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THE BROOKLYN FILM FORUM

Jodie Schiro: Studio 609


STUDIO STATEMENT the PROGRAM: This semester will focus upon the design of an institute that is a non-profit organization dedicated exclusively to supporting independent documentary-artists[1]--intending to offer assistance in bringing their films, audio and visual representations to completion. The Forum will provide a nurturing, contemplative environment while also providing a place to connect with others and make work public--to create a working space for individuals to retreat, think and develop their work AND to create a public space to disseminate the work in society. It will serve as a retreat for photographers, writers, video-documentary artists, visual artists, audio-artists, and interdisciplinary artists along with special invited guests. As part of this class, we will watch and discuss several documentaries in an attempt to relate to these artists and their creative processes and products[2]. The reason I have chosen this program is to offer students a building type that requires the architect to be empathetic and thoughtful about how to create a protective and sublime space for the individual; while also creating an architecture that serves to educate and reveal issues in persuasive, public ways. This project proposes a place of retreat amidst a diverse, complex urban landscape. The student’s task will be realizing and developing degrees of separation—architectural intent will be born out of that understanding.[3]

the SITE: I am proposing a couple of sites in Brooklyn of New York City. (Although not mandatory, I hope you will choose to join me in a trip to NYC, where we will visit the proposed sites and other significant contemporary works of architecture.) The NYC site will provide the rich, urban context that holds diverse interests and complex relationships –these will help motivate, challenge and generate ideas that inform the student and their ideas about how to best incorporate this particular program into its context. studio FOCUS: This studio presumes that it is possible to make places that can give a sense of grace to life—and believes that this matters. Juhani Pallasmaa proposes that “the detachment of construction from the realities of matter, climate and craft further turns architecture into stage sets for the eye, devoid of authenticity of matter and construction.”[4] To counter that, we will proceed with the belief that architecture is capable of framing and providing the opportunity for us to realize our basic human condition, relate us to community, and strengthen our capacity to perceive through engagement with natural forces, tectonics and materiality. It will be our task to connect the intangible, authentic experiences of our daily lives with tangible form—this discussion will motivate the many iterations of study we will take on. Those who enroll in this class should be prepared for daily pin-ups in large and small group discussions. Also, they need to be willing to be self-reflective and motivated to rigorously ‘muscle’ the form to reveal the intangible, in ways that we can relate and to a high degree of detail.


CONTENTS THE SITE

CONCEPTUAL WORK PRECEDENT STUDIES ZONING PROGRAMMING DIAGRAMATIC 3D MODELING WRITE UP 1 PHYSICAL MODELS FLOOR PLANS SECTIONS ELEVATIONS DETAILS RENDERS


THE SITE


URBAN EVOLUTION


Cities ex to meet new demands. Constant Change makes them vibrant and strong.


DUMBO - Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass The DUMBO Historic District is located along the East River waterfront in Brooklyn and is one of New York City’s most significant industrial waterfront neighborhoods. Some of the important manufacturing businesses in Brooklyn include: “Arbuckle Brothers, refiner and packager of sugar and coffee; Robert Gair, manufacturer of paper boxes; the Hanan & Son shoe company; the Kirkman & Son soap company; the John W. Masury & Son paint works; the Jones Brothers/Grand Union grocery business; the E. W. Bliss machine works; and the Brillo steel wool firm.” (Dumbo Designation Report 2007.)

By the early twentieth century, Brooklyn was the fourth largest manufacturing center in the entire country and a major portion of this industry occurred in the DUMBO ar. (Dumbo Designation Report 2007.) Streetscapes: The DUMBO Historic District is enhanced by its industrial streetscapes. Many of the streets and sidewalks retain their original granite Belgian block paving as well as the network of train tracks. The railroad was laid out by the Jay Street Connecting Railroad and in some areas the tracks run into individual buildings. (Dumbo Designation Report 2007.)

DUMBO, NY

They generate the backdrop for the particular architecture quality of the area and allow for the site’s individual presense to be known. Railroad: The Brooklyn City Railroad ran 12 different horse-car lines to the landing to connect residents with the ferry. The Union Ferry Co., which had grown out of Fulton’s business, built a grand ferry terminal at the foot of Fulton St. in 1865. The building of the Brooklyn Bridge began only four years later and, once it opened in 1883, was soon moving people more efficiently across the river. More lines grew up to feed the bridge traffic and soon overshadowed the area.


DUMBO Industrial District: Many of the buildings within the area retain their industrial use, while others are now converted into lofts and residences. The ďŹ lm industry has long used the dramatic industrial streetscapes and the mesmerizing views of the waterfront as a backdrop. Historical Statuses: National Register Status: The DUMBO Industrial District was listed on the State and National Registers of Historic Places in September 2000. Landmark Status: The Landmarks Preservation Commission conducted a public hearing on the proposed DUMBO Historic District on October 30, 2007.


SITE ANALYSIS Tobacco Warehouse: New York City and National Register Construction Date: ca. 1870s Built by the Lorillard family, the warehouse was used for the inspections of tobacco. Now part of Empire-Fulton Ferry State Park, the roofless structure is used to hold special events. The Romanesque characteristic of the Brooklyn area are evident in these long, narrow brick warehouses. They were characterized by their simple functional appearance with semicircular openings in the long walls used to move freight in and out. Iron shutters were used instead of glass in order to help with fire safety. Heavy sills at each opening accommodated the heavy pallets or slings of materials that would be swung onto or pushed out from them using cables and pulleys attached to rooftop winches cranked by hand or hoists powered by electric motors. The openings also admitted light and ventilation into buildings that were unheated to reduce the chance of fire. (Municipal Art Society of New York.) Empire Stores: New York City Landmark Construction Date: western - 1869; eastern 1884-1885 Architect: western - Nesmith & Sons; eastern Thomas Stone Currently: Vacant The original Empire Stores were built just north of Fulton Ferry landing in 1854. They were used for the storage of sugar and coffee. By 1840, congestion and high real estate costs were forcing shipping and manufacturing activities out of Manhattan and many of these operations found a home on Brooklyn’s waterfront spurring the development of warehousing to support the transfer of cargo to and from ships.


New Extended Park Area

External Factors Streets/Circulation Parking Strong Views Highly used Pedestrian Areas


CONCEPTUAL WORK

“Architecture cannot, however, become an instrument of mere function, bodily comfort and sensory pleasure without loosing its existentially meditating task. A distinct sense of distance, resistance and tension has to be manipulated in relation to programme, function and comfort. A piece of architecture should not become transparent in its utilitarian and rational motives; it has to maintain its impenetrable secret and mystery in order to ignite our imagination”.

“I experience myself in the city, and the city exists through my embodied experience. The city and my body supplement and define each other. I dwell in the city and the city dwells in me”. ~Eyes of the Skin~


PRECEDENT STUDIES


Liberty Hall Grandfather Studios Caixforum De Young Museum


Liberty Hall contains a large theatre space, small theatre, concessions, box office, office space, and video rental. The large theatre host concert venues, major motion pictures, can be rented out for group events/ gatherings/parties. The hall is locally owned and operated and also owns La Prima Tazza Café which is a major source of Liberty Hall’s income. La Prima Tazza Cafe 26’ x 35’ : 910 sqft It has seating for 32 people. There is a door that is not in use connecting the café to Liberty Hall. The coffee shop has its own single person bathroom.

Box Office 18’ X 22’: 396 sqft Entering from Massachusetts Street, one is immediately greeted with the ticket office partition, nine feet behind the door. Therefore, not enough space is provided if there was ever a long line. Behind the partition is the employee area, which includes a storage room and three small aisles for more organization. From the box office, there is a direct connection to the main lobby of the theater. Similar to the video store, the box office’s windows are used for displaying present and upcoming films to be shown.

LIBERTY HALL

Video Store (23’ X 30’) + (22’ X 12’): 954 sqft The video store is located right on the corner of Massachusetts and 7th Streets. The display windows at the south and west corners allow one to view in and provide a large amount of daylighting. There is one small unisex bathroom located in the back. Along with the five aisles, every possible wall surface is covered with movie rentals. The 10’-5” high ceilings further allude to an intimate space. The checkout is located in the opposite corner of the entrance. The store holds 13,266 film titles.


Performance Spaces Little Theatre 50’ X 30’: 1500 sqft Main entrance travels through concessions area up the main stairway. There are 3 exits and the theatre holds 125 seats, 12 rows with 12 seats max across and 4 seats min. The little theatre is not handicap accessible. The space behind the screen is 5 feet deep allowing room for speakers and small walking path. There are no windows; the space is light by 2 lights, one in the southwest corner and the other in the northeast corner. Emergency lights and exit signs are placed above the Mass. Street staircase and the main entrance to the theatre. There is a double level projection room that is 12’ X 12’.

The large theatre space seats 675. (400 seats are in the balcony. Underneath the tiered flooring is the orginal sloped floor, however they choose the teired method to allow for multi-use functions such as weddings, concerts, community events. There are acoustical treatments in the theatre spaces such as sound tiles in the coffered ceilings.

Dimensions taken: -upper level 3’6” width aisles -1’4” height between seat levels -1’2” between seats (knee space) -with seat down (knee space)5 1/2” -8’ opening to large theater -4’3” width for stairs -concession desk from door 11’ 4’2” opening to small theatre -3’8” side aisles in small theatre -10’10” distance from screen to front row.


GRANDFATHER STUDIOS


The KU Film Department is housed in Oldfather Studios, a fully-equipped film and video production facility featuring a soundstage, sound and editing suites, screening rooms and classrooms. Here students have the opportunity to plan, produce and edit film and video using state of the art technologies. Film Storage 9X12: 108 sqft This is just a small closet that holds various film equipment for checkout. Storage Shelves are placed along the walls leaving the center open. Film Editing 8X16: 128 sqft This is a small room with three to four computers along the walls. There are no windows or special treatment for acoustics.

Film Space Production Studio 65’X100’X25’H: 6500 sqft The main focus of the building as this is where students carry out their projects. The space has no windows or daylight of any sort. The walls are acoustically treated with 4” thick insulation. There is a loading door that is 12’ X 15’. The back half of the studio is treated as a classroom with chalk board and desks. There is scaffolding float along the open floor always changing their position. A large white back drop curves for evenly flushed light to surround the film stage area. Almost the entire ceiling is fixed with a grid of stage lights.

Sound Editing 1 OF THREE AT 12X22: 264 sqft These are small rooms with heavy acoustic treatment on the floor, walls, and ceiling. There are microphones, tables, chair, computer, speakers, and sound board for recording. Conference Room 25X15: 375 sqft This is a windowless room with a large table at the center. There is a project screen on one wall and flat screen TV at the other for film review.


CAIXAFORUM


Project: CaixaForum, Madrid Architect: Herzog and deMeuron Herzog and de Meuron ďŹ lled in the buildings existing openings with bricks salvaged from the demolition of the interior walls. They punched out a few new openings, including one that allows visitors to view the activity in the plaza from the lobby. They placed the main entry point underneath the buildings suspended volume and enhanced the sense of compression in this space with a facedtged ceiling. The massing of the added cast-iron-clad levels is organized into bays and sloping planes sympathetic to the surrounding roofscapes. From some vantage points , the building has no apparent means of support, its vertical cores obscured by signage of mirror glass.


ZONING

Tobacco Warehouse Photo Credit: Municipal Art Society

Tobacco Warehouse: New York City and National Register Construction Date: ca. 1870s Built by the Lorillard family, the warehouse was used for customs inspections of tobacco. Now part of Empire-Fulton Ferry State Park, the roofless but dramatic structure is used for special events. It was part of the massive development of the Brooklyn waterfront for shipment and storage of freight in the latter half of the 19th century. By 1840, congestion and high real estate costs were forcing shipping and manufacturing activities out of Manhattan and many of these operations found a home on Brooklyn's waterfront spurring the development of warehousing to support the transfer of cargo to and from ships. This large brick warehouse, built in conformity with its trapezoidal site, stands on the waterfront side of Water Street between New Dock and old Dock Streets. In the 1850s this site contained a number of frame buildings, a marble yard, and a lumber yard which fronted on the river, all of which were replaced by the warehouse. The Romanesque elements characteristic of the --Brooklyn stores-- are evident in these long, narrow brick warehouses. They were characterized by their simple functional appearance with semicircular openings in the long walls used to move freight in and out. Instead of glass, these openings were protected from fire, weather and theft by iron shutters. Heavy sills at each opening accommodated the heavy pallets or slings of materials that would be swung onto or pushed out from them using cables and pulleys attached to rooftop winches cranked by hand or hoists powered by electric motors. The openings also admitted light and ventilation into buildings that were unheated to reduce the chance of fire.


Empire Stores: New York City Landmark Construction Date: western - 1869; eastern 1884-1885 Architect: western - Nesmith & Sons; eastern Thomas Stone Currently: Vacant The original Empire Stores were built just north of Fulton Ferry landing in 1854, but the ones that remain to us are later additions. They were used for the storage of sugar and coffee. By 1840, congestion and high real estate costs were forcing shipping and manufacturing activities out of Manhattan and many of these operations found a home on Brooklyn’s waterfront spurring the development of warehousing to support the transfer of cargo to and from ships. The Romanesque- inspired el ments characteristic of the --Brooklyn stores-- are evident in these long, narrow brick warehouses.

Zoning: M3-1 - Heavy Manufacturing -- Low Perfo mance The M3 Manufacturing Districts are for heavy industries which generate noise, trafďŹ c and pollutants. Typical uses include chemical and power plant foundries. The districts are usually loated near the waterfront and buffered from residential areas. Even in M3 areas, certain uses with nuisance effects are required to conform to minimum performance standards. There are two M3 districts, which differ only in parking requirements. Our site is zoned M3-1 or Heavy manufacturing use. FAR: 2.0 Parking is required.


open/airy Bulk of Program entry

acoustical/dark spaces

PROGRAMMING 1. Public Program: The Forum needs (3) public screening rooms which also serve as halls for public events and lectures (one for 300-person audience, the other two for 125-person audiences, include projection rooms); exhibit space(s) for traveling exhibits, exhibition of artists’ work, film festival event support, etc. all administered by a receptionist and one staff member (who will also sell film tickets); bookshop/media rental where the public can browse, rent and purchase books and media; and a café to serve events. Both the media rental shop and the café are to be configured so that they can be accessed during evenings and weekends when the gallery and screening rooms are closed. 2. Educational/Technical Support Program: The Forum will require two offices, one for a director and another for an administrator; (4) offices for partner agencies; (6) editing rooms for filmmakers in postproduction; and, flexible work areas to accommodate extra staff and volunteers for production, during festivals and general collaborative efforts. Media groups, festival organizers, grant panels, community forums, educational programs, etc. will share (2) meeting/conference rooms designed to hold 12 people comfortably, each; (2) classrooms for 25 students each; and a computer lab for 20 students engaged in class instruction. Several of organizations will need to house print and video collections; this room needs to be climate-controlled and approximately 1200sf. Include a small library for access to books, digital, video and film media (approx. 1500sf). The Forum also provides a “Studio PASS,” which allows for production access—providing professional production facilities for artists and independents at affordable prices. The Forum will provide a production studio space for artists to use (includes a cyc wall, provide 3000sf) and a surround-sound recording studio (provide 1000sf) for mixing and monitoring; also, provide (3) offices for technicians who will assist artists with their work and manage all equipment and facilities. Storage space is required to secure rental cameras, lights, other equipment and media supplies; a photocopy and supply room; and shipping and fulfillment services for distribution of films and DVD’s.

3. Artists-in-Residence Program: The Forum is part of a large, existing network of artist residency programs, representing the interests of more than 200 centers and organizations in 50 countries worldwide that offer to international artists facilities and conditions conducive to making documentary films. It is intended to provide a critical forum for the residents and a place where international meetings and conferences provide an arena for the exchange of ideas; as a result, cultural assumptions are tested and the participants’ world-views are broadened. The individual artist benefits by this association and the Forum benefits by their insightful input, lectures and exhibits. Resident artists are provided private rooms with studio equipment, access to all facilities and provided meals during their stay. The facility shall contain six residency suites (to include bed, working space and a small, private bathroom), a residentcommon area including a small kitchen and pantry, dining (for 12) a living area and a laundry room. (A chef prepares meals each day.) An outdoor, roof-terrace, dining area is desired (or some reasonable alternative, private-access to the outdoors.) 4. Building Services: It needs to be emphasized that interstitial spaces are a high-priority for success of the organization. These serve to connect different users of the building: the public, the staff, the artists-in-residence, the students and the volunteers. Other required spaces are public restrooms, mailroom/receiving, garbage/recycling, mechanical/ elevator/electrical closet(s)/telecommunication closets, janitorial, etc. 5. Outdoor Programs: The Forum wishes to be connected and contribute to the nearby, already-established urban spaces. Descriptions and links to some of the parks and local institutions are cited on the Google Group site. It is up to each of you to expand this compiled list as you believe relevant to your own programming interests.


public programs large public screening room small public screening room small public screening room exhibition space lobby ticket booth/reception/staff bookshop/video rental cafe education/technical support director’s office administrator’s office (4) offices for agency groups (6) edit rooms resource/film/video library computer lab for 20 students (2) conference rooms media supplies (2) classrooms @600 each climate controlled print/video collections equipment storage room (3) staff rooms staff break room sound stage/production studio sound-recording studio photocopy/office supplies/mailroom artists-in-residence (6) residence suites w/bathrooms+study small kitchen with pantry dining for 12 living/study laundry room shared outdoor dining space-private

square feet 3520 2400 2400 1200 2,160 800 324 324 12804 144 144 600 1200 1500 324 600 200 1200 1200 324 800 324 3200 324 200 11960 2400 324 324 600 100 100 3848

building services shipping/receiving/packaging power shop building superintendent mechanical equipment/electrical corridors/egress/stairs bathrooms/janitor’s closet elevator(s)

324 600 100 600 1500 3124

total 30% for circulation etc.

31,736 41,256


DIAGRAMMATIC MODELING


WRITE-UP 1


In one sentence I would hope to explain my film institute as “Engaging with the public through the senses”. The design intent is to have interactions with the occupants; and therefore the occupants have unconscious views and interplays that happen within their surrounding by touch, see, taste, feel, and hear. I want it to be a journey through the institute, however also a journey through ones senses. A main focus of my design is to work with the issues we already have, just not always been aware of. Interacting floor plates allow occupants to share experiences with the part of the building they are constantly touching. Ramping through the lobby and exhibition space produces views, excitement, and also allows the ground floor to be left as is. Old vs. new is also a reoccurring theme throughout my project. I am trying to be sensitive to what is already there and working, to what I believe could use new areas of excitement. I also hope to allow views to be shown from almost every angle in the structure. Experiencing through the senses I also hope there to be distinctions between dark vs. light, open vs. closed, etc.

Taste could be expressed by assumption and curiosity. Patterns could resemble taste of viewing a film, and in a literal sense: popcorn. Sound and the sense of hearing are shown through the placement of what needs acoustic detailing. These rooms/spaces are to the south away from the park. The dark, heavy, thick are all to the south; whereas the light/airy are to the north (park side). I want to be thinking of the wellness of the occupant and what they are experiencing, while designing.

I have chosen to only occupy the tobacco warehouse in certain areas for the circulation of the lobby and exhibition area, leaving everything on the ground floor in the main area to be left alone, however allowing views to look at it as how it is currently used. (Weddings, recreations, etc). I see the entry way being in the north side to the tobacco warehouse where the new extended park area is to be. It is one of the densest areas as far as human population and excitement. I am also using the alleyway as is, only also an area to enter the screening rooms (ramping below the empire building) without having to enter through the institute in one way. Most other programmatic issues are dealt within the empire building all within the first bay. This is to help in the advancement of detailing and skin decisions. Private/Public nodes are formed by the vertical circulation; public being lower, private being higher and extending into the park area. I have placed the spaces which need noise isolation such as the sound stage, mechanical areas, power shop, etc on the main floor of the empire below all of the other programmatic issues. Formally I am after a strong “new vs. old” such as the Caixaforum by Herzog and de Meuron. I hope this to form into more of a “one thing” such as a wrapping through the old structure; all while maintaining experiences of the senses.


PHYSICAL MODELS


FLOOR PLANS


SECTIONS


ELEVATIONS


DETAILS


2mm rubber surfacing 330 mm reinforcedconcrete slab 30/30/2 mm galvanized steel grid bracket, steel SHS 80/80/3 mm facade element

facade element

facade element post, 60/50/4 mm steel channel section

emergency opening, aluminum window with insulated glazing

handrail 40/40/2 mm steel SHS

4mm stainless steel cable

railing profile, 3mm bent steel sheet

external solar protection

1

Wall Section 1 1/2" = 1'-0"


RENDERS



Jodie-Studio609-Workbook