Page 1

CHOKED ISSUE 1 SS19 I OVERDRESSED PHOTOGRAPHY CHARLES TOPP


Choked Magazine, Bloomberg LP, 3 Queen Victoria Street, London EC4N 4TQ www.chokedmag.com

The paper used for printing this publication is sourced from www.printonpaper.com. We ensure that products are produced with respect for the highest ecological, social and ethical standards. Choked Magazine is published by Bloomsbury Publishing LTD. All images and prices correct at the time of going to press. All rights reserved. Articles may not be reproduced without written permission from chokedmag.com.

2


CONTENTS

CARCEL PAGE 6 NATURAL BEAUTY PAGE 10 TRANSPARENCY PAGE 12 NOAH PAGE 16 TIFANY MARTA SAHILI PAGE 24 FASHIONED BY NATURE PAGE 30 PRICE OF BEAUTY PAGE 32 NUDE ETHICS PAGE 34 INSTAGRAMS THAT INSPIRE PAGE 39 OVERDRESSED PAGE 41 BEAUTY PAGE 48 FASHION REVOLUTION PAGE 54

3


4


5


6


MORE THAN JUST A T-SHIRT Designed in Denmark. Made in Prison.

Carcel was founded by Veronica D’Souza in 2016 on the basis that the main cause of female incarceration is poverty. Carcel aims to give women in prisons new skills and good wages so that they are able to support themselves and their family, and in turn break the cycle of poverty. Social impact is integrated within the business plan: the more people that buy Carcel, the more women are employed in prison. It is a brand with a difference: no seasons or sales, the items are eternal. Keeping their designs simple creates a wave of timeless fashion; the brand stays relevant this way. The production is slow, respecting the garment in its entirety and the woman who makes it. The items are never discounted nor do they go on sale, this avoids waste and overproduction, giving each garment importance in its entirety. The design process begins in Denmark, taking inspiration from traditional minimal Scandinavian design. Attention to detail meets quality material made to last. A design aesthetic which is simple yet strong.

The label says so much more than the brand’s name; it connects you to who made your garment. Every product carries the name of the woman who made it. Alongside their name you can find out further information about the creator of the garment, with profile pages on Carcel’s website and a card included in your order. Carcel’s first collection is made from baby Alpaca wool, sourced from Peru. This specialist material was chosen for its unique properties. Alpaca wool is naturally temperate regulating, sensitive to the skin and environmentally friendly as is biodegradable. The brand is currently working on their next collection, which will be made from 100% silk, manufactured by women in prisons in Thailand, where 90% of the women incarcerated due to drug-trafficking

.

7


8


‘ We do not compromise on style, planet or people but invest in a

long-lasting impact, considered design and premium natural materials.’

Carcel’s first collection made from Baby Alpaca is currently available on carcel.co Photography Charles Topp Text Alex Cottam

9


NATURAL BEAUTY Organic face masks and scrubs

It can be difficult to determine the exact ingredients within many beauty products, despite what it promises on the label. Many products contain harsh chemicals that can be harmful and cause irritation to the skin. There are many benefits to using homemade organic face masks and scrubs as an alternative to buying expensive manufactured products. Recipes can be altered to personal preferences and needs; have fun and be creative. Giving you a peace of mind knowing what exactly you are putting on your skin, without the addition of harsh chemicals and preservatives found in many manufactured products on our shelves. Not only is the use of natural ingredients healthy for your skin, it also benefits the environment by using everyday household ingredients that have been ethically sourced and made.

COFFEE FACE SCRUB Tired complexions Benefits: Reduces inflammation and redness, gets rid of under eye circles, exfoliates and removes dead skin, contains vitamin C to lighten and brighten, moisturises and wakes up a tired complexion. Ingredients: 1/2 Cup ground organic coffee beans (grind your own or buy pre-ground) 1/2 Cup organic, unsweetened cocoa powder 1 Cup of unsweetened whole milk (or almond milk) 1 Tbsp of lemon juice (for dry skin, try olive or almond oil) 1 Tbsp of honey (for extra oily or acne prone skin, use additional lemon juice here instead of honey)

10


BANANA FACE MASK

Sensitive and acne-prone skin Benefits: Contains vitamins A, B & E, natural anti-aging, soothes and moisturises, exfoliates, natural antibacterial for acne-prone skin, reduces breakouts and clears flair ups, hydrates, tightens pores and brightens complexion, evens skin tone and soothes itchy skin conditions like eczema. Ingredients: 1 ripe banana 1 teaspoon of honey 1 teaspoon of fresh lemon juice 1/4 cup of Quaker Oats rolled oats (optional)

TUMERIC FACE SCRUB Uneven skin tone

Benefits: Evens out skin tone, exfoliates and removes dead skin, wakes up a tired complexion and brightens skin tone. Ingredients: 1 tablespoon of natural plain yogurt 1 tablespoon of honey 1 tablespoon of turmeric powder

AVOCADO & CUCUMBER FACE MASK Oily skin

Benefits: Freshens face and clears pores, vitamin C prevents breakouts, revitalises and replenishes skin, hydrates and reduces inflammation. Ingredients: 1/2 of an avocado 1/4 cucumber, blended

Photography & Text Hannah Guy

11


TRANSPARENCY Five years on from the tragic event of Rana Plaza where 1,134 people lost their lives, Choked magazine sat in on Fashion Revolution’s discussion for improving factory conditions around the world.

How many of the audience know what we are talking about when we say the modern slavery act? and what about section 54 transparency and supply chain? A company with turnover of 36 million pounds or more must report on what they are doing to get rid of modern forms of slavery from their supply chains and there are quite comprehensive guidelines as to what should be included in the report.

THERE IS NO ROOM AT ALL FOR COMPLACENCY IN FASHION BUT EVERYBODY HAS GOT TO UP THEIR GAME IN TERMS OF HOW WE SEE OTHER PEOPLE PRODUCING OUR GOODS BARONESS LOLA YOUNG – OBE, ACTRESS,

AUTHOR AND CROSSBENCH PEER, FOUNDER OF

THE ALL PEOPLES PARLIAMENTARY GROUP

12


WHAT PROGRESS HAS BEEN MADE? Sarah Ditty - Head of Policy for Fashion Revolution met with MPs at the House of Commons to discuss the lack of safety in Bangladesh’s fast fashion factories, the key topics were the Bangladesh accord and developing building fire safety around the country, we now know that the alliance has helped upgrade the safety and structural integrity of many factories in Bangladesh. The citizens of Bangladesh also have a great part to play in rebuilding Bangladesh through the Fashion Revolution movement movement helping to educate consumers about where their clothes really come from through various campaigns, but it seems that there is still more to be done.

WHAT IS THE GOVERNMENT DOING? Baroness Lola Young – OBE, Actress, Author and Crossbench Peer, founder of the All Peoples Parliamentary group. ‘There should be about 12,000 companies reporting and so far only about 6,000 have even though it’s about two and a half years since the act became law this is a low number in the space of time we need faster change in this process. As for our generation, we have to pay more attention to certain aspects of the fashion industry, because at the moment we see it just as a physical element and not really understanding that there are people behind the process and it is dangerous. As part of the fashion revolution we need to start asking ‘who made my clothes?’

WHAT CAN WE DO TO HELP? Tamsin Lejeune – CEO of Common Objective, Managing Director and Founder of the Ethical Fashion Forum ‘As long as it’s a voluntary option for businesses to engage and integrate with sustainability it will be something that’s done with a minority and something that’s never really been taken up to scale’. For all of our sustainable businesses out there, we can only encourage you to keep fighting for ethical fashion and to also help others to partake in this movement ‘we need to do more than a sticking plaster solution to change the way the industry works’. Fashion Revolution Text Shannon Dowell

13


‘PHOTOGRAPHY PIECES,’ 2018, Fred Dellow

14


15


16


NOAH Photography Calvin Basrai

17


18


19


20


21


‘Happy Consumerism!’ 2017, Alex Cottam

22


23


TIFANY MARTA SAHILI ONE PART OF FURIOUS FEMMES COLLECTIVE PHOTOGRAPHY PAUL IFENEZIUCHE CREATIVE DIRECTION JOYCE SISSI

24


25


FURIOUS FEMMES COLLECTIVE AN ALL FEMALE ART COLLECTIVE

26


26


BRINGING A NEW FORMATION OF WOMEN IN THE ARTS

28


29


FASHIONED FROM NATURE The V&A has been a host to a number of exquisite exhibitions, and the Fashioned from Nature is the best to date - Curator Edwina Ehram deserves a round of applause. A fine balance has been created in provoking thought on the topics of sustainability as well as the inspiration of nature within the production and design of fashion garments; from the 17th century botanical embroidery style to the future of fashion and our planet in the modern era. Throughout, the unstable relationship between fashion and nature is discussed. Work is showcased from the likes of Vivienne Westwood to Stella McCartney, highlighting their movement in the step towards a more ethically conscious future. Whilst featuring a bag from Gucci, that has been strongly influenced by nature with the use of a botanical embroidery style. The presentation successfully celebrates the inspiration driven from nature in the fashion industry and the way that designers are addressing in their work the challenge to reduce the environmental impact of the fashion industry. Unfortunately, the Fashioned from Nature exhibition has now closed. However, you are able to buy the ‘Fashioned from Nature’ paperback online on Amazon and on the V&A website, which features all the information and content from the Fashioned From Nature exhibition. Text Poppy Wright

30


31


Beauty and fashion has never been more disposable. Fast fashion has lead to a buy today, wear once then throw away, mentality. However, research suggests that in 2018, consumers are actively seeking out brands that promise trusted credentials. Research studies revealed that every year 300 million tonnes of plastic are produced of which 8 million are dumped in the ocean. The extent of how much waste we currently produce is unprecedented, which is why it is so important to start an active conversation on solutions to this pandemic. New trends are emerging that look to protect the environment and promote healthy, ethical and sustainable ways of living, as there is more demand for products and services that have positive effects on the environment. Millennials realise the negative impact that this throw away culture has had on the environment and are committed to buying products that are eco-friendly and ethically sourced. According to The Business of Fashion, ‘66% of millennials state that they are willing to spend more money on a product that promises honest outcomes, that have positive social and ecological impacts.’ Consumers are very conscious of lowering their carbon footprint and expect companies to do the same. A new wave of natural beauty brands are shaking up the beauty industry as they introduce eco-friendly concepts for beauty and cosmetics. Many brands have explored innovative ways in which they produce and package their products. They aim to use 100% natural ingredients, biodegradable packaging, ethically sourced materials and ingredients with a zero-waste philosophy as well as using factories and retail sites that are wind-powered. Fruu is a brand that partners with local fruit farmers, to support smaller businesses, and uses discarded fruit waste in its lip balms. Zero Waste Beauty Australia is a new brand that offers 100% natural handmade vegan and crueltyfree products using recyclable glass and biodegradable labels. Bare Necessities offers handmade and organic products contained in recyclable and eco-friendly packaging. Other eco-friendly cosmetic brands that follow ethical means to manufacturing their products include Valley Mist, Aveda, Burt’s Bees, Plaine and many more. UK brand Lush is well known for its commitment to being environmentally friendly by using natural ingredients and eco-friendly packaging. Last summer, Lush opened a temporary pop-up in Soho, London, called Naked House, with the launch of the brand’s new Lush Naked cosmetics collection. The aim of the pop-up was to raise awareness and tackle issues on the impact that plastic packaging has on the environment. The exhibition was designed to educate consumers on reducing, reusing and recycling, with talks on solutions to help reduce packaging and displays of the latest innovations.

32

For the future of beauty brands, products need total transparency; conscious consumers will demand natural, non-toxic products with clarity on all ingredients and processes. Brands need to consider both the environmental and social factors such as waste management, packaging practices, marketing concepts, social responsibility and sourcing of ingredients in order to be completely transparent. Plastic is one of the most common materials that cosmetic companies use for packaging, accounting for 40% of total plastic usage. Only 14% of all plastic packaging is collected for recycling. Consumers are not only paying the price for beauty, but also the environmental cost of overconsumption. Greenpeace, other activist groups, and beauty companies that are focused on safe ingredients have campaigned for the ban of microbeads; resulting in companies removing them from products and using alternatives such as coffee grounds, salt and natural bamboo. Campaigners are now calling for a wider ban on all micro-plastics in beauty products. In an innovative aspect, brands are noticing the social attitudes towards sustainablity and are looking into ways in which they can reduce the amount of waste produced. In addition to using environmentally friendly ingredients, brands need to consider packaging design, distributions and marketing practices. Zerowaste has become the goal of many brands as they look for innovative retail concepts that shift away from disposable products that have no value or life expectancy. Many brands are promising that products have a lifetime guarantee. Furthermore, educating consumers by accompanying details on aftercare. Encouraging people to take personal responsibility can have a huge impact on the environment; if everyone does their bit, think of the overall impact this will have on the environment. Consumers need to be product conscious and care about what goes into the products that they purchase. It is so important for individuals to educate themselves; being aware of how products are sourced and whether they are ethical or fairly traded. Supporting brands that promote these philosophies can really help make a difference and lead to a more sustainable lifestyle.


PRICE OF BEAUTY “ Consumers are very conscious of lowering their carbon footprint and expect companies to do the same ”

33


AFFORDABLE ETHICAL BRITISH Nude Ethics is an online independent ethical fashion store based in Cornwall. Founded by Jessica Bailey in July 2017 the store features her own embroidered and screen printed t-shirt designs alongside other ethical clothing brands chosen by herself. Every brand stocked focuses on a product that does good: whether that be traditional craft or made in England. When you buy from Nude Ethics you are getting a product that is honest whilst also being made to the highest standard. Each product stocked is priced affordably, making ethical clothing attainable to all. The movement towards sourcing sustainable clothing is on the rise, from designer brands such as Stella McCartney to the high street within H&M’s conscious range. We must support and encourage purchases from these outlets rather than from detrimental fast fashion brands. At Choked we champion small businesses and spoke to Bailey to find out more about starting up her own brand, her inspirations and her insight into ethical fashion.

34


Why did you start Nude Ethics? In the last few years I have focused on natural cosmetics and organic food. This naturally progressed into the choices I made for all of my purchases. I really struggled to find fairly made clothing at an affordable price and I, like most people around me, can’t afford to pay the price of ethical clothing. I am a graphic designer and I’ve always focused my work around fashion - it made sense to create my own store. Alongside your own collection, Nude Ethics stocks other ethical brands, what do you look for when you source these? I look for pieces that I would wear - everything in the store is based around my own personal style. When it comes to the ethical side, it’s a little bit more complicated. There are so many ways in which brands need to look after the environment. Everyone expects that once a brand states it is ‘ethical’, that it needs to be ethical in every way. I don’t expect that from brands, it takes time to become all round ethical. I look for new independent brands that are still finding their feet (like Nude Ethics), that know their responsibilities in protecting their environment but are figuring out how to do it in their own way. That’s why you’ll find labels in my store that do something different. There’s vintage pieces, hand made, locally crafted, family owned and there are items made of materials that don’t harm the environment - like linen and my organic cotton t-shirts. I’m always looking to add to the store, at the moment, I’m looking for clothing that has been handmade by the designer. It helps as well​if they’re super friendly. Your collection has a fair price point, why is it important to you for Nude Ethics to be affordable? I​t's important because everyone should be able to afford ethical clothing. A lot of ethical brands that I admire and had my eye on before I started my own store, were just simply too expensive. They're perfect items as a yearly purchase, we definitely should encourage everyone to consume and buy less, but these brands tend to only be affordable for a small selection of people. I personally think you should be able to buy something every month without it stopping you from paying your bills - I want to be more realistic to the everyday person. Also, if you make items a similar price to the high-street, it gives you no excuse. It helps that I also work in a Screen Printing studio, which means I can keep costs down. What’s your favourite piece from your collection? My favourite item(s) is my arch ​t-shirts. I really like an item that can go with absolutely everything - choosing what you wear in the morning should be the easiest thing to do. My favourite outfit is a t-shirt, black jeans, white trainer and a nice jacket.

Nude Ethics

35


Nude Ethics

36


‘Funding your own store is very costly, and I have no idea when I’ll get to the point where I’m financially stable enough to leave my job.’ What is your ultimate goal for Nude Ethics? I​ hope that one day I can create my own collection of clothing, not just t-shirts and jumpers. I'd love to make jackets, shirts, trousers etc that I've designed myself. The thought of it right now just makes me feel very tired, so I'll stick to designing t-shirts for now. The imagery alongside the brand is beautiful and natural, where do you take your inspiration for this? ​ he photography style has developed from knowing my own body. Majority of T photos I have taken are actually of myself. ​I'll grab linen sheets and go outside into the garden and use my own body to do all the work - I'll use close up shots of this to further enhance details. It's important to let clothes fall against your body and simply let it make the shapes it wants to make. Once I knew how I wanted my own clothes to look in the store, It was easy to find brands that followed a simplicity that would flow nicely with it. I think it looks natural just because all the photography in the store is just very simple. Little side note: Learning how to photograph your own body actually makes you feel more comfortable with it, it's almost like you get to know yourself better. What’s the biggest obstacle you’ve had when founding the brand? I​ have a day job still. Funding your own store is very costly, and I have no idea when I'll get to the point where I'm financially stable enough to leave my job. While my day job is important to me (it's the studio where I print my designs), it also slows me down. Everyone starting their own business will know that it's going to be very tiring, but you don't actually know how tired you're going to feel until you've done a year of it! I work in the day, and then I come home and work on Nude Ethics in the evening. It is very rewarding and it's worth all the time in the world - but for now there just isn't enough time. Have you always been interested in sustainability? To be honest, no I haven't. I never thought about it until a few years ago. My sister is a Holistic therapist - she started making me question the things I use. Everyone has that person or hears a certain story that wakes them up to what is really happening around them.

37


38


Instagrams That Inspire Instagram accounts you need to follow for a more sustainable lifestyle Choked magazine has compiled a list of the most influential Instagrams that inspire sustainability and ethical living. These are the influencers and bloggers to follow for advice, thoughts, experiences and inspiration. Don’t forget to follow @chokedmag on Instagram to keep up to date with our latest posts.

@livingprettynaturally Kate is a green beauty blogger who enjoys travelling and fitness, also sharing insights to organic and natural beauty. Follow her page for fitness, healthy food recipes, travel photography and inspirational quotes.

@vegiehead

@tollydollyposh

For all the foodies, Adele McConnell is a blogger passionate about creating vegan recipes with plant based ingredients. Her recipes consist of organic ingredients, nutrients. Adele’s goal is to show that healthy food can be interesting and tasty. Follow for information on food and gardening.

Tolly Dolly Posh is an ethical fashion blogger, and aspiring fashion designer steering the industry and consumers into a more ethical and sustainable direction. She shares her favourite ethical fashion brands on her page along with fashion up-cycling and second hand clothing.

@thegirlgonegreen

@trashisfortossers

Manuela Baron is passionate about sustainability and strives to keep the planet free of rubbish by inspiring others to be green. Travelling the world to learn new sustainable practices that she then shares online. Manuela also posts about her minimalist, zero-waste life-style and encourages others to be conscious of the environment.

Lauren Singer is a blogger based in California and lives completely zero waste. She shares her journey online to show that leading a zero waste lifestyle is simple, costeffective, timely and fun. Follow for practical advice on how to produce less waste, shop eco-friendly brands, lifestyle, beauty and food recipes.

@tinyyellowbungalow Jessie is a blogger who is passionate about sustainability, zero waste and plant based products. She promotes eco-living, giving inspiration on how to life naturally, grow food at home and where to find reusable products. She also has her own small business Tiny Yellow Bungalow selling all natural earth friendly products.

@liviavanh Livia van Heerde is blogger based in London and Vienna. An environmentalist passionate about ethically sourced fashion. Livia shares posts about her eco-friendly lifestyle, sustainable fashion and ethical clothing.

@green_global_travel Follow a couple who inspire people to help the world via responsible ecotourism, nature and wildlife conservation as well as cultural preservation. They share amazing travel photography of beautiful wildlife and idyllic views from around the globe. They also promote fair trade and supporting local businesses.

39


40


OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVERDRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVERDRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVERDRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVERDRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVERDRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVERDRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVERDRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVERDRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVERDRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVERDRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVERDRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVERDRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVERDRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVERDRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVERDRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVERDRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVERDRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVERDRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVERDRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVERDRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVERDRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVERDRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVERDRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVERDRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVERDRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVERDRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVERDRESSED OVERDRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVERDRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVERDRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED OVER-DRESSED


350,000 tonnes of clothing ends up in landfill each year in the UK. We are in a fast fashion crisis. ‘OVERDRESSED’ explores the over consumed world we live in and encourages to you to step back from this rampant consumerism.

42


43


44


45


46


Photography Charles Topp Creative Direction Alex Cottam Talent Connor Lee

47


48


49


50


Photography Paul Ifeneziuche Creative Direction Joyce Sissi Talent Lisa Hooper

51


SLOW BITMAP.PSD 06/06/2018, 16:05 Page 1 of 1

52


53


54


need We want to know

FASHION REVOLUTION

55


Fashion Revolution week is coming around again soon, and the campaigning for ‘Who Made Your Clothes’ never stops. Since the Rana Plaza disaster 6 years ago, which killed 1,134 people, and the formation of the Fashion Revolution, Choked Magazine has formed to be a strong advocate for transparency within the fashion industry. As well as this we are constantly striving for brands that use alternative materials/ products to better our environmental impact and reduce the fashion industry’s carbon footprint. No-one should suffer at the hands of fashion, it is possible to still love fashion and be sustainable at the same time. The ‘Who Made Your Clothes’ campaign continues to reach millions of people throughout the world on social media, and is stepping in the right direction to implementing change; edging towards a more sustainable future. Since starting Fashion Revolution a number of big brand names are shedding a light on who is making their clothes and in what conditions. In the weeks leading up to Fashion Revolution week, reports released by the campaign show that high street brands and retailers are doing more than a number of luxury brands to highlight their transparency. H&M, Puma and ASOS, as well as a long list of other high street brands are supporting the ‘Who Made Your Clothes’ campaign whilst luxury brands such as Dior, Long Champ and Nine West disclose next to nothing about the origins of their products. Emily O’Reilly, part of the European Ombudsman who investigate unsolved complaints, said to Fashion Revolution in 2017 ‘The knowledge that important information is being kept from people undermines trust and creates greater uncertainty’. Fashion Revolution calls for a fairer, safer, cleaner and more transparent fashion industry, an agenda we push for at Choked Magazine. 1,134 deaths for fashion was 1,134 deaths too many, we believe in delivering basic human rights to the workers behind our clothes, and respecting the environment whilst bringing the latest fashion.

On the lead up to Fashion Revolution Week join us in the campaign and #whomadeyourclothes on all forms of social media to spread the word. What else can you do to help? Sign the Fashion revolution manifesto at: www.fashionrevolution.org/manifesto/ Illustration & Text Poppy Wright

56


57


PAUSE

58


RESUME

59


60


61


62


‘Graphic Collage V,’ 2014, Joyce Sissi

63


www.chokedmag.com

£6.00

Choked Magazine, Issue 1 SS18  

CHOKED is a magazine with a conscience encapsulating fashion, lifestyle and the Arts with an ethical focus. The world is choked with overco...

Choked Magazine, Issue 1 SS18  

CHOKED is a magazine with a conscience encapsulating fashion, lifestyle and the Arts with an ethical focus. The world is choked with overco...

Advertisement