Page 1

studio[Ci]


studio[Ci]

vol.1 vol vo l.1 .

Editor: Edi ditor: di tor to or: or Haibin Hai Hai ibin bi bin b in Tan Tan Creative C.Bodurow,Calvin Cre Cr reati ative at ve v e Content: Con on nte tent: ten : Constance Consta Consta Co Con stance tance n nc C. C .Bod Boduro Bo uro ow,C w,Calv Calv alvin in T. in T. Creech, Cre reech ech, ech , Robert Rob bert ert W.Fletcher W.Fle W. .Fle F tch Fl tcher er Jordan Aaron Jor ordan dan da n R.M.Martin, R.M.M R. M art rtin i in in, on n E. E. Olko, Ol Olko lko, ko, Haibin Hai a bi bin in Tan,Christopher in T n Ta n,C ,Chri hristo sto ophe pher ph r Lynn Lynn yn Davis Da avis is s Graphic Jordan Graphi Gra aphi h c Design: hi Desi Desi esign es gn: gn: n Jor J or rda rdan da R.M. R.M. Martin, R.M Ma Mar artin t , Aaron Aaro ro r on E. E. Olko, Olk , Olko Haibin Haibi Ha ibin ibi n Tan, Tan, n, , Christopher Chris Ch ris isto is top o her r Lynn Ly ynn Davis Dav vis Design Des D De e ign ig g director: di direc irec re tor r: Constance Con Con nstance sta ce e C.Bodurow C.Bo Bod oduro urow w Community Partners:Kristine Com om o mmun u ity un i it Pa ar rtn rt tners t s:Kri Kri ri isti t ne ti n Miranne, M ann Mir ne, The he Southw S outhwest outhw est t Detroi D etro etroi oit Dev oit Developm De elopm opment Collab lab a or ab orative orati orat v ve Southwest Detroit Development Collaborative Dennis Denni De nn nni nis Nordmoe, Nord Nord or mo mo , Urban moe a Neighborhood Neig Ne eighborhood hborh borhood od I Initiatives nitia tiatives tia tives ves s Da an Loacano, Loac Loac oacano acano ano, , South out west est st Housi ou ousi ousing using S So lutio utio t ns ti Dan Southwest Housing Solutions Kathy Kathy Wendler, W ndl We dl ler er, r South Southwest Sout uthwest west est st Detro Det Detroit troi it t Bu B Business sine sines i ines s As Ass Association ssoc ociat oci ci ion on Jacob Jac acob ac cob ob Corvidae, Cor or rvid vidae, ae, WARM WAR Train Tra Training r ing Editorial Edi Ed di d itor t rial to ia Advisor: ia Ad dvis isor: is or: ali a i barnard al ba arn ar rn r ard rd d Pub P u lis is isher: Lawre La wre ence nc Technological Techn Te chn hnol hn olo logic gi i al University Uni iv ve ver ersit sity sity Publisher: Lawrence c 2 20 2012 012 lawre lawrence wr nce e Tech Technological ec ech c nolo nologica gica c l Univer Un University. iver ersity sity t . a ty al all l rights rights ts s res rese eserved. . No par rt of o t thi h s bo book m book ay y b e reprod re prod roduced o uced od ed d in i any a y reserved. part this may be reproduced manner whatsoever without written permission from mann ma a er w hatsoeve hat hats eve er wi w ithou ithou thout prior tho prior o writ ri ten en perm permissi ission issi on f ro rom publisher. the th t he publ bl lishe is s r.

Lawrence L awrence ce Technological Tec e hnol logical ogic gi al gic l U University nive niv ive iv v rsi rsit i y College g of f Architecture Architect tect ecture u e + Design Desi sign ign gn www.ltu.edu/architecture_and_design www.lt ltu.edu/ ltu. edu/ u/arch u/ arch hitec e ture re e_and _and_des _des _d des de d esi ign gn n 248.204.2805 248.204. 204 2805 204. 280 0

Lawre Lawr nce Technological Techno ech ec echn c log all University logic lo Un U ivers iver ive iver ersity Lawrence 2 21000 Mile e Road Road ad d West Ten Mile Southfield South field,, MI 48075 field 075 75 5 Southfield,


studio[Ci] @ Lawrence Technological University CoAD

studio[Ci] is a design lab within the College of Architecture+Design at Lawrence Technological University. studio[Ci] was founded by Constance C. Bodurow, AICP, Assoc. AIA, as a transdisciplinary team of professional architects, urban designers, civil and environmental engineers. We believe that density [intensity] is sustainable and should be broadly defined and visualized utilizing diverse data [metrics]. Further, that a new urban geography and ecosystem are required to balance the benefits and impacts of both shrinking cities and rapid urbanization within the context of the bioregion and to leverage the assets and complex combinations of forces of the cityscape. Our faculty/student design team has created the Ci methodology and Geo Design platform (4D digital interface) which allows us to proactively design for the “coming together” of metrics [criteria] into a spatial convergence. We map relevant data, model “analysis layerings”, and make specific design proposals to describe the role of density, infrastructure networks and net zero energy in sustainable urbanism. We then create land use, urban design and architectural proposals utilizing digital technology to pose questions and experiment at an urban scale to recommend future dense, sustainable urban form. Our approach is collaborative, criteria driven, integrative, transdisciplinary and both local and global in scale. For more information: www.studio-ci.net

Ford College Community Challenge: Urban Evolution: Creating A ‘Net Zero Energy’ Community design work as of May 2012


studio[Ci]

The stu crew _ studio[Ci] members

Haibin Tan

Chr Christopher Lynn Davis

Research Assistant

Res Research Assistant + Project Manager

Education: Candidate: 3+ Master in Architecture, Lawrence Technological University Bachelor of Landscape Design, Shanghai Institute of Technology University (SITU)

Edu Education: Bachelor of Science in Architecture (with Honors), Delta Sigma Tau, Lawrence Bac Tec Technological University, MI, USA + candidate, M.Arch/m.U.D. and B. Industrial Design, Lawrence Technological University Law Ass Associate of Architecture, Oakland Community College

Awards and Recognitions: 2008 Election Competition for working with Design Elites, Excellence Award 2009 Shanghai Art Fair Exhibition of College Art Design Innovation 2010 D3 Natural Systems Competition, Honorable Mention: Infrastructure The Evolving City Parametric Design Workshop, Shanghai + Beijing 2011-2012 Graduate Assistant Tuition Scholarship

What is your background? I am currently a graduate student in the Master of Architecture 3+ program at the Lawrence Technological University. My undergraduate degree is in landscape design from Shanghai Institute of Technology. Prior to coming to Lawrence Tech, I worked for an architecture firm in shanghai, China. Through my studies I have pursued a position at the intersection of planning and design, working with a diverse array of systems and scales. I am interested in understanding how people etch out a life in biophysical systems and how these systems etch out life in the city. This is, to me, critical in understanding how natural systems can be a more integrated part of cities, and how cities can function more ecologically. Why did you choose Lawrence Tech? I picked Lawrence Tech because of the emphasis on cutting-edge technology can give students the high-level skills to create a challenging and fulfilling future. And I can learn from experienced and engaged faculty members who have had professional experience in my field. I chose Lawrence Tech not only because of the school`s “theory and practice" approach emphasizes the ‘real-world’, but also hands-on experience that better enables me to assume positions of leadership and responsibility in the profession. How did you get involved studio[Ci]? Prof. Constance Bodurow was my instructor for an Independent Study - my first class when I first came to America. She appreciated my passion and enthusiasm for my work. I became a Research Assistant in 2011. Working in studio [Ci], I have the opportunity to participate and work on real projects. It has helped me to create my own professional network.

Aw Awards and Recognitions: 2011 First Place Drafting Competition 201 201 2011 Honorable Mention Specification Competition 2010 D3 Natural Systems Competition, Honorable Mention: Infrastructure 201 The Evolving City Parametric Design Workshop, Shanghai + Beijing 2012 Delta Sigma Tau and Lamda Iota Tau Honor Societies 201 201 2011-2012 NAIA Blue Devil Varsity Soccer, Team Manager

What is your background? Wh I ggraduated high school in 2003 and received my Associates Degree in Architecture from Oakland Community College. Working in the construction field throughout my fro younger years motivated me to become an architect. I received my Bachelor in you Architecture from Lawrence Tech in 2012, and am currently enrolled at Lawrence Tech Arc for my Master in Architecture and Master in Urban Design. I aspire to attend MIT or Berkeley for future education. Ber Why did you choose Lawrence Tech? Wh It is i a university that offers great insight on design while maintaining a strong foundation in technical practice. I wanted to receive the best education in Architecture fou that the state of Michigan could offer and I knew I could find it here at Lawrence tech. tha How did you get involved studio[Ci]? had the pleasure of having Constance Bodurow as my Urban Design professor for my I ha Integrated Design Studios 3 and 4. I quickly discovered that I not only had a talent for Int urban design but also a desire to create positive urban space that accentuates urb architecture. Constance noticed my passion for urban design and guided me arc throughout my junior design studios. In the summer of 2011, she invited me to join the thr team at studio[Ci], starting as a Research Assistant. Currently, studio[Ci] is working tea with the City of Southfield on an illustrative master plan vision for their City Centre, wit where I am taking lead as Project Manager.


studio[Ci]

The stu crew _ studio[Ci] members

Jordan R.M. Martin

Aaron E. Olko

Designer at Large

Designer at Large

Education: Master of Urban Design in Sustainable Urbanism (with Distinction), Delta Sigma Tau, Lawrence Technological University, MI, USA Master of Architecture (with Distinction), Delta Sigma Tau, Lawrence Technological University, MI, USA Bachelor of Science in Architecture (with Honors), Delta Sigma Tau, Lawrence Technological University, MI, USA Architectural Technology Diploma (with Honors), St. Clair College, ON, CA

Education:

Awards and Recognitions: 2008 Eco-Village Competition, Detroit, Honorable Mention 2009-2010 Graduate Assistant Tuition Scholarship 2010 Class Valedictorian 2010 Recipient of the Virginia North Award for Excellence 2010 Delta Sigma Tau and Lamda Iota Tau Honor Societies What is your background? Jordan is an urbanist with a dual Masters Degree from Lawrence Technological University in the fields of Urban Design and Architecture. He chose to pursue his graduate degrees at Lawrence Tech upon receiving a Research Assistantship to collaborate with Professor Constance Bodurow on the many innovative research initiatives she was leading at studio[Ci]. Jordan has been an Adjunct Professor within the CoAD since 2011, teaching an array of undergraduate studios and graduate level Urban Design and Architecture seminars. He has presented at national conferences and contributed to professional publications, including Transactions in GIS, The American Institute of Architects Report on Research, and the Architectural Research Centers Consortium. Why did you choose Lawrence Tech? Jordan grew up just south of Detroit in the small town of Essex, Ontario, Canada. Throughout his life while working at a family construction business he had a passion for the built environment and wanted to contribute to the ways people live and use a city. His professional goal was to become an Architect. To achieve this goal he started his education at St. Clair College to obtain the practical and technical approach to architecture, with the plans of continuing his education at Lawrence Tech University to focus on the design and theoretical aspects. In 2009 he graduated and transferred to Lawrence Tech where he completed his Master’s degrees in Architecture and Urban Design. How did you get involved studio[Ci]? Jordan continues to be part of the studio[Ci] team as a Senior Designer and Intern Architect at large, working from London, Ontario. He has participated in the development of a variety of project types with a multidisciplinary team of professionals and community groups. The many sustainable community orientated projects to which he has contributed include: a net zero energy plan, entitled “Southwest Detroit: Our Region’s First Net-Zero Community” for Ford Motor Company and the Southwest Detroit Development Collaborative; The VDCmp Community Mapping Project, a geospatial urban analysis design platform; and an illustrative master plan vision for the City Centre in Southfield, Michigan.

Candidate: Master of Architecture II , The Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-Arc) Bachelor of Science in Architecture, Lawrence Technological University Awards and Recognitions: 2010 eVolo Skyscraper Competition, Top Ten Honorable Mention 2010 D3 Natural Systems Competition, Honorable Mention: Infrastructure The Evolving City Parametric Design Workshop, Shanghai + Beijing Constance C. Bodurow, Assoc. AIA, AICP Director

What is your background? I am from the Detroit area originally, have a background in art (drawing and painting), a Bachelor of Science in Architecture degree from Lawrence Tech and am currently a graduate student at SCI-Arc. My interest is in architectural theory, computation within architecture, and minimalism as a formal way of post-rationalizing modernism. Why did you choose Lawrence Tech? I chose Lawrence Tech because it seemed to be the most pragmatic of the schools I was looking into. I figured that I would be able to obtain a well rounded education in design, theory, technology, building methods, and engineering. I believe I was right, as the education my degree has given me has positioned me quite nicely into the discipline of Architecture. How did you get involved studio[Ci]? I had Constance as an instructor my third semester at Lawrence Tech during which she became a mentor. The following summer I persisted (for a month or so) in becoming a Research Assistant at studio[Ci]. Constance hired me and I have been involved since. This was the summer of 2009.

Calvin T. Creech, PE, LEED AP, CFM Project Partner

Robert W. Fletcher, Ph.D. Consultant, Alternative Energy


Urban Evolution _ Creating a Net Zero Energy Community

studio[Ci]

Density Ford C3 2010 Grant Winner: studio[Ci] @ Lawrence Technological University: Southwest Detroit: our region’s first net zero energy community

+6; %#2#% $.7' )4''0

Alternative Energy )4';

9*+6'

56 '%15;

Public Realm

'/

The Ford C3 grant enables the Southwest Detroit Community, through the SDDC, to develop the principles, guidelines, plans and designs to implement sustainability collaboratively and at the scale of the entire neighborhood.

Urban Mobility

+0(4#5647%674'

This publication documents the design work of studio[Ci], a multi-disciplinary research team within the College of Architecture + Design at Lawrence Technological University, generously funded by the Ford Motor Company Fund to partner with Southwest Detroit (SWD) through the Southwest Detroit Development Collaborative [SDDC] to create an urban design plan for Regional Detroit’s first “net zero energy” community. The studio[Ci] design team has made recommendations on how existing community initiatives can use vacancy, alternative energy solutions, density, natural systems and community empowerment to create a sustainable community. The design team also focused on leveraging and enhancing the neighborhood’s assets and blue, green, gray and white infrastructure networks to inform the future urban form of the neighborhood. We are urbanists and believe that the city is the most desirable place for human inhabitation [humans to live, work, play and learn]. If humankind has a sustainable future on this globe, we must rethink our spatial dispersion and reinforce uses in close proximity to concentrations of population. For this project, the Design Term: • Established an overall goal to create the Detroit region's first 'net zero energy' community - meaning that SWD will produce more energy (through alternative sources) than it consumes. • Leveraged the community's assets and current "green" community initiatives, planning and design in support of the overall goal. • Embraced a holistic and systemic approach to the design project, and defined five (5) elements which define a Sustainable Community (see diagram, right): Density: invest and densify to support existing populations, and, as the result of a collective, criteria driven dialogue, increase built and population density at points of geographic convergence. Urban Mobility: develop an all modes approach to moving people and goods in a carbon neutral manner. Place emphasis on, and invest in, the pedestrian environment, mass transit, bicycle and EV fleets. Alternative Energy: recommend a hybrid approach based on renewable resources, including solar, geothermal, hydro current and storage solutions that leverage local assets, and leads to neighborhood self sufficiency. Public Realm: cultivate a new urban ecosystem for the new geography of the city, focusing not only physical improvements to the public ROW, but also plantings and ground plane improvements that enhance environmental quality and create spaces for expanding community and social equity. Green Economy: a focus on leveraging significant investment in regional and international infrastructure to create opportunities for economic development, including training, job creation, making and conversion of extant industrial and commercial assets. • Utilized the studio[Ci] digital interface to map data and conduct analysis to identity the geography of the neigh borhood where we will develop urban design proposals. • Called this new geography "Energy/Density Hubs" and have identified four so far: Michigan Central Station+vicinity (leveraging a convergence of density and infrastruc ture); Woodmere/Springdale neighborhood (leveraging community development initiatives), the Detroit Intermodal Freight Terminal [DIFT]/Bow Tie area (leveraging the significant transportation investment in the neighborhood) and the Condon Neighborhood-Livernois/Tireman area (leveraging concentrations of vacant land and diverse partnerships). • Insured that students played an important role as Research Assistants/Designers on the project. • Is concluding the first phase and anticipate a second phase in 2012.

Green Economy


Digital Interface _ Google Earth Pro Platform

130+ DATA LAYERS OF HUMAN, CULTURAL + INFRASTRUCTURE DENSITY IN SOUTHWEST DETROIT

studio[Ci]

STUDY AREA: SWD, a 12,450 acre (5038.336 hectares) neighbourhood bordered by the CBD to the east, the Detroit River (and Canadian border) to the south, and the Rouge River to the west.


studio[Ci]

FordC3

&GPUKV[HQT0GV<GTQ'PGTI[ 4'5'#4%*+PVGTHCEG.C[GTU #0#.;5+5&GPUKV[4WNGUQH6JWOD.''&0& 8+5+10'0'4);&'05+6;*7$5 5WDÄ*WDU¶+*+=OKZGFWUGFGPUKV[ RQRWNCVKQPITQYVJ?+PVGTPCVKQPCN)TGGP.KPM

URBAN EVOLUTION: CREATING A NET ZERO ENERGY COMMUNITY

".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

www.studio-ci.net

What new jobs could the neighborhood attract? Qué nuevos trabajos podía la vecindad atraer? Where should new housing, parks, retail and businesses go? Dónde deben las nuevas viviendas, los parques, la venta al por menor y los negocios ir?

2

6

Continued Research [CONTEXT]

We Want Your Feedback...Join Our Blog: Queremos su regeneración… ensamblamos nuestro blog:

How can the community play a role in the solution? Cómo sabe la comunidad desempeñar un papel en la solución? How can expanded transportation options help achieve net-zero energy goals? Cómo puede la ayuda ampliada de las opciones del transporte alcanzar metas de la energía de la red-cero?

1

3

4

6

Proposed ‘Net Zero Energy’ Vision

Research

Q: What makes a city sustainable? Qué hace una ciudad sostenible?

3

Alternative Energy 1 _‘Energy Systems’ - All new developments will include the installation of solar panels on roof and geo-thermal wells.

Initial Research [THEORY]

Final Research [APPROACH]

2 _‘Solar Lighting’ will be installed along West Vernor Highway.

Mixed-Use Density + Green Economy 3_‘Mixed-Use’ density will be added along West Vernor Highway providing opportunities for new locally owned and operated businesses. 4_‘Residential Infill’

Urban Mobility 5 _‘Car Share/EV Charging Station’ - Existing fuel station will be transformed into a Zipcar© Electric Vehicle (EV) car share and charging facility. The facility would also include a Bike Share/Rental Facility.

8

9

6 _‘Enhanced Mass Transit’ along West Vernor Highway with stops located within approximately 1/4 mile walking radii from each other. 7 _‘Mobile Transit Application’ will be integrated with bus system to inform users of bus arrival times and routes.

Public Realm 8_‘Woodmere Greenway Gateway’ will be enhanced with public open space featuring hard and soft landscaping, solar lighting, and a wayfinding system. 9 _‘Streetscape Improvements’ - Elements of the public realm will be enhanced with wider sidewalks, bike lanes, solar lighting, and bioswales with native landscaping.

4

Energía alternativa 1 _Sistemas de energía del `- todas las novedades incluirán la instalación de los paneles solares en la azotea y pozos geotérmicos. 2 _ el `Lighting solar será instalado a lo largo de la carretera del oeste de Vernor.

Mezclado-Utilice la densidad + economía verde 3 _La densidad Mezclada-Use' del `será agregada a lo largo de la carretera del oeste de Vernor que proporciona las oportunidades para los nuevos negocios localmente poseídos y funcionados. 4 _`Infill residencial

Movilidad urbana 5 _Coche Share/EV del `que carga Station - la estación existente del combustible será transformada en una parte del coche del vehículo eléctrico de Zipcar© (EV) y una facilidad de carga. La facilidad también incluiría una parte de la bici/una facilidad de alquiler.

6 _El `realzó Transit total a lo largo de la carretera del oeste de Vernor con las paradas situadas dentro de radios que caminaban de aproximadamente 1/4 milla de uno a. 7 _El tránsito móvil Application del `será integrado con el sistema de autobuses para informar a usuarios horas y rutas de llegada del autobús.

Reino público 8 _El Greenway Gateway de Woodmere del `será realzado con la atracción pública del espacio abierto dura y el ajardinar de la suavidad, iluminación solar, y un sistema wayfinding. 9 _Mejoras del Streetscape del `- los elementos del reino público serán realzados con aceras más anchas, los carriles de la bici, la iluminación solar, y los bioswales con ajardinar nativo.

studio[Ci]

MCS International GreenLink CP Rail Tunnel at Porter Street Q: What makes a city sustainable? Qué hace una ciudad sostenible?

BUILD OUT ENVELOPE [FAR Potential]

% PERVIOUS

Energy Land (Carbon Uptake Land) Crop Land Grazing/Forest Land MIning Land

WATERSHED[S]

MICRO-CLIMATE RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES

2_WATER

% unrecoverable (thermal pollution) run off WWTP loading

WASTE FLOWS

3_FOOD

biological

Detroit River

material [land fill]

Rouge River Solar Geothermal

4_ENERGY

Blue Green Gray

Housing Retail

coal natural gas crude oil NGPL nuclear renewable

toxic | pollutants

petroleum other

Wind

White [Other]

COMMUNITY

aquatic habitat residential industrial commercial energy irrigation

Green Roof Open Land

% land to absorb wastes

passenger

H2O Current

INFRASTRUCTURE

% impervious surface brownfields % land to sequester (absorb) CO2

1_LAND + BUILT FORM

Fishing Grounds Built Up Land Vacant Land

Water Pervious Surface AQUIFER

impac impacts

5_MOBILITY

CO2 emissions

goods mass transit bicycle pedestrian primary

6_MATERIALS + GOODS + SERVICES

derived % Land to produce materials

recycled

Living wage jobs

metrics + data sources: m 1_Acres 12, 4500 (calculated) - SSquarre Miles 19.3 (calculated) (calculated) 2_Actual ctual Gallons bbyy Sector per year : United States Geological Geological Survey 2005 2005 3_Consumption : Po P unds ds of food (by category) c gory) per per person per year - United United States Food an and Drug Administrat Administration 2010

3

ENGENDERING A CULTURE OF SUSTAINABILITY

4_Quadrillion _Quadrillion BTU by sourcee and sector sector [commercial, industrial, industrial, transportation, transportation, residential] residential] : United States Department of Energy Energy - Energy Information Information Admi Administration report 2008, 00 State te of Michigan EEnergy nergy Profile Interpolated Interpolated 5_Annual Trips Trip by modee : (DDOT; DTC; SMART) - Transpo Transportation Riders Unit Uni ed [TRU] U] + National National Transit Database [NTD] 2009 : Passengers Pas ngers per year - Amtrak 2010 - Passenger Passenger miles driven - Environmental PProtection rotection Agency 2010 2010

Refined Analysis

Refined Analysis Density

Capacity

Energy

Investment

Urban Mobility $.7'

Blue,Green+Gary [ Infrastructure ]

)4'; 9*+6'

Public Realm

'/

Analysis

Alternative Energy

Green Economy

Peripheral Analysis sis (if any)

Refined Peripheral Analysis (if any)

Refined Peripheral Analysis

MICROCLIMATE

INFRASTRUCTURE [ too much? ]

Highway

BUILT DENSITY + CULTURAL DIVERSITY

West

Vernor

MITC + DIFT Gateway

I-75 Buss Transit Stop

VACANT LAND

New

Internationa l Trade

LEGEND

ECOLOGICAL UNDERLAY [ Geothermal, Salt Caverns ]

Water Systems Current and Future Bike Routes Major Arterial Roadway Corridors Railways Systems Highways Bike Share Facility Zipcar© EV Care Share

REGIONAL INTERNATIONAL CONTEXT

Design

)4''0

We begin by determining the “Geography of Convergence” -- mapping concentrations of assets based on five [5] metrics [criteria]: energy (organizations and informal cultural assets), capacity (as of right zoning), population (density by block group), investment (business and employment density by block group), and infrastructure (neighborhood parks, greenways, proposed rail link) to develop formal design recommendations.

CRITICAL MASS: What does Southwest Detroit have that can be leveraged in support of sustainability and net zero energy?

Design Stage 1

+6; %#2#%

Population

Design Stage 2

Design Stage 3

Crossing

www.studio-ci.net

How can the neighborhoods unique assets, such as vacant land, support net-zero energy goals? Cómo pueden los activos únicos de las vecindades, tales como tierra vacante, ayuda las metas de la energía de la red-cero?

6_Dollars per ca capita (Retail, grocery, grocery, apparel, food : expenditure + leakage; leakage; informal info economy - Social Compact Compact Inc. Detroit Drilldown Drilldown Report 2007 2007 - Raw materials m in tons per capita capita - United States Geological ogical Survey 2005

Initial Analysis

We Want Your Feedback...Join Our Blog: Queremos su regeneración… ensamblamos nuestro blog:

How can sustainability be achieved in Southwest and the broader Detroit Region? Cómo se puede la continuidad alcanzar en el sudoeste y la región más amplia de Detroit? How does sustainable design play a role in the future of Detroit? Cómo el diseño sostenible desempeña un papel en el futuro de Detroit?

Alternative Energy: Footprint Rules of Thumb _ Looking for sustainable energy sources vs. traditional sources

Net Zero Energy Vision

1

4

5

2

6

Proposed ‘Net Zero Energy’ Vision

LAND CAPACITIES

consumption consumpti on

How can the community play a role in the solution? Cómo sabe la comunidad desempeñar un papel en la solución?

studio[Ci] believes that as designers, we must look beyond the building employing a holistic approach to the city and its urbanized region. The Team’ research subscribes to current theoretical and design approaches to systemic design and sustainable urbanism . We believe there are valuable lessons to be learned by focusing on post industrial cities, rather than cities in BRIC nations that are experiencing explosive growth. No matter its growth profile, the city is a consumptive entity, challenging its ecological context.

ECO FOO FOOTPRINT N METHOD: Ford C3 Southwest Detroit

Ecological cological Foot Footpri rint : “A measure of how muchh biolog biologically productiv productive landd and water an individual, population population or activity requires requires to produ produce all thee resources resource it consumes mes and to absorb absorb the waste it generates generates using prevailing prevailing technology technolo and resource e management e practices. actices. The Eco cological Footprint is usually lly measured measured in global hec hectares e “. Global Footprint Network The ”base ”baseline” line” Eco-Footprint Eco-Footprint is derived from fro USS Census 2010 population of 106,749 749 people. peopl

capacitiess capacitie

Current Conditions

First, we identify and map density metrics/assets. As urbanists, we believe that density/intensity is sustainable and should be broadly defined and visualized in three primary categories: 1. Human [inhabitation] – Focusing on stable, even growing populations. Concentrations of inhabitation serve as the primary criteria. For the Ford project, we are mapping data sets on immigration, age and ethnicity. 2. Cultural [place] – Focusing on layers of built and narrative heritage. Concentrations of such resources and embedded meaning become the second criteria. For the Ford project, we are mapping data sets on vacant land and housing , among others. 3. Infrastructure [ecosystem] – Focusing on the rich investment in physical and technological infrastructure that supports manufacturing and movement of goods and services and the human settlement associated with these activities. For the Ford project, we are mapping blue, gray, green, and white infrastructure.

56 '%15;

Manifesto

studio[Ci]

Green Infrastructure Sub-Hub Woodmere + West Vernor Highway

Definition NZE Community: “A net zero-energy community (ZEC) is one that has greatly reduced energy needs through efficiency gains such that the balance of energy for vehicles, thermal, and electrical energy within the community is met by renewable energy.” [NREL Technical Report NREL/TP-7A246065 November 2009] 0'9&+#)4#/6TCPU&KUEKRNKPCT[ 7TDCPKUO

Convergence of Intensity [Ci]: “a value based approach which builds on Value Densification and recommends the new geography of the city. Ci proposes specific criteria for building sustainable communities, arguing that balanced, sustainable, dense and urban development is still possible in a post-industrial city like Detroit. The methodology empowers communities to proactively identify and design for the coming together of a broad host of metrics into a spatial convergence. The primary author defines this purposeful phenomenon of re-sizing the city based upon these metrics as a convergence of densities [intensity] intensive convergence or a convergence of intensity [Ci]”

+0(4#5647%674'

We are urbanists and believe that the city is the most desirable place for human inhabitation [humans to live, work, play and learn]. If humankind has a sustainable future on this globe, we must rethink our spatial dispersion and reinforce uses in close proximity to concentrations of population.

Southwest Detroit: Our Region’s First Net-Zero Energy Community

Alternative Energy 1 _‘Solar Energy’ - All new developments, existing warehouses and factories are to include the installation of solar panels on the roof and facade, where applicable.

Urban Mobility 4 _‘Public Rail’ The significant investment of the Canadian Pacific Rail Co. connecting Southwest Detroit to regional and international network will be opened up for passenger rail usage, and for providing a regional link for industry between Chicago and Montreal.

Energía alternativa 1 _`Solar Energy - todas las novedades, almacenes existentes y fábricas son incluir la instalación de los paneles solares en la azotea y la fachada, en caso pertinente.

Movilidad urbana 4 _El `Rail público la inversión significativa del sudoeste de conexión Detroit del Co. del carril pacífico canadiense a la red regional e internacional será abierto para el uso del transporte de pasajeros por ferrocarril.

2 _‘Solar Lighting’ - New solar powered lighting installed along the GreenLink corridor.

Public Realm 5_‘GreenLink’ - Public Greenway with pervious surfaces and native plantings along the railway corridor linking to Michigan Central Station, St. Anne’s Neighborhood, historic Corktown neighborhood, the planned Mexicantown-Corktown GreenLink, Detroit West Riverfront, and other community assets.

2 _`Lighting solar - nueva iluminación accionada solar instalada a lo largo del pasillo de GreenLink.

Reino público 5 _`GreenLink - Greenway público con las superficies penetrables y las plantaciones nativas a lo largo del pasillo ferroviario que liga a la estación central de Michigan, a la vecindad del St. Anne, a la vecindad histórica de Corktown, y al Mexicantown-Corktown previsto GreenLink.

Mixed-Use Density + Green Economy 3 _‘Commercial + Residential Infill’ - Vacant building and parcels to be infilled with mixed use density. First floor will be designated for commercial uses, such as restaurants, cafes, local shops, etc.

6 _‘Bike Share Facility’ - Bicycle share/rental center located along the GreenLink corridor. This center would be part of a series of connected bike share rental facilities throughout the city.

Mezclado-Utilice la densidad + economía verde 3 _Anuncio publicitario del `+ Infill residencial - edificio vacante y paquetes a ser infilled con densidad mezclada del uso. La primera planta será señalada para las aplicaciones comerciales, tales como restaurantes, cafés, tiendas locales, etc.

6 _Parte Facility - parte de la bicicleta/centro de alquiler de la bici del `situado a lo largo del pasillo de GreenLink. Este centro sería parte de una serie de instalaciones de alquiler conectadas de la parte de la bici en la ciudad.


studio[Ci]

Urban Evolution _ Creating a Net Zero Energy Community



















 







 


























studio[Ci]

FordC3

&GPUKV[HQT0GV<GTQ'PGTI[ 4'5'#4%*+PVGTHCEG.C[GTU #0#.;5+5&GPUKV[4WNGUQH6JWOD.''&0& 8+5+10'0'4);&'05+6;*7$5 5WDĂ&#x201E;*WDUÂś+*+=OKZGFWUGFGPUKV[ RQRWNCVKQPITQYVJ?+PVGTPCVKQPCN)TGGP.KPM

URBAN MOBILITY FOR NET ZERO ENERGY

".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

Southwest Detroit: Our Regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s First Net-Zero Energy Community Ford Motor Company is interested in the future of urban mobility - the movement of people, goods and services in both explosive growth and shrinking urbanized regions - with a particular focus on fleets of EVs, Mass Transit and pedestrian mobility to promote sustainable communities.

Solar Lighting

Bus Rapid Transit Stop

(Public Realm + Alternative Energy)

(Urban Mobility)

(Mixed-Use Density)

New solar street lighting to replace existing light system.

Michigan Avenue to serve as a Bus Rapid Transit, with a stop at 19th Street. This stop will be served by other forms of transportation, including Zip Car, Bike Share facility, etc.

Proposed mixed-use density to replace the existing industrialized use area, which includes the designation of relocated â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Planned Developmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; zones. All new residential towers are to be oriented to the south, to maximize solar exposure.

Built Density

Proposed â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Net Zero Energyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Vision

Final Research

Increased mix-use density along Michigan Avenue. New structures to include solar panels on the roof and building facade.

=

Green [ Infrastructure ]

Grray+White [ Infrastructure ]

VDCmp GeoDesign Digital Interface Data Layers: blue, green, gray + white infrastructure; Floodplains, Greenways, State Roads and ADT.

Transit Analysis Layerings - Proposed Ann Arbor to Detroit Rail Stop (Studio[Ci], 2009)

Refined Analysis

Initial Analysis

Refined Analysis

Southwest Detroit: Our Regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s First Net-Zero Community Master Plan I Framework Plan

Car Share/EV Charging Station

Bike Lanes

(Urban Mobility)

(Public Realm)

Zipcar Electric Vehicle car share facility, part of a series throughout the city, to be located at the Bus Rapid Transit stop, along Michigan Avenue.

A continuous bike lane system along Michigan Avenue on both sides, buffered by the parking lane and bioswale system.

C

Vernor

3

MITC + DIFT Gateway

W. Vernor Hwy.

Analysis

A

2 1

Woodmere Cemetery

add language here..............

H1_Woodmere + West Vernor Highway

HX_UNI Community Center

HX_John Kronk West of Lonyo

HX_IHI

HX_MCS[solar]

HX_International GreenLink

B

B B

C

C C

Context Map: The Green Infrastructure Sub-Hub

Peripheral Analysis (if any)

B

5

B

D I-75 Buss Transit Stop

C

4

Highway West

C

C

Refined Peripheral Analysis (if any)

Refined Peripheral Analysis

C

Net Zero Energy Vision

C

N The Green Infrastructure Sub-Hub Framework Plan + Opportunities

Residential Development Opportunities Commercial/Mixed Use Development Opportunities Important Arterial Corridors

Energy/Density [HUB] _ Green Infrastructure Sub-Hub Woodmere + West Vernor Highway

Intermodal Transit Stop

Bike Share Facility

Mobile Transit Application

All new developments include the installation of solar panels and geo-thermal wells, where applicable.

The intersection of Woodmere St. and W. Vernor Hwy. will act as an important transit intermodal center with the convergence of multiple modes of movement (vehicular, bus, bike, pedestrian).

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;D Bikeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; share/rental center to be included as part of the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;D Carâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; rental facility. Adjacent alley to be re-purposed as a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Green Alleyâ&#x20AC;? to connect to Woodmere greenway and include pervious surface materials.

DDOT and SMART bus systems will be connected to a mobile application to inform users/local residents of bus schedules and provide notifications of specific bus stop arrival times, etc.

(Alternative Energy)

(Urban Mobility)

(Urban Mobility)

(Urban Mobility)

Pedestrian Connectivity

Hub and Sub-Hub Locations

Green Buffers Vacant Land Opportunities

Highway Systems

Green Infrastructure ay

Highw West

Vernor

Arterial Network

MITC + DIFT Gateway

Bioswale Water Mitigation System

White Infrastructure Solar Array Fields â&#x20AC;&#x153;Energy Farmsâ&#x20AC;? Geothermal Energy Well Fields Salt Caverns (storage) Existing Electrical Grid Hydro-Current System Telecommunications (Wireless and Public) Vacant Land

Urban Mobility Locate a passenger stop for the Detroit to Ann Arbor Rail Link. Intermodal Rail Stop and transfer point between rail and Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) Michigan Boulevard and Junction. ZipCar access point step down from passenger rail.

studio[Ci] ".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

Mass Transit (Urban Mobility)

Rivers

Proposed DRIC I NITC

I-75 Buss Transit Stop

Blue Infrastructure

Internatio

Systemic Overlay [PLAN]

Crossing

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Car Share Facilities

nal Trade

Commercial Infill

Streetscape Improvements

Within a 1/4 mile walking radius there are six vacant parcels that provide opportunity for new mixed-use development along the W. Vernor Hwy. corridor. This provides the opportunity for new locally owned and operated businesses to serve the neighborhood and create jobs. Current zoning permits a maximum buildable height of 35â&#x20AC;&#x2122;.

The community has announced MDOTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commitment to streetscape and bike lane improvements along W. Vernor Hwy. Elements of the public realm will be enhanced with new wider sidewalks, where applicable, bike lanes (using pervious pavement), solar lighting, and bioswales with native landscaping providing natural cleansing of stormwater.

(Density + Green Economy)

(Public Realm)

Car Share/EV Charging Station

Woodmere Greenway Gateway

Residential Infill

(Alternative Energy + Urban Mobility)

(Public Realm)

(Density)

Existing fuel station be transformed with a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;D Carâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Electric Vehicle (EV) car share and charging facility.

The community has proposed the Woodmere Greenway, an important non-motorized north/south connector. This intersection will serve as a gateway enhanced with public open space featuring hard and soft landscaping, solar lighting and a wayfinding system.

Vacant parcels to be infilled with single and multi-family residential units.

Decorative Fencing (Public Realm)

New architectural decorative fencing to be installed along perimeter of Woodmere cemetery.

Blue I Green I Gray I White Infrastructure

Salt Caverns

New

W. Vernor Hwy. is a major mass transit corridor serviced by both the City of Detroit Department of Transportation (DDOT) and Southeastern Michigan Area Regional Transit (SMART) bus systems. Transit stops should be located within approximately 1/4 mile walking radii from each other.

1 Mile

Water Systems Current and Future Bike Routes Major Arterial Roadway Corridors Railways Systems Highways Bike Share Facility ZipcarŠ EV Care Share

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Bike Share Facilities

LEGEND

White Infrastructure

Grey Infrastructure

Design Stage 2

Systemic Overlay Concept: the diagram illustrates the new conformed convergent systems of the designated Hubs and Sub-Hubs, in association with the connectivity to the systemic locally and regionally infrastructure layers. This systemic overlap was created that defines the location of each of the Net-Zero Energy Hubs and Sub-Hubs, along with the blue|green|gray + white infrastructure systems. Each of the individual systemic layers is designated as blue|green|gray + white infrastructure. Additionally, each of the layers were overlaid together, creating a compilation map of the entire systemic overlay in Southwest Detroit and beyond. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Systemic Overlay Planâ&#x20AC;? illustration represents the convergence of the multiple infrastructure systems that define the region and that can be built upon to reinforce a positive net-zero energy vision.

studio[Ci] ".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

Current Conditions

Design Stage 1

Energy Systems

New solar powered lighting installed along W. Vernor Hwy.

Net- Zero Energy Hub Urban Form

Green Infrastructure Energy Buffers Park Systems Greenways Green Roofs Reforestation Vacant Land

Gray Infrastructure EV Car Charging Stations Bus Rapid Transit System Detroit to Ann Arbor Commuter Rail System Canadian Pacific (CP) Passenger Rail System Highway Systems Bike Share Facilities Railway Networks Major Transportation Infrastructure Projects (NITC, DIFT, Ambassador Bridge) Vacant Land

Solar Lighting

(Public Realm + Alternative Energy)

LAYERS: Blue Infrastructure Bioswales/Infiltration Trenches River and Ravines Water Taxi Water Freight Systems Decommissioned Grid/Pervious Surfaces Vacant Land

Proposed â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Net Zero Energyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Vision

Systemic Overlay Layers

Design

develop an all modes approach to moving people and goods in a carbon neutral manner. Place emphasis on, and invest in, the pedestrian environment, mass transit, bicycle and EV fleets.

Urban Mobility

Built Density + Energy

Continued Research

+

+

19th Street and MIchigan Avenue Sub-Hub

(Mixed-Use Density + Alternative Energy)

Initial Research

Blue [ Infrastructure ]

Energy/Density [HUB]_Intermodal Orientated Development

Woodmere St.

Research

$NWG)TGGP)TC[ 9JKVG+PHTCUVTWEVWTG#0GY7TDCP'EQU[UVGO? studio[Ci] is interested in the role of infrastructure in the Great Lakes regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s past, current and furture growth and sustainability. We have defined infrastructure, for research and design purposes, as â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;blue, green, gray + whiteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;: the systemic and complex overlay required to support a city and its associated urbanized region. We define four categories: blue is associated with fresh water resources and the hydrological cycle; green is associated with the nature environment, precipation processing, open space and non motorized movement systems; gray is associated with vehicular movement systems, especially extant road and rail; and white is associated with telecommunications and energy generation and delivery. Infrastructure is a key determinant of future urban form and plays a significant role in establishing a more desirable, ethical and sustainable condition for urban growth and change.


studio[Ci]

Systemic Overlay [PLAN]

Pedestrian Connectivity

Hub and Sub-Hub Locations

Blue I Green I Gray I White Infrastructure

Livernois Ave. Gateway

Green Buffers Vacant Land Opportunities

Railway Network

Highway Systems

Net- Zero Energy Hub Urban Form

White Infrastructure frast s Green Infrastructure y

ghwa

or Hi

Vern

Inte

ade

l Tr

iona

rnat

New

Arterial Network

MITC + DIFT Gateway

g

ssin

Cro

Bioswale Water Mitigation System

t Wes

Rivers

Proposed DRIC I NITC

I-75 Buss Transit Stop

Blue Infrastructure

tional

Trade

Crossi

ng

Salt Caverns

Interna

‘D’ Car Share Facilities

New

1 Mile

studio[Ci] ".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

1 Mile

Water Systems Current and Future Bike Routes Major Arterial Roadway Corridors Railways Systems Highways Bike Share Facility Zipcar© EV Care Share

‘D’ Bike Share Facilities

LEGEND

White Infrastructure

Grey Infrastructure


studio[Ci]

Energy/Density [HUB] _ Green Infrastructure Sub-Hub Energy Systems

New solar powered lighting installed along W. Vernor Hwy.

All new developments include the installation of solar panels and geo-thermal wells, where applicable.

(Public Realm + Alternative Energy)

(Alternative Energy)

Intermodal Transit Stop (Urban Mobility)

The intersection of Woodmere St. and W. Vernor Hwy. will act as an important transit intermodal center with the convergence of multiple modes of movement (vehicular, bus, bike, pedestrian).

Bike Share Facility

Mobile Transit Application

‘D Bike’ share/rental center to be included as part of the ‘D Car’ rental facility. Adjacent alley to be re-purposed as a “Green Alley” to connect to Woodmere greenway and include pervious surface materials.

DDOT and SMART bus systems will be connected to a mobile application to inform users/local residents of bus schedules and provide notifications of specific bus stop arrival times, etc.

(Urban Mobility)

(Urban Mobility)

studio[Ci] ".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

Mass Transit (Urban Mobility)

W. Vernor Hwy. is a major mass transit corridor serviced by both the City of Detroit Department of Transportation (DDOT) and Southeastern Michigan Area Regional Transit (SMART) bus systems. Transit stops should be located within approximately 1/4 mile walking radii from each other.

Commercial Infill

Streetscape Improvements

Within a 1/4 mile walking radius there are six vacant parcels that provide opportunity for new mixed-use development along the W. Vernor Hwy. corridor. This provides the opportunity for new locally owned and operated businesses to serve the neighborhood and create jobs. Current zoning permits a maximum buildable height of 35’.

The community has announced MDOT’s commitment to streetscape and bike lane improvements along W. Vernor Hwy. Elements of the public realm will be enhanced with new wider sidewalks, where applicable, bike lanes (using pervious pavement), solar lighting, and bioswales with native landscaping providing natural cleansing of stormwater.

(Density + Green Economy)

(Public Realm)

Proposed ‘Net Zero Energy’ Vision

Solar Lighting

Car Share/EV Charging Station

Woodmere Greenway Gateway

Residential Infill

Decorative Fencing

Existing fuel station be transformed with a ‘D Car’ Electric Vehicle (EV) car share and charging facility.

The community has proposed the Woodmere Greenway, an important non-motorized north/south connector. This intersection will serve as a gateway enhanced with public open space featuring hard and soft landscaping, solar lighting and a wayfinding system.

Vacant parcels to be infilled with single and multi-family residential units.

New architectural decorative fencing to be installed along perimeter of Woodmere cemetery.

(Alternative Energy + Urban Mobility)

(Public Realm)

(Density)

(Public Realm)

studio[Ci] ".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

Current Conditions

Woodmere + West Vernor Highway


studio[Ci]

Energy/Density [HUB] _UNI Community Center Sub-Hub Moose Lodge A retention pond is located within the park to collect water from under pervious surfaces around the site. The pond would serve the public during all four seasons, such as ice skating in the winter and a wading pool in the summer.

Solar Panels

Green wall System

Community Center

Solar Field

Protective Fencing

A solar array panel grid will be installed on the Moose Lodge roof to supply power to the Community Center.

A living wall (vegetative) will be applied to the existing facade of the Moose Lodge. This will add a thermal barrier to increase energy efficiency and serve aesthetics purposes linking to the park.

Existing Moose Lodge structure to be acquired by UNI for their offices and transformed into a Community Center. Proposed program includes a training facility, work share program (time bank), learning center, etc.

A solar array field will be installed on the adjacent corner (Lawndale and Senator Street) vacant lot next to the UNI Community Center. For security purposes, the panels will be fastened together and raised above the ground.

A new architectural wood fencing system will be installed around the perimeter of the solar array, for security and protection.

(Alternative Energy)

(Alternative Energy)

(Green Economy + Public Realm)

(Public Realm)

(Alternative Energy)

studio[Ci] ".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

Community Park

Geothermal Energy

(Public Realm)

(Alternative Energy)

A new community park and play lot is proposed in association with the Community Center. The park will offer four season use, with opportunities for both passive enjoyment and active recreation.

A series of geothermal wells will be installed beneath the pervious alleyway pavement and Community Center parking lot.

Pervious Pavement + Decorative Fencing (Public Realm)

Existing alleyway, sidewalks and parking lot surfaces will be repaved with pervious brick pavers and/or recycled materials. An architectural fence will be installed around the perimeter of the new park of the adjacent Community Center.

Heated Sidewalk System

(Public Realm + Urban Mobility)

Solar Lighting

(Alternative Energy)

All new sidewalks are to include A series of solar powered radiant heating, to encourage four lighting to be installed along the green alleyways. season use.

Proposed â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Net Zero Energyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Vision

(Public Realm)

Mass Transit

Green Alleyway Revitalization (Public Realm + Urban Mobility)

Native Plantings

(Urban Mobility)

New mass transit route to be implemented along Lawndale Street, with a stop at the Community Center.

Existing alleyways will be re-purposed for the use of the community. A wide range of uses include: walking and running paths, cross country skiing, etc.

New plantings will be added to define the green alleyway corridors. Native planting are recommended for low maintenance and water conservation.

(Public Realm)

studio[Ci] ".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

Current Conditions

Storm water Run-Off Retention Pond


MCS International GreenLink [HUB]

studio[Ci]

Interchange - Hospital - Intermodal

Urban Mobility E The significant investment by Canadian Pacific in the Michigan Central Station Viaduct and tunnel to Canada allows the existing industrial rail line to be used by commuter trains, connecting Chicago to Montreal and linking Southwest Detroit regionally. A potential stop lies next to the rail lines on the existing empty vacated lot.

Alternative Energy A Potential for photovoltaic arrays on the old Southwest Hospital roof, in addition to geo-thermal wells beneath pervious surfaces (grass, parking lot, etc.). B Opportunities for green buffer zones along freeway system interchange running through the Corktown neighborhood. Opportunities exist for tree plantings, greenery, and decorative plantings, as well as photovoltaic arrays. Density C Opportunities for mixed-use density along Michigan Avenue commercial corridor.

F New Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) route along Michigan Avenue with proposed stop at 18th or 19th Avenue. J Existing 18th and 19th Avenue corridor grid to be re-connected, allowing for mixed-use development and pedestrian connection from Michigan Avenue (BRT stop) to MCS (passenger rail). Public Realm G Opportunities to enhance the streetscape along Michigan Avenue. Improvements include planned bike lanes, bioswales, a variety of vegetated areas, lighting, facade improvements, public seating, and public artwork.

A Vacant Southwest Hospital structure to be renovated into American House for Assisted Living. D Opportunities for mixed-use density/economic development within the vicinity of the proposed passenger rail stop and Michigan Central Station. K Existing industrial district to be repurposed into Transit-Orientated-Development (TOD) mixed use (live I work I play) district.

H Existing proposed 100 points of light project at W. Vernor Highway viaduct should be expanded to the 20th street viaduct, to enhance pedestrian connections to Mexicantown.

Context Map: The MCS International GreenLink Hub

E Green Economy Existing Canadian Pacific rail line to be improved to handle double stack containers being imported into and exported from the City. I Existing parking structure to be transformed into a composting facility and potential addition to North Corktown urban farm. Commercial/Mixed Use Development Opportunities (Infill) Commercial/Mixed Use Development Opportunities (Adaptive Reuse) Parks and Green Infrastructure Transit Orientated Development Corridors Public Mass Transit Corridor/Stop MCS International GreenLink Current Industrialized Use District

B

K B

C K

C

F

4

3

C

C

Michigan

G

16t

5

Avenue

hS

hS

I75

t.

17t t.

K

2

hA ve.

1

A

6

19t

B

20t

J

D

hA

1

2

3

4

5

6

ve.

I E

H

E

H 18t hA ve.

studio[Ci] J

".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

The IHI Sub-Hub Framework Plan + Opportunities

Photo Analysis: Photo Analysis Study


MCS International GreenLink [HUB]

studio[Ci] studio[

MCS International GreenLink Hub

N

N

MCS International GreenLink Hub Analysis MCS International GreenLink Corridor

B

C

Development opportunities for Mixed Use Density and Green Economy

A

Areas claimed for reforestation (Approx. 148 acres)

2 H

Areas claimed for agriculture (Approx. 97 acres)

D

Existing agricultural land use G

E

Existing Mexicantown-Corktown Green Link Plan (relative to area)

F

Urban Mobility connectivity between neighborhoods and points of interest/community assets International Water Taxi Service Corktown and St. Anne’s neighborhoods 1 St. Anne’s 2 Corktown I

Bike Share Facility

1

Zipcar© EV Care Share J

A Proposed American House assisted living facility and proposed

K

composting facility

B Proposed Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) stop C Roosevelt Park Entry Gateway D MCS[solar] Interpretive Plaza E Proposed passenger rail stop along Canadian Pacific rail line

REFERENCE DAIGRAM ----

M

REFERENCE DAIGRAM ----

L

M

REFERENCE DAIGRAM ----

J

F, G, H Entrances to the Historic Corktown neighborhood I Entrance to St. Anne’s neighborhood J International Water Taxi Port K Park/Marina Node

(Detroit West Riverfront District Plan)

L Windsor, ON Downtown Waterfront Park M Riverside Park N Reforestation and Park Overpass


MCS International GreenLink [HUB]

studio[Ci]

studio[Ci] ".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

Solar Energy

Vacant building and parcels to be infilled with mixed use density. First floor will be designated for commercial uses, such as restaurants, cafes, local shops, etc.

All new developments, existing warehouses and factories are to include the installation of solar panels on the roof and facade, where applicable.

(Mixed Use Density + Green Economy)

(Alternative Energy)

Public Rail

(Urban Mobility) The significant investment of the Canadian Pacific Rail Co. connecting Southwest Detroit to regional and international network will be opened up for passenger rail usage, and for providing a regional link for industry between Chicago and Montreal.

GreenLink

(Public Realm)

Solar Lighting

(Alternative Energy)

Public Greenway with pervious surfaces and native New solar powered plantings along the railway corridor linking to lighting installed along Michigan Central Station, St. Anne’s Neighborhood, the GreenLink corridor. historic Corktown neighborhood, the planned Mexicantown-Corktown GreenLink, Detroit West Riverfront, and other community assets.

Bike Share Facility (Public Realm)

‘D Bike’ share/rental center located along the GreenLink corridor. This center would be part of a series of connected bike share rental facilities throughout the city.

studio[Ci] ".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

Current Conditions

Commercial + Residential Infill

Proposed ‘Net Zero Energy’ Vision

International GreenLink


Energy/Density [HUB]_Intermodal Orientated Development and Urban Mobility

studio[Ci] Adaptive Re-Use

Gateway Plaza

(Alternative Energy)

(Density)

(Density)

The convergence of multiple intermodal systems will catalyze opportunities for the adaptive re-use of Michigan Central Station [MCS]. The re-use of the building is part of a greater initiative in the restoration of the area. See MCS[solar] proposed net-zero energy vision for details.

Existing structures along the greenway will be redeveloped into mixed-use opportunities, such as the artist lofts, as illustrated below.

Opportunities exist for new high density residential developments. The implementation strategy include the relocation of designated ‘Planned Development’ zones.

studio[Ci] ".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

MCS Intermodal Center (Urban Mobility)

We propose siting a multi-transit intermodal center at MCS. This would allow various modes of transportation systems to converge and catalyze investment and development. Transportation systems include electric vehicle designated parking spots, general public parking, bike racks, and Detroit Department of Transportation bus stop on Vernor.

Passenger Rail Stop

Pedestrian Bridge

Pedestrian Ramps and Gateway Plaza

(Urban Mobility)

(Public Realm)

(Public Realm)

Canadian Pacific passenger rail system with stop at Michigan Central Station.

A new pedestrian bridge is planned to span across the GreenLink and rail corridor connecting to the Mexicantown neighborhood, Corktown, and the MCS International GreenLink, etc. The bridge is masked of a vegetated living wall system and horizontally cladded with wood.

Proposed ramps from street level (West Vernor and Newark) lead pedestrians to a gateway plaza located at the entrances of the pedestrian bridge system. The areas would be landscaped with vegetation and have the same concrete paving surface on 19th Street.

studio[Ci] ".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

Current Conditions

MCS[solar]

Proposed ‘Net Zero Energy’ Vision

Amtrak/Via Rail Intermodal Rail Stop


studio[Ci]

FordC3

&GPUKV[HQT0GV<GTQ'PGTI[ 4'5'#4%*+PVGTHCEG.C[GTU #0#.;5+5&GPUKV[4WNGUQH6JWOD.''&0& 8+5+10'0'4);&'05+6;*7$5 5WDÄ*WDU¶+*+=OKZGFWUGFGPUKV[ RQRWNCVKQPITQYVJ?+PVGTPCVKQPCN)TGGP.KPM

DENSITY FOR NET ZERO ENERGY

".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

We accept the multifarious contemporary arguments for the virtues and value of density (beginning with Jane Jacobs in the 1960s and extending to Winy Maas, et al in the 2000s). We are interested in the role that density plays in sustainable urbanism, and propose an alternate to the landscape urbanists’ pessimistic perception of the city as “unlimited vacuum” as well as the hyper-density proponents’ optimistic perception of “unlimited capacity”: Convergence of Intensity [Ci] is an ethical approach that meditates these two ends of the density spectrum.

Bagley Housing + South West Housing Solutions, Scotten Park Project The BH/SWHS Scotten Park: MAX Zoning, as of right, yielded an additional 30 development parcels. We designed and modeled 30 new residential buildings with 482,458 sf. of proposed residential density distributed among 488 total units [111 one bedroom units; 236 two bedroom units; and 141 three bedroom units] and 62,108 sf. of new commercial density in the study area. This proposed density, if built, would essentially double the BH/SWHS real estate portfolio within walking distance of the convergence of densities illustrated in the Analysis Layering.

Researching Some of the Overarching Goals With our design work reaching to the extent of a multi-neighborhood span within 1 HUB, it became necessary to research other facets of development and catalysts of work within the city. One of those primary facets is The Detroit Works Project, who is looking for ways to revitalize the city in a massive comprehensive plan developed by several consultants. Another, which affects Southwest Detroit directly and especially the proposed Green Link corridor is the Canadian Pacific Railway. Based on ‘word-of-mouth’ research, we used the information provided to consider a strategy of Transit Oriented Design.

Meeting the drivers of Southwest Detroit Meeting with the community organizations and local entrepenuers gave us the insight as to what the community wants in terms of development and possible density. Some of the organizations and people we met with are: -The Southwest Detroit Development Collaborative (SDDC) -The Southwest Detroit Business Association (SDBA) -Urban Neighborhood Initiatives (UNI) -WARM Training

Energy/Density [HUB]_Intermodal Orientated Development Canadian Pacific Intermodal Rail Stop MCS[solar]

Adaptive Re-Use

(Alternative Energy)

The convergence of multiple intermodal systems will catalyze opportunities for the adaptive re-use of Michigan Central Station [MCS]. The re-use of the building is part of a greater initiative in the restoration of the area. See MCS[solar] proposed net-zero energy vision for details.

Gateway Plaza

(Density)

(Density)

Existing structures along the greenway will be redeveloped into mixed-use opportunities, such as the artist lofts, as illustrated below.

Opportunities exist for new high density residential developments. The implementation strategy include the relocation of designated ‘Planned Development’ zones.

Final Research Continued Research

B

C

A

2 H D

Areas of Interest After meeting with the community and local contributors we designated 3 primary ‘HUBS’. These HUBS were influenced by our previous research on density in Southwest, our LEED ND analysis, and our observation of the concerns and interests within the community

LEED Neighborhood Development (ND) Using LEED ND to analyze and develop the neighborhood at the overall, HUB, and SUB-HUB scales. This was done using the metrics of LEED ND and basing a significant amount of research on intersection density.

G

Intended Land Use Analysis w/ Extended Parameters Once the first pass of our design plan was laid out, we needed to go back and analyze the relationships between everything that we had done to assure that it was all cohesive. We found more opportunities than we had originally anticipated.

F

E

I 1

J

L

studio[Ci]

M

".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

M

MCS Intermodal Center

Initial Analysis

Refined Analysis

Vacancy Rates Where is the lowest amount of vacancy? How does this relate to our LEED ND work and our discussions with the community? From this, we can determine what areas are most suitable for density and what areas should be re-appropriated for other uses.

Exploration of HUBS Our refined peripheral analysis focused on our understanding of the HUBS on the micro, or ground level scale. This consisted of the following elements of analysis: -Vacancy -Existing Density -Ongoing and Up-coming Projects -As-Is Zoning -Existing Parks and Other Green Spaces

2010 Census, Vacancy by Block Group Population

Analysis

Population density for Wayne County illustrates high concentrations in SW Detroit (2010 Census)

Passenger Rail Stop

Pedestrian Bridge

Pedestrian Ramps and Gateway Plaza

(Urban Mobility)

(Public Realm)

(Public Realm)

Canadian Pacific passenger rail system with stop at Michigan Central Station.

A new pedestrian bridge is planned to span across the GreenLink and rail corridor connecting to the Mexicantown neighborhood, Corktown, and the MCS International GreenLink, etc. The bridge is masked of a vegetated living wall system and horizontally cladded with wood.

Proposed ramps from street level (West Vernor and Newark) lead pedestrians to a gateway plaza located at the entrances of the pedestrian bridge system. The areas would be landscaped with vegetation and have the same concrete paving surface on 19th Street.

This analysis played a large role in shaping the buondaries that tied our design work.

Zoning Using our digital interface, we created a model of “as of right” build out envelope. This illustrates PUD areas - opportunitities for unlimited height and density. We recommend strategically relocating the PUDs to Hubs where new density and population should be concentratated

Refined Peripheral Analysis (if any)

Peripheral Analysis (if any)

Refined Peripheral Analysis

studio[Ci] ".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

Net Zero Energy Vision Energy/Density [HUB]_Intermodal Orientated Development 19th Street and MIchigan Avenue Sub-Hub MCS International Green Link Based on our research and analysis, the Canadian Pacific rail line green link expanded to encompass several different peripheral areas and neighborhoods. As this design focus evolved, different elements emerged into different branches of the overall project. Some of these branches include: IHI, North Corktown, the riverfront, and the reforestation analysis and design. Here you can see the convergence of all of these elements.

MCS International GreenLink Hub Analysis MCS International GreenLink Corridor Development opportunities for Mixed Use Density and Green Economy Areas claimed for reforestation (Approx. 148 acres) Areas claimed for agriculture (Approx. 97 acres)

Built Density + Energy (Mixed-Use Density + Alternative Energy)

Increased mix-use density along Michigan Avenue. New structures to include solar panels on the roof and building facade.

Bus Rapid Transit Stop

Built Density

(Public Realm + Alternative Energy)

Solar Lighting

(Urban Mobility)

(Mixed-Use Density)

New solar street lighting to replace existing light system.

Michigan Avenue to serve as a Bus Rapid Transit, with a stop at 19th Street. This stop will be served by other forms of transportation, including Zip Car, Bike Share facility, etc.

Proposed mixed-use density to replace the existing industrialized use area, which includes the designation of relocated ‘Planned Development’ zones. All new residential towers are to be oriented to the south, to maximize solar exposure.

Proposed ‘Net Zero Energy’ Vision

Existing agricultural land use

Navy Street

Senator Street

Initial Density Design After our discussion with UNI and our analysis of the LEED ND areas of interest we began to design based on known possibilities at a small neighborhood parcel scale. Shown here is the UNI neighborhood and the existing Moose Lodge and vicinity. We took our research and analysis, up to this point, and began to design a base for an element of the net-zero energy community.

C

Existing Mexicantown-Corktown Green Link Plan (relative to area) N

Urban Mobility connectivity between neighborhoods and points of interest/community assets

N

International Water Taxi Service B

C

A

Corktown and St. Anne’s neighborhoods 1 St. Anne’s 2 Corktown

2 H D

Bike Share Facility G

E

Zipcar© EV Care Share

F

A Proposed American House assisted living facility and proposed composting facility

I 1

J

1

Car Share/EV Charging Station

Bike Lanes

Commercial Corridor (19th Street)

Retail/Commercial Development

Bioswales

Electric Vehicle Charge Station

C Roosevelt Park Entry Gateway

(Urban Mobility)

(Public Realm)

Zipcar Electric Vehicle car share facility, part of a series throughout the city, to be located at the Bus Rapid Transit stop, along Michigan Avenue.

A continuous bike lane system along Michigan Avenue on both sides, buffered by the parking lane and bioswale system.

(Mixed Use Density + Public Realm)

(Mixed Use Density)

(Public Realm)

(Urban Mobility)

19th Street to be re-purposed from industrialized uses into retail/community functions. The corridor would connect to the Canadian Pacific public rail system at Michigan Central Station, pedestrian bridge connection to the Mexican-Town Neighborhood, etc. Decorative concrete paved surface to extend from 19th Street and across Michigan Avenue.

First floor of the built structures to be activated with retail and commercial uses. Upper levels are to include residential apartments and lofts.

A series of bioswales with native plantings, part of a larger system, are located on both sides of Michigan Avenue to provide a natural cleansing process of the stormwater.

Designated electric vehicle charging stations parking spots along Michigan Avenue. This could be part of a city-wide park and pay system.

E Proposed passenger rail stop along Canadian Pacific rail line

D C

B Proposed Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) stop D MCS[solar] Interpretive Plaza

K

4

F, G, H Entrances to the Historic Corktown neighborhood

6 2

I Entrance to St. Anne’s neighborhood

A B

J International Water Taxi Port 3

J

L

5

M

K Park/Marina Node

(Detroit West Riverfront District Plan)

L Windsor, ON Downtown Waterfront Park

Design Stage 1

Design Stage 2

N Reforestation and Park Overpass

Current Conditions

M Riverside Park M

Design

Density

(Urban Mobility)

We propose siting a multi-transit intermodal center at MCS. This would allow various modes of transportation systems to converge and catalyze investment and development. Transportation systems include electric vehicle designated parking spots, general public parking, bike racks, and Detroit Department of Transportation bus stop on Vernor.

Asset Allocation In order to assure that we had addressed every concern and asset in Southwest we had to develop layers in Google Earth to overlay our work upon. This extra dimension gave us more depth to our design and development work.

Lawndale Street

Density: invest and densify to support existing populations, and, as the result of a collective, criteria driven dialogue, increase built and population density at points of geographic convergence.

Refined Analysis

Proposed ‘Net Zero Energy’ Vision

Initial Research

Current Conditions

Research

Southwest Detroit: Our Region’s First Net-Zero Energy Community


studio[Ci]

Three part analysis to determine the new Geography of the Neighborhood_Hubs / Sub Hubs

[Ci] Methodology 2010 Census

Wayne county population

LEED ND Categories Modeled Smart Location and Linkage Intersections within ½ mile of MCS

Community Sustainability Initiatives and Regional Transportation Investments

Proposed Hubs / Sub Hubs Energy Farms

SWHS Family Wellness Center/Campus SDDC Vacant Housing Inventory

SDBA West Vernor Streetscape Improvements MDOT Economic Development Planning Community Benifits Agreements - DIFT/NITC SWHS Mexicantown Vista Plan Roosevelt Park Revival Plan

Neighbourhood Pattern and Design Intersection Surface around boundary

UNI Woodmere/Springwells Neighbourhood Improvement Strategy Green Infrastructure Report

2010 Census Vacancy by Black Group

WARM Neighbourhood Wide “deep retrofits” $ 30 Million DOE Grant

1.Michigan Central Station+vicinity (leveraging a convergence of density and infrastructure) 2.Woodmere/Springdale neighbourhood (leveraging community development initiatives) 3. The Detroit Intermodal Freight Terminal [DIFT]/Bow Tie area (leveraging the significant transportation investment in the neighbourhood) 4. The Condon Neighborhood-Livernois/Tireman area (leveraging concentrations of vacant land and diverse partnerships)

Green Infrastructure and Buildings

LEED Neighbourhood Development Priority Areas based on Intersection Density

2009 Census

American Community Survey Commute Times + State Road Infrastructure

+

DIFT

CRG

Overlay Wetlands + Open Water (SLL Prerequisite 3+5)

N NITC

=

Regional Priority Credits

Overlay Wetlands + Open Water + Intersection Density

Continental Rail Gateway(CRG) Detroit Intermodal Freight Terminal (DIFT) North American International Trade Crossing (NITC)


Energy/Density [HUB]_Intermodal Orientated Development and Density

Built Density + Energy

Built Density

Solar Lighting

(Urban Mobility)

(Density)

(Public Realm + Alternative Energy)

We advocate for a BRT stop on Michigan Avenue at 19th Street to serve as a catalyst for new development. This stop will be serviced by other forms of transportation, including ‘D Car’, ‘D Bike’ share facility, etc.

Because of the convergence of multiple intermodal systems, this Sub Hub is recommended for intensive investment and densification (population and built environment). Proposed mixed use density phased in over time, to replace the existing DPW yard and former industrial use area. The implementation strategy includes the relocation of designated ‘Planned Development’ zones.

New solar street lighting to replace existing light system.

studio[Ci] ".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

Car Share/EV Charging Station

19th Street Commercial Corridor

Mixed Use Development

Bioswales

Electric Vehicle Charge Station

(Urban Mobility)

(Public Realm)

(Density + Public Realm)

‘D Car’ Electric Vehicle car share facility to be located at the Bus Rapid Transit stop on Michigan Avenue.

Enhancement of the existing and proposed bike lane system on both sides of Michigan Avenue, buffered by a parking lane and bioswale system.

Bike Lanes

19th Street to be re-purposed from industrial uses into an important new piece of public realm, lined with retail and community uses. The corridor would connect to the proposed Canadian Pacific public rail stop at Michigan Central Station, pedestrian bridge connection to the Mexicantown Neighborhood and MCS International GreenLink. A concrete paving surface to extend from 19th Street and across Michigan Avenue.

(Density)

(Public Realm)

(Urban Mobility)

Reinforcing existing patterns, first floor of all new structures will be activated with retail and commercial uses. Upper levels include residential apartments and lofts.

A series of bioswales with native plantings are part of a larger neighborhood blue infrastructure system located on both sides of Michigan Avenue. This will provide a natural cleansing process of the stormwater runoff.

Designated electric vehicle charging stations will be integrated with public parking spots along Michigan Avenue. This could be part of a city wide park and pay system.

studio[Ci] ".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

Current Conditions

Bus Rapid Transit Stop (BRT)

(Density + Alternative Energy)

Increased mixed use density along Michigan Avenue. New structures to include solar panels on the roof and building facade, facing south, to take best advantage of solar orientation.

Proposed ‘Net Zero Energy’ Vision

studio[Ci]

19th Street and Michigan Avenue Sub-Hub


studio[Ci]

FordC3

&GPUKV[HQT0GV<GTQ'PGTI[ 4'5'#4%*+PVGTHCEG.C[GTU #0#.;5+5&GPUKV[4WNGUQH6JWOD.''&0& 8+5+10'0'4);&'05+6;*7$5 5WDÄ*WDU¶+*+=OKZGFWUGFGPUKV[ RQRWNCVKQPITQYVJ?+PVGTPCVKQPCN)TGGP.KPM

A NEW ECOSYSTEM FOR THE PUBLIC REALM

".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

Southwest Detroit: Our Region’s First Net-Zero Energy Community Energy/Density [HUB] _ Reforestation and Best Management Practices for Stormwater Central Avenue and the Detroit Intermodal Freight Terminal

Ford Sponsorship (Green Economy) Ford is an essential economic, social and cultural asset to the city and region, providing living wage jobs and stimulus to the local economy. Reforestation would connect multiple Ford owned properties along the Rouge River, from the Ford Rouge Complex to historic Fair Lane and the Middle Rouge River Forest.

Proposed ‘Net Zero Energy’ Vision

Green Buffers (Public Realm) Green buffers will be implemented around the perimeter of the 350 acre D.I.F.T. (Livernois, Dix, Wyoming and Vernor). These vegetated buffers will enhance the public realm and assist in mitigating the adjacencies between Intermodal Freight and residential and commercial areas.

Refined Analysis

Community Engagement + Benefits (Green Economy) A reforestation initiative should include extensive engagement of local residents, NGOs, private entities and public sector agencies through the formation of a reforestation task force, which would be involved in the planting and maintenance of trees and vegetation. Benefits include public health, training for green jobs, and increased awareness of sustainability.

Bioswales (Public Realm) A series of bioswales with native plantings are part of a larger neighborhood green infrastructure system located in the D.I.F.T. The bioswales provide a natural cleansing process for stormwater run-off.

Reforestation of Gray Infrastructure (Public Realm + Green Economy) Based on the findings of our initial vacancy analysis, we recommend that 1,100 acres of vacant land, beginning at the MCS International GreenLink and running along rail lines in Southwest Detroit, become an urban forest. Large areas of land are concentrated within the vicinity of the proposed Detroit Intermodal Freight Terminal (D.I.F.T.). This provides an opportunity to use the forested area as a noise and pollution buffer, while creating a forested wildlife habitat corridor.

Refined Analysis Current Conditions

Initial Analysis

More Green, More Jobs (Public Realm + Green Economy) Throughout Southwest Detroit, job opportunities can be created based on Reforestation. All generations can be engaged and trained through a community based educational approach.

Final Research

Central Avenue Streetscape Improvements (Public Realm) The plans for the D.I.F.T. include rebuilding the Central Avenue underpass. A public greenway with pervious surfaces and native plantings is proposed to enhance the public realm. Bicycle lanes are recommended and would connect to the neighborhood wide network of greenways and bike share facilities.

URBAN REFORESTATION AN ANALYSIS OF BENEFITS Urban forests provide multiple benefits, however the four primary metrics are as follows: Urban Forests Psychological + Economic (Social) Effects

Stormwater Run-off

Urban Heat Index Reduction

Many factors can affect the amount of carbon a tree can seqeuster individually, such as the longevity and health of the tree from natural occurences in nature

Carbon Sequestration 250

Peripheral Analysis (if any)

Q = runoff in cfs C = runoff coeffient(dimensionless) i = rainfall intensity A = drainage area in acres

Studies have shown economic benefits for urban retail corridors that have strong a botanical presence

In South-East Michigan, most soil is considered to be clay of different types, therefore the runoff coefficient for forested areas can be between 0.15 - 0.25 in increments of 0.05 The average rainfall intensity for SE Michigan is a 10.0 minute, 10 year rainfall which will yield 4.19 inches Example area is 1,000 acres C = 0.15 (approx.) 2 i = 4.19 inches x 0.083 ft = .3477 ft A = 1,000 acres x 43560 ft = 43,560,000 ft Q = (0.15)(0.3477)(43,560,000) Q = 227,187.18 ft of runoff/year

Trees sequester carbon from the environment through photosynthesis and store the by-product in the tree volume of bio-mass. Bio-mass is the overall volume of organic tree material, wood volume, leaves/needles, and roots Urban micro-climates typically provide less productive growing environments than the microclimates in more rural areas. Because of this urban trees may seqester as much as 50% less carbon than rural trees. Trees that require routine maintenance sequester less carbon than those allowed to grow naturally because of the impact maintenance equipment (chainsaws, tree trimmers, etc) 21 Trees/Acre x 1000 Acres = 21,000 Trees avg. age 42 years 100 tons/year= 2.1 million tons of CO2 /year

200 As an average, we can assume that there can be planted 21 Trees per acre (deciduous and coniferous).

150

As an example we will look at the estimated amount of carbon that can be sequestered with 1,000 acres of re-forested land with an average tree age of 10 years old. 21 trees/acre x 1,000 acres = 21,000 trees 21,000 trees x 10 lbs of carbon/tree = 210,000 lbs of carbon/year Average tree age: 20 years 21,000 trees x 20 lbs of carbon/tree = 420,000 lbs of carbon/year *This generalization does not account for the multitude of different variables that may contribute to a more precise estimate of carbon sequestration

Net Zero Energy Vision

Later in life Conifers will typically sequester more carbon because of their ability to retain more biomass in the winter months

Using the table to the right we can see gain an average understanding of how much carbon can be sequestered per tree per year. 100

POUNDS OF CARBON

21 trees/acre x 1,000 acres = 21,000 trees 21,000 trees x 400 kWh/tree = 8,400,00 kWh saved

Studies have shown increased economic and community use of urban areas populated with trees and forested parks.

source: Nowak, David J., Crane, Daniel E. ‘Carbon storage and sequestration by urban trees in the USA’; Bowyer, Jim, Fernholz, Kathryn, and Lindburg, Alison. ‘Urban Tree Utilization and Why It Matters’

Example area: 1,000 acres Average trees per acre: 21

A simple way to calculate run-off is to use what is known as the “Rational Method”: Q = CiA

source: Nowak, David J., ‘Tree Species Selection, Design, and Management to Improve Air Quality’

On a per tree basis, cooling load reductions can amout to between 100 and 400 kWh.

Trees and the visual presence of forests have a positive affect emotional well being.

Reforestation intercepts 90% of stormwater run-off.

source: Creech, Calvin, ‘Stormwater Primer’

Studies have shown that on average, three mature trees can provide a cooling load reduction between 25 to 43 percent and peak cooling load reduction between 12 to 23 percent.

source: McPherson, E. Gregory and Simpson, James R., ‘Carbon Dioxide Reduction Through Urban Forestry’

The shade that trees cast on buildings can significantly reduce energy usage during the warmer months.

50

MCS International GreenLink [HUB]

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

100

CONIFER AGE OF TREES

Refined Peripheral Analysis (if any)

HARDWOOD

Refined Peripheral Analysis

VACANT LAND ANALYSIS

Park/RES

Conversion Factor

1.7941979 13.402330909 5.262667900 4.861535993 2.668131887 3.245449636 4.859204675 4.859204675 4.150452036 3.634606449 3.634606449 5.661095268 5.300509440 4.859204675 4.492905537 5.661095268 4.492905537

2.29568E-05

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34

47536.3811 214873.7228 191068.2079 183710.452 98084.7925 141371.7864 28998.9504 116550.4929 30630.7637 139641.099 226614.1726 166448.4098 176072.2098 191846.8934 260809.2161 149599.8633 52503.9786 140524.337 129545.1325 102966.0902 125969.7917 75221.4351 106121.0522 130528.0586 116491.2352 183498.551 164294.5707 48239.3947 125349.6697 79448.4034 50440.5949 175997.8619 153565.1072 156336.2301 4480898.908

1.091285147 4.932821911 4.386322488 4.217411655 2.251716996 3.245449636 0.665724296 2.675631146 0.703185575 3.205718521 5.202345551 3.821129695 4.042061743 4.404198647 5.987355731 3.43434029 1.205325494 3.225994875 2.973947022 2.363776171 2.891868491 1.726846533 2.436204133 2.9965119 2.674270776 4.212547077 3.771684353 1.107424119 2.877632449 1.823884373 1.157956722 4.04035495 3.525369764 3.588985993 102.8672842

2.29568E-05

35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65

167668.8718 197263.677 234446.0385 264952.1775 268438.4879 84270.57 313712.8062 306484.7587 199288.4817 171775.8697 137575.2826 91916.8987 61202.9692 33871.448 4588.663 15116.7503 83503.1985 161381.3058 1204340.879 201139.778 162709.6075 166097.4813 197997.6132 181455.8865 89541.5997 89338.4834 69501.5249 85487.7632 55631.8748 134404.0483 79807.7852 5514912.58

3.849147647 4.528550888 5.382140452 6.082465038 6.162499712 1.934586085 7.201855043 7.035921905 4.575034007 3.943431346 3.158293902 2.110121638 1.405026839 0.77758145 0.105341207 0.347032835 1.916969659 3.704804994 27.64786218 4.617533922 3.735298605 3.813073485 4.545399744 4.165653953 2.055592276 2.050929368 1.595535463 1.962528996 1.27713211 3.08549238 1.832134643 126.6049718

100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134

50174.4751 33577.6112 31953.5704 32765.8143 41258.3129 155244.668 112592.4604 86308.2327 43518.8421 87772.8451 78865.5319 59783.6307 84380.3831 154667.8103 52382.2286 117211.1781 633615.4354 328854.7624 700482.6248 371286.2928 143827.9382 147511.6632 222378.8887 72297.8379 55903.3718 94699.7923 108027.1221 175915.9006 176397.7354 118159.0728 30871.7764 35860.2186 70310.2441 79669.9637 20497.9371 4809026.173

1.151847452 0.770835885 0.733553038 0.752199592 0.947160533 3.563927175 2.584767222 1.981364384 0.999055143 2.014987258 1.810503484 1.37244331 1.937107047 3.550684344 1.202530498 2.690798391 14.54580887 7.549466525 16.08086831 8.523560426 3.301835123 3.386401812 5.105116812 1.659729977 1.283364823 2.174008084 2.479961477 4.038473377 4.049534782 2.712559059 0.708718465 0.82323734 1.614101102 1.828970697 0.470567885 110.4000497

Total:

Decommissioned Infrastructure

A = ABANDONED O = OCCUPIED [vacant [vacant with with occupied abandoned structures - structures - indicate # LAND USE [Residential, Commercial, Institutional, Industrial, Park] ZONING indicate # in column] in column] Residential O-7 Residential/Commercial A-1 O-10 Residential/Commercial A-3 O-3 Residential/Commercial A-1 O-5 Residential Residential A-1 O-7 Residential O-7 Residential A-1 O-8 Residential A-2 O-5 Residential A-3 O-5 Residential/Commercial A-2 O-6 Residential Residential A-1 O-9 Residential A-2 O-9 Residential A-1 O-9 Residential O-13 Residential

V = VACANT [no structures, no apparent use] V

V

V

A-21

O-3 O-14 O-18 O-6 O-8 0-3

A-1 A-5 A-4 A-4

O-4 O-3 O-8 O-19 O-12 O-12

A-2 A-1

O-18 O-13

A-4 A-4 A-3

V

V

A-1 A-2 A-1 A-1 A-1

O-7 O-4 O-2 O-4 O-3 O-3 O-6 O-11 O-10 O-1 O-2 O-7

A-1 A-4 A-2

O-1 O-7 O-9 0-11

A-3 A-1 A-3 A-1

V

Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Park Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Park/RES Residential Residential

R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R

Residential/Commercial Residential/Commercial Residential/Commercial Residential/Commercial Residential/Commercial Residential/Commercial Residential/Commercial Residential/Commercial Residential/Commercial Residential/Commercial Residential/Commercial Residential/Commercial Residential/Commercial Commercial Commercial Commercial Residential/Commercial Residential/Commercial Industrial Park Park Residential Residential/Commercial Residential/Commercial Residential/Commercial Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential

R/B R/B R/B R/B R/B R R/B R/B R R/B R/B R/B R/B B B B R/B R/B M R R R R/B R/B R/B R R R R R R

Commercial Commercial Commercial Commercial Commercial Residential Park Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Industrial Industrial Industrial Industrial Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Park/RES Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential

B B B B B R R R R R R R R R R R M M M M R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R

E

studio[Ci] ".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

McG

raw

Stre

et

Pre-Settlement Forestry and Potential Reforestation Typology Proposed Mixed Conifer and Hardwood Plantings Wetland Prairie Mixed Hardwood Swamp Oak & Hickory Forest Proposed Contiguous Reforestation Boundary and Direction

Warren Ave Sub Hub

Park Park

A-6 A-2 A-3 A-10 A-6 A-2 A-7 A-3 A-2 A-2 A-3

O-26 O-30 O-20 O-18 O-31 O-14 O-25 O-25 O-30 O-16 O-18 O-10 O-1 O-1

V

A-2

O-1 O-5 O-8 O-1

V A-4 A-2

O-8 O-7 O-3

V V V A-1 A-1

O-3 O-1 O-2

Reforestation Spine

Decomissioned Gray Infrastructure

Existing Forested Area (Middle rouge / Ojibway Park) 1 Mile

studio[Ci] ".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

NOTE: All other open spaces are designated as being “Beech & Sugar Maple Forest.”

Park/RES

Total:

Solar Energy

Vacant building and parcels to be infilled with mixed use density. First floor will be designated for commercial uses, such as restaurants, cafes, local shops, etc.

All new developments, existing warehouses and factories are to include the installation of solar panels on the roof and facade, where applicable.

(Mixed Use Density + Green Economy)

(Alternative Energy)

Public Rail

(Urban Mobility) The significant investment of the Canadian Pacific Rail Co. connecting Southwest Detroit to regional and international network will be opened up for passenger rail usage, and for providing a regional link for industry between Chicago and Montreal.

GreenLink

(Public Realm)

Solar Lighting

(Alternative Energy)

Public Greenway with pervious surfaces and native New solar powered plantings along the railway corridor linking to lighting installed along Michigan Central Station, St. Anne’s Neighborhood, the GreenLink corridor. historic Corktown neighborhood, the planned Mexicantown-Corktown GreenLink, Detroit West Riverfront, and other community assets.

Bike Share Facility (Public Realm)

‘D Bike’ share/rental center located along the GreenLink corridor. This center would be part of a series of connected bike share rental facilities throughout the city.

The 3 Generative Use Opportunites for Vacant Land 1. Energy:

Blocks Outside Sub-Hubs

Park

Commercial + Residential Infill

V V V V V V O-1 O-1 V A-1

O-1 O-1 O-2

V V V V V A-3 V A-1

O-6 O-9 O-9

V V A-1

A-2 A-3

O-4 O-1 O-10[5] O-4 O-5

V V V O-4 V

Potential Land for Hybrid Sustainable Alternative Renewable Energy (Approx. 90 acres) Productive Surfaces Hydro Current 2. Density: Areas of mixed use density 3. Nature Cycle Management: Reforestation: Proposed Mixed Conifer and Hardwood Plantings (Approx. 1100 acres) Existing Parks, Cemetaries, and Forest Water:

Bioswales along Michigan Ave. and Vernor Highway Pervious Paving: Detroit Intermodal Freight Terminal (DIFT) and the North American International Trade Crossing (NITC) Decomissioned Street Grid

Agriculture: Proposed Urban Agricultural Land Use 1 Mile

studio[Ci]

Existing Urban Agriculture Sites

Design

".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

Gross Total:

Total Land: Total vacant land:

20507511.67

470.7876867

70.9

1571.6

Design Stage 1

472.2

Design Stage 2

Design Stage 3

studio[Ci] ".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

Current Conditions

Park

ACRES 78155.25870 583805.5354 229241.8141 211768.5082 116223.8252 141371.7864 211666.9560 211666.9560 180793.6910 158323.4572 158323.4572 246597.3103 230890.1916 211666.9560 195710.9655 246597.3103 195710.9655

t Stree

McGraw St Sub Hub

FEET ² 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

24th

BLOCK #

West Grand Boulevard

LOCATION GreaterCork Town

Total:

Public Realm

Continued Research

Succession Planting (Public Realm) Reforestation is most successful in delivering benefits when planting patterns include an array of different deciduous trees and conifers which range in age from saplings to mature and are planted with an average of 21 trees/acre.

Proposed ‘Net Zero Energy’ Vision

Initial Research

Analysis

cultivate a new urban ecosystem for the new geography of the city, focusing not only physical improvements to the public ROW, but also plantings and ground plane improvements that enhance environmental quality and create spaces for expanding community and social equity.

Research

Urban Reforestation (Public Realm) Urban Forests provide four primary benefits: Urban Heat Index Reduction, Interception of Stormwater Run-off, Psychological and Economic Benefits, and Carbon Sequestration.


Southwest Detroit: Our Regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s First Net-Zero Community

studio[Ci]

Vacant Land Analysis

Vacant Land Repurposing Opportunities Vacant Land 1,571 acres as of 07.21.11 Vacant [no structures, no apparent use] 30% Vacant [with abandoned structures] Approximately 30% 1 Mile

studio[Ci] ".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

Vacant [with occupied structures] Approximately 40%


studio[Ci]

Southwest Detroit: Our Regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s First Net-Zero Community Vacancy: The Next Generative Infrastructure

The 3 Generative Use Opportunites for Vacant Land 1. Energy: Potential Land for Hybrid Sustainable Alternative Renewable Energy (Approx. 90 acres) Productive Surfaces Hydro Current 2. Density: Areas of mixed use density 3. Nature Cycle Management: Reforestation: Proposed Mixed Conifer and Hardwood Plantings (Approx. 1100 acres) Existing Parks, Cemetaries, and Forest Water:

Bioswales along Michigan Ave. and Vernor Highway Pervious Paving: Detroit Intermodal Freight Terminal (DIFT) and the North American International Trade Crossing (NITC) Decomissioned Street Grid

Agriculture: Proposed Urban Agricultural Land Use 1 Mile

studio[Ci] ".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

Existing Urban Agriculture Sites


studio[Ci]

Stormwater Footprint Rules of Thumb_Southwest Detroit Stormwater Quality & Quantity Modeling

Stormwater Primer

Quantity

Stormwater that falls on the ground (not intercepted by plants or other means) will transport off of the land in one of two ways: 1. Infiltration-Groundwater recharge, which typically eventually flows into rivers as river baseflow 2. Runoff

Primary Factors: Landuse and Soil Type More intense landuses (higher imperviousness) increases the amount of runoff. A common (and very simple) calculation to estimate the amount of runoff is called the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rational Methodâ&#x20AC;?

Q=CiA Q=runoff flow in cfs C=runoff coefficient(dimensionless) I=rainfall intensity, inches per hour A=drainage area in acres For example, the total volume of runoff from a 100-year storm (1% chance storm) for a

1-acre site in Detroit, with a heavy industrial landuse would be:

13450 ft of total run off 3

Quality

Contamination

1 acre surface

Depth

Long term hydrologic impact analysis Pollutant loading ( PLOAD )

Best Management Practices [BMP] have been evaluated based on BMP type. A nationally recognized source is the SEMCOG manual, with input from LTU CoE.

Benefits of Green Infrastructure Natural (Forest) Detention Regional (Clustered) Detention Reduction in Stormwater loads to WWTP

Opportunities Large Scale: Vacancy to Green Infrastructure Local Scale: Green roofs, Rain Barrels, other best management practices


Southwest Detroit: Our Region’s First Net-Zero Community

studio[Ci]

Vacant Land: Repurposed_Pre-Settlement Forest Typologies and Reforestation Proposal

Pre-Settlement Forestry and Potential Reforestation Typology Proposed Mixed Conifer and Hardwood Plantings Wetland Prairie Mixed Hardwood Swamp Oak & Hickory Forest Proposed Contiguous Reforestation Boundary and Direction Reforestation Spine Existing Forested Area (Middle rouge / Ojibway Park) 1 Mile

studio[Ci] ".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

NOTE: All other open spaces are designated as being “Beech & Sugar Maple Forest.”


studio[Ci]

Energy/Density [HUB] _ Reforestation and Best Management Practices for Stormwater Central Avenue and the Detroit Intermodal Freight Terminal Succession Planting (Public Realm) Reforestation is most successful in delivering benefits when planting patterns include an array of different deciduous trees and conifers which range in age from saplings to mature and are planted with an average of 21 trees/acre.

More Green, More Jobs (Public Realm + Green Economy) Throughout Southwest Detroit, job opportunities can be created based on Reforestation. All generations can be engaged and trained through a community based educational approach.

Green Buffers (Public Realm) Green buffers will be implemented around the perimeter of the 350 acre D.I.F.T. (Livernois, Dix, Wyoming and Vernor). These vegetated buffers will enhance the public realm and assist in mitigating the adjacencies between Intermodal Freight and residential and commercial areas.

Ford Sponsorship (Green Economy) Ford is an essential economic, social and cultural asset to the city and region, providing living wage jobs and stimulus to the local economy. Reforestation would connect multiple Ford owned properties along the Rouge River, from the Ford Rouge Complex to historic Fair Lane and the Middle Rouge River Forest.

Proposed â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Net Zero Energyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Vision

Urban Reforestation (Public Realm) Urban Forests provide four primary benefits: Urban Heat Index Reduction, Interception of Stormwater Run-off, Psychological and Economic Benefits, and Carbon Sequestration.

Community Engagement + Benefits (Green Economy) A reforestation initiative should include extensive engagement of local residents, NGOs, private entities and public sector agencies through the formation of a reforestation task force, which would be involved in the planting and maintenance of trees and vegetation. Benefits include public health, training for green jobs, and increased awareness of sustainability.

Bioswales (Public Realm) A series of bioswales with native plantings are part of a larger neighborhood green infrastructure system located in the D.I.F.T. The bioswales provide a natural cleansing process for stormwater run-off.

Reforestation of Gray Infrastructure (Public Realm + Green Economy) Based on the findings of our initial vacancy analysis, we recommend that 1,100 acres of vacant land, beginning at the MCS International GreenLink and running along rail lines in Southwest Detroit, become an urban forest. Large areas of land are concentrated within the vicinity of the proposed Detroit Intermodal Freight Terminal (D.I.F.T.). This provides an opportunity to use the forested area as a noise and pollution buffer, while creating a forested wildlife habitat corridor.

Current Conditions

Central Avenue Streetscape Improvements (Public Realm) The plans for the D.I.F.T. include rebuilding the Central Avenue underpass. A public greenway with pervious surfaces and native plantings is proposed to enhance the public realm. Bicycle lanes are recommended and would connect to the neighborhood wide network of greenways and bike share facilities.


studio[Ci]

FordC3

&GPUKV[HQT0GV<GTQ'PGTI[ 4'5'#4%*+PVGTHCEG.C[GTU #0#.;5+5&GPUKV[4WNGUQH6JWOD.''&0& 8+5+10'0'4);&'05+6;*7$5 5WDÄ*WDU¶+*+=OKZGFWUGFGPUKV[ RQRWNCVKQPITQYVJ?+PVGTPCVKQPCN)TGGP.KPM

ENERGY FROM RENEWABLE SOURCES

".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

Southwest Detroit: Our Region’s First Net-Zero Energy Community Solar: At an optimal fixed tilt angle of approximately 30o we see yields of §1533 kWh/m2/yr Southwest Detroit comprises 12,450 acres (5.038 x 107 m2) The area receives approximately 7.837 x 1010 kWh of solar energy If 30% of this land utilized for photovoltaic systems Accounting for the optimal tilt angle and shading Accounting for 15% and 95% efficiencies of PV modules and inverters

Hybrid alternative energy resources most suited to Southwest Detroit are: solar geothermal heat pumps submerged river turbines subterranean compressed air

Initial Research

Energy/Density [HUB] _MCS[solar] Solar Lighting

Geothermal Physical FootprintSizing: - Approx. 2,550 acres - Approx. 21% of the areas land Detroit River Energy Footprint Sizing: - Can be placed in an area of relatively low velocity (~2.1 ft/s) - Area of unaltered river flow - Approx. 552 acres overall

Approximately 2.747 x 109 kWh of solar energy are available annually

Continued Research

Salt Caverns

Research

Can address seasonal and varying energy requirements

Solar Physical Footprint Sizing: - Approx. 3,400 acres - Approx. 27% of the areas land - Requires roof and dual-use innovative land installations

Photovoltaic Generated Energy

(Density)

New residential density to replace and fill vacant parcels. The implementation strategy incudes the relocation of designated ‘Planned Development’ zones.

Roosevelt Plaza

(Hybrid Energy)

Built Density

(Public Realm + Hybrid Energy)

Photovoltaic powered lighting to be installed throughout the surrounding areas to reduce energy usage and ensure a safe pedestrian streetscape.

Photovoltaic panels wrapping Michigan Central Station generates a significant amount of energy to help power parts of the community and facets of the public realm. The morphology of the solar facade was based on the concentration and areas that received the greatest sun exposure.

Roosevelt Park

(Public Realm)

(Public Realm)

This adjacent plaza connects the periphery of MCS to both Roosevelt Park through an open plan that provides the opportunity for up close public viewing of the photovoltaic facade system and entry system to the MCS International GreenLink.

The Roosevelt Park Plan designed by Architect Todd Heidgerken, Developer Philip Cooley, and Designer Noah Resnick provides a connection between Mexicantown and Corktown, as well as supplementing the strength of the Public Realm.

Final Research

White Infrastructure

PHOTOVOLTAIC ENERGY SYSTEMS MATRIX

Kyosemi PV Bulbs, Tubes, and Convex Panel

Cost:

Polycrystaline PV Panel

Integrated Concentrating Solar Facade System

Side Mount

1. System relation to usage applicability, average cost, output per unit, efficacy, and size 2. System proportionality between output, cost, and size Matrix line weight displays typical application usage in volume (estmated)

Initial Analysis

< $1.00 $1.00 - $5.00 $5.01 - $25.00 $25.01 - $100.00 $100.01 - $250.00 $250.01 - $500.00 $500.01 - $750.00 $750.01 - $1,000.00 >$1,000.00

Can be purchased as tinted window treatment and can be used as roof covering Because of the small size units can be applied to almost any outdoor element Can be integrated into the ground in sidewalks and parks with a Plexiglas enclosure

Output per unit (peak performance): <1W 1W-5W 6 W - 50 W 51 W - 100 W 101 W - 150 W 151 W - 200 W 201 W - 250 W

This diagram is intended to display usage and information regarding Photovoltaic Solar Panel systems as a guide for application. On the left, three primary methods of application are considered: Top Mount [for roofplane installations on an existing or new building]; Side Mount [for integration into curtain wall systems or extant facades]; Ground Mount [for at-grade installations such as dedicated, secured field arrays or in the public realm]. In the center the primary system types are displayed and connected to the methods of application via application usage. Lastly, to the right is a grouping of data related to system types and subsequent application type, including cost, output per unit (peak performance), efficacy and size.

Efficacy: < 1% - 5% 6% - 10% 11% - 15% 16% - 25% > 25% Size (area by sq. ft.): < 1 sq. ft. 1 sq. ft. - 10 sq. ft. 1 sq. ft. - 50 sq. ft. 51 sq. ft. - 100 sq. ft. 101 sq. ft. - 150 sq. ft. 151 sq. ft. - 200 sq. ft. 201 sq. ft. - 250 sq. ft. 251 sq. ft. - 300 sq. ft. > 300 sq. ft.

This information is a generalized summary that was developed by studio[Ci] in 2011 and should not be used for the exact calculation of photovoltaic system projects.

Can be purchased in rolls of multiple unit arrays

Refined Analysis

Refined Analysis

studio[Ci] ".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

Solar Energy

Usable Energy EV Station

Battery Bank

Analysis

Geothermal

Hydrocurrent Energy

Peripheral Analysis (if any)

Open Public Space

Mexicantown Vista Plan Storefronts

‘D Bike’ Racks + Rental

MCS International GreenLink & Buffers

Canadian Pacific Industrial + Public Rail

Open park space creates an attraction for the community generating increased usage of the public realm and providing usable space for underserved residences of the neighborhood.

Storefronts along and through the viaduct create the opportunity to link Corktown and Mexicantown through commerce, as well as generating usage of the public realm.

Bike racks and rental shop promote the use of alternative methods of transportation, enhancing the public realm and generating more use of public spaces. The bike rental facility would be part of the ‘D Bike’ system connected throughout the city.

The rail line runs parallel to the new proposed GreenLink, connecting to the Detroit River. This also creates a buffer between the rail and public space, with aesthetically pleasing vegetation, and acts as a sound and pollutant barrier.

The significant investment of the Canadian Pacific Rail Co. provides a regional link passenger between Chicago and Montreal, with a stop at Michigan Central Station. The rail tunnel will be expanded for double stack containers, connecting Southwest Detroit to regional and international transportation networks.

(Public Realm)

Sustainable Energy Grid Air Compressor

Storage to generator [Salt Caverns]

Refined Peripheral Analysis

Refined Peripheral Analysis (if any)

(Density + Public Realm)

Net Zero Energy Vision

(Public Realm + Urban Mobility)

(Public Realm)

Proposed ‘Net Zero Energy’ Vision

Flexible PV Sheet

Application Data: Application: Building - Retrofit (Flat or Angled Structure) Building - New (Flat or Angled Structure) On Ground - Dedicated Solar Array (Angled Structure) On Ground - Public Art Applicable Special Application

Type of Photovoltaic System: Monocrystalline PV Panel

Ground Mount

(Green Economy + Urban Mobility)

Energy/Density [HUB] _Energy Farms Tireman Street Sub-Hub Energy Farms

C

2

E

Michigann M

H

N

D

D D

D

4 C

C

I

B

1 3

studio[Ci] ".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

Opportunities pp Map: p McGraw Street Sub Hub

4 1

Sampson Webber Academy and Dev. Center Inc. 3

2

D C

J

Until 1984, MCS was the primary generator of people, energy and economic activity for the City. Millions of immigrants – from across the U.S. and the globe - arrived via train at the station and were dispersed throughout the city to live, work and play. Over the last 20 years, MCS has been a primary generator of photographic images – the focus of international media depictions of Detroit’s abandonment and disinvestment. studio[Ci] believes that MCS should continue to serve as a Generator – but in the future, we envision it as a generator of alternative energy that will support a sustainable future for residential, commercial and industrial uses in Southwest Detroit. MCS[solar] is a second façade of photovoltaic panels on a structural armature that lightly attaches to the historic building and does not preclude future adaptive reuse. MCS[solar] also incorporates storage and distribution functions on site. MCS[solar]’s south, east and west facades are ideally oriented to maximize solar collection. We estimate that a significant amount of energy can be generated to meet the community’s electricity demand, and also establish an alternative energy precedent/standard for the city and region.

2

D

D

5

A

SHAR

D

D D D

studio[Ci] ".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

West Side Academy of Alt Education

D C

C

3

Opportunities Map: Warren Avenue Sub Hub

C

Digital Display Panels (Alternative energy + Public Realm) A series of digital display boards will be installed on the perimeter of the site that will act as an educational tool, displaying energy production, number of homes and businesses to which the overall system is supplying energy, etc. The panels would serve an educational role for the community, providing real time feedback and interpreting the generative landscape.

H H

C

C

Biddle Elementary School (Density + Green Economy) The existing elementary school would be transformed into an Annex of the SW Detroit Energy Farms Education/Research Institute on Livernois. This provides the opportunity to extend the mission of the joint institute into the neighborhood, collaboration with the local school system, and develop educational and training programs that promote economic development.

Ave

3

1 2

ThyssenKrupp Steel

(Alternative Energy)

A solar array panel grid will be Installed on the roofs to supply power to this active DPS Facility.

G

studio[Ci]

6

or

ern tV

".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

Decommissioned/ Repurposed Grid

ay

hw

Hig

(Public Realm)

ley

Bag

s We

1

Opportunities exist to decommission roads allowing the neighborhood to reduce impervious surface and mitigate storm water. Redundant grey infrastructure adjacent to vacant parcels will be repurposed to enhance green infrastructure and stormwater management.

eet Str

studio[Ci] ".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

Project Energy Education

(Alternative Energy + Green Economy)

A new “outdoor classroom” is proposed to engage the community in the implementation of the Energy Farms. “Hands On” training programs in the management and maintenance of the Energy Farms would be held on site. The park will offer residents and students the ability to actively learn and work with PV technology.

Native Plantings (Public Realm)

New plantings will be added to define ‘green infrastructure’ corridors. These plantings are part of a bioswale cleansing system. Native planting are recommended for low maintenance storm water management and water conservation.

Pervious Pavement + Bioswales (Public Realm)

Existing alleyway, sidewalks and parking lot surfaces will be repaved with pervious zero pavers (turf block) and/or recycled materials.

New Model of Management

(Alternative Energy + Green Economy)

A management model could be developed that would allow Non Government Organizations, Churches and adjacent property owners/residents to play a role in the management and ownership of the Energy Farms. This would allow residents who wish to remain in depopulating neighborhoods to have a role in the community.

studio[Ci] ".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

Opportunities Map: Tireman Street Sub Hub

Design Stage 1

Design Stage 2

Design Stage 3

Proposed ‘Net Zero Energy’ Vision

CocaCola Bottlers of Detroit

Sampson Weber Academy

(Alternative Energy)

Vacancy creates opportunities for generative infrastructure. A solar array and geothermal field will be installed adjacent to the former Biddle Elementary school on Seebaldt Street For security purposes, the panels will be fastened together with special key security fasteners.

studio[Ci] ".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

Current Conditions

4

C

C

Detroit etroit etro trttroit ro Hous H ing Ho ng Commissio Commiss Commissio Commission Comm ssio ion o DTE

Design

Alternative Energy

recommend a hybrid approach based on renewable resources, including solar, geothermal, hydro current and storage solutions that leverage local assets, and leads to neighborhood self sufficiency.

Application of Photovoltaic System:

Top Mount


studio[Ci]

Hybrid Alternative Energy Strategy : Foundational Research _ Looking for sustainable energy sources vs. traditional sources

1. Reviewed all energy needs in Southwest Detroit using best available data from the State of Michigan Energy Office, the local utility company references and publications, and the Department of Energy (DOE) publications and references forâ&#x20AC;Ś

What did we do?

a. b. c. d.

Commercial Industrial Transportation Residential

2. Reviewed the alternative energy options that could be employed in Southwest Detroit

10

A total of 1.019x10 kWh could be available which equates to 13 a total of 3.67x10 kJ These data suggest that alternative energy systems can provide a significant, if not all of Southwest Detroit`s energy needs

3. Reviewed the energy resources available from those alternative sources for Southwest Detroit and then selected viable options (geothermal, solar PV /solar water and hydro current) and rejected non-viable options (wind)

4. Calculated what we thought were realistic energy outputs from those alternative sources using industry best practice and reasonable design and performance assumptions (conversion efficiencies, sizing limits, etc.)


Energy Farms [HUB] _Livernois + Warren Ave Sub-Hub

There is one zoned Planned Development [PD] area in the district, bounded by McGraw, I-94, and Ford Freeway, near 35th street. This may be a candidate for high density mixuse development, or an opportunity for transfer of development rights to other hubs.

Deettrroi oit H Hooous ussin ing ng Coomm C mmis isssiioonn

Opportunities exist to continue Commercial/Mixed Use development along Warren Avenue.

DTE 4

CocaCola Bottlers of Detroit

Urban Mobility The primary opportunity in this Hub is to decommission (convert/re-purpose) redundant gray infrastructure. This will allow the neighborhood to significantly reduce impervious surfaces, mitigate storm water, and yield additional acreage for alternative energy production.

1 2

Opportunities exist to connect the Energy Farms Hub to the neighborhood wide systemic infrastructure overlay along Livernois linking to the Michigan Avenue corridor and Detroit to Ann Arbor Rail Link stop.

ThyssenKrupp Steel

Public Realm The Energy Farms will likely have to be secured with limited public access, but opportunities exist to enhance the neighborhoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s overall ecosystem through cultivating habitats that support expanded bio-diversity. Non motorized corridors and connections should be enhanced on Livernois.

3

studio[Ci] ".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

Opportunities Map: Warren Avenue Sub Hub 1

3

2

Photo Analysis: Panoramic Photo Analysis Study (Warren Ave Sub Hub)

Additional opportunities exist to enhance capacity by adding solar panels on the flat roof tops of the extant industrial and warehouse buildings that

The Energy Farms Hub Framework Plan + Opportunities Alternative Energy Farm Opportunities Decommissioned Grid [converted/re purposed] Grid/New solar orientation Important Public Corridors Important Arterial Corridors Enhanced nonMotorized Corridors

Partnership Opportunities: Industry/Commercial Non Goverment Organization Schools Churches Public Institutions

Green Economy Opportunities to partner with multiple entities and institutions located in the Sub-Hub for education, training, manufacturing, management and maintenance of the proposed Energy Farms. Partners come from diverse sectors, including DTE, ThyssenKrupp Steel, Coca-Cola Bottlers of Detroit, and the Detroit Housing Commission. The Warren Sub Hub is directly adjacent to and well served by I-94 and Livernois. Alternative Energy Solar array installations and geothermal well fields - implemented at a range of scales, from multiple acres to single lots - could potentially produce a large percentage of the energy necessary to meet neighborhood electrical and Mechanical demand. Partnerships could be established with Lawrence Technological University, DTE, ThyssenKrupp Steel, and Coca Cola to create a new Education/Research entity in the neighborhood for the development, manufacture, installation, and maintenance of solar and geothermal technologies. A management model could be developed that would allow adjacent property owners and residents to be trained to play a role in the management, maintenance and operation of the Energy Farms. This would allow residents who wish to remain in de-populating neighborhoods the oppertunity to have a generative role in the community.

4

Educational/Research Opportunities Residential Development Opportunities Commercial/Mixed Use Development Opportunities Planned Development [PD] Zoning

1 Mile

1/4 Mile

studio[Ci]

Density Based on Team analysis, the Warren Sub Hub is 62.5% vacant (blocks that are vacant, vacant with abandoned structures, and/or with less than 50% occupancy). The primary opportunity is to identify vacant parcels and sustainably Re-purpose into generative use for the large scale generation of solar and geothermal energy.

Context Map: The Energy Farms Hub The Energy Farms Hub and its three Sub Hubs, located within the Condon neighborhood at the eastern edge of Claytown and the northern SDDC boundary at Tireman, have the highest concentration of vacancy in the Southwest Detroit community (US Census 2010). This presents an opportunity to identify, quantify and assemble vacant parcels and Re-purpose them for generative use, in particular for the large scale generation of solar and geothermal energy.


studio[Ci]

Solar Panel Systems

Partnerships for Alternative Energy (Green Economy)

(Alternative Energy)

A solar array panel grid will be installed on the Educational + Research Institute and other industrial buildings in the area to supply power to the Facility and neighborhood.

The Condon neighborhood not only has the highest concentrations of vacancy in SW Detroit, but also the highest density of potential corporate partners! ThyssenKrupp Steel, DTE, and Coca Cola all have significant presence and investment in the neighborhood. Each could contribute their expertise and assets as important partners with the community to establish a new economy based on Alternative Energy.

Vacancy creates opportunities for generative infrastructure. A solar array and geothermal well field will be installed on ThyssenKrupp property at Livernois and I-94. For security purposes, the panels will be fastened together with special key security fasteners.

(Alternative Energy)

Energy Farms @ ThyssenKrupp

studio[Ci] ".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

(Public Realm + Urban Mobility)

(Alternative Energy + Green Economy)

Educational + Research Institute

Movement of Goods + Services

Non motorized improvements will enhance the Livernois Corridor to connect to the community’s proposed Ann Arbor to Detroit Commuter rail stop in the vicinity of the Bow Tie.

A partnership will be formed between Lawrence Tech, ThyssenKrupp Steel, DTE, and Coca Cola and other partners to create a joint R+D institute for the research, development, manufacture and maintenance of PV and Geothermal technologies. Vacant buildings along Livernois and centrally located between the corporate partners will be adaptively reused to create the new facility. Residents and students will be engaged and trained to make, install, and maintain the new Energy Farms infrastructure in the neighborhood.

The Condon neighborhood is ideally located adjacent to extensive road and rail infrastructure to support the regional, national, and international distribution of the new Energy Farms products and services.

Livernois Corridor

(Green Economy+Urban Mobility)

Proposed ‘Net Zero Energy’ Vision

Livernois Avenue Sub-Hub

Solar Lighting (Public Realm + Alternative Energy) New solar powered lighting will be installed along Livernois to ensure a safe pedestrian streetscape. Property

perimeters will be transformed with pervious zero pavers (turf block) and native plantings.

studio[Ci] ".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

Current Conditions

Energy/Density [HUB] _ Energy Farms


Energy Farms [HUB] _McGraw Street Sub-Hub

Urban Mobility The primary opportunity in this Hub is to decommission (convert/re-purpose) redundant gray infrastructure. This will allow the neighborhood to significantly reduce impervious surface, mitigate storm water, and yield additional acreage for alternative energy production.

West Side Academy of Alt Education

Opportunities exist to connect the Energy Farms Hub to the neighborhood wide systemic infrastructure overlay along West Grand Boulevard.

2

Public Realm The Energy Farms will likely have to be secured with limited public access, but opportunities exist to enhance the neighborhood’s overall ecosystem through cultivating habitats that support expanded bio-diversity. The Roosevelt Street pedestrian and 24th Street vehicular bridges (are assets) for enhanced public realm and connecting to North Corktown’s urban agruculture initiatives. Non motorized corridors and connections should be enhanced along West Grand Boulevard, linking to the West Riverfront Greenway.

1 3

studio[Ci] ".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

Opportunities Map: McGraw Street Sub Hub 2

1

Photo Analysis: Panoramic Photo Analysis Study (McGraw Sub Hub) The Energy Farms Hub Framework Plan + Opportunities Partnership Opportunities: Industry/Commercial Non Goverment Organization Schools Churches Public Institutions 5

Green Economy Opportunities exist to partner with multiple entities and institutions located in the McGraw Sub Hub for education, training, manufacturing, management and maintenance of the proposed Energy Farms. Partners come primarily from the Non Goverment Organizations (SHAR, Westside Academy for Alterntive Education, et al) and Churches (Tabernacle Missionary Baptist Church, Macedonia Primitive Baptist Church, et al) located within and adjacent to the Sub Hub. With the involvement of neighborhood institutions, an empowered and self sustaining community will emerge. The Energy Farms McGraw Sub Hub is directly adjacent to and well served by interstate highway infrastructure, I-94, Jefferies, I-96 interchange. Alternative Energy Solar array installations and geothermal well fields - implemented at a range of scales, from multiple acres to single lots - could potentially produce a large percentage of the energy necessary to meet the neighborhood’s electrical and mechanical demand. A management model could be developed that would allow Non Goverment Organizations, Churches and adjacent property owners/residents to play a role in the management of the Energy Farms. This would allow residents who wish to remain in depopulating neighborhoods to have a generative role in the commnity.

3

Educational/Research Opportunities Residential Development Opportunities Commercial/Mixed Use Development Opportunities Planned Development [PD] Zoning 6

1 Mile

1/4 Mile

SHAR

Alternative Energy Farm Opportunities Decommissioned Grid [converted/re purposed] Grid/New solar orientation Important Public Corridors Important Arterial Corridors Enhanced nonMotorized Corridors

studio[Ci]

Density Based on Team analysis, the McGraw Sub Hub is 63% vacant (blocks that are vacant, vacant with abandoned structures, and/or with less than 50% occupancy source). The primary opportunity is to identify sustainably Re-purpose vacant parcels into generative uses for the large scale generation of solar and geothermal energy.

Context Map: The Energy Farms Hub The Energy Farms Hub and its three Sub Hubs, located within the Condon neighborhood, at the eastern edge of Claytown and the northern SDDC boundary at Tireman, have the highest concentration of vacancy in the Southwest Detroit community (US Census 2010). This presents an opportunity to identify, quantify and assemble vacant parcels and Re-purpose them for generative use, in particular for the large scale generation of solar and geothermal energy.


Opportunities exist for residential development to reinforce the existing intact neighborhood fabric, and to strengthen Commercial/Mixed Use development along Tireman.

4 1

Sampson Webber Academy and Dev. Center Inc.

Public Realm While most of the Energy Farms will likely have to be secured with limited public access, a focus on neighborhood educational facilities may create opportunities for enhancing the public realm adjacent to the secured energy farms for interpretive and community use.

2

Green Economy Opportunities exist to partner with educational institutions for education, training, manufacturing, management and maintenance of the proposed Energy Farms. Primary partners are the Sampson Webber Academy and Development Centers, Inc. The Tireman Street Sub Energy Farm district is directly adjacent to and well served by I-96, Jefferies Freeway.

studio[Ci] ".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

2

3

4

Photo Analysis: Panoramic Photo Analysis Study (Tireman Street Sub Hub) The Energy Farms Hub Framework Plan + Opportunities Alternative Energy Farm Opportunities Decommissioned Grid [converted/re purposed] Grid/New solar orientation Important Public Corridors Important Arterial Corridors Enhanced nonMotorized Corridors

Partnership Opportunities: Industry/Commercial Non Goverment Organization Schools Churches Public Institutions

1 Mile

Urban Mobility Several opportunities exist to decommission roads allowing the neighborhood to reduce impervious surface and mitigate storm water. Re-purposed parcels and lots will yield additional acreage for alternative energy production.

3

Opportunities Map: Tireman Street Sub Hub 1

studio[Ci]

Density Based on Team analysis, the Tireman Sub Hub, located at the northern SDDC boundary at Tireman, is 37.8% vacant (blocks that are vacant, vacant with abandoned structures, and/or with less than 50% occupancy) and the most intact of the three Sub Hubs. Opportunities exist, at a smaller scale than in the other two Sub Hubs, to identify and sustainably Re-purposed vacant parcels into generative uses for the large scale generation of solar and geothermal energy.

1/4 Mile

Energy Farms [HUB] _Tireman Street Sub-Hub

Educational/Research Opportunities Residential Development Opportunities Commercial/Mixed Use Development Opportunities Planned Development [PD] Zoning

Alternative Energy Solar array installations and geothermal well fields - implemented in a concentrated manner - could potentially produce some of the energy necessary to meet the neighborhoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s electrical and mechanical demand. Clustered around the Sampson Webber Academy, the Energy Farms in this Sub Hub could serve an important educational role. An annex of the new Education/Research entity located here may assist in the revitalization of an existing educational facility and provide education and training to neighborhood children and adult residents.

Context Map: The Energy Farms Hub The Energy Farms Hub and its three Sub Hubs, located within the Condon neighborhood, at the eastern edge of Claytown and the northern SDDC boundary at Tireman, have the highest concentration of vacancy in the Southwest Detroit community (US Census 2010). This presents an opportunity to identify, quantify and assemble vacant parcels and Re-purpose them for generative use, in particular for the large scale generation of solar and geothermal energy.


Sampson Weber Academy

(Alternative Energy)

(Alternative Energy)

Vacancy creates opportunities for generative infrastructure. A solar array and geothermal field will be installed adjacent to the former Biddle Elementary school on Seebaldt Street For security purposes, the panels will be fastened together with special key security fasteners.

A solar array panel grid will be Installed on the roofs to supply power to this active DPS Facility.

Biddle Elementary School (Density + Green Economy) The existing elementary school would be transformed into an Annex of the SW Detroit Energy Farms Education/Research Institute on Livernois. This provides the opportunity to extend the mission of the joint institute into the neighborhood, collaboration with the local school system, and develop educational and training programs that promote economic development.

Digital Display Panels (Alternative energy + Public Realm) A series of digital display boards will be installed on the perimeter of the site that will act as an educational tool, displaying energy production, number of homes and businesses to which the overall system is supplying energy, etc. The panels would serve an educational role for the community, providing real time feedback and interpreting the generative landscape.

studio[Ci] ".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

Decommissioned/ Repurposed Grid (Public Realm)

Opportunities exist to decommission roads allowing the neighborhood to reduce impervious surface and mitigate storm water. Redundant grey infrastructure adjacent to vacant parcels will be repurposed to enhance green infrastructure and stormwater management.

Project Energy Education

Native Plantings

A new “outdoor classroom” is proposed to engage the community in the implementation of the Energy Farms. “Hands On” training programs in the management and maintenance of the Energy Farms would be held on site. The park will offer residents and students the ability to actively learn and work with PV technology.

New plantings will be added to define ‘green infrastructure’ corridors. These plantings are part of a bioswale cleansing system. Native planting are recommended for low maintenance storm water management and water conservation.

(Alternative Energy + Green Economy)

(Public Realm)

Pervious Pavement + Bioswales (Public Realm)

Existing alleyway, sidewalks and parking lot surfaces will be repaved with pervious zero pavers (turf block) and/or recycled materials.

studio[Ci]

New Model of Management

(Alternative Energy + Green Economy)

A management model could be developed that would allow Non Government Organizations, Churches and adjacent property owners/residents to play a role in the management and ownership of the Energy Farms. This would allow residents who wish to remain in depopulating neighborhoods to have a role in the community.

studio[Ci] ".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

Current Conditions

Energy Farms

Tireman Street Sub-Hub

Proposed ‘Net Zero Energy’ Vision

Energy/Density [HUB] _Energy Farms


studio[Ci]

Alternative Energy : Footprint Rules of Thumb _ Looking for sustainable energy sources vs. traditional sources

How much energy is needed for Southwest Detroit? For Southwest Detroit Approximate Energy Usage 13

3.297 x 10 kJ (Annually)

77% natural gas

Sustainable options to address needs?

27.3% of the land available in southwest

th

9

Solar PV = 2.915 x 10 kJ/acre

To meet all of electrical needs and more for peak us 12

2. Geothermal heat pumps (good for both heating and cooling) For vertical geothermal heat pump wells drilled approximately 300 feet deep and other reasonable typical assumption the energy available from

4. Detroit Rive r1 06 .7 5.

s re ac

De tr

How much area is needed?

9

Geothermal = 9.058 x 10 kJ/acre use 2,550 acres for geothermal heat pumps we would yield

Geothermal heat pumps =2.30

13

x 10 kJ

3. Solar water heating (good for year round) Evacuated tubes and assuming 30% system heat losses in storage and exchange Using 15% of land (possibly only roof-tops) at 1,245 acres to yield 12

Solar water=3.37 x 10 kJ

4. Detroit River (good for supporting a base-load electrical supply) If smaller submersible water turbines are used, system sequestered away from shipping lanes and water diverters are used to occupy approximately 19.3% of available surface area the energy available from 11 Detroit Salt Mines: Subterranean 20 miles

G

Solar Photovoltaics:

eo

1. Solar Photovoltaics (good for peak summer electrical needs) Using the best available solar energy resource data and acceptable assumptions the solar energy available from

3,400 acres for 9.91 x 10 kJ

2.

Solar Photovoltaics Solar Water Heating Geothermal Detroit River Hydro Current Detroit Salt Mines

s re ac

tS oi

and

23% electrical,

the southwest Detroit

res es ac alt Min

Currently the mix is ~

0

19.3% along

5

What kind of energy is needed? Need a mix of electrical (provided by coal and nuclear utility plants)and heating (currently provided by natural gas) and does not include motor gasoline

Detroit River:

1. Solar Photo volt aic s 3, ater hea w r a l o 40 S t i . n 3 g1 ,24 5

=

Solar water: Using 15% of land (possibly only roof-tops)

er

ma

l 2, 548

acres

Geothermal:

20.5% of the land available in Southwest Detroit

Overall: 1. Use 3,586.2 acres of land for solar and geothermal energy production (this land could be duel use such as 13 PV and geothermal together, or PV could be on any appropriate vertical, horizontal or angle13surface.) 13 2. We need 3.297 x 10 kJ and using reasonable assumptions we could deliver 3.67 x 10 kJ 3. Fully review Detroit Salt mines as an energy option

Detroit River energy generation = 2.792 x 10 kJ

5. Detroit Salt Mines (good for heating and cooling) Most of the significant costs for geothermal are related to bore-hole drilling, if we use the existing tunnels in the Detroit Salt Mines (over 100 miles of existing tunnels) and use the very stable temperatures found in the mines â&#x20AC;˘ Detailed information is needed to fully assess but this tunnel network could provide most, if not all of the space heating and cooling requirements for Southwest Detroit â&#x20AC;˘ Preliminary estimates with air-heat exchange only at 50% efficiency 11

estimates 1.62 x 10 kJ (this could be significantly more using liquid reservoirs in the mines) Closing-off some of the unused tunnels and pumping compressed air in some of these passageways could be used for peak energy storage Underground compressed air/wind turbines and Air to Air /Heat Exchange Network

7

4.424 x 10 kJ could be available


studio[Ci]

FordC3

&GPUKV[HQT0GV<GTQ'PGTI[ 4'5'#4%*+PVGTHCEG.C[GTU #0#.;5+5&GPUKV[4WNGUQH6JWOD.''&0& 8+5+10'0'4);&'05+6;*7$5 5WDÄ*WDU¶+*+=OKZGFWUGFGPUKV[ RQRWNCVKQPITQYVJ?+PVGTPCVKQPCN)TGGP.KPM

LEVERAGING INVESTMENT TO ESTABLISH A GREEN ECONOMY

".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

NITC: Michigan-Ontario, CA is the worlds’ largest 2 way trade relationship. No jurisdiction in the world buys more from Canada than Michigan. Canada buys more from Michigan than 25 other export partners. $62 billion dollars in 2010. Accounts for 237,000 jobs. Trade grew by 43% from 20092010. Biggest increase since 2008.

Energy/Density [HUB] _ Energy Farms

Partnerships for Alternative Energy (Green Economy)

(Alternative Energy)

A solar array panel grid will be installed on the Educational + Research Institute and other industrial buildings in the area to supply power to the Facility and neighborhood.

The Condon neighborhood not only has the highest concentrations of vacancy in SW Detroit, but also the highest density of potential corporate partners! ThyssenKrupp Steel, DTE, and Coca Cola all have significant presence and investment in the neighborhood. Each could contribute their expertise and assets as important partners with the community to establish a new economy based on Alternative Energy.

Vacancy creates opportunities for generative infrastructure. A solar array and geothermal well field will be installed on ThyssenKrupp property at Livernois and I-94. For security purposes, the panels will be fastened together with special key security fasteners.

Solar Lighting (Public Realm + Alternative Energy) New solar powered lighting will be installed along Livernois to ensure a safe pedestrian streetscape. Property

Energy Farms @ ThyssenKrupp

Source: Office of the Canadian Counsul General, June 2011

The DIFT project seeks to consolidate the operations of several rail facilities at the LivernoisJunction Yard. The Livernois-Junction Yard is owned by Consolidated Rail Corporation (CRC). Consolidated Rail is jointly owned by the Norfolk Southern Railway and CSX Transportation companies. The yard is a shared assets operation arising from the two companies’ purchase of CRC’s assets in the late 1990s. The DIFT project is being jointly planned by private rail companies and various governmental agencies. The project’s most recent pre-development plan agreement identifies the following organizations as the current DIFT Rail-Related Participants: Grand Trunk Western Railroad, Inc. (CN) Canadian Pacific Railway Company (CP) CSX Transportation, Inc. (CSX) Norfolk Southern Railway Company (NS) Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT)

studio[Ci] ".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

(Public Realm + Urban Mobility)

(Alternative Energy + Green Economy)

Educational + Research Institute

Movement of Goods + Services

Non motorized improvements will enhance the Livernois Corridor to connect to the community’s proposed Ann Arbor to Detroit Commuter rail stop in the vicinity of the Bow Tie.

A partnership will be formed between Lawrence Tech, ThyssenKrupp Steel, DTE, and Coca Cola and other partners to create a joint R+D institute for the research, development, manufacture and maintenance of PV and Geothermal technologies. Vacant buildings along Livernois and centrally located between the corporate partners will be adaptively reused to create the new facility. Residents and students will be engaged and trained to make, install, and maintain the new Energy Farms infrastructure in the neighborhood.

The Condon neighborhood is ideally located adjacent to extensive road and rail infrastructure to support the regional, national, and international distribution of the new Energy Farms products and services.

Livernois Corridor

Photo Analysis: Panoramic Photo Analysis Study

1

2

3

1 Mile

Mile

4

studio[Ci]

1/4

The Energy Farms Hub and its three Sub Hubs, located within the Condon neighborhood at the eastern edge of Claytown and the northern SDDC boundary at Tireman, have the highest concentration of vacancy in the Southwest Detroit community (US Census 2010). This presents an opportunity to identify, quantify and assemble vacant parcels and Re-purpose them for generative use, in particular for the large scale generation of solar and geothermal energy.

perimeters will be transformed with pervious zero pavers (turf block) and native plantings.

Refined Analysis

".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

2

1

3

Current Conditions

Refined Analysis

(Green Economy+Urban Mobility)

Proposed ‘Net Zero Energy’ Vision

Final Research

Continued Research

The Green Economy Sub-Hub Framework Plan + Opportunities

Analysis

Solar Panel Systems (Alternative Energy)

Livernois Avenue Sub-Hub

Initial Research

Initial Analysis

4

Photo Analysis: Panoramic Photo Analysis Study (Warren Ave Sub Hub)

Peripheral Analysis (if any)

Refined Peripheral Analysis (if any)

Refined Peripheral Analysis

Net Zero Energy Vision Energy/Density [HUB] _ Green Economy D.I.F.T. Detroit Intermodal Freight Terminal - John Kronk west of Lonyo Sub-Hub

SHAR

1

Proposed ‘Net Zero Energy’ Vision

4

West Side Academy of Alt Education

Sampson Webber Academy and Dev. Center Inc. 3

2

2

1 3

The Green Economy [HUB] _ WyLo Sub Hub D.I.F.T. Detroit Intermodal Freight Terminal

Solar Lighting (Public Realm + Alternative Energy) New solar powered lighting installed along John Kronk to ensure a safe pedestrian streetscape.

Energy Systems (Alternative Energy) All new developments include the installation of solar arrays and geo-thermal wells under the rail yard to support the energy needs for the surrounding areas where applicable

Green + Energy Buffers (Public Realm) Green buffers to be implemented around perimeter of D.I.F.T. (Livernois, Dix and Vernor). Buffer will be used for improvement of public realm with the extension and connection to the greenlink, vegetated area to connect with urban re-forestation, alternative energy through use of solar panels, geothermal wells, ect.

Streetscape Improvements (Public Realm) Public greenway with pervious surfaces and native plantings along the railway corridor to improve public realm of the proposed network of greenways and planned connection through the DIFT at Central. Pedestrian and bicycle lanes will be used, in addition to the greenways that connect to the proposed seriers of bike share facilities. Enhanced public realm along John Kronk between Wyoming and Livernois will mitigate the adjacency of increased intermodal freight activity and the residential neighborhood.

Green D.I.F.T. Yard (Green Economy + Urban Mobility) The 350 acre footrpint provides a significant opportunity for the implementation of pervious surfaces for stormwater mitigation. Green economy jobs will come from construction, management and maintainance.

Detro Detroit D etroi etro trroit o H Housi Housing ousin ousi ousing oussingg Comm Co Commissi C ommiss ission on DTE 4

CocaCola Bottlers of Detroit

1 2

3

Design Stage 1

Design Stage 2

Design Stage 3

Current Conditions

ThyssenKrupp Steel

Design

Green Economy

a focus on leveraging significant investment in regional and international infrastructure to create opportunities for training, job creation, making and conversion of extant industrial and commercial assets.

Research

Southwest Detroit: Our Region’s First Net-Zero Energy Community


studio[Ci]

Energy/Density [HUB] _ Green Economy

studio[Ci] ".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

Energy Systems (Alternative Energy) All new developments include the installation of solar arrays and geo-thermal wells under the rail yard to support the energy needs for the surrounding areas where applicable

Green + Energy Buffers (Public Realm) Green buffers to be implemented around perimeter of D.I.F.T. (Livernois, Dix and Vernor). Buffer will be used for improvement of public realm with the extension and connection to the GreenLink, vegetated area to connect with urban re-forestation, alternative energy through use of solar panels, geothermal wells, ect.

Streetscape Improvements (Public Realm) Public greenway with pervious surfaces and native plantings along the railway corridor to improve public realm of the proposed network of greenways and planned connection through the DIFT at Central Avenue. Pedestrian and bicycle lanes will be used, in addition to the greenways that connect to the proposed series of ‘D Bike’ share facilities. Enhanced public realm along John Kronk between Wyoming and Livernois will mitigate the adjacency of increased intermodal freight activity and the residential neighborhood.

Green D.I.F.T. Yard (Green Economy + Urban Mobility) The 350 acre footprint provides a significant opportunity for the implementation of pervious surfaces for stormwater mitigation. Green economy jobs will come from construction, management and maintenance.

studio[Ci] ".CYTGPEG6GEJPQNQIKECN7PKXGTUKV[E

Current Conditions

Solar Lighting (Public Realm + Alternative Energy) New solar powered lighting installed along John Kronk to ensure a safe pedestrian streetscape.

Proposed ‘Net Zero Energy’ Vision

D.I.F.T. Detroit Intermodal Freight Terminal - John Kronk west of Lonyo Sub-Hub


studio[Ci]

Implementation Incentives _ Looking for sustainable energy sources vs. traditional sources

The currently available incentives tend to be financial incentives that fall into three main categories.

1) Industry support from Federal, State or Local governments for energy production and energy products manufacturing (newly emerging technologies such as PV, geothermal, biomass, wind, etc.) • Loans • Tax credits • Payroll assistance

How to proceed?

Challenge: Many (but not all) of these government incentives either expire on 12/31/11 or are significantly reduced

1) Establish a community plan to coordinate groups within Southwest Detroit to: • Act as a facilitator to discover options available and to review new incentives as they become available • Facilitate applications for these incentives • Bundle or group collective applications to maximize breadth of beneficiaries

2) Focus on energy efficiency within the community: • Go after the lowest hanging fruit – reduce overall energy demands • Reinforce WARM`s current initiatives • Helps to off-set sustainable energy systems needs

Example: CEAM - Clean Energy Advance Manufacturing up to $2 million in low interest loans effective and has no indicated closure date

3) Form partnerships with the community, the municipality and the major utility companies: • Explore how to locally impellent energy generation systems and technologies vs. large central power plants • Review local power and energy options (geothermal, PV, etc.) for local stationing of energy production systems

2) Energy users to implement alternative energy options to off-set some of their standard utility energy usage • Available to industry, commercial, residential, and non-profits • Grants • Loans • Property tax incentives Challenge: Many (but not all) of these government incentives either expire on 12/31/11 or are significantly reduced Example: Commercial or Industrial property tax Incentive for installing renewable energy systems: Amount: 100% tax exemption 3) Utility sponsored programs for energy usage reduction • Available to industry, commercial, residential, and non-profits • Consumer’s energy • DTE Energy Example: Low Income and Energy Efficiency Fund (LIEEF) through the Michigan Public Service Commission: these awards can be substantial up to $1 million or more.

Solar Energy

Solar Water Heating

Battery Bank

Usable Energy

EV Station Sustainable Energy Grid

Geothermal Air Compressor

Hydrocurrent Energy

Storage to generator [Salt Caverns]


studio[Ci]

Generative Infrastructure _ Sustainable Urbansim

THE NEXT GENERATIVE INFRASTRUCTURE FOR DETROIT Our transdisciplinary design research lab wishes to prompt the dialogue. We believe that a new urban geography and ecosystem are required to balance the benefits and impacts of both shrinking and rapid urbanization and leverage the assets and complex combinations of forces of the city-scape. We look at vacancy as a new infrastructure for the city. We see vacancy, as it manifests: in land, buildings and infrastructure, as generative. Vacancy provides an armature for collective dialogue, design intervention and policy. We recommend a variety of productive, temporal uses for vacancy, to generate the next urban form of the city. In the same manner that the grid and infrastructure become a generator of urban form and use (Smithsons, Martin, Banham, Varnelis, Belanger, et al), vacancy can guide future urban form in Detroit.

CREATING A NET ZERO ENERGY COMMUNITY

vacancy: n. 3: empty space. 4: lack of intelligence or understanding. Oxford English Dictionary Detroit has a wealth of empty space, though little intelligence or understanding of it. There is a global, morbid fascination with Detroit’s emptiness. The media and design disciplines have mythologized it in imagery and obsessively mapped and quantified it (the reported yet disputed 40,000 parcels). Vacancy perpetuates entrenched social, economic and environmental disparities and inequities, but, in the midst of formal ‘right sizing’ and informal urban agricultural initiatives, a constructive civic dialogue about the role of vacancy in the future of the city has yet to begin.

Energy:

studio[Ci]

While Detroit serves as the context for our first design intervention, we believe that our design methodology is scalable and replicable to prompt dialogue and guide the future form of urbanized regions across the globe.

MICROCLIMATE

Nature:

Density:

Potential Land for Hybrid Sustainable Alternative Renewable Energy (Approx. 90 Acres)

We define infrastructure networks as the systemic and complex overlay required to support a city and its associated urbanized region. Infrastructure exists in service to an urbanized region, is a key determinant of future urban form and plays a significant role in establishing a more desirable, ethical and sustainable condition for urban growth and change. We have created a Systemic Overlay to understand the profound connections between the neighborhood, the city, and its regional and international context. These connections occur largely through blue, green, gray and white infrastructure networks that span geographic, ecological and political boundaries. Vacancy emerges as the ubiquitous infrastructure in each of these typologies.

This poster describes aspects of our current project to create sustainable community through net zero energy, and the central role which vacancy plays in achieving that goal. In one neighborhood of Detroit, we have identified approximately 1,500 acres (635 hectares) of vacancy, in three categories: Vacant (V); Vacant w/abandoned structures (A); and Vacant w/occupied structures (O). This new armature of infrastructure, in close proximity to other infrastructure systems, supports our recommendations for generative uses for vacant and decommissioned land, buildings and infrastructure. These interventions include hybrid alternative (renewable) energy, targeted density, water cycle management, and reforestation. Our recommendations focus on Detroit’s most iconic examples of vacancy (e.g. Michigan Central Station), those juxtaposed to economic stability providing opportunities to engage partners and remaining residents in joint ownership, training and management (e.g., Condon Neighborhood), and proposed regional/international infrastructure investment (e.g., DIFT). Each envisions an alternative, equitable, and sustainable ecosystem for the city.

Reforestation:

Areas of mixed use density

Proposed Mixed Conifer and Hardwood Plantings (Approx. 1100 Acres)

Productive Surfaces

Existing Parks, Cemeteries, and Forest

Hydro Current

Water Cycle Management: Bioswales along Michigan Ave. and Vernor Highway

A

Pervious Paving: Detroit Intermodal Freight Terminal (DIFT) and the North American International Trade Crossing (NITC)

INFRASTRUCTURE [ too much? ]

Decomissioned Street Grid

O

Agriculture: Proposed Urban Agricultural Land Use Existing Urban Agriculture Sites

@ Lawrence Technological University CoAD

BUILT DENSITY + CULTURAL DIVERSITY

V

VACANT LAND

ECOLOGICAL UNDERLAY [ Geothermal, Salt Caverns ]

MCS [solar]: Michigan Central Station [MCS], since its opening in 1913, has served as a hub of activity for Regional Detroit. As MCS approaches its 100th anniversary, we envision the transformation of its significant role as a ‘Generator, Landmark, and Place’ for our city and region. MCS is iconic -- both in its form and its abandonment. We envision a transformation of this significant urban role from travesty to icon of the city’s future – one of hope, vision and sustainability. Through extensive Ecotect modeling and use of a Markvart table for calculating optimal solar energy, we have determined that MCS [solar]’s south, east and west facades and roof are ideally oriented to maximize solar collection with a photovoltaic array that would not preclude adaptive reuse of the historic structure. MCS [solar] could generate substantial alternative energy to support future reuse and for the surrounding neighborhood.

REGIONAL INTERNATIONAL CONTEXT

Critical Mass: We develop urban design interventions based on indigenous capacities and assets which exist in critical mass and can be geospatially mapped. In this project, we have identified six capacities and assets (from bottom to top): regional|international context; ecological capacity; vacancy; built density and cultural diversity; infrastructure; microclimate.

1 Mile

NEXT NED DO

OCC U

T AN

ABAN

VAC

As a result of the research, analysis and design work funded by the Ford C3 grant, we have identified a relationship between infrastructure and vacancy in the city. This relationship has prompted our interest in making recommendations for generative uses for vacant land, focusing on hybrid renewable energy, targeted mixed-use density, water cycle management and reforestation, in support of sustainable community and economic growth.

D PIE

N

N

C

I 1

Urban Forests Urban forests provide multiple benefits, however the four primary metrics are as follows:

21 Trees/Acre x 1000 Acres = 21,000 Trees avg. age 42 years 100 tons/year= 2.1 million tons of CO2 /year

*This generalization does not account for the multitude of different variables that may contribute to a more precise estimate of carbon sequestration

CONIFER HARDWOOD

Many factors can affect the amount of carbon a tree can sequester individually, such as the longevity and health of the tree from natural occurences in nature

Hub and Sub-Hub Locations MITC + DIFT Gateway

Efficacy: < 1% - 5% 6% - 10% 11% - 15% 16% - 25% > 25% I-75 Buss Transit Stop

Size (area by sq. ft.): < 1 sq. ft. 1 sq. ft. - 10 sq. ft. 1 sq. ft. - 50 sq. ft. 51 sq. ft. - 100 sq. ft. 101 sq. ft. - 150 sq. ft. 151 sq. ft. - 200 sq. ft. 201 sq. ft. - 250 sq. ft. 251 sq. ft. - 300 sq. ft. > 300 sq. ft.

This information is a generalized summary that was developed by studio[Ci] in 2011 and should not be used for the exact calculation of photovoltaic system projects.

Pedestrian Connectivity

Net- Zero Energy Hub Urban Form

< $1.00 $1.00 - $5.00 $5.01 - $25.00 $25.01 - $100.00 $100.01 - $250.00 $250.01 - $500.00 $500.01 - $750.00 $750.01 - $1,000.00 >$1,000.00

Output per unit (peak performance): <1W 1W-5W 6 W - 50 W 51 W - 100 W 101 W - 150 W 151 W - 200 W 201 W - 250 W

This diagram is intended to display usage and information regarding Photovoltaic Solar Panel systems as a guide for application. On the left, three primary methods of application are considered: Top Mount [for roofplane installations on an existing or new building]; Side Mount [for integration into curtain wall systems or extant facades]; Ground Mount [for at-grade installations such as dedicated, secured field arrays or in the public realm]. In the center the primary system types are displayed and connected to the methods of application via application usage. Lastly, to the right is a grouping of data related to system types and subsequent application type, including cost, output per unit (peak performance), efficacy and size.

Green Buffers

Cost:

Type of Photovoltaic System:

Highway Systems

Application Data: Application: Appl Building - Retrofit (Flat or Angled Structure) Building - New (Flat or Angled Structure) On Ground - Dedicated Solar Array (Angled Structure) On Ground - Public Art Applicable Special Application

Kyosemi PV Bulbs, Tubes, and Convex Panel

Monocrystalline PV Panel

Integrated Concentrating Solar Facade System 1. System relation to usage applicability, average cost, output per unit, efficacy, and size 2. System proportionality between output, cost, and size Matrix line weight displays typical application usage in volume (estimated)

Ground Mount

21,000 trees x 10 lbs of carbon/tree = 210,000 lbs of carbon/year Average tree age: 20 years 21,000 trees x 20 lbs of carbon/tree = 420,000 lbs of carbon/year

200

Later in life Conifers will typically sequester more carbon because of their ability to retain more biomass in the winter months

Flexible PV Sheet

Polycrystaline PV Panel

Side Mount

21 trees/acre x 1,000 acres = 21,000 trees

250

150

Top Mount

Using the table to the right we can see gain an average understanding of how much carbon can be sequestered per tree per year. As an example we will look at the estimated amount of carbon that can be sequestered with 1,000 acres of re-forested land with an average tree age of 10 years old.

Railway Network

As an average, we can assume that there can be planted 21 Trees per acre (deciduous and coniferous).

Vacant Land Opportunities

Urban micro-climates typically provide less productive growing environments than the microclimates in more rural areas. Because of this urban trees may seqester as much as 50% less carbon than rural trees. Trees that require routine maintenance sequester less carbon than those allowed to grow naturally because of the impact maintenance equipment (chainsaws, tree trimmers, etc)

Arterial Network

Q = (0.15)(0.3477)(43,560,000) Q = 227,187.18 ft of runoff/year

Trees sequester carbon from the environment through photosynthesis and store the by-product in the tree volume of bio-mass. Bio-mass is the overall volume of organic tree material, wood volume, leaves/needles, and roots

Rivers

Studies have shown economic benefits for urban retail corridors that have strong a botanical presence

Example area is 1,000 acres C = 0.15 (approx.) 2 i = 4.19 inches x 0.083 ft = .3477 ft A = 1,000 acres x 43560 ft = 43,560,000 ft

Proposed DRIC I NITC

Studies have shown increased economic and community use of urban areas populated with trees and forested parks.

In South-East Michigan, most soil is considered to be clay of different types, therefore the runoff coefficient for forested areas can be between 0.15 - 0.25 in increments of 0.05 The average rainfall intensity for SE Michigan is a 10.0 minute, 10 year rainfall which will yield 4.19 inches

Water Systems Current and Future Bike Routes Major Arterial Roadway Corridors Railways Systems Highways Bike Share Facility Zipcar© EV Care Share

Blue Infrastructure

New

International Trade

Crossing

‘D’ Car Share Facilities

Q = CiA Q = ronoff in cfs C = runoff coeffient(dimensionless) i = rainfall intensity A = drainage area in acres

LEGEND

Trees and the visual presence of forests have a positive affect emotional well being.

Reforestation intercepts 90% of stormwater run-off. A simple way to calculate run-off is to use what is known as the “Rational Method”:

Can be integrated into the ground in sidewalks and parks with a Plexiglas enclosure

Can be purchased in rolls of multiple unit arrays

Salt Caverns

21 trees/acre x 1,000 acres = 21,000 trees 21,000 trees x 400 kWh/tree = 8,400,00 kWh saved

Because of the small size units can be applied to almost any outdoor element

source: Nowak, David J., Crane, Daniel E. ‘Carbon storage and sequestration by urban trees in the USA’; Bowyer, Jim, Fernholz, Kathryn, and Lindburg, Alison. ‘Urban Tree Utilization and Why It Matters’

Example area: 1,000 acres Average trees per acre: 21

source: Nowak, David J., ‘Tree Species Selection, Design, and Management to Improve Air Quality’

On a per tree basis, cooling load reductions can amout to between 100 and 400 kWh.

source: Creech, Calvin, ‘Stormwater Primer’

Studies have shown that on average, three mature trees can provide a cooling load reduction between 25 to 43 percent and peak cooling load reduction between 12 to 23 percent.

Application of Photovoltaic System:

Carbon Sequestration

Systemic Overlay Bule I Green I Gray I White Infrastructure

Can be purchased as tinted window treatment and can be used as roof covering

Photovoltaic energy systems matrix Psychological + Economic (Social) Effects

Stormwater Run-off

source: McPherson, E. Gregory and Simpson, James R., ‘Carbon Dioxide Reduction Through Urban Forestry’

The shade that trees cast on buildings can significantly reduce energy usage during the warmer months.

100

White Infrastructure

1 Mile

50

‘D’ Bike Share Facilities

POUNDS OF CARBON

Detroit has a wealth of empty space, though little intelligence or understanding of it. There is a global, morbid fascination with Detroit’s emptiness. The media and design disciplines have mythologized it in imagery, and obsessively mapped and quantified it. Vacancy perpetuates entrenched social, economic and environmental disparities and inequities. Yet, in the midst of formal ‘right sizing’ and informal urban agricultural initiatives, a constructive civic dialogue about the role of vacancy in the future of the city has yet to begin.

Urban Heat Index Reduction

Grey Infrastructure

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

100

AGE OF TREES

Central Ave. Underpass

We wish to prompt the dialogue. A new urban geography and ecosystem are required. Vacancy is a new infrastructure for the city. Vacancy, as it manifests, in land, buildings and infrastructure, is generative. We recommend productive, temporal uses for vacancy, to generate the next urban form of the city. In the same manner that grid and infrastructure become generators of urban form and use, vacancy can guide future urban form in Detroit. We define infrastructure networks as the systemic and complex overlay required to support a city and its associated urbanized region. Connections occur largely through blue|green|gray+white infrastructure networks that span geographic, ecological and political boundaries. Vacancy emerges as the ubiquitous infrastructure in each of these typologies.

The Energy Farms Hub Framework Plan + Opportunities

The Green Economy Sub-Hub Framework Plan + Opportunities Rail Yard with Geothermal Wells Green Warehousing Livernois Freight Rail Line Important Arterial Corridor Existing Park Area Green Buffer Wyoming Entry Bioswale Area Woodmere Greenway Connection

N

Samson Webber Academy and Dev. Center Inc.

1,100

9DFDQF\ DFUHV 

9

1$785( ',)7 $

REFORESTATION at the DIFT Based on our analysis, we recommend that 1,100 acres of vacant land along rail lines in SW Detroit, with a large concentration in the vicinity of the proposed Detroit Intermodal Freight Terminal (DIFT), should become urban forest. We recommend planting the 1,100 acres with a mix of deciduous trees and conifers with an average of 21 trees/acre. Urban forests provide multiple benefits: Urban Heat Index Reduction - the shade that trees cast on buildings can significantly reduce energy usage during the warmer months, which could mean a savings of 8,400,00 kWh annually; Stormwater Run-off Mitigation - reforestation intercepts 90% of stormwater run-off, so based on soil type and average rainfall for SW Detroit, this could mean averting up to 227,187.18 ft of runoff/year; Carbon Sequestration - trees sequester carbon from the environment through photosynthesis and store the by-product in the tree volume of bio-mass. Although urban trees sequester less carbon than rural trees, this could still mean sequestering up to 2.1 million tons of CO /year; Psychological + Economic (Social) Effects – studies have found that urban areas populated with trees and forested parks and the visual presence of forests have a positive effect on emotional well being and generate increased economic and community use.

Educational/Research Opportunities Alternative Energy Farm Opportunities Decommissioned Grid [converted/re purposed] Residential Development Opportunities Grid/New solar orientation Important Arterial Corridors

The Solar Energy Sub-Hub Framework Plan + Opportunities Mexicantown Vista Plan Residential Development Opportunities Passenger Rail Stop Commercial/Mixed Use Development Opportunities ART (Arterial Rapid Transit) Roosevelt Park Plaza Railway Corridor Roosevelt Park

Partnership Opportunities: Industry/Commercial Non Government Organization Schools Churches Public Institutions

100

Michigan Central Station

ay r Highw Verno West

(1(5*< 2

&RQGRQ1HLJKERXUKRRG

ENERGY FARMS at Thyssen Krup/Condon Neighborhood Based on our analysis, the Condon neighborhood at the eastern edge of Claytown has the highest concentration of vacancy in the SW Detroit community (US Census 2010). This presents an opportunity to identify, quantify and assemble vacant parcels and re-purpose them for generative use, in particular for the large scale generation of solar and geothermal energy. We recommend 100 acres of solar array installations and geothermal well fields implemented at a range of scales, from multiple acres to single lots – which could potentially produce most if not all of the energy necessary to meet neighborhood electrical and mechanical demand. Additional opportunities exist to enhance capacity by creating additional horizontal and vertical productive surfaces: adding solar panels on the extant industrial and warehouse buildings along Livernois. Partnerships could be established with Lawrence Technological University, DTE, ThyssenKrupp Steel, and Coca Cola to create a new Education/Research entity in the neighborhood (with an annex at the former Biddle School and the Sampson Weber Academy) for the development, manufacture, installation, and maintenance of solar and geothermal technologies. A management model could be developed that would allow adjacent property owners and residents to be trained to play a role in the management, maintenance and operation of the Energy Farms. This would allow residents who wish to remain in de-populating but stable neighborhoods such as Condon the opportunity to have a generative role in the community.

As we conclude the Ford C3 grant, we launch a research agenda focused on generative infrastructure and its role in sustainable urbanism. Stay tuned! The Next Generative Infrastructure for Detroit, by studio[Ci], American Collegiate Schools of Architecture, Digital Aptitudes, ACSA 100th Annual Meeting, Projects Presentation: Boston, MA, March 2012

20

9DFDQF\ DFUHV 

9DFDQF\ DFUHV 

Street Bagley

'(16,7<

0LFKLJDQ&HQWUDO6WDWLRQ

BUILT DENSITY at the Convergence of Infrastructure We define infrastructure networks as the systemic and complex overlay required to support a city and its associated Built Density at the Convergence of Infrastructure: we are interested in the role that density plays in sustainable urbanism, and reject both the pessimistic perception of the city as “unlimited vacuum” and the optimistic perception of “unlimited capacity”. Our methodology presents an alternative, ethical approach that meditates these two ends of the density spectrum. We believe decisions about future urban form in Detroit should be criteria (vs. data) driven. We created the Ci methodology and GeoDesign interface to proactively design for the “coming together” of metrics [criteria] in three categories: Human [inhabitation]; Cultural [place], and Infrastructure [ecosystem], into a spatial convergence. Based on our analysis, the convergence of multiple blue, green, gray + white infrastructure systems indicates the geography for new built density. We have identified approximately 20 acres to catalyze intermodal oriented development opportunities in the vicinity of Michigan Central Station [MCS]. Infrastructure to support projected new built density and population includes: a proposed passenger rail stop at MCS, a proposed BRT stop on Michigan Avenue to the north, a Detroit DOT bus stop on Vernor to the south, and new on-site electric vehicle designated parking spots, general public parking, and bike racks. A new pedestrian bridge is planned to span across our proposed MCS International GreenLink and the rail corridor connecting the Mexicantown and Corktown neighborhoods.


studio[Ci] vol.1  

sustainable urbanism, urban design, detroit, net-zero energy

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you