Spacient Technologies, both mobile startups. “It’s imperative

pai-ling yin  STRATEGY & MOBILE

to find the right audience to find your market fit,” he

Pai-Ling Yin studies mobile apps, technology and

says. “Analytics reveal the key insights to understand

strategy, platform markets, and entrepreneurship. Before

behavior and usage.”

joining the Trojan Family, she taught at Harvard Business School, MIT Sloan School of Management, and Stanford

22

adlai wertman  SOCIAL CHANGE

University. Pai-Ling co-founded the Mobile Innovation

Adlai Wertman is founding director of the Brittingham

Group, which analyzes the mobile app ecosystem. “I love

Social Enterprise Lab at USC Marshall and the David C.

participating in the conversation around innovation and

Bohnett Chair in Social Entrepreneurship. Adlai spent

the human condition,” she says. “That is the foundation

18 years on Wall Street, then switched gears to become

of my teaching philosophy.”


noam wasserman  FOUNDER CENTRAL Noam Wasserman, founding director of the Founder Central Initiative, understands the early decisions startups

SELECT GREIF FACULTY

make that can get them into trouble. “My mission is to

Kathleen Allen, Professor Emeritus

drive down to zero the startup teams that blow up due to

Greg Autry, New Space Industry

interpersonal tensions, the founders who get fired as CEO

David Belasco, Executive Director

when they shouldn’t be replaced, and the startups whose

Anthony Borquez, VR/AR, Gaming

impact on the world is less than it can be.” Check out his

Jeremy Dann, Case Program Director

bestseller, The Founder’s Dilemmas: Anticipating and

Abby Fifer Mandell, Social Enterprise

Avoiding the Pitfalls That Can Sink a Startup.

Elissa Grossman, Networks, Crowdfunding

jill kickul  SOCIAL ENTERPRISE

Christopher Harrer, Entrepreneurial Strategy Patrick Henry, Marketing & Sales

Jill Kickul wrote the book on social enterprise — several

Jessica Jackley, kiva.org Founder

books, including Understanding Social Entrepreneurship:

Jill Kickul, Social Enterprise

The Relentless Pursuit of Mission in an Ever-Changing

Thomas Knapp, Director, MSEI Program

World. She examines strategic processes within new

Steven Mednick, Corporate Entrepreneurship

ventures, micro-financing practices, and wealth creation

Gene Miller, Finance, Strategy

in transitioning economies. She says, “The future for social

Justin Miller, Financial Entrepreneurship

entrepreneurs is replete with opportunities to effectively

Albert Napoli, Family Business

address and solve some of society’s most pressing issues.”

Michael Napoliello, Media & Entertainment

violina rindova  STRATEGIC ENTREPRENEURSHIP Violina Rindova, Greif Center Research Director and the Captain Henry W. Simonsen Chair in Strategic Entrepreneurship, is a leading scholar in strategic approaches to entrepreneurship. Her research addresses how entrepreneurial firms in nascent industries develop new business models, build dynamic capabilities, and pursue growth. “Opportunity creation is central to the innovation and growth strategies of all firms,” she says, “from young start-ups to Fortune 500.”

Ivan Nikkhoo, Capital, eCommerce Thomas O’Malia, Director Emeritus Paul Orfalea, Kinko’s Founder Paul Orlando, Incubator Violina Rindova, Research Director Molly Schmid, Life Sciences Noam Wasserman, Director, Founder Central Adlai Wertman, Director, Brittingham Social Enterprise Lab Pai-Ling Yin, Strategy, Mobile Helena Yli-Renko, Academic Director 23


START UP LLOYD GREIF CENTER FOR ENTREPRENEURIAL STUDIES USC MARSHALL SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

» IT’S TIME Bring your dreams, your ideas, to reality. Launch the next step in your future. It could be bigger than you ever envisioned. Join us at the Lloyd Greif Center for Entrepreneurial Studies. To learn more, contact us at 213-740-0641 or entrepreneur@marshall.usc.edu.

WWW.MARSHALL.USC.EDU/GREIF

“Entrepreneurs are alchemists. They add value to existence, turning iron into gold —  through strength of will, intelligence, and a determination to succeed. LLOYD GREIF, MBA ’79 PRESIDENT & CEO, GREIF & CO. ALUMNI ENTREPRENEUR OF THE YEAR 1987 ENTREPRENEUR OF THE YEAR 1998 24


THE PLACE TO BE

In a landmark move befitting a top-rated program, the Greif Center now occupies the top two floors of Jill and Frank Fertitta Hall. The new, five-story, 102,000-square-foot instructional building at USC Marshall offers 20 classrooms and 50 breakout rooms. The Greif penthouse suite houses faculty offices, state-of-the-art automation, video boards, conference rooms, and a 150-ft-long balcony with sweeping views of campus, L.A. Coliseum, the Hollywood Sign, and downtown skyline.


Marshall School of Business University of Southern California Jill and Frank Fertitta Hall, 5th Floor Los Angeles, CA 90089-3365

BOUNDLESS HOW BIG CAN YOU THINK?


“If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. HENRY DAVID THOREAU AMERICAN ESSAYIST & BIG THINKER

USC Marshall School of Business Jill and Frank Fertitta Hall, 5th Floor Los Angeles, CA 90089-3365 213-740-0641 www.marshall.usc.edu/greif

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USC Greif Entrepreneur Brochure  

USC Greif Entrepreneur Brochure

USC Greif Entrepreneur Brochure  

USC Greif Entrepreneur Brochure