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STUDIO [] CHRISTCHURCH Summer School 2014


STUDIO CHRISTCHURCH SUMMER SCHOOL 2014

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POLYCENTRIC CITY

STUDIO [] CHRISTCHURCH

Summer School 201


SoLA

School of Landscape Architecture at the University of Lincoln

UoA

The University of Auckland School of Architecture and Planning

UNITEC VUW

Architecture Department

School of Architecture at Victoria University Wellington

CPIT

School of Architectural Studies at CPIT

STUDIO [] CHRISTCHURCH Summer School 2014


Produced by Studio Christchurch http://studiochristchurch.co.nz first published June 2014 Intellectual Copyright Authors and Universities The ideas created in this book are the intellectual property of the editors and students. This book was developed for academic purposes. This is a non-profit academic publication self published and printed online at: http://www.blurb.com/


THE POLYCENTRIC CITY

DUSHKO BOGUNOVICH & JEANETTE BUDGETT

RESILIENCE

MAYOR LIANNE DALZIEL’S PREFACE

POLYCENTRIC CITY

LINCOLN

SYDM 2020 - INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATION

UNITEC, UOA, CPIT

THE CHRISTCHURCH THEATRE DISTRICT

VICTORIA UNIVERSITY

CONCLUSION

[] CHRISTCHURCH SUMMER SCHOOL 2014 STUDIO

CONTENTS

CONTENTS

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[] CHRISTCHURCH SUMMER SCHOOL 2014 STUDIO

FOREWORD

5

FOREWORD The Polycentric City: What Does it Mean for Christchurch?

Dushko Bogunovich, and Jeanette Budgett


THE POLYCENTRIC CITY WHAT DOES IT MEAN FOR CHRISTCHURCH? The Polycentric City theme of the 2014 Summer School addressed a much broader Christchurch area than the inaugural 2013 Summer School, which reflected on the Blueprint plan for the CBD and its major feature - the Green Frame. Almost three years after the Second Earthquake, it is becoming clearer that the CBD has a long way to go to full recovery. Recent reports in The Press and other media suggest that the rebuilding and investment in the central area is in serious trouble. It may take 20 rather than ten years before a new Central City Christchurch emerges from the present wasteland. That poses the question whether alternative, or additional, strategies are needed, beyond the Blueprint. Larger Christchurch has more centres of activity than the CBD. And indeed, some of them are manifesting themselves quite robustly already. They are also proliferating in numbers, to the point that Christchurch increasingly looks like a textbook example of ‘doughnut city’ – an urban area with functional suburbs, but an almost empty core. This year’s Summer School opted to investigate the ‘polycentricity’ of Christchurch – whether as real, potential, or desirable - in an attempt, not to undermine the hard work of rebuilding the Centre, but to make propositions complementary to the Blueprint. The three studios interrogated the concept itself and pondered what it meant in an era of rampant urban sprawl and the quest for sustainability; and asked whether Christchurch’s given physical conditions offer specific opportunities not present in other cities. Polycentricity is not only possible in Christchurch: it already exists – as you would expect in a city of this size, with such flat topography and such low density. Before the earthquakes, it manifested itself mostly in the form of one dominant CBD and many suburban sub-centres. These sub-centers were originally modest local shopping centres combined with community facilities. But over the past 20 or 30 years some of them morphed into shopping malls, which now anchor the major suburban centres. After the earthquake, the city all but lost the main centre – the CBD – while the existing malls prospered. Compounded by the housing shortage, and the Council’s allocation of new green field sites for residential developments on the fringe of the city, a new generation of outer suburban centres is now appearing even further from the centre. Polycentricity is also desirable in Christchurch. The city is growing horizontally more than ever and the CBD is proving to be less accessible or convenient for a growing number of people. What this studio has shown is that polycentric development is not only possible but likely very desirable at the inner city scale. The successful recovery of Addington and Sydenham shows that these original inner suburbs of Christchurch retain a strong role in the


Each of the three studios generated some specific fresh insights. The CTD project seems to lend some credibility to the proposition that the CBD – even in this reduced, 21st century version – is too big to recover all at once. There just isn’t enough demand and the costs of development are extraordinary. It seems more realistic that a few selected corners or hubs in the CBD have a ‘natural’ advantage and this is where CCC and CERA should focus their energies till 2020. The SYDM-E studio set out to demonstrate that Sydenham east of Colombo is a very special area and deserves to be a hub in its own right. The entire ‘borough’ has a great location and significant history. The urban fabric east of Colombo is very amenable to modifications necessary to accommodate the advancing ‘green and smart’ design and ‘green and smart’ technology wave. Consciously planned as

[] CHRISTCHURCH SUMMER SCHOOL 2014 STUDIO

The three studios that comprised the 2014 Summer School have taken quite different angles at the subject of Polycentric Christchurch. The Christchurch Theatre District (CTD) looked into a single pocket of the new CBD and argued the case for a cluster of city-boosting activities which, once established, would radiate its rehabilitating energy to other parts of the CBD. The Sydenham East 2020 (SYDM-E) studio endeavored to re-populate the once residential Borough of Sydenham, as well as recover its industrial past by creating a ‘green-tech innovation hub’ as an entry point for Christchurch into the ‘green knowledge economy’. The Christchurch Polycentric City (CPC) studio accepted the dominant presence of the Big Malls in the late 20th century urban landscape but made a heroic effort to turn the areas by and around the malls into proper town centres, where life does not necessarily revolve around shopping.

FOREWORD

economic and cultural life of the city. In fact, they may be crucial in the recovery of the CBD – which at the moment seems to be in trouble. Short of some financial miracle, the CBD will not recover within the predicted decade, as the initial government estimates suggested. Consequently, it is predicted here that the inner suburbs – such as Addington, Riccarton, Sydenham, and perhaps even Waltham and Linwood – will recover first. This means that the recovery of Christchurch may take two distinct stages, each taking about a decade. First, a cluster of small pockets inside the CBD and a number of old suburban centres just outside the CBD will regenerate. Then, some time after 2020, they will be followed by the CBD overall and the rest of the CBD fringe.

7


Northlands Mall The Palms Merival Mall Westfield Riccarton

New Brighton

Bush Inn Centre

East Gate Re:Start

The Hub Hornby Tower Junction Addington

South City The Colombo

Barrington Shopping Mall

Ferrymead

Tannery

Sumner

Lyttelton

POLYCENTRIC CITY The structure of Christchurch’s system of centres.

a ‘greenovation cluster’, Sydenham East could lead the economic recovery of Christchurch south of the CBD. The CPC project has shown that not all is lost with malls sucking in life from the street – the time has come for Christchurch to think of itself as a collection of towns, each one with its own centre. In such conception of the entire structure of the city, it is quite plausible that Christchurch could have dozen or more local downtowns, operating as well rounded civic, retail and business hubs. It is however, even more interesting to speculate what all three studios might mean together.

City Centre Port Hills

Satellite Town

Satellite Town

Satellite Town Satellite Town

Satellite Town


[]

Additionally, at all these levels, if we look carefully, we notice how different these places are in terms of what they looks like, how they got to be what they are, and what they do for living. Drawing on Chrischurch’s famous original town plan layout as a grid with diagonals, in an oblong (the ‘Union Jack’ 8-directional radial pattern), we could present this configuration in the following manner:

MONO-CENTRIC CITY

MONOCENTRIC vs POLYCENTRIC

POLY-CENTRIC CITY

STUDIO

Put in simpler terms, in Christchurch we can see sub-centres at least at three spatial levels: • inside the CBD; • just outside the CBD (the original, early 20th Century suburbs); • in the outer suburban belt (the newer, late mid-to-late 20th Century suburbs).

FOREWORD

In Christchurch, the polycentricity is potentially a very sophisticated and finely balanced game of multiple hierarchies, reinforced with an amazing functional and physical variety and diversity.

[] CHRISTCHURCH SUMMER SCHOOL 2014

If we assume that polycentric development is indeed ‘natural’ for a city of this size, and of such low-density, low-rise form, and that it does not necessarily weaken the original city centre (CBD) - then we can discern a subtle but very important signal in all three studios outcomes:

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But even this is an oversimplification. Although the city-regional scale was not the subject of this Summer School’s studios – we are conscious that there are two more spatial levels of polycentric development. One is at the outer urban fringe, in the form of the presently growing and emerging ‘most recent’ suburbs (e.g Hornby). The other one is outside the city, in its peri-urban belt; these are the old and new satellite towns, villages and subdivisions. Most of them have been there for a while but have gotten a big boost in the aftermath of the earthquakes, and the new ones are emerging north and east of the city. Rather than despair over the apparently un-containable ‘urban sprawl’ – a relentless force over the past 50 years, turned into a ‘tsunami’ after the earthquake – perhaps the local and regional authorities should direct their attention and their energies at the potential that lies in the Flat Polycentric City in front of us? It would be more effective to steer the seemingly anarchic - but in fact quite organic, and therefore imbued with some inner logic - constellation of all these centres towards the best social, economic and environmental outcomes for the city of Christchurch and the region of Canterbury. Recent developments in the theories of urban form and urban planning, triggered by observed trends in information and communication technology (ICT) and green (or environmental – ET) technology, indicate that we might be at the cusp of a paradigm shift with respect to the idea of what makes a city sustainable. The 30 or 40 years-old wisdom that urban density is ‘good’ and sprawl is ‘bad’ is under question mark. The advent of decentralised and decentralising - technologies of energy generation and conservation, water harvesting and localized sanitation, in combination with the recent spectacular development and proliferation of ICT innovations like mobile internet, cloud computing, ubiquitous sensing, etc – have the combined effect of reinforcing the centrifugal forces of the shaping of urban metropolitan form. It seems likely that a sustainable city might as well be a very flat, lowdensity agglomeration – rather than a compact one – as long as internet is able to delete some demand for transport; whatever transport is still necessary is done in small, super-efficient, clean electric cars; and buildings provide at least half of their key services (power, water, sanitation, food) themselves. There is a case for low-density urban form which harvests solar energy and water, and grows food, fuel and fiber in its midst, just as there is a case for the high-density urban form which enjoys the efficiency of low traffic volumes. Looking at an even bigger picture, cities seem to be moving towards a new aspirational paradigm as well. If you believe that global warming, peak oil, peak water and peak food are real and imminent threats, then adaptation is perhaps more pressing than mitigation. Which means that the new urban quest is for resilience, rather than sustainability. If this is so, then the case for a denser, more compact urban form is further weakened.


FOREWORD

In visual terms, we could represent this as a conceptual model which looks like a square pyramid:

URBAN FORM

STUDIO

Finally, a more balanced view on the future of cities may not necessarily put forward the environmental dimension ahead of everything else. We could argue that a ‘perfect’ city is the one that balances the goals of economic prosperity, social justice and good quality of life with the constraints in the supporting ecosystem. If we code these four agendas with the words ‘prosperity’, ‘affordability’, ‘liveability’ and ‘sustainability’, we then arrive at the proposition that an ideal urban form is the one that equally delivers on all four.

[] CHRISTCHURCH SUMMER SCHOOL 2014

[]

LIVEABILITY SUSTAINABILITY

AFFORDABILITY

PROSPERITY

URBAN FORM The perfect urban form balances four agendas: prosperity, liveability, sustainability, and affordability.

There seem to be no reason to argue that Christchurch as it is – flat and polycentric – does not have a good urban form and therefore needs radical spatial reconfiguration (which then translates into an aggressive urban planning and growth management policy – never terribly popular). On the contrary: the city should be quite content with the way it is. It seems that in the era of the brave new world of ‘smart’ and ‘green’ technology the flat, polycentric Christchurch is rather close to meeting successfully the extraordinary challenges of the 21st century. Dushko Bogunovich and Jeanette Budgett, February 2014

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13

RESILIENCE Mayor Lianne Dalziel

STUDIO

[] CHRISTCHURCH SUMMER SCHOOL 2014

RESILIENCE


MAYOR LIANNE DALZIEL ON RESILIENCE The below text was transcribed from an opening address from Mayor Lianne Dalziel to the Studio Christchurch Summer School students on January 22nd 2014. I thought it might be worth remembering that today is exactly 1 month from the third anniversary of the February 22nd Earthquake and it’s going to be pretty tough time for a lot of people in the city. Reflecting on where we’ve come from in three years is actually a really good opportunity to think about what can come from disaster, because there are huge opportunities. In fact it’s a terrible waste of a disaster if we don’t find those opportunities and make the most of them. Some of you would of read and those of you local will know that Christchurch has been accepted to the Rockefeller foundation’s 100 resilient cities. People get a bit bored with the word resilient here, and that’s because a lot of people say ‘oh you Canterbrians are so resilient’, ‘Gosh you’re great! We are so proud of you.’ But in fact they don’t mean resilient, they mean somebody who can stand up in the face of adversity and say that things are ok. That’s not what resilience is. Resilience is has so many different capacities to it and of course those of you that are going to be working in these fields of creating wonderful buildings of the future, you will know that resilience means so much more. So it’s not about just the capacity to absorb, nor is it just about the capacity to bounce back after adversity strikes, but it is also about the capacity to adapt, which is not just a human thing. Trees adapt to their environment, but the capacity to co-create, that is the human element that sets apart human resilience from every other form of resilience. So I’m kind of passionate about that subject: RESILIENCE. When we made that application, I ended the letter to the Rockefeller Foundation with these words: ‘It would enable us to reach out to the rest of the world with the lessons we’ve learned. A tribute to those who died, injured, or displaced in the disaster, that changed our city forever.’ And it was that phrase when I wrote ‘that changed our city forever’, that I kind of got a bit of a lump in my throat, because actually we’ve got to face up to the fact that our city is changed forever. And for a lot of people, depending on the age range that they are in, that can be an incredibly hard fact to absorb. And how they are able to absorb that in the context of what happens next in the city, I think is an important part of our city’s recovery. I personally think that we can take this opportunity but we have to start at a place. So where do we start? I’m glad that Hugh Nicholson is here, as he was intimately involved in the ‘Share an Idea’ campaign. I remember that part of the campaign, and people forget this, everyone knows about the 106,000 ideas and the 10,000 people that came to the CBS Arena. That wasn’t the only thing that happened with ‘Share an Idea’, it had another valuable contribution, we won an award for cocreation following the campaign. However, we haven’t got to the co-creation just yet, but we will get there. One of the other things that happened in that time was the International Speaker Series. People came from all different parts of the world to share ideas. It was a fantastic opportunity to hear


Christchurch has a very important role to play, not only in the future of our country, but the future of the globe. That’s why a lot of the proposals that we’re going to be looking at this year like Sensing City and a presentation that you may have seen by Ian Taylor, who is behind the American’s Cup animation are important. Christchurch is uniquely positioned to be a world showcase of visualisation tools as well. The future looks incredibly exciting for Christchurch.

[] CHRISTCHURCH SUMMER SCHOOL 2014 STUDIO

Let’s think of Christchurch in that context, we face the Canterbury plains, food and water, security, global issues, we face the coast lines, another global issue with half the world’s population now living in large coastal cities. These are exposed to far more weather events and climate change, sea level rise. We face natural hazards much closer to our city than we had realised. That brings us to an understanding of the physical sciences of new building technologies that link us to the world of risk and of course understanding and measuring risk is equally interesting to governments as it is to insurers and re-insurers. We are a gateway city to the Aoraki Mackenzie Dark Sky Reserve, which is one of only four in the world. We are only five of cities in the world that is the gateway to Antarctica. We are only one of ten gateway cities to the great wine capitals in the world. We are passionate about sport, which challenges us to think about the role of approaching diet and exercise as more of the world’s manual work is mechanised and we stare down on a face of diabetes epidemic that no country’s health system will ever be able to absorb. We love theatre, music, cultural events and art. We have some of the world’s leading expertise on all of these issues that are world class: universities and institutes of technology, Crown Research Institutes, organisations and private companies are all located here in Christchurch. So thinking to the future for our 21 year olds in 2030, is not the Christchurch we’re re-creating but one that is a 21st Century centre of research science and technology which will seek to resolve many of the challenges that not only we will face as a country, but that the globe will face.

RESILIENCE

what people had to say. A man by the name of Douglas Ahlers came from Harvard University, he asked a simple question, ‘why Christchurch?’ It makes you think about what is Christchurch’s place in the South Island, what is Christchurch’s place in New Zealand and what is Christchurch’s place in the world. Where I’ve been trying to expand my thinking about the potential of what’s going to come in the future, I start from the point of the year 2030 and the fact that in 2030, I will be 70 years old. In 2030, somebody starting school today will be 21. It seems to me for a 21 year old, that’s who we’ve got to have our sights on in terms of what’s happening here in the city.

15


LINCOLN UNIVERSITY SoLA

CHRISTCHURCH POLYCENTRIC CITY

[]

17

CHRISTCHURCH POLYCENTRIC CITY Lincoln University School of Landscape Architecture Dr. Andreas Wesener and Craig Pocock


POLYCENTRIC CITY - CHRISTCHURCH

Christchurch seen from Victoria Park. Photo: Andreas Wesener, 2013

References BUCHANAN, N., BARNETT, R., KINGHAM, S. & JOHNSTON, D. (2006) The effect of urban growth on commuting patterns in Christchurch, New Zealand. Journal of Transport Geography, 14, 5, 342-354. DAVOUDI, S. (2003) European Briefing: Polycentricity in European spatial planning: from an analytical tool to a normative agenda. European Planning Studies, 11, 8, 979-999. KLOOSTERMAN, R. C. & MUSTERD, S. (2001) The polycentric urban region: Towards a research agenda. Urban Studies, 38, 4, 623-633. LEHMANN, S. (2010) LESSONS FROM EUROPE FOR CHINA? New Urban Sub-Centres for a Polycentric Network City. Journal of Green Building, 5, 1, 88-100. ROBERTS, M., LLOYD-JONES, T., ERICKSON, B. & NICE, S. (1999) Place and space in the networked city: Conceptualizing the integrated metropolis. Journal of Urban Design, 4, 1, 51-66.


Student Projects 31 Landscape Architecture students at Lincoln University approached the topic in January/February 2014 summer school. They dealt with a number of complex questions: how do popular urban design paradigms (e.g. the walkable, compact city) correspond to polycentric urban structures? How can we connect suburban centres with the CBD and with each other in a sustainable way? How should we design sustainable suburban centres able to attract a variety of uses and users and being more than ‘just another’ shopping mall? Their task was to prepare a structure plan for a suburban centre in Christchurch with the help of a sustainable design strategy in response to polycentric urban development and under consideration of particular urban design concept including New Urbanism and Transit-Oriented Development (TOD). The following pages present a selection of nine student works which looked at six different suburban centres (Riccarton, Hornby, Merivale/ Papanui, Addington, Palms/Shirley and New Brighton), each of them with their own distinctive challenges and opportunities. The works illustrate a variety of different strategies and ideas in response to complex urban design challenges.

CHRISTCHURCH POLYCENTRIC CITY LINCOLN UNIVERSITY SoLA

Introduction Christchurch’s initial compactness of urban form and architectural language provided a familiar urban ambiance for 19th century English settlers. The introduction of a tram system by the late 19th century and the prevalence of the motorcar in the second half of the 20th century encouraged subsequent patterns of suburbanisation. Christchurch started to expand outwards with new sub centres based around shopping malls enabling a dispersed suburban population to cater for their daily supplies. These suburban hubs emerged prior to the 2010/2011 earthquakes; the subsequent destruction of Christchurch’s CBD and correlated relocation patterns of businesses and homes have, however, increased their strategic importance within the city. Today, particular indicators such as commuting patterns (Buchanan et al, 2006) suggest that urban development in Christchurch is essentially polycentric. Polycentrism has been linked to various urban development challenges such as dispersed urban structures and urban sprawl (Davoudi, 2003: 983), cross-commuting and correlated motorcar dependency (Kloosterman & Musterd, 2001:626) as well as a lack of urban design quality, pedestrian friendliness, and choice of transportation modes (Roberts et al., 1998: 63; Lehmann 2010). On the other hand, polycentric urban structures have been considered to improve cooperation between sub-centres by creating complementary rather than competing specialist hubs (Davoudi, 2003: 992; Lehmann, 2010: 88), to diversify the economic attractiveness of a city (Lehmann, 2010:88), and to accommodate heterogeneous and diverse household structures and lifestyles (Davoudi, 2003:981).

COURSE BRIEF

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RICCARTON 2044 Located to the west of Christchurch’s CBD, the suburb of Riccarton is a Key Activity Centre, with Riccarton Mall being the hub of this. Riccarton Mall is a very popular place for people to visit, and could possibly be the most popular meeting place in Christchurch currently. Running through the area are the heavily trafficked Clarence Street, Riccarton, Blenheim and Straven Roads. Along with this is Riccarton Bush, the last remnant of ancient podocarp forest which once covered large areas of Canterbury.

High Risk Medium Risk Low Risk

PEDESTRIAN SAFETY

Bus Routes Bus Stops

ISSUES/ CHALLENGES

Within Riccarton, a number of key issues were identified through survey and analysis. Riccarton suffers from significant traffic congestion and is a car-dominated suburb. Cycle connectivity is poor, making it dangerous and unappealing as a transport mode, while pedestrian safety is also a key issue, shown in the diagrams to the right.

Cycle Lanes (on-road) Cycle Paths (off-road)

BUS AND CYCLE NETWORK

Service Entrance Mall Parking Timed Parking

Street Parking Residental 2001 The expansion of Riccarton MallDensity overin Christchurch recent decades has caused significant ‘big box pox’ and a Other Carpark spread of the mall along Riccarton Road, pushing Pedestrian Entrance out specialized retail, and making the character of Riccarton much like any other centre in Christchurch with a large-format mall.

The residential density of Riccarton is predominantly low, ranging from 9.8 to 18 dwellings per hectare (2001 figures)1, meaning that there is insufficient density to support public transport. However, a number of key opportunities were also identified, as challenges can also create opportunities. _________________________________ 1. CCC (2013). “Frequently Asked Questions” [Online]. Available: http://www.ccc. govt.nz/homeliving/goaheadbuildingplanningS00/resourceconsent-s05/faq-s05-11. aspx [2014, February].

ACCESSIBILITY

Living 1 (9.8 DU/ha) 1 Living 2 (13.3 DU/ha) 1 Living 3 (18 DU/ha) 1 Commercial and Business Zones

DWELLING DENSITY 2001


[] OPPORTUNITIES

VISION

By the year 2044, Riccarton is a highly functioning hub within Christchurch’s polycentric network. It is a prosperous community celebrating and embracing its natural ecological systems, landscapes and history, with a high quality public realm and environmental quality. Riccarton is connected by a high quality pedestrian, cycling and public transport network with a range of housing, retail and business developments, culminating in rich cultural value and great sense of place.

natural ecological systems, landscapes and environmental

living, retail and

pedestrian, cycling and public transport

sense of public realm

STUDENT TIM REED NAME(S)

Differentiated retail along Riccarton Road and around Riccarton Mall can be created, with new pedestrian streets creating permeability through the blocks. A link with nearby Riccarton Bush can also be established, drawing on environmental qualities which celebrate this unique element of Riccarton and improve the sense of place.

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY SoLA

There is potential to increase the residential density and to introduce mixed-use development, providing business and social quality, while supporting an improved public transport system to provide a faster alternative to the car.

CHRISTCHURCH POLYCENTRIC CITY

Active transport (cycling and walking) can be encouraged through improved networks which make pedestrians and cyclists the priority, with car-parking spaces being better utilized for cycle lanes, wider footpaths, rain gardens and swales.

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GOALS

Increase and enhance the mixture of retail, business and housing typologies within Riccarton. Mixed Use

High Density

Medium Density

Enhance and develop pedestrian, cycling and public transport networks within Riccarton to form highly connected and safe transport modes. Public Transport

Cyclists

Pedestrians

Increase /enhance the public realm and sense of place and amenity within Riccarton through increased environmental quality, daylighting natural ecological systems and connection with Riccarton Bush. Public Realm

Sense of Place

Quality Environment

Ecological Systems

Riccarton Bush

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CHRISTCHURCH POLYCENTRIC CITY

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY SoLA

OBJECTIVES

1.1. Encourage mixed use developments along Riccarton Road and surrounding Riccarton Mall. 1.2. Reduce the footprint of Riccarton Mall, replacing big box retail with mixed use retail and residential housing. 1.3. Increase the density of housing from 10 DU/ha to 40 DU/ha 1,2,3 surrounding Riccarton Bush. 1.4. Strengthen and support existing businesses along Riccarton Road. 1.5. Increase the density of housing from 18 DU/ ha to a minimum of 30 DU/ha 1,2,3 to the south of Riccarton Mall.

LEGEND Medium Density Living Riccarton ‘Green’ Streets Existing Roads New Roads Avon River Project Area Business/ Residential Mixed-Use Retail/ Residential Mixed-Use Riccarton Mall Enhancement

2.1. Develop a light rail transit hub located to the north of Riccarton Mall within 800m4 of residential developments. 2.2. Increase the number of traffic signals and cross walks along Riccarton Road, Matipo Street and Clarence Street. 2.3. Increase the provision of street furniture and attractions along key walking routes. 2.4. Develop a connected primary cycle network along Riccarton Road. 2.5. Reduce the speed limit from 50 km/h to 30km/h 2,3 on secondary roads. 3.1. Restore vegetation native to the area surrounding Riccarton Bush. 3.2. Introduce native street trees on all key streets. 3.3. Increase the amount of active edges along all edges of Riccarton Mall through facilitating new retail units on the ground floor. 3.4. Reduce the provision of car parking at Riccarton Mall and on surrounding streets, replacing the spaces with cycle lanes, rain gardens, swales, street trees, wider footpaths. 3.5. Daylight stormwater systems and drains along Riccarton Bush feeder streets. _________________________________ 1. CCC (2013). “Frequently Asked Questions” [Online]. Available: http://www.ccc. govt.nz/homeliving/goaheadbuildingplanningS00/resourceconsent-s05/faq-s05-11. aspx [2014, February]. 2. Aseem Inam (2011). From Intentions to Consequences: San Diego TOD Design Guidelines and Rio Vista West Project, Urban Design and Preservation Division, American Planning Association 3. Jeffrey Tumlin and Adam Millard-Ball (2003). “How to Make Transit-Oriented Development Work,” Planning Magazine, American Planning Association May 2003. 4. Calthorpe, P. (1993). The next American metropolis : ecology, community, and the American dream. New York: Princeton Architectural Press.

Riccarton Bush High Density Living Existing School Existing Suburban Greenspace Riccarton Road Transport Hub Riccarton Road Transport Enhancement Pedestrian Network Upgrade Riccarton Bush Buffer Regeneration Existing Building Footprints

Stage One:

2014

2020

Pedestrian Network Upgrade Riccarton Road Transport Enhancement Riccarton ‘Green’ Streets Riccarton Road Transport Hub

Stage Two:

2020

2026

Medium Density Living Riccarton Bush Buffer Regeneration Riccarton Mall Enhancement

Stage Three:

2026

2032

Retail/ Residential Mixed-Use Business/ Residential Mixed-Use Riccarton Bush High Density Living Riccarton Road Transport Hub

Stage Four:

2032

2038

2038

2044

Riccarton Road Transport

Stage Five:

Riccarton Bush High Density Living


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NEW PEDEST RIAN ST

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Scale 1 to 10000 @ A4

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LINCOLN UNIVERSITY SoLA

CHRISTCHURCH POLYCENTRIC CITY

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CHRISTCHURCH POLYCENTRIC CITY

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY SoLA

RICCARTON ROAD HUB CROSS-SECTION

Cross-section looking east along Riccarton Road, showing the streetscape involving pedestrian space, cycle lanes, narrowed car lanes, a central rail platform and the transport hub. This area is in close proximity to the high density living surrounding Riccarton Bush, and also close to Riccarton Mall, with a pedestrian street connecting the three, providing high quality spaces and efficiency. A swale in the centre of Riccarton Road collects water runoff from the road surface and filters it into the ground below. Rain gardens also run along areas of the path connecting the transport hub to the high density housing. Scale 1 to 200 @ A4

DESIGN PROPOSAL

The design proposal encompasses many of the key features of Riccarton 2044. High density housing surrounds Riccarton Bush, providing greater visual amenity and sense of place for people, while providing functional amenity for native wildlife. Ecology is further celebrated with native vegetation being common around living areas, pedestrian streets and Riccarton ‘green’ streets, with storm systems daylighted and ecosystems enhanced. The Riccarton Road Transport hub containing light rail, cycle and car hire is well connected to service the surrounding area. Riccarton is a much safer pedestrian and cycle environment, with greater permeability for pedestrians with the addition of pedestrian streets, dividing Riccarton Mall and creating active retail edges. Scale 1 to 1000 @ A4

LEGEND

Riccarton Bush

High Density

Housing

Grass - Swales and Lawns Light Rail Paving tail/ Mixed Use Re al Residenti

Playground Seating Umbrellas Cycle lane Pedestrian Crossing

tail/ Mixed Use Re al nti de Resi

RD RICCARTON

Native Street Trees Road Concrete

Paving Strips Native Rain Gardens Public Art

MATIPO ST

Timber Boardwalk

Riccarton Business


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High Density

Housing

Housing

TIM REED

KAURI ST

High Density

Housing

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tail/ Mixed Use Re al nti Reside

tail/ Mixed Use Re al nti Reside

tail/ Mixed Use Re al Residenti

Transport Hub

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tail/ Mixed Use Re al nti Reside

n Mall Retail/ s

Transport Hub l Retail/ Riccarton Mal Business

l Retail/ Riccarton Mal Business

l Retail/

Riccarton Mal Business

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY SoLA

High Density

CHRISTCHURCH POLYCENTRIC CITY

RICCARTON

N


Riccarton is a suburb in Christchurch that is situated west of the central city, a Key Activity Centre that with the intensification of large scale big box developments, Riccarton’s culture and sense of place is becoming increasingly diluted. In order to secure a future identity for Riccarton we are required to think outside the box, to break up the pull or influence of the mall in order to develop out of the box Riccarton is becoming. CHALLENGES

High traffic volumes on the main distributor roads pose a void to the accessibility of services by pedestrians. These generate a threat to Riccarton’s ability to support of multi modal transit, inevitably leading to a highly inaccessible public realm and a lack of stewardship to public space. Due to the possibility of Riccarton thriving as the new central business district, it requires development that enhance a more distinct identity that moves away from big box pox. The potent draw of business and people to Westfield Mall is itself a barrier and a challenge in order to dissolve the boundaries of a public and transit space and enhance a sense of place and a vibrant community for Riccarton.

OPPORTUNITIES

Riccarton Road has high potential to increase the connectivity between both north and south sides of Riccarton road. Accessibility for cyclists and pedestrians in Riccarton is of poor quality and unaccommodating due to the high traffic volumes on Riccarton Road and surrounding distributor streets including Matipo, Clarence and Straven Road. This has left a car dependant centre that lacks any incentive to become more walkable. The residential areas have the capability to become higher in density, something that will allow for mixed use developments and a vibrant Key Activity Centre.

THEORY APPLICATION

In order to provide an efficient transit network that supports accessibility for Riccarton residents and users, the application of principles of Transit Oriented-Development will be applied. Such developments will be compact and of high density mixed use. The high density surrounding the transit concentrate will endorse walkability in Riccartons 400m and 800m catchment.1 The developments will promote active streetscapes 2 as high quality and pedestrian oriented, limiting the provision for private vehicle parking. 1 2

Calthorpe (1993) Cervero,R, Sullivan, C 2011)

Medium density behind high, allowing for a mix in typologies and residents.

800m 400m

CBD

Tr an sit

CHRISTCHURCH POLYCENTRIC CITY

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY SoLA

RICCARTON: OUT OF THE BOX

High Density Central Transit surrounding Station station. Mixed use

Riccarton Road

Transit Interchange


[]

Residental Density in Christchurch 2001

Living 2 (32.3 pp/ha) Living 3 (38.1 pp/ha) Commercial and Business Zones

The land use of Riccarton is dominated by lower density residential and retail businesses, the main concentration being Westfield Riccarton. There is a lack of connection to existing public spaces for social interaction and recreation. At present, Riccarton does not support mixed use, something necessary to encourage walkability and support use of transit facilities. BUS AND CYCLE NETWORK

High traffic volumes on the main distributor roads pose a void to the accessibility of services by pedestrians due to the continuous flow of buses. These generate a threat to Riccarton’s ability to support multi modal transit, a required element of TOD; with no provision for cycle lanes or paths this will inevitably lead to a highly inaccessible public realm and a disjointed network for pedestrians and passive modes of transport.2

Living 1 (26.1 pp/ha)

Living 3 (38.1 pp/ha)

Living 2 (32.3 pp/ha)

Commercial and Business Zones

Outer Suburban Inner Suburban Medium Density Educational Business Retail Park Suburban Industrial Conservation Neighbourhood Recreation

Bus Routes Bus Stops Cycle Lanes (on-road) Cycle Lanes (off-road)

ACCESSIBILITY

The provision of on-street parking for private vehicles on Riccarton Road is a barrier to the accommodation of cycle lanes and poses a threat of pedestrian safety when accessing both north and south sides of Riccarton Road. The limited pedestrian access displays inactive edges of the mall, a feature discouraging the complementing of both large and small businesses. 1 2

Cervero,R, Sullivan, C 2011) Newman & Kenworthy (1996:6)

Service Entrance Westfield Parking Timed Street Parking Other Carparks Street Parking Pedestrian Access

KATE MCNEILL

LAND ZONING/LAND USE

CHRISTCHURCH POLYCENTRIC CITY

The current density in Riccarton in medium at most, a deficiency of high density suggests lacking encouragement of public transit use or walkability for residents within the Riccarton catchment. A higher density of mixed use retail and residential is required under TOD principles to support a decrease in car dependency.1

Living 1 (26.1 pp/ha)

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY SoLA

DENSITY

27


A vibrant multi modal transit concentrate developed ‘outside the box’, embodied by a highly integrated network of active social

spaces to aid the restoration of Riccarton’s identity. Increase connectivity/accessibility of public transit through establishing a hierarchy of transit modes and decreasing car dependancy 1

1. Increase the quality of cycle networks for users through on street allocated cycle lanes and cycle facilities. 2. Reduce the provision of parking on and off Riccarton Road and Mall by placing responsibility in local businesses to provide parking.

2

Increase and enhance a sense of place and social amenity within the public realm of Riccarton. 1 Increase active edges to enhance pedestrian accessibilty. 2. Create multifunctional spaces that support day and night time use and small businesses surrounding Riccarton Mall.

3

3. Encourage walkability by increasing the quality of connections between existing social infrustructure. 4. Increase the quality of the public transport networks through the provision of facilities and access to ‘real-time’ information.

Enhance and develop the diversity of retail, road, residential and business land use. 1. Restrict development of big box retail 2. Create mixed use retail residential and business residential to support small and private businesses. 3. Increase residential density to promote walkability to social amenities and public transit.


[] Existing land parcel

Public transit facility/ interchange

Existing built form

Transitional retail business area High density residential Medium density residential

Enhancement of streetscape; allocated cycle lanes, sheltered bus stops, street trees, planted median, furniture and lighting. wide pedestrian footpaths, allocated cycle lanes Redevelopment of Division and Rotherham streets as pedesdrian only spaces.

KATE MCNEILL

High density mixed use business residential

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY SoLA

High density mixed use retail and business

CHRISTCHURCH POLYCENTRIC CITY

STRUCTURE PLAN

STAGING

Stage 1 2014 - 2026

2014

Stage 2 2026 - 2038

2020

On

street

parking

off

Riccarton

be

allocated

2026

will

Road, for

be space

cycle

taken will lanes.

29

Stage 3 2038 - 2044

2032

2038

2044

Westfield Mall will begin to decrease car

Pedestrian

parks.

between Rotherham and Division

connection

developed

Implementation of Multi-Modal Transit

Street.

Implementation of cross walks and

Interchange.

Medium density business residential

planted medians, street scape improved to

Rotherham Street will develop as a

commence development to the east

support CPTED principles.

pedestrian only space.

and west of the mall, phasing out lower

Matipo, Clarence and Straven will

Implementation

have allocated cycle lanes, supporting

residential block by block.

From 2044 onwards, Riccarton mall

connections to surrounding KAC’s and

Division Street will become a pedestrian

will continue to decrease car parking

NAC’s.

only space and reconfigure to its original

space, changing land use to business

By 2026 a higher density concentration of

form.

office space starting on the rooftop car

mixed use business and retail will thrive

Westfield Riccarton will action a

park.

on north and south sides of Riccarton

reduction of Big Box retail through

Road.

activating the mall edges.

of

high

density

density areas closest to the mall.


Planted median strip at road level

Outdoor multifunctional moveable kiosks

Public art/display/social boxes

Cross walks along Riccarton Road

Seating/dining areas for surrounding cafes/bars

Pedestrian/public space

Built form

Road, public and private vehicle access

Avenue tree planting

Movable seating

Allocated cycle lanes On street parking

Glass rood, detached mall space


LINCOLN UNIVERSITY SoLA

CHRISTCHURCH POLYCENTRIC CITY

KATE MCNEILL

[]

31


RAPID GROWING RICCARTON Riccarton is a suburb located within Christchurch City which has been growing rapidly post earthquake and even was becoming much more vibrant and used before the 2011 earthquake occurred. It is a very car orientated place and doesn’t have much consideration for pedestrians, cyclists and people using public forms of transport currently but there are many opportunities to increase the quality of these.

Vision

Objectives

To develop Riccarton into a functioning hub 1. To increase the density of residential housing surrounding Riccarton mall from low-density to that caters for transportation, housing and medium-density housing recreational spaces and also bring a better sense of community to the suburb. 2.

To increase the amount of mixed use development along Riccarton Road, Riccarton Mall and surrounding street frontage.

1. To develop Riccarton as a highly functioning 3. hub within Christchurch’s polycentric network that provides a safer transportation network. 4. 2. Higher density housing supported by mixed use spaces for the community and increase the amount of outdoor recreational spaces. 5. 3. Stronger sense of place and community in Riccarton. 6.

To create a more cohesive character between and within the mall and residential areas

Goals

Improve the quality of transport networks and transport modes within and to Riccarton from surrounding centres Increase network connectivity for pedestrian cycle and public transport. Create more mixed use spaces within Riccarton that help enhance the sense of community and place.


[] Inventory Public Transport- Bus and Cycle Networks

Housing Density

Higher density housing means that more public transport opportunities are available within the Riccarton suburb. Housing in the Riccarton area has the potential to increase: - Higher density closer to centre - Density getting lower as moving away from centre - Housing incorporated into mixed use development - Community areas

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY SoLA

The Riccarton area has the potential for mixed use development within and around the centre which would be the mall. Mixed use development will provide many more opportunities to the suburb of Riccarton and the rest of Christchurch. By providing this mixed use development it can help develop Riccarton to function more as a Central Business District which the city of Christchurch is now missing post earthquake.

HOLLY STITT

Mixed Use and Zoning

CHRISTCHURCH POLYCENTRIC CITY

Walking and bicycling networks that connect to public transit stops. (Bike lanes and paths and greenways) which help increase healthy mobility and connectivity between different areas and give a safer way for connectivity that on road cycling.

33


Strategic Plan Bus routes to be changed and for frequent. Increase in housing density surrounding mall. Decrease spaces parking areas Increase cycling lanes along Riccarton Road Creating active edges along mall. Creating more open spaces. Green connection between Mall and Riccarton Bush. Bus and Pedestrian only road. Introducing more bus routes along Riccarton Road that are on route to places which are currently directly unconnected from Riccarton. Make the most used buses more regular throughout the week.

Decrease the amount of parking allowed at the mall and start charging for the parking that is currently there so discourage people from using it. Start charging people to use the parking that is left at the mall.

Take cars out off Rotherham Street and create a new car park entrance to the car parking block that isn’t off Rotherham Street. This will create a better pedestrian realm within this area.

Make cycling lanes along Riccarton road, which are separated with a low barrier from the cars. This will make people feel safer when using cycling as a form of transportation and will hopefully encourage more people to take this form or transport as it will be safer and more efficient. Increase the housing on the North side of Riccarton Road, behind the shops fronting the main road, from low density to high density. Keep the South side of Riccarton Roads living density remaining at high. Raise from 26.1 pp/ha to 38.1 pp/ha

Create a pedestrian and cycling link between Riccarton Bush and Riccarton mall with a boardwalk connecting the two by planting more vegetation and making the connection between the two stronger and easier. Create green spaces that help link the connection between Riccarton Bush. These can form community areas and small parks around the mall, which there currently is a lack of. By creating more outdoor relaxing and recreation areas it will encourage people to spend more time outside and creative a more vibrant environment surrounding the mall.

Start to open the mall out from the inside out. Making the edges around the mall more active and used instead of the dead edges that there currently is. By making more active edges and having more pedestrian based entrances it will make the street life surrounding the mall more vibrant.


Strategy Plan

2014 - 2024

Staging Plan

2024 - 2034 204 - 2044 LINCOLN UNIVERSITY SoLA

HOLLY STITT CHRISTCHURCH POLYCENTRIC CITY

[]

35


Master Plans

Rata Street and Rimu Street


Riccarton Road and Rotherham Street LINCOLN UNIVERSITY SoLA

HOLLY STITT CHRISTCHURCH POLYCENTRIC CITY

[]

37


HORNBY As compared to other suburbans in Christchurch, Hornby is a further one which connects to the city center and the outskirts. It is eager to be developed as a linkage to response to a Polycentric Christchurch. The commercial area is surrounded by the medium density residential area. The linkage between these two areas is weak so that there is a potential of improving the connectivity from both physical and social aspect of the study area. The two arterial roads and the railway make the business center dangerous to the non-vehicle users. Moreover, the existing pedestrian pathway lacks of shelter which decreases the quality of travelling. Moreover, the car parks have taken too much space of the core business area that makes it harder for travelling by foot, bicycle and bus. In order to improve the sense of place, the footprint of car park could be reduced for creating public realm.

TRANSPORTATION NETWORK OF HORN-

GOALS & OBJECTIVES GOAL 1

-To create a better connectivity for non-vehicle tran sit modes. OBJECTIVES

- To create more pedestrian crossing and more cycle lanes on the arterial roads. - To redesign the bus stations to provide shelter to the users.

LANDUSE INVENTORY OF HORNBY

GOAL 2

- To create a friendly environment for non-vehicle users. OBJECTIVES

- To increase the green space by decreasing the footprint of car park. - To add more facilities to increase the safety and amenity for pedestrians and cyclists such as traffic lights and bikesheds. CAR PARK INVENTORY OF HORNBY


[] GOAL 3

- To enhance the linkage between the commercial area and the residential area. OBJECTIVES

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY SoLA

WANJUN DU

CHRISTCHURCH POLYCENTRIC CITY

- To set up mixed used public space with providing facilities in between these two zones to enhance the social connectivity such as a commnunity center. - To create more pedestrian pathways to increase the physical connection between these two areas.

39

STRATEGIC PLAN The proposed future Hornby focuses on the connection of non-vehicle transit modes.


STAGING PLAN STAGE ONE

The first step is to increase the connectivity of the whole area by creating pedestrian crossing, pedestrian pathway and consistent cycle lane. In order to decrease the usage of vehicle, good alternative transit modes should be provided properly. Moreover, it is the most directly way to encourage more non-vehicle transit movement.

STAGE ONE

STAGE TWO

The large area which is taken off by car parks encourages people to drive more. It is a gap between pedestrians and the focal points. Thus, a removal of car park should be done to support the non-vehicle transit network. However, car park is essential to support residents’ daily life, built it on the roofs is a good solution.

STAGE TWO

STAGE THREE

The third stage is to rebuild the bus stations with shelters to increase the amenity of the users. Bus station is an important part in creating a good transit network, thus, a well designed bus station is effective in encouraging people to travel more by bus.

STAGE THREE

STAGE FOUR

In order to create a high standard network, the environment has to be improved to adapt to both physical and social connectivity. Therefore, the third step will be to create mixed used zones which include community center, open space, bus station and commercial area. This will support the physical connections to enhance the sense of the place. STAGE FOUR


PROPOSED FUTURE TRANSPORTATION NETWORK

WANJUN DU

The proposed network increases the connectivity of Hornby, especially for the non-vehicle users. It contributes to a better connection between the commercial area and the residential area.

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY SoLA

CHRISTCHURCH POLYCENTRIC CITY

[]

41

STRUCTURE PLAN


DESIGN INTENT This Design aims to offer a example of well connected Hornby which response the goals and objectives mentioned before. It points out the priority of pedestrians with providing a suitable environment. Moreover, the proposed community center would enhance the connection between the commercial area and the residential area.


SKETCH

MASTER PLAN

SECTION ELEVATION LINCOLN UNIVERSITY SoLA

WANJUN DU CHRISTCHURCH POLYCENTRIC CITY

[]

43


PACKING PAPANUI Papanui is a suburb located Northward of Christchruch’s CBD, here Papanui, is on the outer edge of the CBD sitting on a main arterial route (Fig 1). A route which flows directly in and out of the CBD. However, while there it is on a direct route there is very little radial links that connect it with other major hubs. If Christchurch is to become a Polycentric city then there must be more connections made to and from each Suburb.

Fig 1. Papanui

CBD

Riccarton

Hornby

Eastgate/Linwood

Addington

Halswell

Har ewo

in N ort

hR

d

Barrington

od R

LEGEND

d

PAPANUI

Central Area

nui

a Pap

Major Hubs (Classified by proximity to a variety of transport options and future development/growth) Sub-Hubs (Hubs that are not located within direct distance to a railway line) Mass Transit Corridor-Radial Mass Transit CorridorCircumferential Opportunity for close circumferential link

Rd

The chosen theory and principals have been taken from the concept of Transit-Orienated Development and applied future to Papanui.

Applied to Christchurch Belfast

PAPANUI

Hornby

New Brighton

Palms/Shirley

Ma

A successful example of a polymetric city is Singapore’s Constellation Plan (Fig 2). It demonstrates a way where transit can effectively stitch together different areas that are specialised in a variety of landuses functioning together as a whole.1 Fig 2. Adapted Constellation Model

Belfast

TRANSIT-ORIENTED DEVELOPMENT

A trend which is considered to create vibrant, livable and sustainable communities as it is a development of compact, walkable communities centred along high quality public transport system. The idea is that it increases the quality of life without car dependency for mobility and survival.

Addington

Papanui sits on the edge of a major arterial road into and out of the CBD, a direct railway line and has the potential to create a circumferential link between other hubs and or suburbs. __________________________________

1. Constellation Plan cited in Los Angeles City Council (2012) Transit Corridors Strategy: CO ordinated Action toward a Transit-Oriented Metropolis 2. http://www.transitorienteddevelopment.org/

Basic TOD Principal 400m 800m

Walking Distance Radius of 800 m = 10 mins Considered to be the appropriate distance for pedestrians from a 2 Transit stop.


[]

d

Papanui High School

lan

No rth

L

x

x

ds

x

Green Space

L P PS

PS

P

T

T

Retirement Villages Commercial/Business (street access) Bus Exchange/Stop Bus Routes Railway Feeder roads Cycle Ways Schools Library Post Office Police Station Tennis Courts

nui

a Pap

x

Rd

FINDINGS:

Issues: Opportunities: • Lack of utalised open space. • Northlands mall, bus stop/exchange, railway • Bus stop/exchange acts as a host to late and main road route out and into the city night vandals leaving nearby residents creates an opportunity to develop the hub as feeling unsafe after hours. a possible TOD neighborhood. Focusing on • Traffic congestion during peak hours bethe Principals on Sheet tween cross road conjunction and mall. • Connect open/green space with one another. • Expand on streetscape amenity, encouraging Constraints: smaller grain development rather than big • Big box retail with excessive car parking box retail. space and hard surfaces causes an unfriend• Creating a sense of place and place identity. ly pedestrian environment. • The location of Papanui High School • Integrating a variety of people who would otherwise not meet on a daily basis against rail way and back of Mall creates a • - Intensify mixed you and density on east challenging space. side of Main North rd. • Low density housing within area makes it difficult to intensify.

VISION

Enhance Papanui’s identity and appeal by developing it into a Transit Oriented Development community, through re-structuring the infrastructural network into a more condensed fine grain structure with efficient use of space and effective transport networks. GOALS

1. To Enhance Diversity and Vibrancy 2. To promote a greater community/ business amenity 3. To create a stronger Sense of Place

[

[

CHRISTCHURCH POLYCENTRIC CITY

Main

x

od R

Harewood Rd

LEGEND Business Zone Northlands Shopping Mall Box Retail - Supermarkets: (Pak ‘n’ Save, Countdown)

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY SoLA

Har ewo

Nort h

Inventory and analysis gathered on the current conditions (2013) of the Papanui area.

EMILY MABIN

x

Rd

x

INVENTORY & ANALYSIS

45


STRATEGIC PLAN

This proposal presents the train stop/hub is located north of Harewood rd and has been cited here due to its locality of existing amenities. Main North Rd

LEGEND Existing

Harewood Rd School

Proposed

Green Space Walkway

Train Stop

Bus Exchange Bus Routes Railway Track Cycle Ways

High Density Residential

Public Space

Mixed-Use Residential/Retail Mixed-Use Business/Retail Pedestrian Only streets

Retirement Home Boundary

L

Big Box Retail

Walkway Connection

T

One way Streets

Walking Distances Between Transit Stops Bus Stop 400m 800m

Train Stop 400m 800m

Papanui Rd

HIGH DENSITY RESIDENTIAL

Blighs Rd

LOW DENSITY RESIDENTIAL

The train hub intersects the 400m walking circle from the bus stop providing a strong core between these two transport networks. Here the opportunities arise for a Transit-Orientated Development. CONNECTIVITY & MIXED-USE

MEDIUM DENSITY RESIDENTIAL MEDIUM DENSITY RESIDENTIAL. MIXED-USE

TRANSPORT & DENSITY Main North Rd

Main North Rd

Harewood Rd

Harewood Rd

School

School

L

L

T

T

T

Papanui Rd

Papanui Rd Blighs Rd

• The overlapping of the business zone and mixed • Multi-modal networks are promoted varying from

use allows for successful integration into the Rail, Bus, Cycle ways and Walk ways. physical environment creating social diversity. • One-way road systems are located to revitalise the • Connection of existing open/green spaces creatstreet as a pedestrian friendly environment while ing corridors enhancing the outdoor experience. also reducing the amount of private traffic use.


[] STRUCTURE PLAN

LEGEND High Density Residential

ds

Mixed-Use Retail/ Medium Density Residential Medium-Low Density Residential Mixed-Use Retail/ High Density Residential

EMILY MABIN

rth

lan

Mixed-Use Business/Retail

No

Public Open Space Papanui High School Recreation Centre Street Upgrade One-Way Street Network Train Transit Hub Pedestrian Only Streets Proposed Connections Green Open Space Papanui Boundary Bus Stop

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY SoLA

CHRISTCHURCH POLYCENTRIC CITY

Staging Plan enables the following: 1. The growth of a Transit-Orientated Community through enhancing the transport network providing effective, efficient public transport services. 2. Encourage population growth allowing for the continuity of social diversification through multi-modal travel. 3. The development of new business/retail sectors, providing new functionality to Papanui. 4. Encourage a walk-able community through street and quality connections, building amenity and a stronger sense of place and identity.

47 400 m 400 m

Site 1: Train hub

Site 2: Northlands

TIMELINE

This framework has been developed in a way that is flexible and adaptable to the future and its unpredictably. The aim has been to revitalise Papanui into a Transport Oriented Development however currently the lack of people and street life challenges this. 5 ROAD NETWORK STREET QUALITY

15

10

PEDESTRIAN ONLY ST CONNECTIVITY MIXED-USE BUSINESS/RETAIL PHASE 2

PHASE 1

0

MIXED-USE RESIDENTIAL/RETAIL TRANSIT HUB RESIDENTIAL DENSITY

30


AA

Ha

rew

oo

dR

d

This site has been chosen to show how the principals of TOD can be applied to Papanui, benefiting the community and wider Christchurch. Currently the area exists as a main intersection involving 3 busy roads. N PLAN

TRAIN HUB

Papanui High School

This site has been chosen to show how the principals of a pedestrian friendly environment would work within this over all structure plan. Currently the area exists as a car parking lot, with little vibrancy and edge activation.

Northlands

NORTHLANDS

Northlands has the opportunity to be separated into two sections to create a lane way. Enhancing the spatial experience of the front and back of the shopping mall.

N PLAN


PERSPECTIVE AA

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY SoLA

EMILY MABIN CHRISTCHURCH POLYCENTRIC CITY

[]

49


ADDINGTON STRUCTURE PLAN Addington is a major suburb of Christchurch, located at 2.5 kilometres south-west of the city centre. It has a mix of residential, retail and light industrial. Historically Addington was one of the earliest inner city suburb established based on industry along the tram lines. It has problems as many early industrial suburbs, like car-dominated, unsustainable, low amenity and poorly planned. After the February 2011 earthquake, many businesses have relocated along Lincoln Road at Addington. The booming businesses, new investment and fresh employment make it promising to become one of the city’s most vibrant and exciting suburbs. This project is to prepare a 30-year vision structure plan for Addington by exploring contemporary urban design theory and sustainable urban design strategies; designing for residential population growth and various transport modes; formulating strategic objectives; developing strategic plan and implementation strategy in response to formulated objectives.

Compactness, mixed-use, walkability, regeneration, place and community, public spaces and sustainability are the main principles of New Urbanism. Transit-oriented-development (TOD) is also an influencing urban design concept that closely related to New Urbanism movement. TOD has new centre: transit station or stop (train station, metro station, tram stop or bus stop) surrounded by relatively highdensity development and progressively lower-density development spreading outwards from centre which located within a radius of 400 to 800 metres from a transit stop.3

The expansion of Christchurch to 1926.1

URBAN DESIGN THEORY

New Urbanism is now an important planning and design movement. It seeks strategic way to support the following principles: “neighborhoods should be diverse in use and population; communities should be designed for the pedestrian and transit as well as the car; cities and towns should be shaped by physically defined and universally accessible public spaces and community institutions; urban places should be framed by architecture and landscape design that celebrate local history, climate, ecology, and building practice�.2 __________________________________ 1. Sourse: http://www.teara.govt.nz/mi/map/10370/the-expansion-of-christchurch-to-1926 2. Sourse: Congress of the New Urbansim, 1990. 3&4. Sourse: New Urbanism and TOD (Wesener, 2014)

Concept of Transit-oriented-development.4

According to history of cities evolution, all urban development is essentially transit oriented, it is just the dominant mode and its spatial expression varies. Addington has many specific attributes that make it realistic to become a transit oriented development; such as the existing and underutilised infrastructures, historical characterisation as a local and regional node; and current urban intensification pressure. It is significant to consciously intergrate its urban


[] DESIGN GOAL

DESIGN OBJECTIVES Objective 1

Design Goal Visualisation. Sourse: Peter Pritchard, 2000

Objective 2

Create mixed use throughout the day. This is achieved through shared facilities and streets, vertically along streets and horizontally within building blocks. Criteria: an area needs to serve more two primary purposes. Primary use is offices, residences, shops, places of education, recreation & entertainment. Secondary use is the support of the primary uses and the people they attract.1 Objective 3

Create a public realm that has sequences, proportions and dimensions and add public green space for healthy and attractive neighborhood. Criteria: successful cities are shaped by the relationship of built form to space, and the range, variety and characteristics of the spaces made available: outdoor rooms, civic spaces, promenading routes, night-strips, quiet gardens, little corner stores, favorite meeting places.2 Objective 4

Create options for movement via transport, traffic management, bicycle lanes and frequent public transport alternatives. Criteria: reduce trips by car by traffic management, reliable and frequent public transport alternatives and by establishing bike lanes. 3 __________________________________ 1,2 &3. Criteria Source: Montgomery, J. (1998). Making a city: Urbanity, vitality and urban design.

YALING YAN

Increase development intensity via diversity of use and activities. This is achieved through increasing business and residential density.

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY SoLA

CHRISTCHURCH POLYCENTRIC CITY

The goal of this 30-years vision Addington structure plan is to assemble various urban functions to provide Addington a framework for a vital and self-sustaining urban form and residential neighborhood diversity and the public realm.

51


DESIGN STRATEGY

My design strategy is to increase the residential and commercial density by rezoning some of the areas and increase the connection between the existing core activity area and proposed new town square, shopping square and the Tower junction. This is achieved by creating additional walking/ cycling ways and new bus routes. Once the transport connection is enhanced, Addington will have a comprehensive northwest to southeast mixed-use complex which can accommodates business, retails, restaurants, civic spaces, and community activity spaces. In addition, more public green spaces are proposed to locate in residential areas in order to create a healthy and an attractive neighborhood. The connection between the Church Square and the core business area is enhanced to improve its walkability and accessibility.


[]

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY SoLA

YALING YAN

CHRISTCHURCH POLYCENTRIC CITY

ADDINGTON STAGINGPLAN

53 Staging Plan

Stage 1 from 2015-2020 (5 years) • Main road pedestrian acess and streetscape enhancement • Mixed-use development for new commercial opportunities • Anchor development at the railway and Deans Avenue intersection; railway and Clarence Street (Key connections to eliminate railway barrier) Stage 2 from 2020-2035 (15 years) • Comprehensive development for new community square, including new buildings for community facilities: Library, Community hall, the Court Theater • Development of new bus station and bus stops • Primary pedestrian and cycling routes development Stage 3 from 2035-2045 (10 years)

• Open space enhancement and coutyard connections • Redevelopment of community facilities • Community minor walking and cycling routes enhancement


DETAIL SITE PLAN

DESIGN STATEMENT

This detail site plan shows how the triangle mixed use retail space could be connected to the proposed town square. The existing car auction space is transferred into a space with mixed use including retail, restaurant, cafe and outdoor green space. Large area of surface parking is largely reduced and more indoor car park is provided. Vegetation between railway tracks provides function as ‘traffic island’. The paved walking cycling way and better permeability improved the walkability of this area.


LINCOLN UNIVERSITY SoLA

YALING YAN CHRISTCHURCH POLYCENTRIC CITY

[]

55


SHIRLEY IN THE POLYCENTRIC CITY As cities begin to grow rapidly in population, methods of preventing or slowing wider urban sprawl are becoming more important. The polycentric model looks at having many centres to a city, each centre having a range of hosing density and activity. At the moment in the City of Christchurch this is more important than it has ever been, as the recent Earthquakes have demolished what once was an exciting city centre. Before the earthquakes, Christchurch followed a mono centric model, where the whole of Christchurch relied on going to and from the CBD, but in changing the cities model to a polycentric model; car use can be reduced, preventing the amount of green house gasses being produced and saving city dwellers money. Communities will be strengthened, with each centre having a individuals will be attracted to different areas.

Funtionally Monocentric

Diagram: Burger et al (2011: 163)

Funtionally Polycentric

Shirley Inventory and Analysis

Vision: To provide a Vibrant and Sustainable centre where infrastructure, housing and business are designed with people at it’s centre. Through researching Urban Design theories, such as TOD, Human Scale, New Urbanism and Urbanity, certain aspects of what Shirley had and was lacking in became apparent. One of the main attraction of Shirley is the big box retail or the Palms Mall (Image 1), currently this is the main attraction, Shirley was really lacking a sense of identity other than the mall. The Christchurch Earthquakes had massive affect on the Eastern suburbs as this ground was historically wetlands. The neighbouring suburbs have massive areas of red-zoned land (Image 2) which are now unhabitable. This has causes the population of the area to drop significantly. The proposed medium density housing supports the decision to increase the density, which is also supported by all design theories researched (page 2, Output 1). Plenty of green space offers the community with opportunities for recreation and the creation of a stronger identity.

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New Brighton

Papanui

Merivale

CBD

Image 1 - Big Box Development, The Palms Mall


[]

Shirley

New Brighton

CBD

Riccarton Hornby

Main Centres in Christchurch as a Polycentric Model

New Brighton

Papanui

New Brighton

OLIVIA JOHNSTONE

Addington

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY SoLA

Merivale/Papanui

CHRISTCHURCH POLYCENTRIC CITY

Christchurch, Canterbury, New Zealand

Papanui

57 Merivale

Merivale

CBD

CBD

Image 3 - Schools in Shirley

Image 2 - Red Zone to the East of Shirley

Open Schools Closed Due to Earthquake

New Brighton New Brighton

Papanui

Papanui

Merivale

Merivale

CBD

Image 4 - Medium Density housing, Proposed by the Christchurch City Council

CBD

Image 5 - Open Green Space

Private Green Public Green


Strategic Plan & staging Plans The strategic plan encompasses aspects such as stainability, diversity and sense of place, putting in place the physical elements will support the development of a community identity. Goals formed through the research of Urban Design theories, focus on moving from a car dependent society to a move sustainable people friendly way. Putting in place a strong transport system allows easy access for all people. Aiding the Polycentric model as a whole, as it is easy to travel around the entire city. Making the centre people focused will encourage people to move back to the Eastern Suburbs as well as creating a uplifting and stimulating environment. Taking the best aspects from Urban Design Theory the aim is to turn Shirley into an exciting vibrant centre with a higher population, a strong identity and diversity in activities to cater for a wide range of people.

Legend Transport Network TOD 400 and 800 walking distances Proposed cycle and walk way network Bus routes Transport Exchange Proposed Traffic lights

Structure Plan Zones Low Density Residential Proposed MediumDensity Residential Public Green Space Horse Shoe Lake Reserve Shirley Gold Club Retail/Cafes/Bars Relocated QEII Education/Relocated Shirley Boys Water ways

Redevelopment of the Red Zone Organic Community Orchard Wetland Resortation Rowing Lake

Shirley Structure Plan - Structure plan showing new development proposals for the area. Following goals formed through Urban Design Theories.

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To provide an abundance of diverse green spaces, that are aesthetically pleasing and comfortable, all interconnected to allow for road free safe travel. (New Urbanism)

Create a strong transit hub surrounded by mediumdensity housing, with accessible public transport facilities and safe friendly cycle and walkways connecting the suburb (TOD)

To provide a wide range of first class community facilities creating a recreational and educational hub, giving opportunities to people within the suburb and attracting visitors from other centres. (Urbanity)

To provide a range of specialised local business which offer activities and retail for all locals and attract other city dwellers due to unique character. (Urbanity)

The transit Oriented Development and Medium Density housing will be implemented in the first stage as it supports existing and encourages the increase of population.

OLIVIA JOHNSTONE

Stage One

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY SoLA

Goals:

CHRISTCHURCH POLYCENTRIC CITY

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Stage Two New outdoor shopping experience and new park will be facilities for the growing population. The relocated Shirley Boys High and Shirley Intermediate will be built to provide educational facilities to provide for existing and encourage the growth of population.

Stage Three The QUII facilities will be relocated to the centre of Shirley, along with a rowing lack on the outskirts of the suburb. This will strengthen Shirleys identity as a recreational centre.

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LINCOLN UNIVERSITY SoLA

CHRISTCHURCH POLYCENTRIC CITY

OLIVIA JOHNSTONE

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FINDING SHIRLEY In a fast paced era of urban growth, postquake Christchurch finds itself on the cusp of polycentric development. A historically monocentric CBD presents several connectivity issues which are exacerbated by growing hubs such as Shirley. Vision Shirley has several key advantages providing economic viability and design feasibility for a proposal. A diverse mix of demographics, range of housing density, exciting green spaces and anchor retail should theoretically provide a good balance. However, division in demographics, under-utilised green space, poor connectivity and a serious lack of walking/cycling infrastructure have rendered Shirley a suburb lacking in local identity and permeability. As such, a vision has been established to enhance the recreational and open space facilities, celebrate the mixed demographic and ultimately give Shirley a strong local identity in the greater Christchurch context. Theory Three key theoretical precedence have been explored. Urbanity; defined as being a primarily experiential entity which encompasses the aspects of a dynamic city life1, Walkability; measured as having 9 key qualities with quantitative effect on the walkability of a place- such as permeability, human scale, tidiness etc2, Green TOD; which encompasses core ideas of TOD and green infrastructure3. Refer to Figures 1 and 2 to see how these three theories have been analyzed at a Chirstchurch scale, and how they will be applied at a Shirley scale.

1. Urbanity and Urban Design. Retrieved from http://learn.lincoln.ac.nz/pluginfile. php/82761/mod_resource/content/2/2014_lasc321_ss_urbanity_urban%20design_copyright%20version.pdf. (Wesener, 2014). 2. Identifying and Measuring Urban Design Qualities Related to Walkability. (Ewing et el, 2006). 3. Green TODs: marrying transit-oriented development and green urbanism, International Journal of Sustainable Development & World Ecology. (Cervero et el, 2011).

To create a vibrant and

active Recreational

identity for Shirley

which encompasses core ideas of Green TOD and Walkability theories. This will aim to decrease car dependency, increase local activity and celebrate the demographic diversity of Shirley.

theory analysis WALKABILITY

URBANITY

GREEN TOD

All three theories are weak in both quality and quantity throughout Christchurch. More Urbanity and TOD is present than Walkability. Provisions for Urbanity and TOD have generally only been included in post-quake plans, thus the analysis is half existing/half porposed. Lack of dynamic diversity, connectivity and sustainable design decrease permeability of these three theories across Christchurch. Fig 1.

At a Shirley scale, Green TOD, Urbanity and Walkability will be applied with priority respectively. These three theories will aid in achieving an overall vision. This enables a flexible design which stiches into the existing context as much as it does the projected vision of Christchurch. This consideres Shirley at an isolated scale with dynamic potential; and as a small connective part of a polycentric makeup.

Fig 2.


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The Social Bridge To bridge the gap between the socioeconomic communities within the area.

G2

G3

The TOD connection

Integrate for Identity

To connect using transport orientated (TOD) and walkable city principles throughout.

To integrate existing developments into the surrounding area creating identity and sense of place

key initiatives

3 4 5 6

CBD Install a linear skate park, dog park and organic playground within the green space crossing Jebson Road.

Restructure Horseshoe Lake Rd. entrance into a visual gateway for the Recreational area.

Implement a neighborhood wide cycle track which links into the AvonOtakaro path.

strategy QEII

key

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Main Visitor Entrance Park/open space Golf course Wetland Gateway Transition

Reformat current retail into a night focused hub with daytime eateries.

Dedicated Walk/Cycle Way Cycle priority intersections Dedicated mixed-use

Implement mixed use, high density buildings on cnr Marshlands and Shirley Rd.

Repurpose Shirley Intermediate into a Recreational Centre and community centre.

Recreation/ Community centre

TENILLE PICKETT

2

SHIRLEY

RD MARSHLANDS

1

Enhance Burwood Park, Shirley Golfcourse and Horseshoe lake to a recreational destination.

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY SoLA

G1

CHRISTCHURCH POLYCENTRIC CITY

goals

Activated Edges

SHIRLEY RD


STAGING

Key Actions • Rezoning for stage 1, 2a and possibly 3b (Horseshoe Lake Reserve) require council involvement. • Moving of the current community centre (possibly an expansion of facilities including the old and new community centre). This would harness support from the ShirleyPapanui Community Board. • Design and tender for Recreation Centre Building, Community Centre Building, Mixed use strip and nighthub area. This will require private developers and would work in with existing local business buildings. Designs must encompass Green TOD where possible. • Restructuring of Marshlands, Shirley and the greater cycle route would require the NZ Transport Agency. Refer to Figure 3 for spatial placement of key actions Justification • Phase 1 is all about anchoring a stable retail [transient] population prior to phase 2 and phase 3. The aim is to provide a core base of activity and reason, which will flow through to the recreation area (phase 2) and be well established before phase 3. • Phase 2 completes Shirley’s new identity. Four individual areas provide enough dynamicboth in activity, function and accessibilityto cater for Shirley’s diverse population. Intensity of purpose is also increased for visitors not local to Shirley, which anchors economic stability for the area. • Phase 3 connects all facilities through a TOD focused cycle/walk network. This is introduced last as initial focus should be on generating interest and public knowledge of the new facilities. Phase 3 also completes the whole day experience that Shirley can now offer: range of retail- recreational facilitiesnight time activities. Refer to Figure 4 for time line and stage development.

deta i l co nte xt

NOT TO SCALE plan showing gateway into Recreational Park.

phase 1

1 2 2a 3 3a 3b 4 5 6

phase 2

phase 3

Recreation Centre and Community Centre Street Design of The Palms Frontage Mixed use Retail strip Recreation Park Facilities Jebson Street Park Visitor centres for Recreation Park Cycle and walk infrastructure throughout Nighthub Recreation Park Gateway

NOT TO SCALE Isometric showing connection between The Palms and proposed Recreational Centre.


[] key

structure plan

Burwood Park

Fig 3.

Horeshoe Lake Reserve Shirley Golfcourse

Proposed mixedused Retail

Existing public facilities Proposed carparking Visitor Centres Primary TOD intersections Secondary TOD intersections Existing Pathwaysto be enhanced Proposed Pathways Landscaped Gateway Secondary Cycle ways Primary Cycle ways

NOT TO SCALE

2015

1

2 2a 3 3a

3b 4

2020

2030

5

6

2040 Fig 4.

5 3

eld Fi er cc So by fie Ex ld Pl ist ne ayg ing ar w s rou ea ea n . tin d w g/ ith bb q

Ru g

Example of Green Space identified as having significant Recreational Value. Two strategies are shown to illustrate activity diversity and green space identity.

N co ew u n r all ho etba t fo we ck ll r b ath ey an as er d ke an tb d all ,

1

burwood park

by clu b

3b

Ru g

3b 2a 2 6

N co ew co nn pat Pa urs ect hw rk e w ing ay ith th dir Bu e G ectl rw olf y oo d

3a

T an enn clu d T is c b en ou ni rt s

3b

R BM e-d Re e X vel ro -d tra op ex pes eve ck ed ist c lop in ou e g p rs d h in e u ig e t sin h re g es . La co nd La nn sca ke ect pe Re w d e Ex se ith ntr pl ist rv H an ay in e or c gr g l es e t ou in Ru ho o nd ear gb e yF iel d Sm Fi al l e e l Ru ds r R gb ug y fi by eld

4

TENILLE PICKETT

Existing commercial

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY SoLA

Low socio economic housing Medium socioeconomic housing High Socioeconomic housing

CHRISTCHURCH POLYCENTRIC CITY

Public Park

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Artists impression showing ropes course and rebuilt BMX track )in background) which utilises existing pine trees in Burwood Park


LINCOLN UNIVERSITY SoLA

CHRISTCHURCH POLYCENTRIC CITY

TENILLE PICKETT

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NEW BRIGHTON The aim of this project is to come up with a structure plan for New Brighton Centre, through a strategical design process. The process includes a series of research and analysis based on biophysical and socio-economy character of New Brighton Centre, and on three urban design theories and strategies. The final structure plan will be able to tackle the current issues at New Brighton and provide a guideline for future developments which will take place at the site for the next 30 years.

Photo overlooking from the East to the New Brighton Centre

INTRODUCTION FOR NEW BRIGHTON

New Brighton is a suburb located on the east side of CBD in Christchurch, New Zealand. It is listed as a key activity centre by Christchurch City Council.

Photo of Saturday Community Market at Brighton Mall

However, it is not as viable as other suburbs as it has suffered damage from earthquakes and due to other factors which cause constraints and issues. Overall, New Brighton has a unique character due to its coastal location, but work has to be done for it to become a attractive and viable centre again.

Photo of Kite Day 2013 at New Brighton Beach Understanding the concept of Polycentric vs Monocentric, and their main traits Define the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and constraints of the site Understanding the three theories and concepts, and their design principles and criteria

Map of New Brighton within the context of Christurch City

Setting out the things that need to be done in order to design a successful New Brighton Putting goals and objectives together strategically for the site and its implementations Develop a final plan for future developments, focusing on the site and design principles Detailed design for the site’s focused area, in this case Brighton Mall

Map of New Brighton Centre

__________________________________ 1. Kelbaugh, D. (1997) The new Urbanism. Journal of Architectural Education, 51, Diagram of the project’s design process 2, 142 constrains 144.


[] INVENTORY AND ANALYSIS

Main issues of the site are derived from the analysis, concerning both socio-economy and biophysical character.

1. Unique coastal character -> Recreations & tourism 2. Community with a strong and commited spirit MAIN CONSTRAINTS:

1. Prevailing cold easterly winds throughout the year 2. Permanent loss of residential catchment at red zone 3. Impossible for high densities at waterfront due to possible hazards such as flooding 4. Its isolated location, on the edge of Christchurch URBAN DESIGN THEORIES

Three urban design theories have been researched on, mainly with a focus on how to design a successful urban place. They are Urbanity, New Urbanism and Transport-Oriented Development (TOD). While these three theories are highly interrelated, New Urbanism provides 7 principles for designing a successful urban space that allows for urbanity to happen.1 Below are the principles/qualities New Brighton should achieve if it was to become a successful urban place. 1. public/open spaces 2. mixed land-use 3. compactness around centre 4. social and economic sustainability Key Layer Map of Inventory & Analysis 5. infill and redevelopment 6. transit integration

CHRISTCHURCH POLYCENTRIC CITY

MAIN OPPORTUNITIES:

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY SoLA

1. Insufficient residential catchment 2. Low quality commercial sprawl 3. Lack of cycle ways and main bus interchange 4. Aesthetically unpleasant gateway into the site 5. Insufficient choices for indoor entertainment 6. Weak connection between commercial and beach

HIN CHUN WOODY LEE

THE KEY ISSUES ARE LISTED BELOW:

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New Brighton has transitioned into a compact, vibrant and functionable centre that sustains local community and attracts visitors from across the city.

HOUSING DEVELOPMENT

The centre is a dynamic and popular shopping destination that is distinctive from other sub-centres.

•Attract future residential investments

•Restore and provide sufficient residential catchment for commercial

•Raise land values

DESIGN GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

Six design goals are developed to tackle the current issues, and to provide for a self-sustainable and attractive future New Brighton Centre. 1. To provide a greater housing variety and higher densities

-Two different densities of housing -Medium Density (15HH/ha) first-home units -Medium to High (20HH/ha) 3-5 story apartments

2. To retrofit surplus areas into public and residential areas

-Key public meeting and green space at the centre to replace surplus retails -Consolidate existing retails with future offices

3. To integrate the current bus transit

-Establish a bus interchange station that connects all existing bus routes to, through and around New Brighton Centre

4. To establish recreational facilities/ tourist attractions

-New indoor leisure centre at waterfront -Outdoor event centre at waterfront -Entertainment hub and shops

5. To upgrade the quality of current gateway

-Restore red zone at bexley into conservation site

6. To increase the walkability and bicycle-friendliness

-Re-roadings for walkers priority -Additional cycle ways in, through and around centre

RECREATIONAL OPTIONS •Serves local & tourist attractions •Provide for future events and festivals •Unique key activity centre

INVITING GATEWAY •Reuse red zone areas •Restore ecological values to the site •Aesthetically pleasant gateway

BICYCLE FRIENDLY •Decrease site’s car dependency •More walkable centre •Connects to CBD

INFILL DEVELOPMENT •Reinject vitality to its streetlife •Better amenity and surveillance •Avoid wasteful land consumption •Alleviate retail expenditure

BUS INTERCHANGE •Encourage use of public transit •Provide for future population growth

STRCTURE PLAN FOR NEW BRIGHTON

CHRISTCHURCH POLYCENTRIC CITY

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY SoLA

DESIGN VISION


[] LEGEND COMMERCIAL Entertainment/Retail

The Pier

RESIDENTIAL Medium-High Density (20 HH/ha) Medium Density (15 HH/ha) Family / Retirement housing

Medium Density (15 HH/ha) Single-Family / First-home units

Existing Low-Medium Density (10HH/ha)

PUBLIC / GREEN SPACE Key Open Space Existing Public /open Space Existing Schools Key Green Space Ecological Reserve

HIN CHUN WOODY LEE

Seaside Accommodation Apartments

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY SoLA

Existing Retail

CHRISTCHURCH POLYCENTRIC CITY

Office/Retail

Existing Conservation Zone 0

100

200

400

Existing Reserve METRES

Scale 1:12000

Beach Front /Leisure

Structure Plan for New Brighton Centre FACILITIES AND TRANSPORT

STRUCTURE PLAN

The structure plan for New Brighton Centre is developed after the previous steps including inventory and analysis. It is to provide a guideline for future developments which will take place at New Brighton Centre.

Bus Interchange Outdoor Event Centre Indoor Leisure Centre Focal Point (Library) Additional Cycle Network

The plan is developed following principles of New Urbanism and Urbanity, with respect to the site’s biophysical and socio-economic character. Design goals and objectives are realistic and can achieve their design vision. MAIN DESIGN CRITERIA

Main principles are applied to the design, including: compactness, mixed-use, sufficient amount of public and green spaces, infill developments and social diversity; which they are to achieve longterm social and environmental sustainability.

New Roadings Re-route (One way) Major Gateway

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STAGING PLAN AND STRATEGY

A staging strategy is developed to provide a timeline for the structure plan and the design objectives’ implementating. The priority of the implementation will be serving and sustaining the local first, then attracting and providing for tourists.

Renovating

Refurbishing

STAGE ONE

•Alleviate retail expenditure •Low-cost projects •Surveillance on the street •Cycle ways connection •Retrofit the demolished and surplus •Indoor recreational options

STAGE ONE (2015-2017)

Developing

STAGE TWO

•Alleviate retail expenditure •Relatively low-cost projects •Bus interchange •Start to restore residential catchment •Outdoor event centre for festivals

STAGE TWO (2017-2022)

Upgrading

STAGE THREE

•Further increase residential catchment •Compactness and mixed-uses •Developing towards waterfront •Connection to the beach •Provide for tourists

STAGE THREE (2022-2030)

Flourishing

STAGE FOUR

STAGE FOUR (2030-2035)

•Legible accessibility in, through and around centre •Provide for higher walkability •Introducing offices •Employment opportunities STAGE FIVE

•Introducing higher-class housing •Further increase residential catchemnt •New income groups > social diversity

Gentrification STAGE FIVE (2035-2040)

Enhancing*

STAGE SIX

•Upper-class housing and accommodations •Relatively high-cost projects •New income groups > social diversity

STAGE SIX (2040-2045)

STAGE TWO - SIX

•Long-term on-going project •Slowly attract visitors STAGE TWO-SIX (2017-2045)*


4

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2

m

Exe

1000 le 1: a c S e | entr C n ighto LEGEND w Br e N r o f lan Proposed Entertainmnt/ Retail sal p

opo

pr plary

CHRISTCHURCH POLYCENTRIC CITY

1

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY SoLA

HIN CHUN WOODY LEE

3

Outdoor Cafes

Proposed Office/ Retail

Community Market Centre

Proposed Medium Residential

Glass Roof

Proposed Indoor Leisure Centre

Timber Seating

Pedestrian Mall

Proposed Cycleway

EXEMPLARY DESIGN PROPOSAL

The plan is focused on a more detailed design, with the proposed entertainment hub. The centre is highly walkable and accessible for visitors. Shops, recreations, facilities, the beach and car parks are all within walking distance. Refurbished Brighton Mall will have vibrant streetlife and provide opportunities for mixed-use activities. Linkages between activity areas and the beach are reinforced with safer and better connectivity and floor pavement. The centre will become a popular destination for visitors across the city.

Primary Footpath

1

Proposed Entertainment Hub

Primary Vehicular Lane

2

Brighton Mall

Secondary Vehicular Lane

3

Existing Open Space

Secondary Footpath

4

Proposed Bus Stop

Library Footpath


UNITEC, THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND, CPIT SYDENHAM 2020 INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATION

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SYDENHAM 2020 – INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATION Led by Unitec: Jeanette Budgett and Dushko Bogunovich In collaboration with The University of Auckland: Camia Young CPIT: Belfiore Bologna and Irene Boles

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EAST SYDENHAM 2020 - INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATION CHRISTCHURCH’S GATEWAY INTO THE GREEN ECONOMY? East Sydenham, traditionally a working class area on the southern fringe of Christchurch is today an inner city suburb with interesting potential for redevelopment. South of Moorhouse Ave, it reveals a remarkably consistent urban footprint of industrial factories, warehouses and commercial premises. Outside the mooted Green Frame and the CBD (Central Business District) of Christchurch’s Blueprint, East Sydenham might easily fall outside the purview of the city planners. Such areas display pragmatic commercial forces at work - a condition that seems to occur largely without architects. Left to their own devices they might tend to the common retail encroachment of modern cities, i.e. the mall, the big box, the ‘category killer’1. Just north of Moorhouse Avenue, closer to the city centre, we see already the incursion of big box retail with ‘The Warehouse’ at 555 Colombo Street. One big box with a gigantic car park and pulling power tends to attract similar scaled developments, which seek to take advantage of the passing traffic. Such developments inevitably shift the focus from traditional pedestrian town centres to car-dominated peripheral sites. They tend to dictate the movement patterns of cities, road design and may even determine the location of motorway exit ramps. This type of polycentric development of the city deserves the attention of architects and, in the case of East Sydenham, preferably before the big box destroys the existing scale and grain of the old industrial neighbourhood. Economic contingency has largely determined the form, scale and material in East Sydenham. Reliance on the motorcar as the dominant mode of transport is evident in the large areas of onsite parking. Paved surfaces dominate and the natural world is suppressed. Low-performance lightweight buildings reflect their period of construction through the decades of cheap and abundant electricity. Programmatic drivers are reflected in the design of buildings from the 1940s and 50s in particular. Portal frames, saw tooth roofs and high level gable-end glazing all speak to the programme and working conditions inside the large footprint buildings. More commonly now transparent profiled roofing removes any need to consider the tectonics of the window opening and the way light enters the interior. In spite of this apparent loss of design attention, architectural oddities and signs of the domestic roof still appear beside the strictly pragmatic flat-roofed tin shed. It is an area ripe for some kind of investigation and proposition. How might we re-think these environments? How do we bring back residential population? What can we do to recuperate __________________________________ 1. Kelbaugh, D. (1997) The new Urbanism. Journal of Architectural Education, 51, 2, 142 constrains 144.


UNITEC, THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND, CPIT SYDENHAM 2020 INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATION

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SYDENHAM EAST

them, or in the case of East Sydenham intervene at a crucial time in the future city’s development? It seems just a matter of time till East Sydenham experiences an economic transformation and the manufacturing and low-value services (car tyre shops) are replaced by creative, high-value activities (designers studios). The summer school in the first instance investigated the scale, material and programmatic condition of East Sydenham. Students selected a cluster of adjacent sites to investigate and propose architectural interventions that explored the social, cultural, urban, economic and tectonic character of the area. Floor/area ratios as a measure of density were to be doubled or tripled from those currently existing. Live-work-play scenarios that support and sustain domestic life, and new economic activity, within a commercial and hard-urban context were encouraged. Thus the slogan ‘industrial occupation’ was a deliberate double reference: it was the code word for people re-colonising this area as residents, socialisers, consumers, and, workers with occupations in the new, green economy.

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Green innovation – dubbed as ‘greenovation’ – was suggested as the double driver of change: not only does the building stock get a retrofit with clean energy, water and waste technology, but actually the new tenants in these retrofitted buildings are the design and engineering firms who drive the green economy transformation of Christchurch. In sum, the studio was driven by three agendas rather than just one: 1) Polycentric City - being the over arching theme of the whole 2014 Summer School and asking of all three studios: What does ‘polycentric development’ mean in the Christchurch case? 2) Industrial Occupation - expanding the regeneration of Sydenham east and west of the Colombo Street spine by attracting back permanent residents, visitors and new businesses and making the once proud manufacturing suburb again the pioneer of a new industrial era; 3) Green Innovation - addressing the global concern with climate change and assuming clean-tech investment presents an economic opportunity for Christchurch. The recovering city could play a special role in the global green technology revolution, both as the key innovator and manufacturer, and the key consumer and demonstrator of what the urban (re)development looks like and how it works. If there is a case for a ‘green-tech’ cluster in Christchurch, then Sydenham East looks perfect for such initiative in terms of its location, appearance and history.


In response to this challenging multi-brief, the students have produced a double proposition, at two spatial scales: 1) at the level of a cluster of 3 or 4 private commercial properties, they proposed a new functional programme – a mix of commercial, residential and public use – while at the same time introducing architectural and technology features which enhance sustainability and resilience. 2) At the level of the whole suburb, they looked for broader application of their ideas – to other sites, and with other clients, in Sydenham East. Without exception, they managed to identify some generic values in their design strategies and solutions and match them with opportunities across Sydenham East. The second point, importantly, addresses the original intent of the Summer School – to evolve the Polycentric City concept so that it meets the actual spatialphysical conditions of Christchurch. In showing how Sydenham East could regain its industrial past and recover some of its residential use, the student projects demonstrate that Christchurch has more than one layer of polycentricity. What is more, the ring of old suburbs around the CBD is potentially Christchurch’s best opportunity to speed up rebuilding the inner city. There is no reason to suspect that places like Addington, or Sydenham, or Linwood, might be in competition with the CBD. They have their own histories, characters, potentials and futures, as this case for Canterbury’s gateway into the Green Economy, attempts to prove. Jeanette Budgett and Dushko Bogunovich, February 2014

UNITEC, THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND, CPIT SYDENHAM 2020 INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATION

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BREAKING THE GRID

The aim of this project is to create a live-work environment within the industrial fabric of Sydenham. East Sydenham in the 1940s consisted of a mix of residential lots and a few industrial areas. Over time industrial programmes took over, pushing residents to the south. To counter the monotonous industrial occupation and the relentless Christchurch grids, the project introduces a diagonal cut that acts as an entry point into the industrial side of east Sydenham. It challenges the existing grid to create a pedestrian friendly circulation route within the car dominated grid. The diagonal cut brings life into the courtyards of the cold industrial blocks. A gradient of public and private spaces brings greenery and water into the site.

SYDENHAM SITE The site is located east of Colombo Street and south of the CBD in the North-East corner of Sydenham.

1941

2012

SYDM 1941 to 2013 The area has transitioned from 100% residential into 100% industrial.

The urban strategy is to continue the pedestrian diagonal cut through east Sydenham. The project proposes residential occupation to be mixed with office and suitable manufacturing occupations. The range of programs include residential and offices on the street, studios and public amenities located inside the block, and exhibition space at the centre of the block.

CHRISTCHURCH CBD Victoria Street and High Street break the otherwise consistent urban grid.


[] food

construction car

EXISTING FIGURE GROUND

EXISTING PROGRAMMES

PROPOSED FIGURE GROUND

PROPOSED PROGRAMMES

THERESE SAMSON, CHRISTIAN BURGOS

apartment

UNITEC, THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND, CPIT SYDENHAM 2020 INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATION

office

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URBAN MASTERPLAN Masterplan showing the new paths to be created allow for pedestrian access to public spaces.

public

semi-public

private


SECTION A-A

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

FIRST FLOOR PLAN


NORTH ELEVATION

SOUTH ELEVATION

UNITEC, THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND, CPIT SYDENHAM 2020 INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATION

THERESE SAMSON, CHRISTIAN BURGOS

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83 PV / SHW panels natural cooling atrium ventilation

SUSTAINABLE FEATURES

passive solar heating/cooling

food production natural ventilation rain water storage


UNITEC, THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND, CPIT SYDENHAM 2020 INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATION

THERESE SAMSON, CHRISTIAN BURGOS

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GREEN PROMENADE This project introduces a promenade through the industrial area of Sydenham. The industrial area of north Sydenham divides the residential neighbourhoods in the south from the CBD in the north, and acts as a barrier between the two areas. The area is predominantly made up of grey, large scale industrial buildings and very little else. The promenade works like a crack in a surface, bringing life into the concrete dominated landscape. The design of the promenade introduces greenery and residential housing along a path and connects Sydenhams residential neighborhoods with the CBD. The aim of the project is to create a catalyst for a greener, more pedestrian friendly, mixed use area.

This scheme proposes commercial and community based activities within the existing industrial buildings that border the promenade. The programmes include a food court, art studio and gallery, sports centre, and a community centre. The green promenade itself will have a cycling lane and a walking path to provide a safer pedestrian and cycling route to and from the CBD. We believe that this design opens up opportunities for a more welcoming, safe, sustainable and human friendly lifestyle within the industrial area in Sydenham.


RESIDENTIAL PODS

Residences are built on top of the existing industrial buildings and will be made of lightweight, sustainable materials.

UNITEC, THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND, CPIT SYDENHAM 2020 INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATION

The surprise element along the promenade are small courtyards that act as magnets, and are created in the voids between the existing buildings. Each courtyard has a unique activity such as: open air movie screenings, public dance floors (inspired by the DanceO-Mat gap filler that was such a hit), public barbeques and picnic tables. Each courtyard will be colour coded for easy reference, for example some people might meet in the red courtyard at 7pm for a movie screening, or the music studio is holding a concert in the purple courtyard on Friday. The biggest magnet will be situated at the heart of the green promenade, which is an amphitheatre that can comfortably seat 120 people. The idea is to offer places for people to gather and destinations along the promenade for both local and neighbouring residents.

SAMANTHA CHU & PEARL PATEL

COURTYARDS

SAMANTHA CHU & PEARL PATEL

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PEDESTRIAN PATH Trellises are placed in blocks at intervals to define the pedestrian path.

NORTHERN ENTRANCE A designated cycle path passes through the lane.

BUILDING PROGRAMMES The existing buildings around the promenade would be repurposed to cater to community based programmes (as seen in the key).

Timber SECTION A The main materials in our design are brick, and lightweight materials such as bamboo and channel glass.

Wind Turbines

Residential Pods Masonry Bricks

Bamboo Pa


FUTURE VISION In the future the promenade could extended through the remaining blocks to connect to the CBD. Each block would have a central magnet and smaller courtyards. Pedestrian traffic lights could be placed directly in front of the pedestrian path for easier access to people in the residential area.

UNITEC, THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND, CPIT SYDENHAM 2020 INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATION

CBD

SAMANTHA CHU & PEARL PATEL

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Residential

anels

Channel Glass Red Courtyard


UNITEC, THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND, CPIT SYDENHAM 2020 INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATION

SAMANTHA CHU & PEARL PATEL

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GREENING SYDENHAM The project focuses on the streetscapes of Sydenham East. The site has a strong industrial character and has a landscape dominated by vehicles and carparks. There is an obvious lack of green infrastructure and pedestrian space. Greening Sydenham claims carparks and underutilized lots to attract pedestrians and turn Sydenham into an outdoor living room for the community. The project is located along the axis of Wordworth Road, and introduces curves and vegetation to create a unique recreational space for social interaction, hospitality, wildlife, art, play. The aim is to create a pedestrian friendly area through the rehabilitation of the natural and physical environment of Sydenham. The surrounding areas within Sydenham provide some of the major inspiration and design ideas such as the Sydenham pod park, wildflowers and in general the reuse of hardscape materials.

WORDWORTH RD & ZONE OF INFLUENCE

CARS DOMINATE

RECLAIMING LAND FOR PEDESTRIANS


PROPOSED STREETSCAPE

INTERACTIVE PARK

OUTDOOR CINEMAS

EXISTING OPEN SPACE

MOUND PARK

PATRICIA MORRISON

EXISTING STREETSCAPE

UNITEC, THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND, CPIT SYDENHAM 2020 INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATION

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UNITEC, THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND, CPIT SYDENHAM 2020 INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATION

PATRICIA MORRISON

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St. ART What is Sydenham’s identity? Sydenham has a unique persona which is portrayed within the industrial typology. Although this area remains untouched, it conveys remnants of a diverse creative culture that has potential to act as a catalyst for the future of Sydenham as well as Christchurch. The project’s aim is to utilize the artistic discipline of Street Art and morph it into a scenario that acts as a shared space for all to dwell within the site and to freely allow the public to express their designs and artworks. The site is located on a major intersection in Sydenham East, at the corner of Gasson St. and Wordsworth Rd. The project retains a cluster of industrial rectangular buildings in order to maintain the existing structure and emphasize the working character of the area. The design capitalizes on the dynamic edge of this intersection by placing the main new building on the corner. The artist workshops and concrete canvases are located at the back of the site, while the principal interface with the public is the courtyard.

SITE The site is located at the corner of Gasson St. and Wordsworth Rd. at the heart of Sydenham East.


NORTH ELEVATION

EAST ELEVATION

SOUTH ELEVATION

WEST ELEVATION UNITEC, THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND, CPIT SYDENHAM 2020 INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATION

MOHAMMED AL-ALI, MOHAMMED CHIRAAGH

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UNITEC, THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND, CPIT SYDENHAM 2020 INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATION

MOHAMMED AL-ALI, MOHAMMED CHIRAAGH

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1. Retail / Office

2. Event and Seating Space

3. Covered Performance Area

4. Studio Spaces

5. Cafe / Bar

LEVEL 1 PLAN

1. Office Space / Retail Space

2. Upper Studio Space

3. Office Space

LEVEL 2 PLAN


UNITEC, THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND, CPIT SYDENHAM 2020 INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATION

MOHAMMED AL-ALI, MOHAMMED CHIRAAGH

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LIGHT CONVERSION This project proposes the repurposing of existing factories into a place of combined live-work. Factories constructed of portal frames and tilt slab concrete are typical structures in Sydenham. They use skylights to drop natural light, deep into the building. Light is the driving design impetus for this project. By preserving the existing skylights and structure, the building retains the traditional industrial appearance but is transformed into a live-work-environment. The preserved skylights allow a maximum amount of natural light into the building space. The North-East corner of Sydenham is an industrial area operating mainly during the day. It’s location offers opportunities for the area to be developed into a mixed use district, as it is a buffer zone between the residential area in the South and the CBD to the North. Sydenham has the potential to become a sustainable and affordable area where new technologies and arts come together to enliven the area. Future Sydenham can be used to hold events such as Luxcity to encourage people to dwell, as well as bring light back into Sydenham during the night time.

SITE ANALYSIS

Summer Air Circulation

Winter Heat Storage

GREEN INNOVATIONS

VENTILATION


SITE PLAN

FUTURE URBAN PLAN UNITEC, THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND, CPIT SYDENHAM 2020 INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATION

REYA PATEL, FLORA KWAN

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ELEVATIONS STRUCTURAL GRID DEVELOPMENT

SECTIONS

FLOOR PLANS


UNITEC, THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND, CPIT SYDENHAM 2020 INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATION

REYA PATEL, FLORA KWAN

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UNITEC, THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND, CPIT SYDENHAM 2020 INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATION

REYA PATEL, FLORA KWAN

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INDUSTRIAL HOUSING The project is located on the corner of Byron St. and Brisbane St. in East Sydenham. The brief was to take an industrial site and turn it from an existing ‘big box’ environment, into a mixed-use development that caters to innovative start up businesses. The site has an existing furniture business in a sawtooth roof warehouse. It is proposed to retain and transform the business into an eco-innovative furniture business that refurbishes or uses recycled materials, thus turning the place into a learning centre for green innovation. A public passage way passes through the existing sawtooth building connecting the street to a courtyard on the other side. A cafe and office are located in the front section, providing a place for people to gather. The pattern of the sawtooth roof was the initial inspiration for the new mixed-use design. In addition we discovered a tukutuku panel of NgÄ i Tahu te iwi o te rohe o Otautahi, which resembled the same sawtooth pattern. We derived the design concept from both of these forms. It was a key aim to retain and strengthen the unique identity as a place of industry, action, and innovation. At the same time it was important to offer attractive places for businesses, residents and the community that seek a different experience to that of the CBD. The new buildings are composed of three different typologies, derived from a triangular form. The smallest of the three modular designs is 12m x 6m and accomodates retail and office space. The medium module is 12m x 9m, and is designed for mixed use, such as a light industrial workshop with residential living above. The double module has two different designs: a 12m x 6m backed onto an 18m x 6m module and a 12m x 9m module backed onto an 18m x 9m. Both are designed for mixed use. All modules were designed for passive solar energy collection, air ventilation and water collection. Concrete panels are used for thermal mass and a green edible garden is located at the bottom of each module.


UNITEC, THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND, CPIT SYDENHAM 2020 INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATION

BREE MORGAN, JESSICA HULME

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L1

L2

L3

L1

L2

L3

L4

L5

L6

12M X 6M TRIANGLE

L1

L2

12M X 9M TRIANGLE

L3

DOUBLE TRIANGLE


UNITEC, THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND, CPIT SYDENHAM 2020 INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATION

BREE MORGAN, JESSICA HULME

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UNITEC, THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND, CPIT SYDENHAM 2020 INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATION

BREE MORGAN, JESSICA HULME

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DENSI CI

TY

The design is based on four identified problems: the lack of residents, the absence of 24 hours activity, the poor use of unbuilt spaces and the high crime rate. The project aims to create a sustainable live, work and play community by creating pockets of density where lively sub-centres incorporate basic daily facilities. The design was inspired by the drastic shift in residential accommodation from the 1920s (full of residents) to 2000s (with no residents). These studies drove the shape and form of the design by stacking and compacting the years one on top of another, starting with the 1920s at the bottom and the 2000s at the top. The program distribution places residents on the upper floors, retail on the ground floor and offices in between. By placing the smaller footprint buildings on the bottom floor, it creates an easy flow of movements for pedestrians throughout the buildings. Hagley Park CBD

Industrial Belt

Sydenham Catchment Area

BY

RO


ON

STR

GAS

SON STR EET

CAR

EE

T

LYLE STRE ET UNITEC, THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND, CPIT SYDENHAM 2020 INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATION

NARA BERTOLONI, THOMAS (WENJIE) HUANG

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FLOOR AREA RATIO The average Floor Area Ratio (FAR) is 0.39 - given that the buildings are predominantly single story it means that only 39% of the area is being used.

POCKETS OF DENSITY Three pockets of density were created and strategically located where there is a lower average block FAR so that the unused space could be transformed into an amenity. By proposing basic daily needs within a 1-kilometre radius, the foundation of a sustainable living community is formed, and ultimately this contributes to reducing the need for excessive car travel.


DECLINING RESIDENTIAL POPULATION

CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT FOR DESIGN UNITEC, THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND, CPIT SYDENHAM 2020 INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATION

NARA BERTOLONI, THOMAS (WENJIE) HUANG

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SITE CIRCULATION

BYRON ST & GASSON ST

CARLYLE ST PERSPECTIVE


UNITEC, THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND, CPIT SYDENHAM 2020 INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATION

NARA BERTOLONI, THOMAS (WENJIE) HUANG

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REPROGRAMMING SYDM Sydenham is beautiful. It has a raw, uncompromising character that is the result of decades of industrial activity, resulting in a complex urban pattern that not only resembles a work of art, but is also the physical evidence of a surprisingly rich cultural history that has been and may continue to be of vital importance to the development of past and future Christchurch. Reprogramming Sydenham is about appreciating the inherent beauty, and developing an architectural language using both the physical and historical material that constitute the area today. The architectural language is guided by strategically reducing and adding architecture, so that existing spatial configurations can be transformed into spaces that can house new types of functionality in a manner the original architecture wasn’t intended for, in the case of this particular brief, a center for Arts & Technology.


UNITEC, THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND, CPIT SYDENHAM 2020 INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATION

THOMAS BOUCHIER

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UNITEC, THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND, CPIT SYDENHAM 2020 INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATION

THOMAS BOUCHIER

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JUNC.FACTORY Located at the critical junction where Moorhouse Avenue and Waltham Road intersect, Junc.Factory stands as an icon and landmark of East Sydenham. The complex consists of a series of buildings (old and new) including a factory workshop, exhibition space, several art workshops, lecture rooms and an office tower for studio and live-work space. The architecture builds on Sydenham’s identity as a manufacturing nexus in the city. It also celebrates the culture of Kiwi ingenuity and DIY.

A CULTURE OF MAKING

Ever since Christchurch’s first passenger railway terminal was built on Moorhouse Avenue in 18631, Sydenham population has gradually increased, followed by the rapid development of a variety of light industries. “Today Sydenham stands pre-eminent amidst the large number of progressive and successful districts in a most progressive and successful colony. Numerous industries have been established, chief of which is Booth Macdoland & Company, a roller flourmill, a large furniture factory, a stocking and knotting mill, wholesale boot manufacturers, a cyclist workshop and carriage works, a soap factory and many other industries.” Chroniclers (1904)

LUKE ADAM POTTERY WORKSHOP

GNIKAM TOOB

__________________________________ 1. Sydenham : the model borough of old Christchurch : an informal history

KNITTING AND BIKE WORKSHOP


UNITEC, THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND, CPIT SYDENHAM 2020 INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATION

JEFFERY CHOW, TAO SHEN

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SITE

The site is not only located at the North East corner of Sydenham East, but also on the fringe of Christchurch’s CBD where two busy roads intersect. (Moorhouse Avenue and Waltham Road). A large number of people pass through the intersection everyday, making the site an appropriate location for a landmark building. While it is a prime location, the current existing infrastructure (the bridge and railway) divides the area, making the site inaccessible and hidden.

ACCESS

In order to improve the current lack of access, terraces are designed to connect to the existing bridge which spans across the railway. This forms a pedestrian friendly, direct connection between the existing skate park, the bridge and the site. The dynamic circulation of the terraces extend into the complex of Junc. Factory. LOCATION MAP

FORMER CHCH RAIL STATION

BRIDGE

TERRACES

SITE

RAIL WELCOME TO SYDENHAM SKATE PARK

TERRACE CONNECTION

SYDENHAM LANDMARK


SITE PLAN 40m

18.5m

100m

1m 1.5m

200m

18.5m

1m 1.5m

20m

20m 20m

20m

IMPROVEMENT 1 Widen the bridge to be more pedestrian and cycle friendly.

IMPROVEMENT 2 Make use of existing skate park and existing bridge by adding more greenery to the site.

IMPROVEMENT 3 Implement a direct connection (both visually and physically) to the site from Moorhouse Ave. DESIGN STRATEGY

UNITEC, THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND, CPIT SYDENHAM 2020 INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATION

JEFFERY CHOW, TAO SHEN

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Lift core and stairs

Perforated Corten Steel panels locally sourced The tower is to be built with Post Tensioned LVL system, an innovative building technology developed in Christchurch utilized for Multi-storey timber construction. Windows are designed to create adequate crossventilation to reduce the use of air-conditioning.

A collection of solar panels and wind turbines are placed on top of the roof of the building to generate electricity.

SECTION Rain water is collected from the roof and terraces and recycled for reuse

2m 4m

10m

20m


[] 7/F

Viewing Tower

Exhibition Office

6/F

Service

Bar/Restaurant

5/F L2-L5 Live/Work Office

4/F

3/F

2/F

Workshops/Rooms: Smaller workshops generally for arts and crafts (smaller scale DIY including pottery, arts, and smaller groups of community gathering.

ROOF

Reception: Information Hub

1/F

Exhibition Hall: Display historical industrial machinery, DIY products, items etc.

G/F

DIY Factory Workshop: Large open space where people share tools and machinery to make/fix their own items.

PLAN 2m 4m

10m

20m

JEFFERY CHOW, TAO SHEN

The rooftop is dedicated to showcasing different types of solar panels, wind turbines, solar tubes, thermal panels etc

UNITEC, THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND, CPIT SYDENHAM 2020 INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATION

Workshop

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VICTORIA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

THE CHRISTCHURCH THEATRE DISTRICT

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THE CHRISTCHURCH THEATRE DISTRICT Victoria University of Wellington School of Architecture & Design. Mark Southcombe, Victoria Willocks and Rebecca McLaughlan


VUW PROGRAMME BRIEF Context In mid 2012 the CCDU developed a Blue Print for the rebuild of Christchurch. This was put together in 100 days, dividing the city into different precincts with a major/anchor project in each precinct. The Performing Arts Precinct Te Whare Tapere is described in the Central Recovery Plan Blueprint as a major anchor project that will “offer facilities for music and the performing arts, and to act as a catalyst for recovery.” The precinct was spread over a range of different sites and was intended to support co-location of organisations and foster the arts and creative industries to reinvigorate the city. “Most of all, they draw people to the city and make it an inspiring place to be”.

The proposed precinct adjoins Ngai Tahu land holdings and the Te Puna Ahurea Cultural Centre. The blueprint planned to “be a world class centre for celebrating Ngāi Tahu and Māori culture, and acknowledging Christchurch’s place within the Pacific”. It would be a unique, vibrant visitor destination that supports central city recovery through increased cultural, retail and hospitality activity. The design and function of the Cultural Centre will be intended to reflect New Zealand’s evolving identity, integrate with Te Papa Ōtākaro/ Avon River Precinct, and provide an inspiring and interactive facility to showcase and celebrate Ngāi Tahu, Māori and Polynesian traditions, and performing and visual arts.”

In August 2013 the Christchurch City Council voted unanimously to retain the Town Hall and proceed with the Performing Arts Precinct. So it was timely that we engage with the thinking around this area of the city and this project. The Performing Arts Precinct is located in the blocks defined by Oxford Terrace, Gloucester Street, Colombo Street and New Regent St. We found as the project began that the land adjacent to the Avon river between Armagh Street and Oxford Terrace although potentially key to the performing Arts Centre puzzle, is also a prime development site highly attractive to the private sector.

The obvious synergy, overlap and at times tension between the Performing Arts and Cultural Precinct briefs led us to consider both together. As the project progressed a Kohanga Reo, Kura, and Wananga (Preschool, Primary and Tertiary education campus) were introduced to the project programme in collaboration with Ngai Tahu as a means to explore the potential of a blending educational uses within the cultural centre brief.

The precinct brief consisted of a significant group of buildings that included the Rebuilt Town Hall, the fully restored Isaac Theatre Royal, a new Court Theatre, and homes for the Music Centre of Christchurch and the Christchurch Symphony Orchestra.

Engaging Atelier The Performing Arts Precinct Studio was conducted as an Atelier where students collaborated in a similar manner to an office. The programme began by the predominantly 2nd year architecture and interior students collectively researching the city context. A series of site visits to the proposed precinct and also to the new Court Theatre with actor and architect Stewart Ross, The Issac Theatre


Six excellent different design proposals were selected by staff and students to be developed by the groups of thwo or three students over the final three weeks of the summer school. Over the three week period critical inputs and tutorials were contributed by a range of practicing architects and designers, and Summer school VUW staff Mark Southcombe, Rebecca McLaughlan and Victoria Willocks.

A particular highlight of the summer school was a visit to Ohinetahi, the Garden designed by Sir Miles, his sister Pauline Trengrove, and her husband, John. The garden includes a series of buildings including the restored homestead and other small buildings including a gallery designed by Sir Miles Warren.

The student concept proposals and their implications and potentials were tested by the teams, before the final presentations at the end of the summer school in the public reviews held at the Christchurch City Council offices. The reviews were attended by most of our critics over the period of the summer school including representatives of Ngai Tahu, David Sheppard and Sir Miles Warren. At the end of the summer school a winning proposal was selected in the manner of an architectural competition. The winning scheme was Expressive Exchange by Luke Bryant and William Hope.

Design-led-research The 16 VUW students each undertook a quick fire design charette where each student designed an overall urban concept for all the components of the Theatre District programme, and produced a quick sketch model of the urban form for at least one of the major buildings within the proposed precinct. We reviewed the student design results at the Lincon University Landscape Architecture school with Critical inputs from David Sheppard and Peter Cui from Sheppard + Rout Architects.

The Theatre District Project offers Christchurch sixteen significant fresh views of some key parts of the new city puzzle, and six contrasting developed concept designs that are a valuable reference to those who are engaged in or care about Theatre and the Performing Arts in Christchurch. The design led research projects test and draw out a range of key implications and architectural tactics with their design implications explored and presented beautifully. The implications of these design tests can now be compared to Christchurch’s benefit...

VUW PROGRAMME BRIEF

Royale with Vanessa Carswell of Warren and Mahoney and construction manager Ed Leeson, and the earthquake damaged, but still remarkably powerful Christchurch Town Hall with Patrick Cantilon of Christchurch City Council. A series of site and precedent studies and analyses followed, along with targeted meetings and lectures with a range of amazing Christchurch people such as Don Miskell from CERA, Te Marino Lenihan, Perry Royal, Te Ari Prendergast, and Rangimarie Parata Takurua from NgÄ i Tahu, Luke Di Soma young innovative music and theatre practitioner, Andrew Just and Ryan Reynolds of F3 design and Hugh Nicolson Principal Urban Designer at Christchurch City Council .

UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE THE CHRISTCHURCH THEATRE DISTRICT

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AMELIA HOULT: Laneway Theatres

Performing Arts precinct, from Armagh Street / Concept forms

The laneways was a concept focused on deconstructing the performing arts establishments of Christchurch and providing opportunities for collaboration within different genres of theatre including informal and street theatre. This occurred through creating a set of lane ways that snake around the proposed theatre district. These lane ways allowed people to look into the rehearsal spaces of the surrounding theatres and also provided a place for artists to perform for the public. LANEWAY AREA MARKET SPACE URBAN ANCHORS TRANSITIONAL PERFORMING + EATING AREAS __________________________________ 1. Site master plan


My first week’s idea was The Theatre Axis. By placing the Court Theatre in the middle of the axis drawn from the entrance of the Town Hall to the entrance of the Theatre Royal it creates a much needed link across the theater precinct. Furthermore it more elegantly connects the two existing axis going off Victoria Square in both directions (which are based on Maori travel routes). The entrance of the Court Theater would also be placed on the axis and showcase a new glass and steel heavy architecture leading into timber. __________________________________ 1. Theatre Axis concept plan 2. Cultural Centre sketch model

UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE THE CHRISTCHURCH THEATRE DISTRICT

Master Plan, showing the Theatre Axis

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INITIAL CONCEPTS

ANKA KUEPPER: Theatreness

135


BENJAMIN WEBBER: Performing Arts Hub

Site studies and concept master planning

My big idea was creating a large outdoor like space under a large pavilion for alfresco amenities and public performances. The performance facilities are scattered around a central courtyard in this space and also open out to the street edge. The Forsyth bar building is cut through at the base, continuing the axis through Victoria Square and into the courtyard pavilion. __________________________________ 1. Performing Arts precinct concepts 2. Concept model showing corner of Armagh and Colombo St.


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VICTORIA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

Site Model (digital / physical)

INITIAL CONCEPTS

THE CHRISTCHURCH THEATRE DISTRICT

CHRIS YOUNG: Focus

137

The concept was to change the focus of the precinct to one of pedestrian zone rather than vehicles. This was done by creating spaces of human scale more suited to people than vehicles. __________________________________ 1. Music School model 2. Site master plan


DIVYESH BHAVEN: Fluidity Contemporary design ideas

Linking buildings together via bridge

Site master plan

As Christchurch is becoming a new city, the idea behind this scheme was to develop a distinctive identifiable contemporary arts precinct within the city. This was achieved though the fluid forms of the buildings. The fluid form represents theatre, drama, song and dance, as this shows movement. The form is a contrast with surrounding buildings from old to new and shows a city moving forward into the future. __________________________________ 1. Site master plan model


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VICTORIA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

INITIAL CONCEPTS

THE CHRISTCHURCH THEATRE DISTRICT

JANICE CHAN: Folding the city grid

139 Through landscape and public walkways, this idea addresses the Town Hall building and how a connection might be created with the Performing Arts Precinct, whilst making active the spaces in-between the two sites. Geometric forms have been explored to develop a terrain which feeds into Market Square where opportunities for public engagement with the landscape can occur. __________________________________ 1. Victoria Square form modelling (digital / physical) 2. Victoria Square form concepts 3. Site master plan


LUKE BRYANT: Meander

West Elevation

West Section

Cultural Centre sketches; Cultural Centre / Site Model

The Ngai Tahu Cultural Centre would define an entranceway and journey on a diagonal axis route from Victoria Street to the Performing Arts Precinct/Cathedral Square. The axis route would provide both a cultural and historical experience of both native and colonial origin which allows moments of engagement through physical and visual paths and thoroughfares for occupants. An additional element to the Performing Arts Precinct explored the idea of redeveloping the the Industrial spaces around the temporary Court Theatre in Lincoln forming additional, cheaper learning/practice environments for many of the programmes both included and excluded in the programme for the Performing Arts Precinct.

__________________________________ 1. Victoria Square model plan 2. Victoria Square model perspective


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As the North West entrance into the city, the spatial organisation and program depicts the ritual of the Powhiri celebrating culture, diversity and mahinga kai. The Cultural Centre takes its form from the eel and becomes the gateway entrance with relative Marae Atea and civic space binding the Town Hall, Cultural Centre and School. The diagonal axis is strengthened with the House of Tahu taking residence in the newly fitted Forsyth Bar building, serving as a connection to the Cultural Centre and the Gateway into the Performing Arts Precinct.

__________________________________ 1. Site master plan; Cultural Centre sketch model 2. Cultural Centre sketch model; Victoria Square planning

VICTORIA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

Cultural Centre form

INITIAL CONCEPTS

THE CHRISTCHURCH THEATRE DISTRICT

MATAMOANA NUKU: Gateway to the city

141


MICHAEL RICHARDS: Hinge CONFERENCE CINEMA COURT THEATRE RESIDENTIAL CARPARK MUSIC SCHOOL / CSO RESTAURANTS / MARKET NGAI TAHU CULTURAL CENTRE

Site master plan

After investigating the history of Victoria Square this scheme proposes to reintroduce an open market space into the area, as an acknowledgement of “Market Square.” This market space also doubles as an open courtyard, creating a space for performance art, gathering spaces, and overflow from any cafes and restaurants in the area. The placement of the CSO and Music School was chosen so that there could be a greater connection between rehersal spaces and performance venues, also meaning that it would be easier to transport instruments. __________________________________ 1. Concept model of Performing Arts precinct (Plan) 2. Concept mode lof Performing Art


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MILLA SARRIS: Spatial Performance Used Usable

Site master plan

INITIAL CONCEPTS

Hospitality School Retail Cinema Carpark

VICTORIA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

THE CHRISTCHURCH THEATRE DISTRICT

Te Puna Music School CSO Apartments Town Hall Isaac Theatre Court Theatre

143 In understanding the wider context of the inner city site, I concluded that the arts precinct needed to form a relationship with Victoria/Market Square. This was achieved through the introduction of a linking common space. The placement of each building in my master plan was placed according to their function, and grouped together according to target users. __________________________________ 1. Master plan concepts 2. Gloucester Street model (Court Theatre, Carpark, Isaac Theatre Royal)


OLLY SYME: Breaking down the Fabric Town Hall

Apartments

Ngai Tahu Cultural Centre

Hotel Block

CSO

Convention Centre

Convention Centre

By aligning the Ngai Tahu Cultural Centre as a composed reflection to the Christchurch Town Hall along the Victoria Street axis, the two unyielding forms are able to generate a threshold of intimacy between them and act as a formal entrance to the Market Square. This formal and more spacious mass is then challenged by the lower end of the Precinct which is deliberately a more delicately, broken down urban setting where the Performing Arts meets the general public at a intimate and interactive scale. The precinct master plan relies largely on scale and the quality of space in between form to integrate Christchurch’s performing arts culture and programme.

Court Theatre

Perf. Arts Centre

Retail

Education Facility

Isaac Theatre Royal

Library

__________________________________ 1. Site master plan 2. Site model perspective shots 3. Cultural Centre form finding (as seen from the Avon River)


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PATRICK LI: Per-form Green space

Site master plan

Cultural Centre

Convention District

Residential / Hotel Music Carpark Theatres Library

INITIAL CONCEPTS

Civic Space

VICTORIA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

THE CHRISTCHURCH THEATRE DISTRICT

Market / Public (informal) performance space

Market / Perf.

Playing with the existing geometries found within Victoria Square (triangular) and Cathedral Square (rectangular), the new Performing Arts Precinct would take on a circular shape to connect it with the convention centre and other surrounding blocks. By having a circular node, accessibility (primarily pedestrian) would be free from the restricting grid plan, and the arts culture of Christchurch would be allowed to grow radially outwards from the precinct to the city, region, country, world‌ __________________________________ 1. Early concept exploration 2. Site master planning and relationships 3. Refined site master planning 4. Performing Arts Precinct model

145


RALPH TITMUSS: Culture Through Involvement

Site master plan

This initial iteration focused on creating a strong diagonal procession through Victoria Park, which culminated in a large plaza. The plaza would back onto the newly built Court and CSO, and would allow for open air performances, temporary installations, and the arts community to thrive. In addition to an arts plaza, the river side of the Town Hall has been refurbished as a place for relaxation and involvement throughout the day, rather than only for performances. __________________________________ 1. Performing Arts precinct model perspectives


VICTORIA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

Library

Theatre Royal

INITIAL CONCEPTS

Christchurch Symphony Orchestra

Dance Academy

NEW REGENT ST

School of Music

THE CHRISTCHURCH THEATRE DISTRICT

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RENÉE WILLIAMSON: The Sanctuary

147 Court Theatre drama school elevation

The intention is to create a “sanctuary” where like minded organisations feed off each other. It is to be an energetic location where the performing arts can flourish. __________________________________ 1. Performing Arts master plan 2. Site master plan (focusing on the Performing Arts precinct) 3. Court Theatre / Performing Arts precinct model


VANESSA COXHEAD: Culturing Performance

Town Hall

Big move is to shift Ngai Tahu Cultural Centre

Site model

Culturing Performance takes the approach of connecting, occupying and activating a number of central city blocks to draw the wider arts and cultural community back into the central city and develop a neighborhood of key practice and performance sites to revitalise and retain Christchurch’s arts scene. Creating a gateway to the city’s arts and cultural hub is fundamental to the scheme and the gifting of land along the Avon River (Ōtākaro) to Ngāi Tahu on which to build the Te Puna Ahurea Cultural Centre and alternative education facility is a significant move in the planning of what aims to generate a more inclusive, engaged and energised series of spaces and places for the community. __________________________________ 1. Site model perspective 2. Site master planning concept 3. Site master planning concept and relationships


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CIVIC COURTYARD SPACE GREEN SPACE

VICTORIA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

HISTORIC PA ENTRANCE

INITIAL CONCEPTS

PERFORMING ARTS

INITIAL CONCEPTS

THE CHRISTCHURCH THEATRE DISTRICT

WILLIAM HOPE: Performing Arts Village

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My project investigated the long standing absence of Maori culture in Christchurch, by establishing Maori statues on the historic outline of the Pauri Pa in central Christchurch. A multicultural architectural village is established between the cultural centre and Town Hall within the outline, and a second village(the performing arts precinct) is established outside the outline. __________________________________ 1. Historical Pa site overlay 2. Site master planning 3. Performing Arts precinct model and drawn overlay


VUW STUDIO CHRISTCHURCH STUDENTS AND STAFF

Amelia Hoult; Anka Kuepper; Benjamin Webber; Chris Young Divyesh Bhaven; Janice Chan; Luke Bryant; Matamoana Nuku; Michael Richards; Milla Sarris; Olly Syme; Patrick Li; Ralph Titmuss; RenĂŠe Williamson; Vanessa Coxhead; William Hope

Victoria Willocks; Mark Southcombe; Rebecca McLaughlan


THE CHRISTCHURCH THEATRE DISTRICT VICTORIA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

DESIGN CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT

PHASE 2 DESIGN CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT

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151

Cultural Centre / School final render. William Hope & Luke Bryant


TEAM TRANSITION: Matamoana Nuku; Anka Kuepper; Patrick Li

Acknowledging how the community pulled together and moved forward post-earthquakes we conceptualised a transitional architectural solution for the Performing Arts Precinct. A new resilient architecture is slowly introduced through form, spatial planning and materiality In the future the area will become a memorial space. Moving away from the brutalist Town Hall new form and materiality is introduced in the House of Tahu building that visually connects back to the Town Hall through height assimilation across Colombo Street along the Avon River and material. Despite the primary use of concrete the interplay with glass along the faรงade induces an architecture of transition between the Town Hall and the Performing Arts District. The House of Tahu towers not only over the cultural site but also over the entire arts precinct, highlighting the cultural significance of reconsidering Maori in the redesign of the future Christchurch. The Ngai Tahu Cultural Centre transitions into a lower scale concrete featured space breaking

away from the dominating geometry of the square. Internally it features retail uses facing the street and cultural craftsman workshops towards the central inner courtyard. The Maori Schools are located adjacent along the north of Armagh Street. Continuing with the free flowing shape timber is introduced as a main feature material. Internally a circulation concourse links the cultural centre with the east adjacent residential complex in the proposed green park along the Avon. Open plan teaching rooms are responding to the cultural need of whanau and more collective life style. A step further is the Performing Arts complex along the transitional axis ending in the material and formal climax and a lighter materiality and broken up form towards Cathedral Square. The building becomes an urban transition space due to its main feature: a green ramped roof. Internally the circulation axis links to the other main elements of the design and uses similar materials; glass, timber and steel.


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CSO Admin Main Entry Parking

Foyer Retail

153

100 Seat Auditorium

Food Court

Arcade Entry

Music School Entry Crush Space

500 Seat Auditorium

VICTORIA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

Forecourt

TEAM TRANSITION

THE CHRISTCHURCH THEATRE DISTRICT

PERFORMING ARTS PRECINCT

Shopping Arcade

CSO Space

__________________________________ 1. West Elevation Performing Arts Precinct 2. North Elevation Performing Arts Precinct 3. Plan view of the Performing Arts Precinct Ground floor

Isaac Theatre Royal


HOUSE OF TAHU

Three-dimensional model of completed buildings __________________________________ 1. Perspective from Colombo Street 2. East Perspective 3. East Elevation


Retail

Info Stage

FIRST FLOOR

Retail

GROUND FLOOR

Cafe

Wharenui

Retail

Outdoor

Function

Retail

Exhibition

IT Area

Function Space

VICTORIA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

TEAM TRANSITION THE CHRISTCHURCH THEATRE DISTRICT

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PA WANANGA - 21ST CENTURY LEARNING VILLAGE

Wharekai

Foyer

Creche

Learning Centre

Exhibition

Foyer

Offices

Library Admin.

Lobby

Library

Lecture Theatre

Learning Space

Gym

Learning Space

Health

Lounge

Rooftop Courtyard

Sleeping

__________________________________ 1. Ground Floor plan 2. First Floor plan 3. Second Floor plan 4. Site section, looking North


VICTORIA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

TEAM TRANSITION

THE CHRISTCHURCH THEATRE DISTRICT

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__________________________________ 1. Perspective looking North 2. Perspective looking South 3. North Elevation 4. South Elevation


URBAN THEATRE: Amelia Hoult; Chris Young

_Circulation Diagram Urban Theatre is a project focused on enlivening the urban environment by creating opportunities for performance art to be viewed by the public on a daily basis.

up parts of the schools that otherwise would have been hidden behind closed doors, allowing audiences on the street to view and be a part of the creative process.

Our aim was to dismantle the theatre and the performing arts establishments of Christchurch so that they were more prominent in the community and created opportunities for collaboration within different genres of performing arts throughout public spaces. We wanted to create collaborative educational facility that not only had some shared facilities, but also challenged the idea of what performing arts might be. We did this by opening

We felt that creating this collaborative environment was very important to the performing arts and the Christchurch community as it gave performers the opportunity to collaborate with other like minded individuals. The intergration of the Cantebury University further contributed to this vibrant atmosphere, and encouraged an influx of creative young students into the city centre.


VICTORIA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

URBAN THEATRE

THE CHRISTCHURCH THEATRE DISTRICT

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Retail Court Theatre Shared Hall Cinemas Music School UC Music School Cultural Centre

Te Pa O Rakaihautu Offices Isaac Theatre Residential Dance School CSO


VICTORIA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

URBAN THEATRE

THE CHRISTCHURCH THEATRE DISTRICT

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__________________________________ 1. Public Performance; The Central Plaza 2. Looking into the lanes from Victoria Square; View from Victoria Square 3. Looking across the Avon towards the precinct


ELEPHANT IN THE PARK: Renée Williamson; Michael Richards; Ralph Titmuss

As we move through both built and natural spaces, a story is unravelled; the Powhiri narrative. Through this journey we seek to create both conscious and unconscious links to the Maori history of the area and link with the creative aspects of performing arts. Arriving at the Ngai-Tahu cultural centre from Victoria Street, a fluid form referencing the movement of an Eel welcomes (Karanga and Whaikorero) and draws its audience through an open gateway before opening up to an amphitheatre, where Maori song known as the Waiata takes place. Historic Maori legends specify the Eel as a gift from the Gods therefore we use the river to represent the Koha (gift). A sculptural form rises from the river and winds into the built form of the cultural centre, mimicking the movement of an eel. Proceeding onto the existing historic

bridge, where the salt and fresh waters historically met, symbolises the meeting of two cultures; the Hongi. Continuing along the diagonal axis of the park leads to a series of paths which references an eel net and are to be utilised as Market spaces where hospitality and a “feast” occurs (Kai). This hospitality continues into the Performing Arts Precinct which also houses the House of Tahu in the majorly redeveloped Forsyth Barr building. The Forsyth Barr building serves as a gateway into the Performing Arts Precinct. This space houses a relocated Court Theatre with a 400, and 150 seat theatre, as well as a combined Canterbury Symphony Orchestra and Christchurch Music School complex. The area is activated through ground floor retail, cafes, and restaurant spaces, as well as open courtyard which promotes gathering and slow movement.


VICTORIA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

THE CHRISTCHURCH THEATRE DISTRICT

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THE ELEPHANT IN THE PARK

MASTER PLAN

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__________________________________ 1. Site master plan 2. Perspective from Armagh Street looking at the Cultural Centre


VICTORIA SQUARE

__________________________________ 1. Cultural Centre perspective from Armagh Street 2. South East corner Victoria Square looking towards Cultural Centre (North West) at human level 3. Central bridge Victoria Square looking towards Performing Arts precinct (South East) at human level


Gallery & Function Space

Store

Reception

Open Work Space

Board Room

THE ELEPHANT IN THE PARK

Cultural Library

Kitchen

Entry Foyer

VICTORIA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

Cultural Library

THE CHRISTCHURCH THEATRE DISTRICT

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165 NORTH WEST TO SOUTH EAST (SECTION AA)

SOUTH EAST TO NORTH WEST (SECTION BB) __________________________________ 1. Ground Floor of the Ngai Tahu Cultural Centre 2. Second Floor of the Ngai Tahu Cultural Centre 3. North West to South Eat section of entire site 4. South East to North West section of entire site


THEATRE DISTRICT

Food / Tickets

Entry / Foyer

Small Stage

Kitchen Workshop

Admin Hall of Fame

Large Stage

A.

Staff Lounge

A. A.

Rehersal / Drama school space

A. A.

Retail

Cafe

Retail

Cafe Cafe

Kitchen

Kitchen

Meeting room

Cafe

Retail

Kitchen

Cafe

Cafe

Retail

Cafe

Entry Foyer Retail

Retail

Storage

__________________________________ 1. Court Theatre Ground floor plan 2. Christchurch Symphony Orchestra / Music School Ground floor plan. Redeveloped Forsyth Barr Building Ground floor plan


THE CHRISTCHURCH THEATRE DISTRICT VICTORIA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

THE ELEPHANT IN THE PARK

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__________________________________ 1. Internal Courtyard looking towards renovated Forsyth Barr 2.Looking towards Internal Courtyard and Isaac Theatre Royal’s eastern external wall 3. Gloucester Street elevation, Internal Courtyard looking east (towards Convention Centre) 4. Sectioned CSO elevation looking south, High angle perspective overlooking the precinct


ARTS CULTURE: Milla Sarris; Olly Syme; Divyesh Bhaven

The Master Plan predominantly occupies the initial sections allocated in the Central Development Blueprint for the precinct, however our programme is structured in a way that acts as a trigger for the Arts culture already evident inside the city. The driving concept around our project with relation to Christchurch’s Performing Arts Precinct was to establish a more diverse and flourishing ‘performing arts culture’ rather than encouraging a sanctioned precinct to cater for the entire Arts programme itself. We also acknowledge the presence of the Ngai Tahu iwi within the land and a sense of bi-cultralism between Maori and Pakeha heritage. Our final scheme is one which primarily functions around the gesture of not confining culture or programme in order to give individuals the freedom to use and explore the city on their own without the influence of a set, predictable location for the Performing Arts. Although this notion of sporadic diversity is to an extent a different

interpretation of the brief we feel that our role was to provide an integral, functioning system for the community and this idea we imagine would work cohesively rather than conflicting back against Christchurch’s post quake inherited central city commercial culture. This approach follows on from precedents such as Gap Filler and introduces an inclusive attitude of ‘explore’ to discover the arts within the city. Through the cohesion of both a structured formality and informality within the city alongside our concept offering a further integral activation of Addington through the Court Theatre and Music Centre we feel we have laid down a successful base in which Christchurch can firmly grasp and take hold of their eminent Performing Art Culture and call it their own. If you put someone inside a box they can only see or experience what the box has to offer, so why not give that person their own freedom out on the street and see what might happen then...


Gateway Threshold

ARTS CULTURE

Mezzanine Above

THE CHRISTCHURCH THEATRE DISTRICT

Roof & Floor Overhang

COOMBO ST

Ramp up

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VICTORIA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

NGAI TAHU GATEWAY BUILDING / TRADITIONAL MAORI MUSEUM

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__________________________________ 1. Ground Floor plan 2. Physical Model perspective of Ngai Tahu Gateway building and Traditional Maori Museum 3. Sectional render


THE CULTURAL SQUARE ARMAGH ST GROUND FLOOR

Modern Maori Art Museum CSO Rehersal

Ngai Tahu Offices Creative NZ

The Cultural Square

Isaac Theatre

Dealer Galleries

Ngai Tahu Offices

Modern Art Museum

GLOUCESTER ST FIRST FLOOR

Retail

Hos.

Gap Filler

Retail

Apts. Apts. Apts.

NEW REGENT ST

CSO 200 Seat Theatre


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__________________________________ 1. Perspective looking into Modern Maori Art Museum (Corner Armagh / Colombo) 2. North Elevation of the Cultural Square 3. “The Cultural Square” Internal Courtyard

DURHAM ST

VICTORIA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

ARTS CULTURE

THE CHRISTCHURCH THEATRE DISTRICT

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CULTURAL AND EDUCATION CENTRES Foyer

Library Computers Workshop

Drop off / Parking

Health

Gymnasium

Learning

Staffroom

Learning

Marae Wharenui Learning

Preschool

Drop off

Creche

Student Lounge

Learning

Assembly Hall / Cafeteria

Parking ARMAGH ST


VICTORIA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

SHARED FORMAL IDENTITY / ENTRANCE

ARTS CULTURE

THE CHRISTCHURCH THEATRE DISTRICT

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__________________________________ 1. Education Centre sectional render 2. Ngai Tahu Section - Marae Entry 3. Ngai Tahu Cultural and Education Centre Durham Street elevation 4. Looking across Victoria Square from the Traditional Maori Museum towards the Modern Maori Museum and Cultural Square


EXPRESSIVE EXCHANGE: Luke Bryant; William Hope

Master plan

Expressive exchange is an architectural project that explores the interactions between humans and architecture. The scheme consists of 3 design proposals that each investigate a different mode of exchange. The first defines exchange, the second practices exchange and the third creates exchange. The first proposal expresses the identity of Maori and European settlers. The spaces illustrate an exchange of two large leaders. Initially the standoff/tutaki, followed by gift exchange/ koha, and finally interaction. Subtle landscaping throughout creates extended walk to emphasise the dramatic encounter. Formality and tradition define the exchange in this space.

The second proposal retains Victoria Park as it is today, to recover the original program of the square as a marketplace. The park offers an opportunity to practice exchange for the occupants through program and space. There are no designated market spots, and steps guide one from pavement to grass, creating a free space that puts the user in control. The third proposal is the Performing Arts precinct and intergrates theatres, education, hospitality, and retail. The Precinct explores the idea of exchange within the buildings and also in the spaces between the buildings. This proposal encourages the performers to engage with people on a casual and formal basis, by providing moveable theatre walls that open outdoors and designing semi-transparent screens that show movement from within the rehearsal spaces.


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MASTER PLANNING Victoria Park \ Markets

Christchurch Cathedral

Convention Centre

THE CHRISTCHURCH THEATRE DISTRICT

Central Library

Ngai Tahu School CSO \ NZ Music School School Admin \ Library

Te Puna Ahurea \ Cultural Centre

Earthquake Memorial

Reworked James Hay Theatre

Traditional Maori Restaurant

Drop-Off Zone

Maori Chief Memorial (Po)

EXPRESSIVE EXCHANGE

House of Tahu

VICTORIA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

Isaac Theatre Performing Avon Arts Precinct Royal

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__________________________________ 1. Circulation diagram for Victoria Square and the Performing Arts precinct 2. Victoria Square physical model, perspective shot from corner of Kilmore & Durham


PERFORMING ARTS PRECINCT MUSIC SCHOOL OF CANTERBURY R

Hosp. Retail

H 500 Seat

R R

Hosp.

100 Seat

H

R

H H H

R

350 Seat Theatre

R

Precinct Workshop

Foyer t

100 Sea

COURT THEATRE Foyer Rehersal

170 Seat

Hosp.

Retail Hosp.

H

Foyer

Retail

H 350 Seat

R

H. H

R

R

R Office / Administration

R R

R

R

R

R

R

Music School CSO Court Theatre Cafe Dining / Bar Isaac Theatre Retail Central Library __________________________________ 1. Performing Arts Precinct master plan 2. Performing Arts Precinct pedestrian density / usage diagram

H. R

Isaac Theatre Royal


VICTORIA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

EXPRESSIVE EXCHANGE

THE CHRISTCHURCH THEATRE DISTRICT

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__________________________________ 1. Precinct section North to South 2. Precinct section East to West 3. Precinct Space allocation. Precinct Circulation Diagram 4. Performing Arts Precinct perspective render


EDUCATION CENTRE

Primary School Entrance / Drop Off Admin

FIRST

SECOND FOURTH

Gathering / Communal learning

Hal

l

Group Learning

THIRD

Outside / Horticulture Learning Spaces

Outdoor Rec. Zone

Student run Cafe

Perf

orm a

nce

Reading

Music Spaces

Secondary / Tertiary Entry ARMAGH STREET __________________________________ 1. Education Centre perspective render 2. Education Centre floor plans


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CULTURAL CENTRE & SCHOOL KILMORE STREET

Po

THE CHRISTCHURCH THEATRE DISTRICT

THIRD

Gallery

Boardroom

EXPRESSIVE EXCHANGE

Kitchen

Dining

R

VICTORIA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

SECOND

DURHAM STREET

FIRST

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__________________________________ 1. Cultural Centre floor plans 2. Cultural Centre / School section North to South 3. Perspective render of the entrance to Victoria Square at the corner of Durham & Kilmore


THE VILLAGES: Janice Chan; Benjamin Webber; Vanessa Coxhead

After the devastating earthquakes and clearing of much of the central city’s building fabric, this project aims to weave community and culture together as two distinct but cooperative public villages. This urban typology is a mix of tradition within a contemporary context, combining the human scale and intimate experience of internal courtyards with open public space, the return of Victoria Square to that of a market place and regeneration of the Avon River. The Villages imagines two open and permeable communities marked by blocks bordering Christchurch’s Victoria Square. Each village has its own space but are unified through the diagonal axis, market square and integrated systems that exhibit, educate and engage occupants in the architecture. We propose to return Victoria Square to an open public square and market place connecting the adjoining urban programme; Ngāi Tahu’s Te Pā o Rākaihautū and Te Puna Ahurea developments,

the performing arts precinct and adjacent developments, into one new public space. The Ngāi Tahu development re-establishes an urban pā in the central city where the central focus is on a learning village that embraces kaitiakitanga [the guardianship of the environment] and protects the values and heritage of the land. The Theatre District becomes a village of key venues and participatory spaces central to an open square that is ripe for collective exchange. In a city where the centre has gravitated in many directions after the earthquakes, The Villages looks at drawing the centre back in to a neighbourhood of vibrant activity, education, performance and celebration.


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PERFORMING ARTS VILLAGE

THE CHRISTCHURCH THEATRE DISTRICT

R

R

R

Re tail

Rehersal / Performance

Workshop Retail

y

lit

Isaac Theatre Royal

Admin.

Admin.

Rehersal

H

THE VILLAGES

ita

p os

VICTORIA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

Studio

Rehersal / Performance

Offices

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__________________________________ 1. Plan of the Performing Arts Village 2. Performing Arts Village section North to South 3. Perspective view of Performing Arts Village, Entrance to the Performing Arts Village


TE PA O RAKAIHAUTU

Kapa Haka + Performing Arts Theatre

__________________________________ 1. Perspective view of Te Pa O Rakaihautu 2. Te Pa O Rakaihautu Ground and First floor plans


VICTORIA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

THE VILLAGES

Fo

ry le al

G

ye r

O

ffi

ce

A

dm

in .

THE CHRISTCHURCH THEATRE DISTRICT

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CULTURAL CENTRE & HOUSE OF TAHU

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__________________________________ 1. Gound Floor plan and First Floor plan of Te Puna Ahurea Cultural Centre & House of Tahu 2. South West Elevation 3.


REFLECTION AND DISCUSSION Some remarkable things happened during this project. The students were extraordinarily well briefed. Many times we heard the comment “How did you get to speak to that person or work with particular people? or How did you get access to that place?” The good will and support of a very wide range of Christchurch people allowed the students to get a rare overview of a current problem that is ironically not available even to Christchurch people because of the web of interests and networks that exist. The student projects can be seen in this light to be very informed and extremely relevant. The very idea of a performing arts precinct was critiqued by several of the student projects, that also advanced the broader idea of a ‘Theatre District’ for the wider project. The student’s perceived that the blueprint had a narrow ‘elite’ definition of theatre and that there are limited audiences ‘theatre’ as briefed caters for. Several schemes intended to expand the Theatre District audience to make theatre ‘more relevant’ to a younger and wider social audience. Some schemes included film, or facilitated emerging forms of theatre, and most activated the exclusive internal, focused nature of traditional theatre architecture through their design. The Arts Culture design argued for a more dispersed theatre district - recognising the polycentric character of Christchurch and the success of the Court Theatre in Addington in terms of its accessibility, design, large area, and its financial viability. Theatre is often marginal economically and even more so in the community theatre sector

which also formed part of the brief. While a relocated Court Theatre would anchor a new Theatre District in the city centre, can it really provide an accessible, affordable, large scale, flexible space environment to rival the success of the theatre in Addington? And will a new Music Centre be able to be affordable and accessible to a wide range of community based and educational uses if it is in new facilities in the city centre? The linking of the possible Ngai Tahu Cultural Centre and School with the Theatre District was an important provocation. How might Ngai Tahu, CCC and CERA aspirations interact and engage for the good of all parties? How will more than lip service be paid to aspirations to recognise, represent and even celebrate the place of Ngai Tahu within the rebuilt city? There are clearly potential overlaps in the facilities required for the proposed Cultural Centre and proposed performing Arts precinct theatre facilities. Most student designs responded enthusiastically to the cultural component of the brief providing examples of how cultural facilities might be integrated into the fabric of the city Centre. Cultural identity and the expression of Ngai Tahu history and their contemporary relevance and place within a renewed Christchurch civic and social landscape emerged as a major issue for the student programme as it will be for the city as it redevelops. Designs such as Expressive Exchange, Team Transition and Arts Culture demonstrate different tactics for cultural expression.


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What are the key locations for the key elements of the blueprint? The Town Hall is somewhat disconnected from the city centre so linking it back to the city and Theatre District is a big issue. Team Transition design makes this connection by building on land adjacent to the Avon river between Armagh Street and Oxford Terrace – an exemplary siting of a public building that helps bridge this gap reconnecting the Town Hall to the city and the Theatre District to the Avon River. The design also provides an urban edge opening onto Queen Elizabeth Square. This strategically critical site is currently designated Theatre Precinct. Regrettably its value and prime

There is much more to be learnt from a closer study of these designs which are the result of 60 rigorous weeks of student design and research time. As the southernmost Architecture School in New Zealand many of our students are from the South Island including Canterbury and Christchurch. They will be a big part of Christchurch’s future. The student projects documented here represent a fresh and future focused vision of a sustainable, diverse, and integrated Christchurch Theatre District that we hope will help inform the design of the future of this part of Christchurch. Mark Southcombe. Victoria University of Wellington.

THE CHRISTCHURCH THEATRE DISTRICT

The Urban Theatre design is noteworthy for its development of the land across Kilmore Street from the Town Hall – forming a mini Theatre District around the existing Town Hall access, and also connecting the CSO practice rooms directly to the Town Hall. This tactic is effective recognising the reality of the remoteness of the Town Hall main entry and splitting the Theatre district into two major parts. It is noteworthy that all six designs created a new dense but concentrated hollow Armagh / Colombo / Gloucester block that connects Victoria/Market Square back to Cathedral Square through the centre of the block. There are associated public spaces and laneways that explore different scales and configurations for the major public spaces that will order this critical part of the city.

VICTORIA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

A contradiction within the Blueprint is the idea of a Cultural Centre on the land currently occupied by the existing courts. While the courts are destined to move to the new Justice Precinct, the substantial buildings that contain them are likely to remain for the medium term precluding the idea of a new Cultural Centre on that site as planned. This a big issue for the city that has yet to be critically engaged with. Four of the student projects redeveloped the courts site as planned, however Team Transition, and Urban Theatre show that the Cultural Centre could move and integrate with the Theatre District.

location suggest the land is likely to revert to private uses.

REFLECTION AND DISCUSSION

Several schemes also reconnected Victoria Street to the city diagonally through Victoria Square. Some addressing the top corner of Victoria Square as gateway either by flanking the path or in two cases by building over the path in the manner of the previous Crown Plaza hotel – but with major public access either through or under the building.

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UNIVERSITY OF LINCOLN SCHOOL OF LANDSCAPE CHRISTCHURCH POLICENTRIC CITY

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CONCLUSION

Events, Lectures and Presentations


SUMMER SCHOOL STAFF

Dushko Bogunovich (Unitec) Associate Professor

Jeanette Budgett (Unitec) Senior Lecturer

Andreas Wesener (SoLA) Lecturer in Urban Design

Craig Pocock (SoLA) Guest Lecturer

Irene Boles (CPIT) Architecture Tutor

Belfiore Bologna (CPIT) Third Year Leader

Mark Southcombe (VUW) Senior Lecturer

Rebecca McLaughlan (VUW)

Victoria Willocks (VUW)


David Sheppard Adjunct Professor

Camia Young (UoA) Practice Coordinator

Erica Austin Teaching Assistant

UNIVERSITY OF LINCOLN SCHOOL OF LANDSCAPE CHRISTCHURCH POLICENTRIC CITY

Uwe Rieger (UoA) Academic Coordinator

SUMMER SCHOOL STAFF

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STUDIO


UNIVERSITY OF LINCOLN SCHOOL OF LANDSCAPE CHRISTCHURCH POLICENTRIC CITY

STUDIO

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PUBLIC LECTURE SERIES

David Sheppard

Shaun Hardcastle

Ceciel DeLaRue

Ryan Reynolds

Andrew Just

Hugh Nicholson

Peter Marshall

John Hare

Luke di Somma

Kaila Colbin

Robert Henderson

Bridget Mckendry


Andrew Russell

Craig Preston

Jason Pemberton

Gary Franklin

Katie Smith

UNIVERSITY OF LINCOLN SCHOOL OF LANDSCAPE CHRISTCHURCH POLICENTRIC CITY

Coralie Winn

PUBLIC LECTURE SERIES

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193 Jessica Halliday

Kess Aleksandrova

Kate McDougall

Julia Taylor

Peter Cui

Ian Williamson


MAYOR LIANNE DALZIEL: ‘A CONVERSATION’


UNIVERSITY OF LINCOLN SCHOOL OF LANDSCAPE CHRISTCHURCH POLICENTRIC CITY

PUBLIC LECTURE SERIES

ANTONY GOUGH: THE TERRACE PROJECT

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SIR MILES WARREN: OHINETAHI HOUSE VISIT

Group Photo with Sir Miles Warren


Cakes after presentation

Morning Tea

EVENTS

Akaroa Trip

UNIVERSITY OF LINCOLN SCHOOL OF LANDSCAPE CHRISTCHURCH POLICENTRIC CITY

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OTHER EVENTS

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Under the Arcades Project


FINAL STUDENT PRESENTATIONS


UNIVERSITY OF LINCOLN SCHOOL OF LANDSCAPE CHRISTCHURCH POLICENTRIC CITY

FINAL STUDENT PRESENTATIONS

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[Studio

Christchurch Summer School was a collaborative Christchurch based design unit organized by five New Zealand architecture schools: the School of Architectural Studies at CPIT, School of Landscape Architecture at Lincoln University, the School of Architecture at Victoria University Wellington, the Architecture Department at Unitec, and the School of Architecture and Planning at The University of Auckland. The summer school was hosted in Christchurch at CPIT and ran from January 9th to February 5th. The 2014 Studio Christchurch Summer School investigated the ‘polycentricity’ of Christchurch. The three studios took quite different angles: The Christchurch Theatre District looked into a single pocket of the new CBD and argued the case for a cluster of city-boosting activities which, once established, would radiate its rehabilitating energy to other parts of the CBD. The Sydenham East 2020 studio endeavored to re-populate the once residential Borough of Sydenham, as well as recover its industrial past, all towards creating a ‘green-tech innovation hub’ as an entry point for Christchurch into the ‘green knowledge economy’. The Christchurch Polycentric City studio accepted the dominant presence of the Big Malls in the late 20th century urban landscape but made a heroic effort to turn the areas by and around the malls into proper town centres, where life does not necessarily revolve around shopping. Studio Christchurch is a platform for interdisciplinary collaboration between New Zealand’s tertiary institutions and the profession. The aim is to focus on praxis oriented outcomes with the intention to produce meaningful investigations and design propositions to contribute to the development of the city.]

School of Architectural Studies at CPIT School of Architecture at Victoria University Wellington Architecture Department at Unitec School of Architecture and Planning at The University of Auckland School of Landscape Architecture at Lincoln University

Studio Christchurch: The Polycentric City  
Studio Christchurch: The Polycentric City  

The 2014 Studio Christchurch Summer School investigated the ‘polycentricity’ of Christchurch. The three studios took quite different angles:...

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