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Caltech connect

Alumni Reunion Weekend and Seminar Day May 16 – 19

The 2013 Distinguished Alumni Awards

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Building Better Connections

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Rediscover Caltech Jean-Lou Chameau

Jim Simmons (BS ’72)

President, Caltech

President, Caltech Alumni Association

Caltech When Caltech leaders were asked to describe what makes Caltech special earlier this year, there was—as you might imagine—no single answer among them. The Caltech advantage is rooted in its parts: the extraordinary faculty who choose to develop their scientific careers here, the young scholars who learn to question and problem solve here, and you—our alumni—who venture from our campus to explore, invent, build, and innovate. This year was no exception. In October, Caltech was recognized—for the second consecutive year—as the world’s top institution of higher education by the UK’s Times Higher Education. This international recognition came just months after Caltech scientists and Jet Propulsion Laboratory engineers landed the car-sized analytical laboratory called Curiosity on Mars, and after a Caltech team contributed to the discovery of the longsought Higgs boson, the fundamental particle that is thought to endow elementary particles with mass. Beyond our campus borders, Caltech’s 22,000 alumni continue to exemplify our story of excellence. Take a moment to read about this year’s Distinguished Alumni Award recipients and you will find groundbreaking contributions in research, academics, business, and philanthropy. You will also find that they are people very much like yourself. Every day, you take bold leaps to solve unique problems, drawing upon the skills and training that you received while at Caltech. Your contributions as researchers, artists, educators, entrepreneurs, and inventors advance the bounds of our collective knowledge and help to shape our world. Your Caltech degree offers you a place among—and access to—one of the most accomplished alumni networks of any institution. The Caltech Alumni Association, in partnership with Caltech, works to help you realize the full potential of that network, personally and professionally: through regular news updates, local and regional events, social networking, professional development, and more. We invite you to join us on campus for Alumni Reunion Weekend and the 76th annual Alumni Seminar Day, where you will have the opportunity to learn about current research, connect with friends and colleagues, and share your own news. You are an indispensable part of the Caltech story. From the time that you first stepped onto campus, your passion and commitment to pursuing knowledge and excellence has helped make Caltech one of the world’s leading science and engineering research institutions. We are deeply proud and honored that you discovered Caltech. Jean Lou Chameau

For in many ways, our greatest discovery is you.

Jean Lou Chameau

Jim Simmons

Jean-Lou Chameau

Jim Simmons (BS ’72)

President, Caltech

President, Caltech Alumni Association Jim Simmons


Contents

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Cle an Energy Acceler ates

3 Top Stories of 201 2 5 Alumni Ne ws 6 The 20 1 3 Distinguished Alumni Awards 13 Our Gre atest Discovery 17

Building Be t ter Connections

21 Alumni Reunion Weekend and Seminar Day 22 Alumni Reunion Weekend May 16 –19 24

76th Annual Seminar Day May 1 8

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Campus Map and Information

35 Pl anner 37 In Memoriam


Clean Energy Accelerates

Caltech clean-energy research is accelerating thanks to the renovation of the Earle M. Jorgensen Laboratory. Transformed into a cutting-edge facility for energy science, the lab unites two powerhouse programs: the Resnick Sustainability Institute and the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP).

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Inside the newly renovated lab, teams of students, postdoctoral scholars, staff researchers, and faculty are working to invent revolutionary, clean, and inexpensive methods for the next generation of fuels and power. Through the Jorgensen renovation, researchers have gained new prototyping facilities for turning lab breakthroughs into market-ready inventions and experimental systems that are helping speed work on some of the toughest problems in energy science. These facilities include an advanced and customized type of ink-jet printer with which researchers can fabricate more than 100,000 sample materials per day. Each day, thousands of these materials can be tested for their ability to absorb light or to serve as catalysts for water-splitting—crucial steps in generating fuel from sunlight. The Jorgensen Laboratory brings together researchers from Caltech’s nationally top-ranked divisions of Engineering and Applied Science (EAS) and Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (CCE). “Our researchers are working with Caltech’s chemists and chemical engineers to challenge the status quo and translate scientific discovery into clean-energy innovations that will directly benefit society for generations to come,” says Ares Rosakis, EAS division chair and the Theodore von Kármán Professor of Aeronautics and professor of mechanical engineering. “This facility capitalizes on Caltech’s extraordinarily collaborative culture. It equips our students and faculty to come together across fields to develop novel and viable approaches to renewable energy technologies,” adds Jacqueline Barton, CCE division chair and the Arthur and Marian Hanisch Memorial Professor and professor of chemistry. JCAP, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Innovation Hub, is the nation’s largest research effort focused on artificial photosynthesis. Its researchers aim to create a low-cost generator that uses sunlight, carbon dioxide, and water to make fuels—after which they hope to hand that prototype off to private-sector companies to launch a new solar-fuels industry.

Photos by Bill Youngblood

by Ann Motrunich

“We would think about our energy problem so differently if we could get this card on the table,” says Nate Lewis (BS ’77), JCAP director and Caltech’s George L. Argyros Professor and professor of chemistry. The Resnick Sustainability Institute, for its part, is set up to foster Caltech-based research collaborations that have the potential to develop renewable-energy technologies that can be scaled up to power the planet. Research supported by the Resnick Institute will yield tangible benefits even faster thanks to the new facilities, says Harry Atwater, the

The recent renovations of the Jorgensen Laboratory included many upgrades that were designed to reflect Caltech's commitment to sustainability. Bottom-Right: Postdoc researcher Slobodan Mitrovic explains his work with nanostructures. institute’s director and Caltech’s Howard Hughes Professor and professor of applied physics and materials science. He predicts, “Caltech will do for energy in the twentyfirst century what it did for physics in the twentieth: reinvent it.”


Top Stories of 2012

Here are some of the most widely read and shared news articles from Caltech in 2012.

Choking when the stakes are high In studying brain activity and behavior, Caltech biologists and social scientists learned that the more loss-averse people are, the more likely it is that their performance will peak at a level far below their actual capacity.

Powering toilets for the developing world Caltech engineers won the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation’s Reinventing the Toilet Challenge with a solar-powered toilet that can safely dispose of human waste for just five cents per use per day.

Uncovering the Higgs boson The discovery of the long-sought Higgs boson, the fundamental particle that is thought to endow elementary particles with mass, was made possible in part by contributions from a large contingent of Caltech researchers.

Amplifying research

Swims like a jellyfish

Researchers at Caltech and JPL developed a new kind of amplifier that can be used for everything from exploring the cosmos to examining the quantum world.

Caltech bioengineers partnered with researchers at Harvard University to build a freely moving artificial jellyfish from scratch, using silicon and muscle cells.

Eyeing the X-ray universe NASA's NuSTAR telescope was launched on June 13. Its mission, which was Caltech led and designed, is to explore the high-energy X-ray universe and to uncover the secrets of black holes and the remnants of dead stars, as well as the mysteries behind energetic cosmic explosions—and even the sun.

Man in the Moon Research by Caltech planetary scientists indicates that the “man in the moon”— an illusion caused by darkcolored volcanic plains—faces us because of the rate at which the moon’s spinning slowed before becoming locked in its current orientation, even though the odds favored the moon’s other, more mountainous side.

Boosting nerve-cell repair

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Caltech scientists developed a gene therapy that helps the brain replace nerve-cell-protecting myelin sheaths destroyed by spinal-cord injuries or diseases like multiple sclerosis.

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Understanding solar flares By studying jets of plasma in the lab, Caltech researchers discovered a surprising phenomenon that may be important for understanding how solar flares occur and for developing nuclear fusion as an energy source.

And the #1 Story is...


Curiosity

After more than eight years of planning, 354 million miles of space travel, and seven minutes of terror, NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory successfully landed on the red planet on August 5. The roving analytical laboratory, named Curiosity, is now using its 10 scientific instruments and 17 cameras to search Mars for environments that either were once—or are now—habitable.

There’s a little more of Caltech on Mars than first meets the eye. When JPL landed Curiosity on the red planet last August, a message was hidden within the rover’s calibration target, courtesy of Blacker House.


Alumni News 2012

1930s – 50s

1970s

1980s

1990s

Charles Townes (PhD ’39) received the first “Golden Goose Award”— honoring research resulting in significant human benefit—for his discovery of the Maser and Laser.

Trinh Xuan Thuan (BS ’70) received the Cino Del Duca Prize from the French Institute for his efforts to popularize science worldwide.

Arati Prabhakar (MS ’80, PhD ’85) was named the new director of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).

Yu-Hung Kuo (BS ’90) was appointed co-director of the Neuro-Oncology Center at Stony Brook University.

Sarah C. R. Elgin (PhD ’72) was elected to the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Philip Hanlon (PhD ’81) was selected as the 18th president of Dartmouth College.

Frank Kendall (MS ’72, ENG ’74) was named Defense Under Secretary for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics.

Charles M. Rice (PhD ’81) was honored by the Belgian Royal Academy of Medicine.

Anton Monk (MS ’90) was named to the board of RVU Alliance, a consortium of content-serviceprovider, semiconductor, and consumer-electronics companies.

Xie Jialin (MS ‘48) was presented with China’s top science and technology award by Chinese President Hu Jintao. Carver Mead (BS ‘56, PhD ‘60) was awarded the BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award. Harrison H. Schmitt (BS ’57) was honored by the New Mexico Museum of Space History for his distinguished career as an astronaut. Dick Van Kirk (BS ’58) was elected to a leadership role at the Special Olympics Summer World Games.

1960s Ivan E. Sutherland (MS ’60) won the Kyoto Prize in Advanced Technology for achievements in computer graphics.

Lily Jan (PhD ’74) and Yuh Nung Jan (PhD ’75) received the Gruber Neuroscience Prize for fundamental contributions to molecular neurobiology.

Cleve Moler (BS ’61) was honored by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers for his invention of the numerical computing environment and programming language MATLAB.

David Lee (PhD ’74) was named chair of the Caltech Board of Trustees.

Michael Baskes (BS ’65, PhD ’70) was elected to the National Academy of Engineering. Sean Solomon (BS ’66) was named director of the LamontDoherty Earth Observatory. David A. Evans (PhD ‘68) was awarded the Welch Award in Chemistry for his contributions to organic reaction design. Leroy Hood (PhD ’68) received the National Medal of Science. Thomas H. Jordan (BS ’69) was recognized by the American Geosciences Institute for his contributions to the public understanding of the geosciences.

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Jessica Tuchman Mathews (PhD ’73) was elected to the Harvard Corporation. William Ward (PhD ’73) was named a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Michael M. Rosbash (BS ’65) was appointed to the endowed chair in neuroscience at Brandeis University.

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Steven Koonin (BS ’72 and former Caltech provost) was named the director of NYU’s new Center for Urban Sciences and Progress.

Alan P. Lightman (PhD ’74) heads a foundation to provide educational and leadership opportunities to women in Cambodia. George C. Schatz (PhD ’76) was recognized with an honorary doctor of science degree at Clarkson University. John Gustafson (BS ’77) became chief graphics product architect at Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. Beatriz Infante (MS ’77) was appointed to the board of directors of Emulex Corporation. Thomas Peterson (PhD ’77) was named provost at UC Merced. France Córdova (PhD ’79) received an honorary doctorate from Purdue University for her service and leadership as its 11th president. Eli Dwek (PhD ’79) was named a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Walter G. Kortschak (MS ’82) was elected to the Caltech Board of Trustees. Charles A. Wight (PhD ’82) was named president of Weber State University in Utah. David Jewitt (PHD ’83) won the Kavli Prize and the Shaw Prize in recognition of his discovery of the Kuiper Belt. Roch Guérin (PhD ’86) was named chair of the computer science and engineering department at Washington University in St. Louis. Stephen Hsu (BS ’86) was named vice president for research and graduate studies at Michigan State University. Deven Kalra (MS ’87, PhD ’90) was named vice president of engineering for AtHoc, which provides emergency mass notification and crisis-communication systems. Hanif S. Mamdani (BS ’87) was identified by Barron’s as a top fund manager. Joe Cline (PhD ’88) was named vice provost of undergraduate education at the University of Nevada, Reno. Reed Henry (MS ’88) was named as the chief marketing officer for Genesys, a customer service software provider. Steve Mayo (PhD ’88) was named the William K. Bowes Jr. Foundation division chair at Caltech. Andrea Ghez (MS ’89, PhD ’93) won the Crafoord Prize. Richard Hsu (BS ’89) became a partner at Shearman & Sterling, LLP.

Robert Behnken (MS ’93, PhD ’97) was named chief of the Astronaut Office for NASA. Rohan Mahadevan (BS ’93) was appointed PayPal’s vice president for Asia. Jeffrey Prisbrey (PhD ’93) was appointed vice president for competition/antitrust practice at Charles River Associates. Richmond Wolf (MS ‘94, PhD ‘97) was elected to the Caltech Board of Trustees. Marcia France (PhD ’95) was named associate dean at Washington and Lee University. Kenneth T. Christensen (MS ’96) was appointed associate head for mechanics programs at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Paul Asimow (PhD ’97) won the Feynman Prize for Excellence in Teaching at Caltech. Mark Long (PhD ’99) was singled out as CTO of the Year for a company of 100 – 500 employees by the LA Times.

2000s Heather Dean (BS ‘00, MS ’00) began her fellowship in Washington, DC, for the American Association for the Advancement of Sciences. Christopher Hirata (BS ‘01), Kevin Tang (PhD ‘06), and Rebecca Washenfelder (PhD ‘06) received the Presidential Early-Career Award. Andrei Faraon (BS ’04) joined Caltech as assistant professor of applied physics and materials science. Helen Chuang (BS ’03) received the award for innovation from Women of Color in Technology. Bettina Chen (BS ’10) founded Roominate, a toy company created to help inspire girls to pursue the sciences.

For more alumni in the news, go to alumni.caltech.edu

Jessie Rosenberg (PhD ’10) was chosen by Forbes magazine as one of “30 under 30” in Science and Innovation.


The 2013

Distinguished Alumni Awards

First presented in 1966, the Distinguished Alumni Award is gr anted in recognition of a par ticul ar achie vement of note wor thy value, a series of such achie vements, or a career of note wor thy accomplishment. It is the highest honor the Institute bestows upon a gr aduate.

The entire Caltech communit y celebr ates the following six individuals for their groundbre aking contributions in

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rese arch, academics, business, and phil anthropy.

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Juris Hartmanis PhD ’55

The outsized impact that Caltech continues to have on the sciences is r emar kable. I r emain in awe of the br illiant minds assembled her e.

Caltech Degree PhD ’55 Mathematics

Current Title Walter R. Read Professor of Engineering, Emeritus; Cornell University

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Selected Achievements

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After a briefing on an innovative new theory on information transmission, Juris Hartmanis was ignited with inspiration. A research mathematician at GE Labs in the early 1960s, Hartmanis saw a correlation with his own work. “I remember wondering, ‘Could there be a quantitative theory of computation?’” The answer was yes. Hartmanis grew up in Latvia, partially under Soviet and German occupation. He finished high school in Germany and earned a degree in physics at the University of Marsburg before coming to America to study mathematics at the University of Kansas and then Caltech. “Caltech, in their wisdom, decided that I looked more like an applied mathematician than a physicist,” Hartmanis laughs. Following stints teaching at Cornell and Ohio State University, Hartmanis joined the venerated GE Labs in Schenectady, New York. Together with Richard Stearns, he studied computation, focusing on Turing machines. The lecture on noise reduction gave Hartmanis an idea: Could they mathematically quantify the efficiency of computing? “Take the traveling salesman,” he says, citing a classic mathematical problem: A salesman must crisscross the country to make calls to a number of cities. Which route will be the most efficient?

“The problem is good for a computer because it requires mathematical brute force. You must measure all of the possible routes and compare the results to find the answer.” Hartmanis and Stearns wanted to know if they could proactively quantify how much time such a problem would take to compute. The result was a seminal paper on computational complexity, published in 1965. In it, Hartmanis and Stearns introduced the time-hierarchy theorem, codifying exactly how a machine, given more time, could solve more problems and defined classes of computational complexity. Hartmanis and Stearns work ultimately earned them a Turing award in 1993 for helping establish computer science as a formal discipline distinct from mathematics, physics, and electrical engineering. Hartmanis eventually returned to Cornell, where he continued his work and co-founded the university’s computer science department. Today, he confesses that one of the most satisfying aspects of his work has been to see others build upon it—including researchers at Caltech. “The outsized impact that Caltech continues to have on the sciences is remarkable,” he says. “I remain in awe of the brilliant minds assembled here.”

Developed the field of computational complexity, a major contribution to the development of theoretical computer-science • Created one of the first computer science departments in the country, now ranked within the top five worldwide • Assistant director of the National Science Foundation for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE) • Chair, National Research Council, Study of the Scope and Direction of Computer Science

Sampling of Awards Gold Medal of the Latvian Academy of Science (Lielo Medalu), 2001 • Computer Research Association (CRA) Distinguished Service Award, 2000 • B. Blozano Gold Medal of the Academy of Sciences, Czech Republic, 1995 • Humboldt Foundation Senior US Scientist Award, 1993-94 • The Turing Award (with Richard Stearns), 1993

Juris Hartmanis (left) and research partner Richard Stearns at GE Labs in the early 1960s. Hartmanis and Stearns share the Turing Award for their 1965 paper on computational complexity.


Y.C.L. Susan Wu

Caltech Degree PhD ’63 Aeronautics

PhD ’63

Current Title Chairman, ERC, Inc.

Selected Achievements

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Ar med with the knowledge o f how to appr oach and solve a pr oblem, ther e’s almost nothing you can’t accomplish.

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During her final year at Caltech in 1962, Susan Wu received alarming news. Her doctor explained that she had a congenital heart condition—a hole in the organ’s lining—that demanded potentially life-threatening surgery. Wu, then 30, was already seasoned in overcoming obstacles. Her family left Beijing to escape China's bloody civil war, eventually settling in Taiwan. There, Wu had earned her first degree in engineering. Communist China offered few prospects to female scientists, so Susan and fellow student James Wu had left home, emigrating to the United States in 1957. The pair continued their studies in different parts of the United States, married, and ultimately joined the Graduate Aerospace Laboratories (GALCIT) at Caltech. Wu quickly earned accolades for her methodical research. And in 1963, she became the first woman to earn a doctorate in aeronautics from the Institute. Initially, a world of opportunities appeared to open. But Wu’s fateful diagnosis dramatically narrowed the field. “My first concern was for my family,” she recalls—Wu had given birth to her two children while earning her degree at Caltech. Open-heart surgery was still new and dangerous, and even if it went well, there were the costs to consider. Few corporate insurance carriers would cover such a serious pre-existing condition.

Hope came from Pasadenabased Electro-Optics Corporation, which offered Wu a position researching magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) propulsion—an alternative way to generate power using electric and magnetic fields and a domain, at the time, Wu knew nothing about. “They offered to pay for my surgery, so I took the job,” Wu says. “It ended up defining my career.” Wu later joined the faculty at the University of Tennessee Space Institute, where she continued to focus on MHD power generation. For the next 20 years, she led the university’s energy program, pioneering new analytical models for MHD performance while becoming a leading authority in the field. By 1988, Wu was ready for change. “But I wasn’t ready to fully retire,” she confesses. Instead, she poured her intelligence and enthusiasm into founding ERC, Inc.—a start-up focused on aerospace, defense, and information technology, based in Tullahoma, Tennessee. Today, what began as Wu and a part-time secretary is now a financially robust firm that employs more than 700 people in five states. Wu credits Caltech with teaching her how to approach and solve a problem—a crucial ingredient to her success. “Armed with that knowledge,” she adds, “there’s almost nothing you can’t accomplish.”

Developed pioneering analytical models for MHD power generation and performance • Directed a leading energy-research program at the University of Tennessee Space Institute • Founded and led ERC, Inc., a distinguished provider of scientific and engineering services supporting the nation’s defense and spaceexploration activities

Sampling of Awards Faraday Medal, awarded by the International MHD Liaison Group, 1999 • Plasma Dynamics and Laser Award, AIAA, 1994 • Distinguished Achievement Award of American Chinese Engineers, 1986 • Achievement Award, Society of Women Engineers, 1985

Susan Wu pictured at Caltech graduation in 1963 with her two sons, Ernest and Albert. She was the first woman to receive a PhD in aeronautics from the institute.


Sébastian M. Candel MS ’69 / PhD ’72

ca lt ech a lumni associ at ion

My year s at Caltech modified the equation for the tr ajectory of my life.

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Before a series of experiments in 1994 at Onera, the French national aerospace research center, Sébastien Candel asked the assembled group of experts to draw a sketch. A model scale rocket engine was about to fire in a test, fed with liquid oxygen and high-speed gaseous hydrogen. Candel’s question was straightforward: Where, exactly, did each fellow researcher think the actual flame would start? At the injector outlet? Somewhere at a distance from it? ... He invited them to draw their answers. No one got it right. Candel recalls, “For years, we had been designing engines and launching rockets, and we were [still] learning something new about the structure of the flame and its stabilization.” (The test revealed that the flame was anchored at a point right at the edge of the injector’s inner channel, which conveyed the liquid oxygen stream.) Candel, who has spent his career studying aerospace sciences, focusing on combustion, is used to such surprises. “It turns out that, particularly with combustion, engineers are pretty good at building things that work,” he said. “But we just don’t always fully understand why.” Part of what makes combustion so complex is linked to the nature of turbulence—something Richard Feynman once described

as “the most important unsolved problem of classical physics.” Fast reactions and intense chemical conversion complicate the picture even more. Candel, through his research and teaching, has helped to provide significant insight into this field. Candel arrived at Caltech in 1968, armed with a Harkness Fellowship (established in 1925 and modeled after the Rhodes Scholarship). After researching aeroacoustics under the direction of Frank Marble, an ally who assisted Candel throughout his career, Candel returned to France and ultimately joined the faculty at Ecole Centrale Paris. There, he headed the mechanical and aerospace studies program and initiated combustion and propulsion work at the EM2C, CNRS laboratory. His ongoing research has contributed to significant advances in the fields of combustion, aeroacoustics, and propulsion. “Candel has played a major role in developing some of the fundamentals of rocket propulsion,” said Charles Elachi (PhD ’71), director of Jet Propulsion Laboratories. “He exemplifies the best in a Caltech graduate.” For Candel, Caltech was a game-changer. “When I arrived, I barely knew what research was all about,” he says. “My years at Caltech, particularly with Frank, modified the equation that defined the trajectory of my life.”

Top: Sébastian Candel with Frank Marble during a research visit in 1985. Bottom: Addressing the French Academy of Science upon his election in 2011.

Caltech Degrees

MS ’69 Mechanical Engineering • PhD ’72 Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mathematics

Current Title Professeur des Universités, Ecole Centrale Paris and honorary member of Institut Universitaire de France

Selected Achievements Innovative and outstanding contributions to combustion theory • Extensive and pioneering technical contributions to aerospace literature, including seminal papers on turbulent combustion, dynamics of perturbed flames, combustion instability and control, advanced rocket combustion processes and computational aeroacoustics • Gave the esteemed Combustion Institute’s Hottel plenary lecture in 2002

Sampling of Awards Elected to the Air and Space Academy of France, 2012 • Elected to French Academy of Science, 2011 • Zeldovich gold medal of the Combustion Institute, 2010 • Elected to the National Academy of Engineering of the United States, 2009 • Pendray Aerospace literature award, AIAA, 2005 • Chevalier de la Legion d’Honneur, 2000 • Marcel Dassault Grand Prize of the French Academy of Sciences, 2000 • Founding member of the French Academy of technologies, 2000 • Silver medal of the French National Center for Scientific Research, 1993


Uma Chowdhry MS ’70

Caltech Degree MS ’70 Engineering Science

Current Title Chief Science and Technology Officer, Emeritus

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Pick the most impo rtant issues of the day that fascinate you and go after them. Dr eam cou r ageously.

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“I’ll never forget the day I received conduct electricity. But Chowdhry the letter that said I’d been accepted and her team utilized solid state to Caltech,” says Uma Chowdhry.“ chemistry principles to produce suI was in seventh heaven.” perconducting oxide ceramics. Their Born in Mumbai, India, work generated more than 20 patChowdhry was the youngest ents, and numerous publications. of three children. Her father Chowdhry and her team went on challenged his children to excel in to work on ceramics for electronic academics (schooling he’d been packaging which led to commercial unable to complete). And after materials for electronic substrates. earning her bachelor’s in physics “DuPont has a marvelous history a the Institute of Science in of transforming the world—in texMumbai, Chowdhry set her sights tiles, construction, and transporon an ambitious dream: to study tation.” Chowdhry recalls, “It was physics in the United States and like being in a giant sandbox with someday win the Nobel prize. incredible tools where we were “There were three Nobel Laureencouraged to play and produce ates at Caltech who were particle groundbreaking results.” physicists, so of course I thought In 2006, Chowdhry became that’s what I would do,” Chowdhry DuPont’s chief science and techsays.“Ignorance is bliss. My naivete nology officer—the first woman allowed me to dream courageously.” to assume the role at a Dow 30 Once at Caltech, metallurgy company. She spearheaded a professor Pol Duwez delivered a global effort to bring DuPont’s career-changing twist, propelling research, marketing, and manuher into the emerging field of facturing efforts into alignment; material science—the study of then shepherded the company’s fundamental physical and expansion into emerging econchemical properties of materials. omies, establishing facilities in “He said, ‘If you’re a little China, India, and Brazil—all while interested in materials, I’ll make remaining a champion at the you much more interested,’” forefront of sustainability. Chowdhry recalls. With many private companies She eventually earned a PhD in migrating towards mission-based the field from MIT while her future research, Chowdhry now sees the husband Vinay, a chemist, studied role of research universities—parat Harvard. ticularly Caltech—as increasingly Interested in joining a research essential for pure science. She tells lab, Chowdhry landed at DuPont young researchers to aim high. where she continue her work in “Pick the most important issues advanced ceramic materials. Chemof the day that fascinate you and ically similar to china, porcelain, go after them,” she encourages. or glass, ceramics don’t normally “Dream courageously.”

Selected Achievements Became the first female CSTO at a Dow 30 company (DuPont) • Provided leadership at the fulcrum of global R&D management, strategic planning, engineering technology management, and business management at DuPont • Formulated the strategy for global R&D programs, policies, and procedures to advance DuPont’s vision, competitive position, and profitability • Guided groundbreaking innovation that garnered DuPont several significant industry awards

Sampling of Awards American Chemical Society (ACS) Earle B. Barnes Award for Leadership in Chemical Research Management, 2011 • Industrial Research Institute (IRI) Medal Award, 2011 • Numerous achievement and leadership excellence awards from DuPont, Delaware Women’s Hall of Fame, and many other organizations and non-profits

Uma Chowdhry at DuPont in 1981, researching superconductive ceramics, work that generated more than 20 patents and numerous practical applications.


Stephen Wolfram PhD ’80

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Incr edibly simple systems can do sophisticated computation. I believe this has deep implications on the limits o f science itself.

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As a Caltech faculty member and researcher studying theoretical physics in the early 1980s, Stephen Wolfram often found himself frustrated—at a computer. “I needed to rapidly compute equations for my research,” Wolfram explains, but he found the software available at the time to be lacking—a problem he believed he could solve by creating a brand new computer language. The result, co-developed with a small group of handpicked recruits, was the computer algebra system Symbolic Manipulation Program (SMP). The effect was logarithmic. SMP released commercially in 1981, spawned a software company, helped earn Wolfram a MacArthur Fellowship, and sparked a lifelong fascination with computational complexity. Wolfram regularly introduces a key concept with an illustration: A collection of very basic programs are coded with a set of rules. The programs—which Wolfram dubbed “cellular automata”—launch out like little worker bees to construct a very simple image resembling a pyramid. With only slight variations to their coding, however, the automata create an image wildly more complex, producing elegant, cascading, interconnected patterns Wolfram describes as “computationally irreducible.” “When I first saw that, it came as a huge shock to my intuition,” Wolfram confesses. “A very simple program can produce a pattern

too complex to predict. The only way to find its outcome is effectively to simply watch it evolve.” In 1988, Wolfram turned his focus to business, releasing a new version of his computing software, Mathematica—now considered one of the standard software-language environments for scientific, technical, and algorithmic computation and software development. Wolfram continued his research behind the scenes, and in 2002 published A New Kind of Science, a 1,200-page book detailing his extensive study into computational complexity. By 2009, Wolfram released Wolfram|Alpha, a muscular Webbased “computational knowledge engine.” Similar to a search engine, the service accepts freeform text queries, but instead of merely polling, it both sources and computes relevant data in real time using approaches outlined in his book. Wolfram’s ambitious hope is to make all systemic knowledge immediately computable and accessible to everyone. Today, Wolfram remains as surprised and fascinated by the intersection of nature and computing as when he began, and he predicts it will help unlock ever-greater mysteries. “Incredibly simple systems can do sophisticated computation,” he says. “I believe this has deep implications on issues such as biological processes, economies, artificial intelligence…the limits of science itself.”

Top: Stephen Wolfram in 1978, at that time the youngest PhD candidate at Caltech. Bottom: “Rule 18”— one of the patterns produced by Wolfram’s cellular automata.

Caltech Degrees PhD ’80 Physics

Current Title CEO, Wolfram Research

Selected Achievements MacArthur Fellowship, 1981 •

Founded numerous companies and organizations, including: Computer Mathematics Corporation (later merged into Inference Corporation), 1981 • Center for Complex Systems Research, 1986 • The Journal Complex Systems, 1987 • Wolfram Research, 1987 Developed computing software Mathematica, considered one of the standard software-language environments for scientific, technical, and algorithmic computation and software development, 1988 • Synthesized more than 10 years of research into seminal book A New Kind of Science, 2002 • R&D Magazine’s Scientist of the Year, 2002 • Launched Wolfram|Alpha, a Web-based computational knowledge engine, 2009


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James R. Fruchterman

Caltech Degrees BS ’80 Engineering • MS ’80 Applied Physics

BS ’80 / MS ’80

Current Title

Founder, President, and CEO, Benetech

If we can measu r e ou r endeavor s by the lives that we ar e able to make better , then we can tr uly say that we ar e su ccessful.

ca lt ech connec t 20 1 3

It was a Caltech lecture on weapons systems that steered James Fruchterman toward a life of philanthropy. The discussion focused on missile guidance systems employing optical target recognition. Fruchterman remembers, “I went back to my dorm room and thought, ‘How could we use that technology for something a little more benign?’” The answer came to him quickly: a text-reader for the blind. Fruchterman rushed back across campus to tell his instructor about his idea. A discussion revealed the concept was technically flawed, but Fruchterman maintained his enthusiasm. “As a budding researcher, you hope to come up with an idea that could have a profound impact,” he explains. “I felt strongly that this was my really big idea.” Years later, a colleague introduced Fruchterman to a researcher from Hewlett-Packard— an entrepreneur who wanted to develop a chip he’d invented ... also to recognize text. The three formed Calera Recognition Systems, a start-up that quickly developed a breakthrough optical text-recognition technology that yielded large commercial applications. Though

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financially lucrative, it didn’t fulfill Fruchterman’s true passion. So in 1989, he founded spin-off company Arkenstone, Inc., which built reading devices based on Calera technology. Then, in 2000, Fruchterman took an even larger step. He sold Arkenstone and used the capital to found Benetech—a nonprofit specializing in adapting commercial technology to help the disabled. Benetech has catalyzed an impressive, sustained, positive effect on global literacy, human rights, and the environment. The company’s online library software, Bookshare, now holds more than 50,000 titles. And in 2012, Benetech helped prepare the United Nations report on Syria’s human-rights crisis. As for his personal accolades, Fruchterman sees them strictly as leverage to garner more support. (He frequently visits Silicon Valley colleagues—not to ask for money, but for permission to license their technology. He often gets it.) “As much as anything, engineers and inventors are problem solvers who want their work to be relevant,” he says. “If we can measure our endeavors by the lives we improve, then we can truly say we’re successful.”

Selected Achievements

Co-founder of two successful Silicon Valley tech corporations • Co-founder of the Social Enterprise Alliance, the nation’s leading social-enterprise association • Leading developer of open-source software for the humanrights and environmental movements • Founder of Benetech, Silicon Valley’s leading nonprofit, responsible for creating Bookshare, the largest online library for the blind

Sampling of Awards

MacArthur Fellowship, 2006 • Duke University, CASE Award for Enterprising Social Innovation, 2011 • Brigham Young University, Center for Economic Self-Reliance Social Innovator of the Year, 2009 • AT&T Technology Innovation Award from the Alliance for Technology Access, March 2008 • Fast Company Social Capitalist Award: Top 20 Groups Changing the World, 2004

An early Arkenstone model. Fruchterman adapted optical text recognition technology from his commercial venture to create a reading device to aid the blind, such as the one pictured above. The experience inspired him to found the company Benetech.


Since its founding in 1891, Caltech’s researchers, faculty and alumni have developed the principles of modern aviation,

established how to measure earthquakes, uncovered proof of antimatter, discovered quasars, and quarks, and assisted in the

discover y of the elusive Higgsboson particle—just to name a few. Among them all, one ongoing discovery stands out.

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“Every day I get to use lasers to shed new light on the signatures of life on other worlds.” Morgan Cable (PhD ’10) NASA Postdoctoral Fellow working at JPL to detect extraterrestrial organic compounds.

“Caltech has enabled a structural engineer like me to think freely and explore—to transform the engineering of manmade structures, hopefully (in the long run) making the world a lot safer!” Swaminathan Krishnan (PhD ’04) Assistant Professor of Structural Engineering and Geophysics at Caltech

“The most exciting days by far are when you come up with a new idea or direction for an experiment, and you can’t stop thinking about it the whole day.” Noelle Stiles PhD candidate in Computation and Neural Systems (CNS)

Photos by Dustin Snipes

ca lt ech a lumni a ssoci at ion

OUR GREATEST DISCOVERY IS...


YOU.

One of Caltech’s greatest strengths is its people: students who learn to question and problem solve, extraordinar y faculty who choose to develop their scientific careers here,

and you—our alumni—who venture from our campus to explore, invent, build, and innovate. Your contributions as researchers, artists, educators, entrepreneurs, and inventors

make possible the achievements that advance the bounds of our collective knowledge and help to shape our world. We celebrate our greatest resource, legacy, and future... You.

“The closer I get to graduation, the more I come to appreciate the sheer number of opportunities that Caltech has afforded me.”

ca lt ech connec t 20 1 3

Jonathan Schor (BS ’14) Biology and Chemistry

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“I wanted a research project that was smaller and more focused, and that’s exactly what I got with Dr. Libbrecht. I feel like I’m helping to fill a hole in the research world.” Nina Budaeva (BS ’13) Research assistant in Kenneth Libbrecht’s Soft Condensed Matter Physics Laboratory. Studying the transition points of snowflakes.

“There’s really no place like Caltech. I love the general buzz of excitement over education and the collaboration of brilliant scientific minds that can only be found here.” Stanford Schor (BS ’14) Biology and Chemistry

“I believe that the house system at Caltech helps to foster bonds and lifetime friendships in ways that set us apart from any other campus.” Michelle Tang (BS ’14) Bioengineering/Premed Interested in pursuing pediatric medicine

“Caltech is the place where there is always a brilliant mind within 10 meters.” Peter Hung (BS ’08, MS ’12) PhD candidate in Applied Physics, working with Michael L. Roukes in nanoscale systems


“I am helping to develop sustainable energy technology so that society can reduce its dependence on fossil fuels.”

ca lt ech a lumni a ssoci at ion

Anna Beck (PhD ’12) Postdoctoral scholar in Applied Physics and Material Science, working with the Atwater research group on silicon-microwire devices

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“As a student, I always heard people brag that Caltech's training was ahead of the rest. I thought, 'Oh, baloney. I'm sure other programs are just as good.' Then I discovered that it was true. I was extremely well prepared by Caltech, and I'm eternally grateful." Julia Kornfield (BS ’83, MS ’85) Professor of Chemical Engineering at Caltech

“We’re figuring out simple methods to study how cells can change their fate. It is amazing to see the flexibility of life at the cellular and tissue level.” Labeed Ben-Ghaly PHD candidate in Biology working in the Meyerowitz Lab

“At Caltech I have learned so much about being both a good scientist and an effective instructor and mentor." Kaitlyn Lucey PhD candidate in Environmental Science and Engineering


“Only Techers can fully understand and appreciate the unique culture, values, capabilities, and training that fellow alums have.”

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Jim Simmons (BS ’72) Managing member, Simmons Goodspeed Investment Management, an early stage venture capital firm

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“Every day I get to grapple with cutting edge legal and scientific issues, and I represent a great client—Caltech!” Chantal D’Apuzzo (PhD ’00) Associate general counsel for Caltech specializing in intellectual property and research affairs

“Caltech taught me the power of collaboration. When a group of Techers work together, there is nothing we can’t accomplish.” David Tytell (BS ‘99) Marketing and communications manager, MIT Medical

“Being in the Caltech Alumni Association allows me to strengthen my lifelong friendships and make new connections with interesting and like-minded Techers across generations.” Heather Dean (BS ‘00, MS ‘00) AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellow at the National Science Foundation

“Caltech equips me to pursue imaginative research into synthetic biology as it relates to propulsion, discovering ways in which we can probably improve on natural performance.” JOHN DABIRI (PhD ’05) Professor of Aeronautics & Bioengineering and director of Caltech’s Biological Propulsion Lab

"My Caltech degree fostered my ability to tackle the kind of broad, often vaguely defined questions that pepper policymaking and data science today— and to rally others to help solve them." Ayeh Bandeh-Ahmadi (BS ‘02) PhD candidate in economics at the University of Maryland


ca lt ech a lumni associ at ion

BUILDING BETTER CONNECTIONS

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The mission of the Caltech Alumni Association is to promote the interests of Caltech as a world standard of academic excellence by strengthening the ties of goodwill and communication between the Institute, its alumni, and its students, and by maintaining programs to serve their needs. The strength of our Association comes directly from its members—You. Your membership enables us to offer unique, in-depth coverage from campus, bring world-renowned researchers directly to your region to speak about their work,

and promote one-of-a-kind experiences that draw you back to campus. In 2013, we will be introducing new services to help you connect with other Techers personally and professionally around the globe in ever more meaningful ways. The Association is also an important means by which Caltech hears back from its alumni. Your experiences after graduation provide invaluable insight and wisdom. You can also volunteer to become a mentor to current students and other Techer graduates, directly helping

to shape the careers and lives of a new generation of explorers, who will in turn make discoveries not yet imagined. But we can’t do any of this without you. We invite you to keep in touch, come back to visit, host an event in your city, or become a mentor. Your individual ingenuity, dedication and entrepreneurial spirit set you apart. Joining with fellow graduates, the Caltech Alumni Association is a network with boundless potential. Let’s continue to discover, together.


FULL ACCESS

With 22,000 graduates, Caltech's relatively small alumni community has an outsized influence on science, business, and culture around the world. Membership in the Caltech Alumni Association can help you to access the full potential of this unparalleled network. Find, friend, hire, and learn from the best. Here are just a few of the ways to get started.

The Data @ CALTECH

ACROSS THE COUNTRY

PLAY DOUGH

Come back to campus to hear from noted researchers and get a first-hand glimpse at the latest discoveries, year-round. In 2012, Caltech alumni were among the first to see photos from Curiosity, a few days after it landed on Mars—before the imagery was released publicly.

The Caltech Alumni Association hosts events across the United States: presentations from noted researchers, film screenings, professional networking, social gatherings, and more.

Got an idea for an event? We want to help! Last year, we introduced Play Dough, our micro-fund kickstarter program. Any Caltech graduate can apply for reimbursement of up to $100 for organizing a small event that brings together alumni—and up to $500 for larger events.

125 events in 2012

attended by

TESLA FACTORY TOUR August 2012

3886 Techers

CAA provided some funds, found alumni in the area and got the word out. I even met a fellow graduate who worked at my own company, just several offices down! —

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Dan Loeb (BS ’86) used Play Dough to plan a Bridge Night in Philadelphia

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LATEST NEWS AND RESEARCH Stay up-to-date on the latest news from Caltech, including research and discoveries and events from campus. The Caltech Alumni Association provides:

The best people I have ever hired are Techers. And I always wish that I could find more of them. —

A quarterly subscription to Engineering & Science Monthly e-news delivered to your inbox Stories on alumni around the world

Robert Johnson (BS ’98) CTO, InterAna and former CTO, Facebook

PROFESSIONAL

SOCIAL

Access to a professional network like no other.

Find people who share your passion.

We know that Techers like to work with other Techers. The Alumni Association provides several tools to help you connect professionally.

Your Caltech experience is a unique privilege—both for the knowledge acquired and the talented individuals gained as friends. Whether you want to reconnect with an old friend or discover new ones, the Caltech Alumni Association provides several tools to keep you connected.

ca lt ech a lumni associ at ion

Post a job or résumé on TECHERLink 11,000+ alumni on LinkedIn In-person career counseling from Career Journeys (a member benefit) 2 Career Workshops over Reunion Weekend

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And Coming Soon Online Mentorship Connections New Webinars

Browse by cit y using our online director y Join our Facebook group Follow us on Twitter

Built for Techers. Powered by Techers. The strength of our Alumni Association comes directly from its members—You. Your membership makes it possible for us to provide compelling programming, relationship-building events, and careernetworking opportunities to alumni around the globe and in every walk of life. But becoming a member is just the first step. Keep in touch, join us at the next event, or even better—volunteer to help. Together, we’ll continue to build a better Alumni Association for all current and future Techers.

Get Connected. connect.caltech.edu


Alumni Association Board (2012 – 13)

Caltech Alumni Relations

Caltech Connect

Alexx Tobeck

Ben Tomlin

Executive Committee Jim Simmons (BS ‘72)

Director, Alumni Relations & Executive Director, Caltech Alumni Association

Editor

President

Heather Dean (BS ‘00, MS ‘00) Vice President

Sam Foster (BS ‘98) Treasurer

Lee Fisher (BS ‘78)

Phil Scanlon Associate Director, Alumni Relations

Ben Tomlin

Charles Halloran (BS ‘94)

Associate Director, Communications

Directors Michelle Armond (BS ‘00) Debbie Bakin (BS ‘86) Ayeh Bandeh-Ahmadi (BS ‘02) Chris Bryant (BS ‘95) Jasmine Bryant (BS ‘95) Karina Edmonds (MS ‘93, PhD ‘98) Bobby Johnson (BS ‘98) Lee Fisher (BS ‘78) Alice Lin (BS ‘05, PhD ‘12) Lonnie Martin (BS ‘69, MS ‘70) Carol Mullenax (BS ‘89) Phil Naecker (BS ‘76) Nicola Peill-Moelter (MS ‘93, PhD ‘97) Anneila Sargent (MS ‘67, PhD ‘77) Michelin Sloneker (BS ‘95) David Tytell (BS ‘99) Tom Workman (BS ‘86, MS ‘87, PhD ‘92) Richard Yeh (BS ‘98)

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Associate Director, Alumni Relations

Secretary Past President

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Patsy Gougeon

Sherry Winn Membership Coordinator

Shayna Chabner McKinney, Ann Motrunich, Blaed Spence, Dave Tytell (BS ’99) Contributing Writers

Michael Farquhar, Patsy Gougeon Associate Editors

Dustin Snipes, Lance Hayashida, Bill Youngblood Photographers

NASA / JPL Additional Photography

Warren Group | Studio Deluxe Design

In 1973, Caltech celebrated the first women to earn bachelor’s degrees from the Institute. Flora Wu (BS ’73 CH), Stephanie Charles (BS ’73 PH), Sharon Long (BS ’73 ISP), and Deborah Chung (MS ’73 ES) proudly walked the graduation line and… into Caltech’s history books.


YO U A RE INVITED TO J OIN U S FOR

APPROACH

EXCHANGE

DISPERSE

The Caltech Alumni Association invites you to join us on campus for the 76th annual Alumni Seminar Day and Reunion Weekend. Connect with friends and colleagues over the course of four intellectually engaging and event-filled days. Choose from nearly 80 events and activities, including thoughtprovoking lectures, private tours, house reunions, social events, and more. The campus once again belongs to you.

In one of the most venerated traditions at Caltech, alumni and their guests are given a front-row seat to the new discoveries taking place on campus at Seminar Day. For 75 years, history-making breakthroughs—ranging from microscopic mysteries to the exploration of the universe—have been previewed exclusively for you.

Come meet people and experience ideas that will ignite your imagination and send you home inspired to continue your own path of discovery.

thu

fri

ALUMNI REUNION WEEKEND 2013 MAY 16-19

A weekend designed for you. Only at Caltech.

sat 7 6 t h A nnual

SEMINAR DAY MAY 18

sun


MAY 16 – 19

ALUMNI REUNION WEEKEND

Thursday M ay 16 Events open to all alumni and guests unless otherwise noted.

Admissions Office Information Session and Campus Tour 10:00 a.m. Campus Tour 11:15 a.m. Information Session Admissions Office, 383 S. Hill Ave. Reservations required RSVP: (626) 395-6341 (please specify that you are part of the Reunion Weekend.)

Class of ’63—Registration and Lunch 11:00 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. Alumni House, 345 S. Hill Ave.

Class of ’53—Registration and Lunch 11:00 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. Tom Mannion’s House, 400 S. Hill Ave.

Huntington Library Estate Tour 2:00 – 3:00 p.m. 1151 Oxford Rd., San Marino One hour private, docent-led, outdoor tour. Guests welcome to stay and explore the gardens until closing. Meet at the Huntington; transportation not provided.

Gamble House Tour

Friday M ay 1 7 Continental Breakfast 8:00 – 10:00 a.m. Alumni House, 345 S. Hill Ave. Enjoy a sit-down continental breakfast with your classmates.

Campus Architectural Tour 9:30 a.m. Tour departs from Alumni House, 345 S. Hill Ave. 10:00 a.m. Illustrated Lecture Hameetman Auditorium, Cahill Center Romy Wyllie, chair of the Caltech Architectural Tour Service will present a 45-minute illustrated lecture outlining the history of campus architecture and comparing its decorative motifs with examples found in world architecture.

10:45 a.m. Walking Tour Departs from Cahill Center Members of the Caltech Architectural Tour Service (CATS) will give 45-minute walking tours of the campus. CATS is a special service of the Caltech Women’s Club; all members are volunteers who are thoroughly educated in the history of the campus architecture and are eager to show visitors some of Caltech’s hidden treasures.

Admissions Office Campus Tour and Information Session 10:00 a.m. Campus Tour 11:15 a.m. Information Session Admissions Office, 383 S. Hill Ave.

3:30 – 4:30 p.m. 4 Westmoreland Place, Pasadena

See Thursday’s schedule for description.

Meet at the Gamble House; transportation not provided.

Class of ’78—Registration and Lunch 11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. Tom Mannion’s House, 400 S. Hill Ave.

Classes of ’43, ’48, ’53, ’58, ’63 President’s Reception 6:00 – 7:15 p.m. President’s Residence, 415 S. Hill Ave. Hosted by President Chameau and Dr. Carol Carmichael

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followed by

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7:30 p.m. Reunion Dinners The Athenaeum, 551 S. Hill Ave.


Half Century Club Luncheon

Career Seminar for Techers

Reunion Dinners

Class of ’63 undergraduate and graduate alumni and Half Century Club members and guests

Branding: Leverage Your Unique Work Trademark 4:00 – 5:00 p.m. Beckman Institute Auditorium

7:30 p.m. The Athenaeum, 551 S. Hill Ave.

12:00 p.m. Reception

Join us for the first session of our professional development series. Designed to help you develop your own career brand for use at work and in your professional life including: understanding what a career brand is and isn’t, why it’s important to have one, and knowing your current career brand and the value you carry in the marketplace and work.

12:30 p.m. Lunch The Athenaeum, 551 S. Hill Ave. The Half Century Club is an elite group consisting of Caltech undergraduate and graduate alumni who received their degrees 50 or more years ago. Members of the club are invited to join us for this year’s luncheon and induction of the class of ’63.

Class of ’63—Group Photo Immediately following luncheon on the west steps of the Athenaeum.

Caltech Fund Party and Cocktails

Class of ’53—JPL Tour

Everyone’s Invited! 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. The Athenaeum, 551 S. Hill Ave.

3:00 – 5:00 p.m. 4800 Oak Grove Drive, La Cañada Flintridge Meet at JPL; transportation not provided

Torchbearer Social 2:00 – 4:30 p.m. The Athenaeum Rathskeller, 551 S. Hill Ave.

ca lt ech a lumni a ssoci at ion

All members of the Torchbearers of Caltech and their guests are invited to attend The Torchbearer Social at the Rathskeller. Complimentary drinks and hors d’oeuvres will be served. Come join your fellow alumni, current and emeriti faculty, and friends of the Institute for a casual afternoon of conversation and camaraderie while catching up with fellow Techers.

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Celebrate supporting the New Generation of Techers with a fun cocktail party! You’ll hear from President Chameau and have plenty of photo ops with alums and friends. Bring a guest and share the importance of being part of this community of giving.

Class of ’63: 50th Reunion Dinner Alumni House, 345 S. Hill Ave.

Individual Dinners for Classes of ’68, ’73, ’83, ’88

Combined Dinner for ALL Alumni ’74 – ’81

› Combined Dinner for ALL Alumni ’89 – ’12 For the first time—this year we invite ALL Caltech graduates from 1989 through 2012 to join us for a special combined dinner. Mingle with old classmates and close friends from years close to your own. Make new friends, as well. Join us for a new Caltech tradition.

After Party @ Tom Mannion’s Young Alumni ’89 – ’12 10:00 p.m. – 2:00 a.m. Tom Mannion’s House, 400 S. Hill Ave. Party to the wee hours with fellow young alumni and enjoy Techer-approved specialty cocktails and desserts with our Student Activities Director Tom.


Saturday M ay 1 8

7 6 t h A nnual

SEMINAR DAY MAY 18 Events for Registrants of Seminar Day Check pp. 26-34 for more details on Seminar Day and a list of abstracts.

Check-In Starting at 8:15 a.m. Beckman Mall (Registration Tent) Check in and pick up name badges and room assignments.

Relax and Enjoy Light Refreshments 8:15 – 9:00 a.m. Gates Annex Start the day with an assortment of fresh danish, doughnuts, muffins, coffee, and juice on the south side of Parsons-Gates. Where better to meet your friends and get ready for a full day of events.

Find Your Classmates 8:15 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Arcade Columns Gates Annex Check to see how many of your friends are attending Seminar Day: class lists are arranged according to undergraduate degree or first degree attained.

The Beckman Room Science Museum 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. Beckman Institute, Room 131

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Four display areas will be on view in the Beckman Room: a timeline of the history of science; a re-creation of an early chemistry lab; a blackboard area showing work being done in Beckman Institute; apparatus developed by Dr. Beckman; and the film Arnold O. Beckman: The Man Behind the Machines.

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Caltech Seismological Laboratory

Caltech Oral Histories in the Making...

11:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. Exhibit Center South Mudd

12:30 – 2:30 p.m. Sherman Fairchild Library of Engineering and Applied Science (First Floor Desk)

Caltech, along with the USGS, UC Berkeley, and the California Geological Survey, is coordinating earthquake monitoring efforts under the California Integrated Seismic Network (CISN). We will display the project’s exciting new capabilities, including an Internet-based, real-time ground-shaking map called ShakeMap, amd the new High Performance Computing (HPC) Cluster, where research is taking place in seismology, planetary science, geology, environmental sciences, chemistry, and other disciplines. Get briefings at one of two stations: › North Hallway, Second-Floor › The Media Center, Room 269

Over the past 35 years, the Caltech Archives has recorded and released more than 200 oral histories capturing the memories and life stories of notable administrators and faculty. Come to the Sherman Fairchild Library during the lunch break to record your stories.

Graduate Aerospace Laboratories (GALCIT)

Pick up a tasty box lunch and grab a table, or bring your own picnic lunch and spread your blanket on the lawn.

11:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. Guggenheim Tours depart from lobby. Alumni are invited to tour the laboratories where research is performed in aerospace and related areas in GALCIT. Facilities will include the Lucas Adaptive Wall Wind Tunnel, the T5 Hypervelocity Shock Tunnel, the Space Structures Laboratory, and the Charyk Laboratory of Bioinspired Design. Displays in the Kármán Conference Room and Archives will highlight the life and achievements of Theodore von Kármán, the founding Director of GALCIT and JPL.

Black Ladies Association of Caltech (BLAC) Luncheon 12:00 – 2:30 p.m. Caltech Alumni House 345 South Hill Ave., Pasadena, CA 91125 This event is open to all African American alumni. This is the 2nd Annual event for BLAC and is a great opportunity for alumni to create an academic and social forum to network, build partnerships, and forge professional relationships. A catered lunch will be provided with live jazz. Contact: t: (626) 395-8108 e: lindaw@caltech.edu

Contact: Shelley Erwin Head of Archives & Special Collections t: (626) 395-2702 e: cerwin@caltech.edu oralhistories.library.caltech.edu

All Alumni Lunch 12:30 – 2:00 p.m. Beckman Mall (Registration Tent)

Linde + Robinson Laboratory for Global Environmental Science 11:30 a.m. and 1:00 p.m. Sixty-minute tours depart from the east patio. Wheelchair access is via the north door. Renamed in honor of alumnus Ronald K. Linde (MS ’62, PhD ’64) and his wife, Maxine, the Linde + Robinson Laboratory for Global Environmental Science sets new standards in green design, with innovations from heating, cooling, and air-conditioning to a visionary repurposing of the historic solar telescope. Tour guests will learn about the building’s unique features and about the research at the Linde Center for Global Environmental Science.

? Want directions? Have a question? Looking for something to do? Student volunteers from the Caltech Y and the SURF program are here to help! Look for the colorful t-shirts.


Sunday M ay 19 Career Seminar for Techers

Page House Alumni Dinner

Class of ’53 Farewell Breakfast

Career Management: Effectively Navigating Your Career at All Stages of Your Work Life 4:00 p.m. Beckman Institute Auditorium

5:00 p.m. Page courtyard

10:00 – 11:30 a.m. Residence of Rolf and Gunilla Hastrup

Fee: $25 RSVP: jjlu@caltech.edu

RSVP Required

The second in our professional development series. Whether you are just starting your career or are mid-career or beyond, this session will focus on important strategies such as: understanding your transferable skills, the importance of an online and offline presence, and staying mindful of your career at all phases and stages.

Wine and Cheese Reception 4:45 – 5:30 p.m. Gates Annex All Seminar Day attendees are invited to a wine and cheese reception served along Gates Annex. Come and refresh yourself at the end of the day!

SURF Reunion 4:45 – 5:30 p.m. Glanville Courtyard, Beckman Institute Since 1979, more than 4,000 Caltech students have participated in the Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships (SURF) program. If you were a SURFer, or are a friend of the program, please join us for our first ever reunion. Reconnect with former classmates, chat with current SURF students, and learn about what’s new with undergraduate research at Caltech.

All Alumni Barbecue 5:00 p.m. Beckman Mall (Reunion Tent) Alumni are invited to meet and talk with friends from all class years. Bring the family for ribs, chicken, vegetarian fare and all the fixings.

Fleming House Reunion

Caltech Y Alumni Brunch

5:00 p.m. Reception Fleming House

11:00 – 1:00 p.m Caltech Y Offices 505 S. Wilson, directly north of the Caltech Credit Union

6:00 p.m. Dinner Tom Mannion’s House, 400 S. Hill Ave.

This event is open to all alumni who have fond memories of the Y and want to get updated on Y activities. Stop by to enjoy good food and chat with friends.

Fee: $40/plate RSVP: alanmene@gmail.com

Contact: t: (626) 395-6163 e: caltechy@caltech.edu

Theater Arts (TACIT) Reunion! 7:00 p.m. TACIT House, 275 S. Hill Ave. Please join Distinguished Alumna Sandra Tsing Loh (BS ’83) and Director of Theater Arts Brian Brophy for a Theater Arts at Caltech (TACIT) reunion. Share stories, perform a monologue or song, or just relax and enjoy the company of your friends at TACIT. RSVP: Brian Brophy: brophy@caltech.edu Cindy De Mesa: (626) 395-3295

Fifth Annual Chamber Music Marathon Concert 2:00 – 6:00 p.m. Dabney Lounge (free) Small ensembles of multi-talented students will present piano duets, music for small string ensembles, woodwind classics, and many other selections. Feel free to arrive when you can and stay as long as you like.

Blacker House Associates Tea 2:00 – 5:00 p.m. Blacker House Courtyard RSVP: mole-vp@ugcs.caltech.edu

Lloyd House Casino Night 8:00 p.m. – Midnight Lloyd House Lounge RSVP: president@lloyd.caltech.edu

Avery Alumni Reunion 8:00 – 10:00 p.m. Avery Fireplace Room RSVP: jysu@caltech.edu

Ricketts House Beer & Brats 2:00 – 5:00 p.m. Millikan Pond RSVP at crosen@caltech.edu

Ruddock House Alumni Reception 2:00 – 5:00 p.m. Tom Mannion’s House 400 S. Hill Ave. RSVP: rudd-sec@ugcs.caltech.edu

ca lt ech a lumni a ssoci at ion

Dabney House Picnicking with Teddys

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5:00 p.m. Dabney Courtyard RSVP: jlei@caltech.edu


Seminar Day At a Glance

Saturday M ay 1 8 9:00 a.m.

Session I

Chemistry on the Brain: Understanding the Nicotine Receptor

Brain Control with Light V. Gradinaru (BS ’05)

The Grand Tour: Planetary Atmospheres Outside the Solar System

Under the Hood of the Earthquake Machine N. Lapusta

D. Dougherty

10:00 a.m.

Session II

Lessons for Bioinspired Design: Fluid Dynamics of the Embryonic Heart

H. Knutson

From Pulsing Planets to Exploding Stars: The Exploration of the Transient Radio Universe

Engineering the Composition and Fate of Wild Insect Populations to Prevent Disease

G. Hallinan

B. Hay

M. Gharib (PhD ’83)

Using Sunlight to Turn Water and Carbon Dioxide into Fuel N. Lewis (BS ’77, MS ’77)

11:00 a.m.

Session III

Distinguished Alumni Awards and General Session

12:00 p.m. Lunch

2:00 p.m.

Brain Control with Light

Session IV V. Gradinaru (BS ’05)

3:00 p.m.

Session V

Lessons for Bioinspired Design: Fluid Dynamics of the Embryonic Heart

Perspectives of a Lancashire Lad at Mr. Huntington’s Mansion

Toward Modeling the Contribution of Polar Ice Sheets to Sea-Level Rise

Using Sunlight to Turn Water and Carbon Dioxide into Fuel

J. Hindle

E. Larour

N. Lewis (BS ’77, MS ’77)

Engineering the Composition and Fate of Wild Insect Populations to Prevent Disease

The Grand Tour: Planetary Atmospheres Outside the Solar System

Under the Hood of the Earthquake Machine

M. Gharib (PhD ’83)

N. Lapusta H. Knutson

B. Hay

4:00 p.m. ca lt ech connec t 20 1 3

Session VI

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Chemistry on the Brain: Understanding the Nicotine Receptor

What’s Going On in the Libraries and Archives? K. Douglas

From Pulsing Planets to Exploding Stars: The Exploration of the Transient Radio Universe

D. Dougherty

Autism, Immunity, and Mind-Altering Microbes

E. Hsiao G. Hallinan


Other Activities The Science of Privacy K. Ligett

Higgs Quo Vadis? The Discovery and Voyage into the Unknown

Getting Curiosity on Mars A. Steltzner (MS ’91)

M. Spiropulu

Was the Philosopher John Locke a Beaver at Heart? A Sound Mind in a Sound Body, the Caltech Way!

Taking Antarctica’s Pulse: Changes at the Ocean-Ice Interface

What Time Is It? Past, Present, or Future in American Literature

A. Thompson

C. Weinstein

10:00 a.m. The Beckman Room Science Museum

B. Mitchell

21st-Century Energy: Solar Storage in Hydrogen Gas

Higgs Quo Vadis? The Discovery and Voyage into the Unknown

What Time Is It? Past, Present, or Future in American Literature

M. Spiropulu

C. Weinstein

When Less Means More: Exploring Sparsity, Structure, and Correlation in Signals

Getting Curiosity on Mars

J. McKone

The Science of Privacy K. Ligett

11:00 a.m. Caltech Seismological Laboratory Exhibit Center

11:00 a.m. Graduate Aerospace Laboratories (GALCIT)

12:30 – 2:30 p.m. Caltech Oral Histories in the Making… Join us and contribute your recollections!!

12:00 p.m. Black Ladies Association of Caltech (BLAC) Luncheon

1:00 p.m. Linde + Robinson Laboratory for Global Environmental Science

A. Steltzner (MS ’91)

P. Pal ’14

Toward Modeling the Contribution of Polar Ice Sheets to Sea-Level Rise

Taking Antarctica’s Pulse: Changes at the Ocean-Ice Interface

E. Larour

A. Thompson

SURF Lecture Series R. Britto ’13 A. Mouschovias ’13

4:00 p.m. Career Management: Effectively Navigating Your Career at All Stages of Your Work Life

11:30 a.m. Linde + Robinson Laboratory for Global Environmental Science


7 6 t h A nnual

SEMINAR DAY MAY 18

General Session Speaker 11:00 a.m. Beckman Auditorium

Lee Hood P hD ’6 8 President, Institute for Systems Biology

Lee Hood, M.D., Ph.D., is a pioneer in the translation of technology from R&D to industry. He has co-founded more than 14 biotechnology companies and has more than 700 publications and 26 patents. This year Dr. Hood received the National Medal of Science for his “unique cross-disciplinary approaches resulting in entrepreneurial ventures, transformative commercial products, and several new scientific disciplines that have challenged and transformed the fields of biotechnology, genomics, proteomics, personalized medicine and science education.”

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Systems Medicine and Proactive P4 Medicine: Revolutionizing Health Care

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We are at a tipping point in medicine, for the approaches of the old medicine are already beginning to be replaced by a medicine that is predictive, preventive, personalized, and participatory (P4). A major component of P4 medicine is the systems approach to disease, or systems medicine—employing global and comprehensive analyses of the disease process. Systems medicine is already creating powerful new genetic approaches to identifying disease genes; it is turning blood into a window for assessing health and disease in the individual; it is determining the genome sequences of tumors to identify targets for preexisting drugs; it is stratifying a disease into its different subtypes so that a proper impedance match against effective drugs can be achieved; it is beginning to develop entirely new, more rapid, and

less expensive approaches to the creation of drugs; and it is beginning to assess wellness in individual patients. I will discuss these revolutions in medicine with specific examples. I will also talk about some of the emerging technologies that are enabling P4 medicine—powerful sequencing machines for deciphering human genomes, a systems approach to blood diagnostics, new approaches to detecting proteins and the analyses of single cells. P4 medicine is the convergence of systems medicine, big data analytics, and patient-activated social networks. I will discuss these latter features and predict where each of the four Ps will be in 10 years. I will then discuss the impact that P4 medicine will have on society, along with our efforts to bring P4 medicine to patients.


Abstracts of Seminar Lectures

Dennis A. Dougherty George Grant Hoag Professor of Chemistry

Viviana Gradinaru (BS ’05) Assistant Professor of Biology

Chemistry on the Brain: Understanding the Nicotine Receptor

Brain Control with Light

The manner in which drugs—including pharmaceuticals and substances of abuse—interact with receptors in the brain defines a major challenge of modern science. A key issue is understanding how some drugs are able to find a specific target from a large collection of very similar receptors. The actions of nicotine present a prototype for this phenomenon, and we will describe a number of studies that lead to a new understanding of the unique pharmacological properties of nicotine and related substances.

Session I

9:00 a.m.

Session VI

4:00 p.m. Chair: Robert Burket

Chair: Edward Bryan

Kimberly Douglas University Librarian

This is an exciting time, as it’s now becoming possible for neuronal circuits to be engineered to reverse pathological states like depression, addiction, and Parkinson’s disease, and to enhance mental performance. With the convergence of accumulating knowledge about brain circuits and technological advances in imaging and electrophysiology instrumentation, previously unimagined experiments are possible. Until recently, no available technology could cope with the tremendous variety of cell types in brain tissue. Now, optogenetics—a technology based on light-responsive proteins—can be used to probe brain circuitry, offering insight into both healthy and diseased brains. This lecture will describe the development of optogenetics and its applications and challenges.

Session I

9:00 a.m.

Chair: Peter Groom

Session IV

2:00 p.m.

Chair: Gary Stupian

What’s Going On in the Libraries and Archives? Invented by researchers, the Internet and the Web are transforming the way we create, share, and preserve knowledge. “We tend to overestimate the effect of a technology in the short run and underestimate the effect in the long run,” as noted by the late Roy Amara, a longtime president of the Institute for the Future. Explore the new possibilities and consequences of web-based scholarly publishing, the challenges of preservation, and the many undeniable changes in research libraries today.

Session VI

4:00 p.m.

Morteza Gharib (PhD ’83) Hans W. Liepmann Professor of Aeronautics and Professor of Bioinspired Engineering, and Vice Provost

Lessons for Bioinspired Design: Fluid Dynamics of the Embryonic Heart

ca lt ech a lumni associ at ion

Nature has shown us that some hearts do not require valves to achieve unidirectional flow. Inspired by the simple and elegant functional design of the embryonic zebrafish heart, we have succeeded in constructing a new generation of biologically inspired pumps that function on both the micro- and macroscale without valves or blades. These advantages offer exciting new potential for use in applications where delicate transport of blood, drugs, or other biological fluids is desired.

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Session II

10:00 a.m.

Chair: Michael Krieger

Session V

3:00 p.m.

Chair: Daniel Whelan

Gregg W. Hallinan Assistant Professor of Astronomy

From Pulsing Planets to Exploding Stars: The Exploration of the Transient Radio Universe The detection of a new or variable source in the radio sky invariably signals an explosive or dynamic event, in some cases among the highest-energy particle populations in the observable universe. A new generation of radio facilities are coming online that will allow this dynamic radio sky to be systematically explored for the first time. In particular, a new radio telescope will be completed in 2013 at Caltech’s own Owens Valley Radio Observatory that will image the entire viewable sky every second. I will discuss the motivation for our exploration of radio transients—explorations that range from studying aurorae on nearby extrasolar planets to detecting exotic bursts from the edge of the observable universe.

Session II

10:00 a.m.

Chair: Peter Groom

Session VI

4:00 p.m.

Chair: Emilio Sovero


Abstracts of Seminar Lectures

Bruce A. Hay Professor of Biology

Engineering the Composition and Fate of Wild Insect Populations to Prevent Disease Insects act as vectors for diseases of humans, animals, and plants. The globalization of human, plant, and animal movement compounds this problem by introducing insect vectors and their pathogens into new environments. We aim to prevent disease by converting wild populations of disease-transmitting insects into noninfectious forms, or by driving the local (but not global) insect vector population to extinction. I will discuss the genetic tricks we use to achieve these goals.

Session II

10:00 a.m.

Chair: Gary Stupian

Session V

3:00 p.m.

Chair: Robert Burket

Steve Hindle W. M. Keck Foundation Director of Research, The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens

Perspectives of a Lancashire Lad at Mr. Huntington’s Mansion As the Huntington’s new director of research, and coming from industrial Lancashire via Cambridge and Warwick universities to my first foray west of the Mississippi, I was awestruck by the Library’s vast and astonishing collections. Informed by this uniquely fresh perspective, assimilating into SoCal and its academe, and now with a tad of experience at the helm, I will offer a view of the Library’s opportunities, challenges, and goals, its new research and community initiatives (and minimal bureaucracy), and its potential as an independent institution—while difficult times roil academic humanities research—to become a “library of last resort.”

Session IV

2:00 p.m.

Chair: Michael Krieger

Heather A. Knutson Assistant Professor of Planetary Science

The Grand Tour: Planetary Atmospheres Outside the Solar System The past decade has marked a period of great progress in our quest to discover and characterize the properties of the planets outside our own solar system. Observations of transiting systems, in which a planet periodically passes in front of and then behind its star as seen from Earth, have given us new insight into the nature of these unusual worlds. I will discuss ongoing efforts to understand the diverse properties of exoplanet atmospheres, including their compositions, temperatures, and global weather patterns.

Session I

9:00 a.m.

Chair: Michael Stefanko

Session V

3:00 p.m.

Chair: Gregory Holk

Nadia Lapusta Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Geophysics

Under the Hood of the Earthquake Machine

ca lt ech connec t 20 1 3

The San Andreas and other faults in Southern California separate two tectonic plates that slowly move in opposite directions. The faults remain locked for many years and then catch up in sudden dramatic rupture events perceived as earthquakes. These occasional fast motions coexist with much slower fault slips. The talk will describe how laboratory-derived friction laws and sophisticated numerical models can be used to reproduce all stages of past fault behavior—locked, slowly moving, and earthquake-producing—in remarkable detail. Such calibrated physical models will provide new ways to assess seismic hazards and forecast seismicity response to perturbations of natural or anthropogenic origin.

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Session I

9:00 a.m.

Session V

3:00 p.m. Chair: Michael Krieger

Chair: Daniel Whelan


Abstracts of Seminar Lectures

Eric Larour Program Manager, Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM) Team

Betsy Mitchell Director of Athletics, Recreation and Physical Education

Toward Modeling the Contribution of Polar Ice Sheets to Sea-Level Rise

Was the Philosopher John Locke a Beaver at Heart? A Sound Mind in a Sound Body, the Caltech Way!

Polar ice sheets are progressively becoming one of the most critical components of the Earth system. Indeed, in a warming climate, the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets are contributing larger amounts of fresh water to the oceans, which results in increasing sea-level rise. Here, we look at recent developments within the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM) team (based at JPL, UC Irvine, and Caltech) that have resulted in improved projections of sea-level rise. Our focus will be on understanding what uncertainties remain in such projections, and how to improve them using a combination of modeling and observations.

The important role that the physical dimension plays in the overall educational and intellectual development of our students is discussed. This will include a brief trip on the Beaver Bandwagon—the past, present, and future of Caltech athletics, physical education, and recreation. And why now more than ever students need the character development and release that physical outlets provide.

Session IV

2:00 p.m.

Session VI

4:00 p.m. Chair: Jon Hamkins

Chair: Maribeth Mason

Nathan S. Lewis (BS ’77, MS ’77) George L. Argyros Professor and Professor of Chemistry

Using Sunlight to Turn Water and Carbon Dioxide into Fuel The design of highly efficient, nonbiological, molecular-level energy conversion “machines” that generate fuels directly from sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide is both a formidable challenge and an opportunity that, if realized, could have a revolutionary impact on our energy system. In the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP), we are developing artificial photosynthetic devices that split water into hydrogen and oxygen and that convert carbon dioxide into carbon-based fuels.

Session II

10:00 a.m.

Session IV

2:00 p.m. Chair: Edward Bryan

Chair: Robert Burket

Katrina Ligett Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Economics

Our personal information is constantly being gathered, aggregated into enormous databases, and used—without our explicit permission or knowledge. Is privacy dead? What does “privacy” even mean? Can we quantify the harm you experience when your information is used, or the potential benefit from its use? This talk will explore recent work that attempts to cast and address such questions within a formal, mathematical framework. ca lt ech a lumni associ at ion

10:00 a.m.

Maria Spiropulu Professor of Physics

Higgs Quo Vadis? The Discovery and Voyage into the Unknown On August 5 at 10:32 p.m. PDT, signals were received on Earth confirming the successful landing of the Mars Science Laboratory’s Curiosity rover on the planet Mars. With this signal came the first proof of success of the ambitious new entry, descent, and landing system that had taken Curiosity to the surface. Curiosity weighs more than 900 kilograms, which required the development of a new landing system. The MSL entry, descent, and landing system is novel, applying old technologies in a new way and pioneering new technologies as well. This talk will discuss the challenges of developing this novel landing system, the history of its architecture, and possible future applications.

Session I

9:00 a.m.

Session IV

2:00 p.m. Chair: Peter Groom

Chair: Emilio Sovero

Adam Steltzner (MS ’91) Phase Lead and Development Manager, Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing Team, JPL

Getting Curiosity on Mars

The Science of Privacy

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Session II

Session I

9:00 a.m.

Session V

3:00 p.m. Chair: Robert Gershman

Chair: Sean Upchurch

On August 5 at 10:32 p.m. PDT, signals were received on Earth confirming the successful landing of the Mars Science Laboratory’s Curiosity rover on the planet Mars. With this signal came the first proof of success of the ambitious new entry, descent, and landing system that had taken Curiosity to the surface. Curiosity weighs over 900 kilograms, which required the development of a new landing system. The MSL entry, descent, and landing system is novel, applying old technologies in a new way and pioneering new technologies as well. This talk will discuss the challenges of developing this novel landing system, the history of its architecture, and possible future applications.

Session I

9:00 a.m.

Session V

3:00 p.m. Chair: Maribeth Mason

Chair: Jon Hamkins


Abstracts of Seminar Lectures

Everhart Lecture Winner Series ca lt ech connec t 20 1 3

32

Andrew Thompson Assistant Professor of Environmental Science and Engineering

Cindy Weinstein Professor of English and Executive Officer for the Humanities

Taking Antarctica’s Pulse: Changes at the Ocean-Ice Interface

What Time Is It? Past, Present, or Future in American Literature

Sections of the Antarctic ice sheet, containing enough ice to raise the global sea level several meters, are rapidly melting. These ice sheets are sensitive to ocean warming and changes in circulation patterns. Antarctica’s remote location and harsh climate make observing these changes an extraordinary challenge. This talk will focus on the use of ocean gliders—autonomous underwater vehicles—to measure ocean variability at the Antarctic margins in unprecedented detail.

Novels are almost always told in the past tense. The stories of Ishmael, Hester Prynne, and Sister Carrie have already taken place, and their experiences are narrated retrospectively. But what about a novel that vacillates between past, present, and future? What might the collision of different tenses say about such a novel, its author, and the culture in which that text appeared?

Session II

10:00 a.m.

Session VI

4:00 p.m. Chair: Michael Stefanko

Chair: Gregory Holk

Session II

10:00 a.m.

Session IV

2:00 p.m. Chair: Sean Upchurch

Chair: Robert Gershman

James R. McKone ’14 Graduate Student, Chemistry

21st-Century Energy: Solar Storage in Hydrogen Gas Solar energy is by far the most plentiful renewable resource, but large-scale adoption of solar technologies requires some form of energy storage. Inexpensive solar absorbers and chemical catalysts can be combined into integrated assemblies for solar energy storage in chemical bonds by splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen gas. This presentation will describe recent efforts in developing structured silicon absorbers and nickel composite catalysts for this application.

Session IV

2:00 p.m.

Chair: Susan Murakami-Fisher

Elaine Hsiao ’13 Postdoctoral Scholar, Biology and Chemistry & Chemical Engineering

Piya Pal ’14 Graduate Student, Electrical Engineering

Autism, Immunity, and Mind-Altering Microbes

When Less Means More: Exploring Sparsity, Structure, and Correlation in Signals

Humans are composed of a vast diversity of microbes that impact health and disease, and recent studies have revealed a remarkable effect of microbes on brain development and behavior. We have found that manipulating the microbiome corrects abnormalities in a mouse model of autism, a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder afflicting 1 in 88 children in the United States. These results reveal a novel role of the microbiota on autism-related behavior and provide compelling evidence for a microbe-based treatment for autism-spectrum disorders.

Today’s signal-processing systems face an enormous challenge storing, processing, and reliably communicating data that is being generated at a faster-than-ever rate. In this talk, I will show how data sparsity and correlation can be exploited to address this issue. I will demonstrate novel structured sampling schemes and algorithms, through the use of which one can derive more information from fewer measurements chosen judiciously from the vast amount of available data.

Session V Session VI

4:00 p.m. Chair: David Zobel

3:00 p.m.

Chair: David Zobel


Doris S. Perpall SURF Lecture Winner Series

Reuben J. Britto ’13 Senior, Chemical Engineering

Removing Cu Contamination from Si Microwire Solar Cells Reactive ion etching (RIE) has been used to remove the top few microns of Si microwires grown by the vapor-liquid-solid growth method, thereby removing the Cu-Si intermetallic region formed during growth and forming a flat Si surface. Compared with as-grown Si microwire arrays, photoanodes fabricated from the resulting Si microwire arrays showed an improvement in their energy-conversion efficiency from 1.1% to 2.0%.

Session VI

4:00 p.m.

Chair: Susan Murakami-Fisher

Alexander Mouschovias ’13 Senior, Applied Physics

A Survey of the Radio-Frequency Interference at the Site of the Future Owens Valley LWA In order to isolate the radio frequency interference (RFI) at the site of the future Long Wavelength Array station at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory, a survey was conducted of the RF spectrum up to 200 MHz. We used three custom cross-dipole antennas, whose signal was broken up into 1,024 channels by a Reconfigurable Open Architecture Computing Hardware field-programmable gate array correlator. The survey covers several weeks of observation. We have identified and localized the strongest continuous and transient sources of RFI.

Session VI

4:00 p.m.

Chair: Susan Murakami-Fisher

ca lt ech a lumni associ at ion

Seminar Day Committee

33

G. Edward Bryan (BS ’54) Robert C. Burket (BS ’65) Hannah Dvorak-Carbone (PhD ’99) General Chair Robert Gershman (BS ’62) Peter J. Groom (BS ’75) Jon Hamkins (BS ’90) Gregory J. Holk (MS ’91, PhD ’97) Michael M. Krieger (BS ’63) Maribeth Mason (MS ’99, PhD ’04) Susan S. Murakami-Fisher (BS ’75) Emilio A. Sovero (BS ’70, MS ’71, PhD ’77) Michael Stefanko (BS ’70) Gary W. Stupian (BS ’61) Sean A. Upchurch (BS ’96) Daniel S. Whelan (BS ’79, MS ’81, PhD ’85) David H. Zobel (BS ’84) Patsy M. Gougeon, Staff


Map and Information

Weekend Attire

Accommodations

Convenience Store

Parking

Reunion dinners require traditional evening attire. A jacket for gentlemen is recommended but not mandatory. Seminar Day is more casual; comfortable clothing and walking shoes are recommended.

Looking for a place to stay during your visit to Caltech? There are numerous hotel options close to campus or Old Town Pasadena. For rates and guidelines, go to alumni.caltech.edu/lodging

Monday – Friday 9:30 a.m. – 1:00 a.m. Saturday & Sunday 11:00 a.m. – 10:00 p.m. Located next to Chandler Dining Hall

Wireless Access

Caltech Bookstore

Red Door Café

Enjoy free wireless Internet access throughout the weekend. alumni.caltech.edu/wireless

Thursday – Friday 8:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. Saturday 11:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Alumni Association members receive a 20 percent discount on all merchandise with the exception of computer products.

Saturday 11:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Located north of the bookstore. Just say, “Meet me at the Red Door!”

On Thursday and Friday, May 16 and 17, parking is available on Hill Ave. between California Blvd. and Del Mar Blvd., and on Holliston Ave. between San Pasqual St. and Del Mar Blvd. Additional parking is available in the Holliston parking structure. Enter the structure and stop at the security dispatch office located at the entrance to obtain a parking permit which must be displayed in your vehicle. Permits are not necessary on Saturday and Sunday, May 18 and 19.

Monday – Friday 7:45 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.

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STAFF & FACULTY CONSULTING CENTER

34


register online at

reunion.caltech.edu

PLANNER

ALUMNI REUNION WEEKEND AND SEMINAR DAY

Use this checklist to plan your weekend, then go online to register by May 6th. If you do not have access to the internet, you may fill out the following information and mail to us (see reverse for instructions):

Name

Year

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIP

Annual

Your journey of discovery with Caltech continues by becoming a member of the Caltech Alumni Association. Access Caltech’s exclusive network of graduates, stay up-to-date with the latest research from campus, and receive special discounts to world-class events like Seminar Day. All made possible entirely by you, our members.

$55 /yearly

FRIDAY M AY 1 7

THURSDAY M AY 16

Members receive a special discount to Seminar Day.

$900

class of ’08 – Present

joint membership

Event (open to all unless other wise noted)

Cost

10:00 a.m.

Admissions Office Information Session and Campus Tour

11:00 a.m.

Class of ’53 Lunch

$30

11:00 a.m.

Class of ’63 Lunch

$15

2:00 p.m.

Huntington Tour

$20

3:30 p.m.

Gamble House Tour

$12.50

Reunion Activities for ’43, ’48, ’53, ’58, ’63 6:00 p.m.

President’s Reception

7:30 p.m.

Reunion Class Dinners

8:00 a.m.

All Alumni, Continental Breakfast

9:30 a.m.

Campus Architectural Tour

10:00 a.m.

Admissions Office Campus Tour and Information Session

11:30 a.m.

Class of ’78 Lunch

$30

12:00 p.m.

Half Century Club Luncheon

Welcome to Class of ’63: HCC’s newest members are invited, free of charge

$70

Comp.

All current HCC Members and any Guests

$30

2:00 p.m.

Torchbearer Social

3:00 p.m.

Class of ’53 JPL Tour

4:00 p.m.

Career Seminar for Techers

5:30 p.m.

Caltech Fund Party and Cocktails

ca lt ech a lumni associ at ion

Reunion Dinners

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7:30 p.m.

’63 Dinner

Vegetarian

$70

7:30 p.m.

’68, ’73, ’78, ’83, ’88 Class Dinners

Vegetarian

$70

7:30 p.m.

All Alumni ’74 – ’81 Combined

Vegetarian

$70

7:30 p.m.

All Alumni ’89 – ’12 Combined

Vegetarian

$50

10:00 p.m.

After Party @ Tom Mannion’s House ’89 – ’12

$600 one time payment

$10 / yearly

Time

Vegetarian

Life

– SUBTOTAL

x No.

= Total


SATURDAY M AY 1 8

SEMINAR DAY EVENTS

T ime

Members

NON-Members

Early Bird (must be postmarked by April 19)

$80

$140

Regular (on or after April 20 – May 6)

$100

$160

Students

$20

x No.

= T o ta l

Seminar Day Sessions and Activities. Please indicate the number attending each. I 9:00 a.m.

Dougherty

Gradinaru

Knutson

Lapusta

Ligett

Spiropulu

Steltzner

II 10:00 a.m.

Gharib

Hallinan

Hay

Lewis

Mitchell

Thompson

Weinstein

III 11:00 a.m.

General Session

IV 2:00 p.m.

Gradinaru

Hindle

Larour

Lewis

McKone

Spiropulu

Weinstein

V 3:00 p.m.

Gharib

Hay

Knutson

Lapusta

Ligett

Pal

Steltzner

IV 4:00 p.m.

SURF

Dougherty

Douglas

Hallinan

Hsiao

Larour

Thompson

4:45 p.m.

Wine and Cheese Reception

T ime

Reunion Weekend Events Cont’d

12:00 p.m

BLAC Luncheon

12:30 p.m.

All Alumni Lunch

4:00 p.m.

Career Networking Seminar

4:45 p.m.

SURF Reunion

5:00 p.m.

All Alumni Barbecue

5:00 p.m.

Page House Alumni Dinner

5:00 p.m.

Fleming House Reunion

7:00 p.m.

Theater Arts (TACIT) Reunion

8:00 p.m.

Lloyd House Casino Night

8:00 p.m.

Avery House Alumni Reunion

C o st

x No.

= T o ta l

– Vegetarian

Vegetarian

$12

$27

SUNDAY M AY 19

Additional free events offered throughout the day. Consult the schedule on pp. 24-25 for more.

10:00 a.m.

Class of ’53 Breakfast

11:00 a.m.

Caltech Y Alumni Brunch

2:00 p.m.

Music Marathon Concert

2:00 p.m.

Blacker House Associates’ Tea

2:00 p.m.

Ricketts Beer & Brats

2:00 p.m.

Ruddock House Alumni Reception

5:00 p.m.

Dabney House Picnicking with Teddys

– S UB T O TA L S UB T O TA L f r om page 1

Register now online at reunion.caltech.edu If you do not have access to the internet, please fill out the following information. Name

Year

Alumni ID# (on back of magazine) No. of Guests

ca lt ech connec t 20 1 3

36

City

State

Email

Phone

Credit Card# Signature

House

Mail to:

Apt #

Mail postmarked by: April 19th – Earlybird May 5th – Final

Names

Current Address

Method of Payment

grand t o ta l

Check

ZIP

Credit Card CVV

Exp

Caltech Alumni Association MC 1-97 Pasadena, CA 91125 att: Reunion Weekend and Seminar Day t. 626-395-6592 f. 626-795-8736 e. reunions@alumni.caltech.edu


In Memoriam 2012 We mourn the loss of the following members of our Caltech alumni family in 2012

Frederick H. Allardt (BS ’35, MS ’36, MS ’37) Glenn R. Carley (BS ’36) Arthur Hemmendinger (PhD ’37) Edward T. Price, Jr. (BS ’37) Sidney Bertram (BS ’38) George Asakawa (BS ’39) Robert C. Hagen (BS ’39) Richard K. Pond (BS ’39) L. Ivan Epstein (BS ’40, MS ’41) A. Finley France III (BS ’40) David W. Whittlesey (BS ’40) James R. Garrett (BS ’41, MS ’52) David R. Howton (BS ’42, PhD ’46) Robert R. Staley (BS ’42, MS ’43) Albert G. Wilson (MS ’42, PhD ’47) George D. Griffith (BS ’43) Jack L. Mataya (MS ’43) Melvin L. Merritt (BS ’43, PhD ’50) John W. Bell (CERT ’44, MS ’52) Grant L. Benson, Jr. (BS ’44) Thomas E. Hudson (BS ’44 MS ’46) Carl W. Olson (BS ’44) Louis S. Osborne (BS ’44) Maurice Rattray, Jr. (BS ’44, MS ’47, PhD ’51) Irving S. Reed (BS ’44, PhD ’49) Thomas S. Schalk (CERT ’44) William A. Baum (MS ’45, PhD ’50) Raymond F. Berbower (BS ’45) Raymond L. Chuan (MS ’45, ENG ’48, PhD ’53) Richard A. Montgomery (MS ’46, PhD ’48) Walter L. Murphy (BS ’45) John F. Nichols (BS ’45) Wayne A. Roberts (BS ’45, MS ’48) Latham L. Brundred, Jr. (BS ’47) William E. Davis III (MS ’46) Robert H. Grube (BS ’46) John W. Gryder (BS ’46) John S. Showell (BS ’46, MS ’49) Milton A. Strauss (BS ’46, MS ’48) Egbert M. Tingley, Jr. (MS ’46) Robert C. Belyea (BS ’47) William D. Graziano (MS ’47) Wendall M. Haas (BS ’47) Norman R. Lee (BS ’47) Fred E. Rosell, Jr. (MS ’47) George D. Shipway (BS ’47 Francis D. Sullivan (BS ’47)

E. Arthur Trabant (PhD ’47) Eugene F. Wyszpolski (MS ’47) Fernand P. de Percin (MS ’47) Kurt H. Barnett, M.Sc. (MS ’48) J. Sage Burrows (BS ’48) George E. Hlavka (MS ’48, PhD ’54) Harold Johnston (PhD ’48) Col. Leroy C. Land, USA (ret.) (ENG ’48, MS ’48) Thomas Vrebalovich (BS ’48, MS ’49, PhD ’54) Marion A. Condie (MS ’49) William J. Houghton (BS ’49) F. Beach Leighton (MS ’49, PhD ’52) Hardy C. Martel (BS ’49, PhD ’56) Emmett P. Monroe (MS ’49) Emerson W. Smith (MS ’49) Robert M. Stewart, Jr. (BS ’49, MS ’50) Marvin C. Brooks (PhD ’50) Donald V. Kendall (BS ’50) Henry Lemaire (PhD ’50) Leonard S. Lerman (PhD ’50) Howard R. Schmidt (MS ’50) Capt. John T. Shepherd, USN (ret.) (ENG ’50) Wilbur A. Wikholm (BS ’50) Dean M. Blanchard (BS ’51) Richard G. Brewer (BS ’51) Walter V. Goeddel (MS ’51) Richard A. Hoppin (PhD ’51) Eliot A. Butler (BS ’52, PhD ’56) Thomas W. Hamilton (BS ’52) Robert H. Owens (PhD ’52) Jean Robieux (MS ’52) Thomas H. Applewhite (BS ’53, PhD ’57) Charles W. Cook (MS ’54, PhD ’57) Joseph Kraut (PhD ’54) Howard E. Shanks (BS ’54) Bern D. Folkman (BS ’55, MS ’56) William B. Lindley (BS ’55, MS ’58)

Peter B. Lissaman (MS ’55, PhD ’66) Allen I. Ormsbee (PhD ’55) Van I. Walkley (BS ’55) David G. Cantor (BS ’56) Basil Gordon (PhD ’56) Robert T. Herzog (BS ’56, MS ’63, ENG ’64) Pierre C. Mahieux (BS ’56) Alan E. Farley (BS ’57) Richard O. Hundley (BS ’57, MS ’59, PhD ’63) Mark F. Meier (PhD ’57) Capt. Eugene M. Wisenbaker, USN (ret.) (ENG ’57) Richard T. Cowley (BS ’58, MS ’59) Paul L. Donoho (PhD ’58) Harold K. Forsen (BS ’58, MS ’59) Jerrold Fried (BS ’58) John F. South (BS ’60, MS ’61) Douglas W. Shakel (BS ’61) Lawrence J. Altman (BS ’62) Neng-Ming Wang (PhD ’62) Harvie Andre (MS ’63) Ronald K. Counsell (BS ’63) Lisle T. Jory (PhD ’64) Lionel J. Skidmore (PhD ’64) Michael J. Cosgrove (BS ’65) Paul C. Kochendorfer (BS ’65, MS ’66) Ralph R. Gajewski (BS ’66) Robert J. Allen (BS ’70) David L. Glackin (BS ’74) Deno P. Dialynas (BS ’76) Charles L. McKnett (BS ’76) Katherine B. Dickie MS ’80) Yorgos C. Stylianos (BS ’81) Michael W. Day (PhD ’96) Aleksandr Chechkin (BS ’07) Names are listed by class year. Additional names can be found online at alumni.caltech.edu/in_memoriam


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Caltech Alumni Association MC 1-97 Pasadena, CA 91125

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