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DAIKI TSUTSUMI

architecture portfolio 2013

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Daiki Tsutsumi 813 Alpine St. #410 Los Angeles, CA 90012 t // 1+213.804.7054 e // daiki.tsutsumi@gmail.com s // daiki-tyler

Southern California Institute of Architecture // www.sciarc.edu // 1+ 213.613.2200 2013 // daiki tsutsumi Typeset in Helvetica Neue, Times New Roman


INTRODUCTION

Since I came to Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-Arc), it has been more than one year. Be honest, when I applied SCI-Arc, I did not understand most of works by SCI-Arc faculties and students’ works. I was more likely programmatic and mathematical thinking about architecture. Curve wall, blob form, and grotesque detail are unnecessary thing in this field. However, SCI-Arc has attractive and impressive power to collect people. I am not that exception. The school made me wants to understand and learn about them. This is first reason that I decided to choose SCI-Arc as my final (hopefully) education. SCI-Arc has been changing the way I look at things dramatically, and it is not as like other people can experience at other location. Recently (winter 2013), I was a part of the exhibition called Japanese Junction. It is the architectural exhibition by Japanese students who study architecture at overseas. When I looked up other students’ theory and design, the way of SCI-Arc is totally different from others. I appreciate about the school efforts how it changed me at architecture sense; moreover, people around me included parents, colleague, and audiences also thought as same way. As constructing this portfolio, I compiled the collection of many skills that include but are not limited to: techniques of representation, material exploration, understanding about structures, architectural culture and theory, and aesthetic sensibility. Please enjoy.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

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Table of Contents

PROJECTS

OBJECTS

ESSAYS

THESIS STATEMENT

I Cruella de Veil

II Dissociative Ensemble

III Infra_Scape

I Liner Curvature

II Outdoor Exhibition Pavilion Series

III Landscape [N]Ever Exists

I What Is Boundary

I Half or Double

III Very Fast Airport

IV Mega-drawing


006

SPRING 2013


PROJECT I

Chiaroscuro is a set of painting techniques able to create contrast between the well-lit form and its dark background. Dark subjects dramatically lit by a shaft of light from a single constricted and often unseen source was a well-known compositional device developed by artists to create a dramatic effect in their canvas. What we found interesting about Chiaroscuro is how the strong contrasts between light and dark hide and highlight geometry. we limited our color palette to simply white and black to allow for thesebold contrasts, and for shadow to easily blend into our pattern. Our painterly effect is created by our overlay of similar patterns. The voids between white exterior stripes allow the viewer to see the white and black pattern behind, creating a crossed pattern effect that only becomes less clear with the addition to shadows. The building is oriented so the open faceades are faced towards the highway, where drivers will expe- rience the optical effect as they pass further from the building at fast speeds. The exterior shell also serves as a public interstitial space between the building envelope and the site.

CRUELLA DE VEIL I

DS1201 // On Forms of Tectonics and Cellular Aggregation 2GBX // Spring 2013 Instractor // Marcelo Spina

Project Type // Public [Theater] Site Location // Los Angeles, CA USA Partner // Gregory G Ingalls

007


008

SPRING 2013

DRAWING + RENDERING // Section Drawing 

0

8’

16’

32’

64’


PROJECT I

DRAWING + RENDERING // Left // Interspatial Area Right // Theater Detail 

009


010

SPRING 2013

DRAWING + RENDERING // Section Drawing 


PROJECT I

011

DRAWING + RENDERING // Left // Ground Floor Right // Theater Level 


012

SPRING 2013


PROJECT I

013

DRAWING + RENDERING // Unrolled Panorama Interior View


014

PHOTOGRAPHS // Physical Model

SPRING 2013


PROJECT I

PHOTOGRAPHS // Physical Model

015


016

SPRING 2013


PROJECT I

PHOTOGRAPHS // 1/350 Sclae Section Model

017


018

Fall 2012


PROJECT II

019

Casting, it seems, has a rich range of meanings that are useful for architectural production. While we are most familiar with the sculptural kind, as in the casting of an object, its more general etymology covers a range of physical and meta-physical projections that range from the rational and inutitive to the accidental.The casting of characters for a movie or play consists of projecting a ficitonal figure onto/into a non-fictional one and then back out to an audience. The actor is the medium. The casting of spells consists of the projection of mystical/magical content from one source onto another. The design basis of the project was the idea of mess ensemble in which multiple characters (generated objects) are casted to play a specific role in the design process and landscape. The project was to design a winery and was to be situated in Mendoza at the current Catena Zapata winery. Here is our first go at a new form of architectural representation in the form of cinematography.

DISSOCIATIVE ENSEMBLE II

DS1200 // Compositional Morphologies Instractor // Ramiro Diaz-Granados

Project Type // Public [Winery] Site Location // Mendoza, Argentina Partner // Andrew Suelki Choi Vimeo // https://vimeo.com/55399055


020

CASTING OF CHARACTERS // For the 2D folding we gather a range of iconic images that are still legible when converted to a mono chromatic shape like silhouette. And using topological principles, 2D shapes will be folded into closed (or semiclosed) 3D objects.

Fall 2012


PROJECT II

021

CASTING OF CHARACTERS // Using seaming principles, 3D objects will be cast onto and unfolded to produce pseudo 2D fields.


022

Fall 2012


PROJECT II

023

PHOTOGRAPHS // Physical Model


024

Fall 2012

CINEMATOGRAPHY // Animation Footage


PROJECT II

025


026

Fall 2012


PROJECT II

027

CINEMATOGRAPHY // 100 years later Image. Messthetics never ends.


028

Summer 2013


PROJECT III

The studio spent designing a structure on the site of the Tsukiji Fish Market that articulates resilient 21st century urban master plan coastal strategies. We are to retain Tsukiji Market while incoporating residential areas, retail spaces, open green space, and an Olympic venue for water sports an activities. The factor of water on site raises many issues (low level site with rising sea levels, proximity to the mouth of the Sumida River, flooding control), and thus adding more variables to the studio. The goal of this project will be to synthesize the Japanese practice of heavy state investment in infrastructure, sophisticated engineering practices, pre-occupation with disaster preparedness and rich history with the sea as an opportunity to synergize tradition, urban planning, architectural production, infrastructure and the environment. Architecture is situated between the biological and the geological - slower than living beings but faster than the underlying geology. Resistance and change are both at work in the land- scape: the hardness of the rock and the fluid adapt ability of living things. - “Landform Building: Architecture’s New Terrain” by Stan Allen Tsukiji fist market has been changed three major time according to urban infrastructure is developed. What is Tsukiji 4.0 (new Tsukiji) after 20 century end and 2011 Earthquake/ Tsunami happened? INFRA_SCAPE is a new landform architecture that will work as Tsukiji 4.0.

infra_scape III

DS4332 // Japan Studio Instractor // John N Bohn, Chikara Inamura

Project Type // Urban Design Site Location // Tokyo, Japan Partner // Alexander Torrez Chang, Tommy Shao, Carlos Vargas

029


030

Summer 2013

Architecture is situated between the biological and the geological - slower than living beings but faster than the underlying geology. Resistance and change are both at work in the landscape: the hardness of the rock and the fluid adapt ability of living things. - “Landform Building: Architecture’s New Terrain” by Stan Allen

High City / Shinjyuku

Mid City / Ginza

Low City / Asakusa

Toshio Shibata - “a View” series

Kiyonori Kikutake, Marine City, 1963.

Saitama Storm Sewer

Tokyo-3 from Evangelion 1.0

When does implanting somthing ‘natural’ into something artificial become natural?

// Tsukiji 4.0 // Japan Studio 2013 // Alexander Torrez Chang, Tommy Shao, Daiki Tsutsumi, Carlos Vargas

07 / 30 / 2013


PROJECT III

5m 10m

[Coastal Border Use]

20m

40 m

031


032

Villa Savoye Villa Savoye by Le Corbusier (1931) by Le Corbusier (1931)

Summer 2013

Glass House Glass House by Philip Johnson (1949) by Philip Johnson (1949)

Farnsworth HouseHouse Farnsworth by Mies van (1951) by Mies vander derRohe Rohe (1951)

// Tsukiji 4.0 // Japan Studio 2013 // Alexander Torrez Chang, Tommy Shao, Daiki Tsutsumi, Carlos Vargas

ChichuChichu Art Museum Art Museum by Ando Tadao (2004) by Ando Tadao (2004)

Olympic Sculpture Park Olympic Sculpture Park by Weiss / Manfredi by Weiss / Manfredi(2007) (2007)

California Academy of Science California Academy of Science by Renzo Piano (2008) by Renzo Piano (2008) 07 / 30 / 2013


PROJECT III

[???]

033

[???]

// Tsukiji 4.0 // Japan Studio 2013 // Alexander Torrez Chang, Tommy Shao, Daiki Tsutsumi, Carlos Vargas

07 / 30 / 2013


034

Summer 2013

SEATING FOR ROWING 15,000 seats [37,500m2]

SEATING FOR SAILING 10,000 seats [25,000m2]

300 COMMERCIAL BERTHS 250 BERTHS [1,800m2] [1,500m2] 70 MOORINGS [420m2]

OFFICE [5,900m2]

LOADING [5,500m2]

AUCTION AREA [11,000m2]

U.G. Level WHARF DOCKING [5,000m2]

G. Level OFFICE [885m2]

OFFICE + RESTAURANT [1,100m2]

250m SLIPWAY [5,000m ] 2

SEATING FOR KAYAK 8,000 seats [20,000m2]

PRODUCE [50,000m2]

HOUSING 400 UNITS [60,000m2] [150m2 ea x 4m height = 600m3 ea]

INTERMEDIATE WHOLESALES [50,000m2]

M.G. Level

HOTEL 75 rooms [7,500m2]

SHOPPING + ENTERTAINMENT + DINING+ RECREATION [50,000m2]

10,000m2 LAKE for KYAK

300m KYAK SLALOM COURSE [25,000m2]

SERVICE + MAINTENANCE [19,000m2]

COLD STORAGE / WORKSHOPS [12,000m2]

+ Subdivide Program

L.G. Level

= Natural Tokyo Landscape

New Landform Shape

New Landform Shape with Multi-Level

// Tsukiji 4.0 // Japan Studio 2013 // Alexander Torrez Chang, Tommy Shao, Daiki Tsutsumi, Carlos Vargas

07 / 30 / 2013


PROJECT III

035

SCALE :

Evacuation Plan

40m

1:2000 80m

160m

320m

[Stormwater Surge & Respective Egress] SCALE : 40m

Typical Evacuation Route

Half-Ground Evacuation Route

Underground Type Evacuation Route

// Tsukiji 4.0 // Japan Studio 2013 // Alexander Torrez Chang, Tommy Shao, Daiki Tsutsumi, Carlos Vargas

1:2000 80m

160m

320m

New Underground Type Evacuatio Route 07 / 30 / 2013


Instances // Plan]

036

Summer 2013

[Arch Instances // Section]

[LEGEND] Intermediate Market Produce Market Office Residential Public Space

// Tsukiji 4.0 // Japan Studio 2013 // Alexander Torrez Chang, Tommy Shao, Daiki Tsutsumi, Carlos Vargas

07 / 30 / 2013

DRAWING // Plan Drawing at Fist Market

[LEGEND] Intermediate Market

[Arch Instances // Section]


PROJECT III

037

DRAWING // Section Drawing at Fist Market

[LEGEND]


038

DRAWING // Plan Drawing at Subway Station

Summer 2013


PROJECT III

039

[Arch Instances // Section] DRAWING // Plan Drawing at Subway Station

// Tsukiji 4.0 // Japan Studio 2013 // Alexander Torrez Chang, Tommy Shao, Daiki Tsutsumi, Carlos Vargas

07 / 30 / 2013


040

Summer 2013

RENDERING // Left // From Other Side of Sumida River Right // Above the Train Station

[Rendering [Rendering////From FromOther OtherSide SideofofSumida SumidaRiver] River]

[Rendering [Rendering////Above Abovethe theTrain TrainStation] Station]


PROJECT III

041

RENDERING // Park Area


042

RENDERING // Train Station

Summer 2013


PROJECT III

043

SIMULATION // Vasari Engine Tsunami Simulation


044

Fall 2013


PROJECT IV

045

Airport is not like single architecture. Airport is like a city. City works by the rule of “form follow function.” City is represented as more visual component rather than function. Misrepresenting the common sense of the “form follow function” is now the airport. Intersecting the circulation lines is modern. It is the problem. Separation of people is contemporary or old? I don’t know. Well, it might be one of the solution for airport.

VERY FAST AIRPORT IV

DS1200 // Vertical Studio Instractor // Nanako Umemoto

Project Type // Public [Airport] Site Location // Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan


Fall 2013

Airline A

Airline B

Airline C

Airline D

Airline F

Airline E

Airline G

Third Class

First Class

Second Class

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Loading Circulation

Check In

Baggage Claim

Check In

Immigration Control

Security Check

Boarding

Security Check

Security Check

Check In

Security Check

Boarding

Check In

Security Check

Boarding

Check In

Security Check

Boarding

Check In

Security Check

Boarding

Check In

Security Check

Boarding

Airline A

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Security Control

Baggage Circulation

Airline D

DIAGRAM // Left Top // Modern Airport Problem Left Bottom // New Circulation Diagram Right // Circulation Idea

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Airline C

Return Baggage Circulation

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Airline B

Boarding


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DRAWING + GRAPHICS // Axon drawing -001 -001

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047 PROJECT IV


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Fall 2013 048


PROJECT IV

049

SHORT SECTION // 1’-0” = 1/32”

DRAWING // Short Section with Diagram 


050

Fall 2013


PROJECT IV

051

first class floor business class floor economy class floor airplane hanger

LONGITUDINAL SECTION // 1’-0” = 1/32”

DRAWING // Longitudinal Section with Color Diagram 


052

Fall 2013


PROJECT V

This project takes the Cruella de Veil project (Schematic Design phase) into Design Development where it was reorganized to fit new structural conditions, materials, egress, HVAC, and ADA requirements. We need to understand how we can constract the building that we designed. While this course is as regular design development class that means draw construction document, we also focus on to new representation way of construction documents. Practical situation (real world) and academic situation should be different. However, in a long history, design development class are not like academic way, more likely practical way. Therefore, we started to produce new middle way between practical and academical way called “Mega-drawing.” Our mega-drawing is methods of representation exceed the technical, thankfully, but they do not disregard the technical. The peeling, slicing, and dicing up of architecture to reveal its interior, its infrastructure, its internal complexities and conflicts is a way of thinking and seeing, but also type of resistance to the ‘construction document’ as we know it. It is a messy but ultimately empowering place from which to operate-- across the full spectrum of architecture, rather than exclusively within the realm of theoretical constructions.

V

MEGA-DRAWING AS3222 // Design Document Instractor // Thom Wiscombe, Herwig Baumgartner

Project Type // Design Development Document Partner // Andrew Suelki Choi, Jaeguen Lim, Kiem Ho Special Exhibition // Art Walk LA [Fall 2013] at Tom Gilmore’s Farmers and Merchants Bank Building

053


054

Fall 2013


PROJECT V

055


056

Fall 2013


PROJECT V

057


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Fall 2013


PROJECT V

059


060

Fall 2013


PROJECT V

061


062

Fall 2013


PROJECT V

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064

Fall 2013


PROJECT V

065


066

Fall 2012


OBJECT I

This course looks at the new ability of architects to design, develop and produce structural assemblies for highly specific performances and applications. The course explores new materials, as well as the integral manner in which building systems and structures are produced—from design idea to fabrication and erection—to precisely fit designers’ specifications and to provide optimized performance. This year, we explored the carbon fiber as new type of structure material. First of all, the test starts from creating patterns in 2 dimensional. Next, we tried to create 3 dimensional partition wall system.

liner curvature I

AS3200 // Reflexive Formal Assemblies - Material to System Instractor // Marcelo Spina

Project Type // Material Exploration Partner // Andrew Suelki Choi, Jaeguen Lim, Hung-Yu Chen, Ziye Liu

067


068

MATERIAL TESTING // Top // Form Finding Right // Applying process

Fall 2012


OBJECT I

069

PHOTOGRAPHY // 2D material exploration


070

3D MATERIAL APPLICATION // Top // Applying pattern process Right Top // Line work Right bottom // Final form

Fall 2012


OBJECT I

PHOTOGRAPHY // Physical model

071


072

Spring 2013


OBJECT II

073

The course examines how architectural concepts can be enhanced with appropriate struc- tural systems. The class content includes structures in nature, the modern history of structural engineering and engineers- structural models- and demonstrationsof analysis techniques. Lectures are based on structural engineering as a form generator. Established structural systems such as membranes-shells-tension structures- space frames-folded plates-grid shells-pneumatics- cable nets- etc. and new approaches are discussed in depth through evaluations of built projects- current designs- studio projects and class assignments.

outdoor exhibition pavilion series II

AS3302 // Advanced Structural Systems Instractor // Greg Otto

Project type // Material & Structure Exploration Partner // Andrew S. Choi, Jaeguen Lim


074

Spring 2013

DRAWING // Left // Explode Axon Top // Perspective view


OBJECT II

PHOTOGRAPHY // Physical model

075


Spring 2013

12"

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OBJECT II

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OBJECT III

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In time “still life” has become the ground for critical differentiation of styles and for the exploration of new tools. As a timeless instrument, this exercise measures the ability of the young artists against the previous generations of masters and frames their original research. It is possible to say that “still life” defines the relationship between painting and painter thus developing a conversation among experts of the same field. On the other hand, a “tableau vivant” is intended for an audience and not as an exercise of personal style. The “Living Picture” is considered successful in its element of theatrical engagement with the public. In other words a “tableau vivant” is about the relationship between the artistic production and the awareness of the beholder. This Tableau vivant is not an act of duplication, but of appropriation.

landscape [n]ever exists III

VS4200 // VS Modeling Tooling Computation Instractor // Elena Manferdini

Project type // Visual Study + Installtion Partner // Hung-Yu Chen Vimeo // https://vimeo.com/55739606


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OBJECT III

RENDERING // Image 1 // Before Sunset

RENDERING // Image 2 // Aftr Sunset

RENDERING // Image 3 // Light from Moon

RENDERING // Image 4 // Rain

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I

WHAT IS BOUNDARY CS2200 // Theories of Contemporary Architecture 2 Instructor // Todd Gannon

According to Aureli, the author of “The Possibility of an Absolute Architecture,” archipelago is the most ideal plan to orga- nize cities and architecture.1 This concept will create multiple cities without hierarchy, and they are connected each other to be equal. In archipelago cities, not like modern cities from last century, specific cities will not be concentrated to develop. To achieve this idea, he proposes several projects with cities’ scale such as Stop City and A Simple Heart. (Figure 1 and 2)

However, they do not work efficiently. These projects opposed to the unlimited expansion of cities to prove archipelago concept. On

Project type // Essay

the other hand, they will produce more hierarchy between inside and outside of boundary, which the archipelago should not have. To achieve archipelago idea, we do not need to have physical boundary like Aureli’s proposition. When people visit famous cities such as Los Angeles, Las Vegas, or New York City, they are looking forward to see some specific culture and society that they are only existed in these places. We should develop cities more distinctively from others to prevent unlimited expansion of city growth. If architecture and city are more specialized to their own culture and society, it will automatically produce archipelago. As architecture scale, archipelago should be in operation as same way as the city scale. To argue about it, we can see many projects that stand in public without specializing. Projects of Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and Tom Wiscombe could be pointed as the example of opposite side of the idea. Their projects are based on the discussion of that architecture have to be autono- mous. Architecture should be seated on plinth, which is boundary what they speak: for example, S.R. Crown Hall and Chinese University of Hong Kong Arena. (Figure 3 and 4) In 20th century, especially around the end of World War II, mass production was main- stream of economic and social standard that we called Fordism. Architecture was not exception. Modern architecture, mainly international style, was one of the products


ESSAY I

that everyone could buy and own, which really represents Fordism. Therefore, archi- tecture from these decades did not need to include contextual relationship into design. More likely, they should be stood as one of the goods. But, because of not carrying the relationship, as example, S.R. Crown Hall does not have to be located at the Illinois Institute of Technology campus. The proj- ect could be located anywhere we want to. On the other hand, people might argue that S.R. Crown Hall is one of the greatest masterpieces. Architecture usually carries its own potential value. When they show up to public first time, they will get attention from public. However, they will never stand in forever, and will be abandoned after years and years later. After the economic collapse in 21th century, how architecture can be survive from this turbulence, and still we can create specialized architecture and cities while having archipelago concept without boundary? Since people started to purchase products not from mass production, more likely people selected only one or unique one from other. Architecture should follow this new stream too. To be special architecture for specific site, architecture need to contain the site’s culture and social meaning. Starbucks store in Dazaifu designed by Kengo Kuma is one of the great examples. (Figure 5) The project is located closed to one of the most major shrines and used weaving thin woods diagonally

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that reminds us traditional shrines’ structure. Moreover, their materials are gotten from the region and it mostly used for traditional Japanese architecture. This represents one way of merging with culture and society. Even Star- bucks are most common coffee stores in the world; people want to visit this exclusive store.

Why specialized architecture and cities are better than other? We can see the answer at other fields such as art and culture. Even the natural disaster destroys buildings such as tsunami at Japan in 2011, traditional arts crafts such as wood works, potter, lacquer ware, and so on never end up because they connect to social / politics strongly. Since 20th century, a lot of architecture was cre-


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Spring 2013

ated with concrete and steel for only the reasons of economic and function. Without considering social meaning of architecture, after economic crisis, all architecture collapse not only as physical mean but also psychological mean. Architecture should embrace more careful treatment like not just about space, and also design with time. Moreover, we supposed to think about who will build and that the architecture will become parts of city economy also. If we could create architecture like this way that related to the particular culture and society with considering people and economy, we do not need to make “literal” boundary to emphasize archipelago with reducing hierarchy. To make association with society is already creating archipelago that make each architecture and city as special. In Japanese, when we explain something that is strongly related to specific region, culture, and society, we use phrase “地域に根 付く”, which means “take root on one’s soil” or “take hold.” Perhaps, architecture with contextual relationship could be defined as “Rooted architecture.” Our project with Gregory Ingalls and I under Marcelo Spina (principle of P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S) at Southern California Institute of Architecture in 2013-spring semester can be the one to describe what can be rooted architecture. We mainly focus that how architecture could be related to context differently from usual, which here we specifically assign to color pattern and form. After our research, geometrical-optical illusions have potential value of

object and context relationship in unique way. To achieve this type of optical illusions, we need to set up who will be au- dience and what type of audience will have. According to the site context, the project faced to two main different audiences: from N. Grand Ave. and W Temple St. and from highway 101. From street level, all pedestrian usually walk slowly; therefore, we need to make more color and pattern confusion. (Figure A) From highway side, car will drive faster than street side. Thus, the project should contain the more quick illusion with depth and motion perceptional distraction. (Figure B) If this project is located to different place, our purpose will not be same as supposed to be. Rooted architecture need to contain specific contextual relationship in somehow such as historical background, cultural references, and geographical relationship. In the book “Kissing Architecture”, the author Sylvia Lavin argued that architecture itself could not keep people’s attention anymore. Architecture should meet with other type of media / arts like how two distinct projects are kissing. However, if architecture wants to be more interesting, architecture should not just be a kiss between other arts. They should blend together. Architecture still has potential value when it becomes to rooted architecture, which is the blend between social and contextual perspective. Therefore, rooted architecture could be ultimate proposition against to kissing architecture also.


ESSAY I

Boundary is necessary component to create archipelago; however, boundary less defined by plinth, column, or wall, more defined by context and how people affect: invisible boundary create archipelago.

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1 Pier Vittorio Aureli, The Possibility of an Absolute Architec- ture, (Cambridge: MIT Press, 2011). 2 “The Cosmic Inspiro-Cloud,” Tumblr blog, February 11, 2013, http://www.cosmicinspirocloud.com/ post/1537972580/pier-vittorio-aureli-stop-city-2007 3 Tomeu Ramis & Sauter Florian. Text + Project: Interview with Pier Vittorio Aureli, last modified April 7, 2012, http:// www.architecturalpapers.ch/index.php?ID=76 4 Jeffery Howe, A Digital Archive of American Architecture: Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, last modified 1998, http://www. bc.edu/ bc_org/avp/cas/fnart/fa267/mies.html 5 Tom Wiscombe, Tom Wiscombe Design: Chinese University of Hong Kong Area, http://tomwiscombe.com/ project_005.html 6 Kengo Kuma, “Kengo Kuma and Associates: Starbucks Coffee at Dazaifutenmangu Omotesando, last modified 2013, http://kkaa. co.jp/works/starbucks-coffee-at-dazaifut- enmangu-omotesando/ 7 Sylvia Lavin, Kissing Architecture, (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2011)


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THESIS STATEMENT

Half or Double Symmetry is one of the ideal images that human has always obsessed in history. The reason is that we have considered that comprehending symmetry will create order, beauty, and perfection; moreover, we always discus perfect design and proportion that human do not have. To achieve symmetry design, after digital design tools were invented, people could create symmetry design more easily and more intricately. Moreover, new fabrication methods such as 3D printing and CNC milling also encourage exploring complex geometry with retaining the symmetry. The Digital Grotesques project by Benjamin Dillenburger and Michael Hansmeyer is successful example with symmetrical complicated geometry. In architecture, symmetry theory is discussed in religious and authority matter. In European history, we see the symmetrical detail design as small scale, church with symmetrical plan and elevation as middle scale, and symmetrical palace design as large scale. On the other hand, we do not see the symmetry in housing design as much as other examples. We sometimes find symmetry design in housing; however, it is not completely symmetry because of interior function, orientation, and so on. If the reason that we do not see the symmetry in housing is program matter, we might explore the symmetry in different way. “Half or Double� is the thesis about creating symmetry design with using digital tools and different materials, also including function and program. According to these factors and processes, the symmetry design creates exactly same thing at other side like a mirror. Or it creates another thing, which looks like similar at other side. Investigating the symmetry with digital tools will define another contemporary symmetry design.

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Southern California Institute of Architecture

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2013 SCI-Arc Gateway Portfolio