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BROTHERHOOD CHALLENGERS

ACHIEVERS DETERMINED AND DEDICATED

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THE BROTHERHOOD CHALLENGERS

ACHIEVERS DETERMINED AND DEDICATED

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Copyright Š 2013 by M Marketing Group All rights reserved. No part of the material protected by this copyright notice may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without the written permission of the copyright owner.

Publisher - Multimedia Marketing Group Columbia, SC 29202

Los Angeles, CA

www.mmarketinggroup.com

Published in the United States of America Library of Congress Catalog-in-Publication Data

ISBN

Publisher: Multimedia Marketing Group

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Editor: in Chief

Robert Kirton, Ed.D.

Graphic Illustrator:

Donna Daniels

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THE BROTHERHOOD TABLE OF CONTENTS The Purpose of the Brotherhood

Page 5

The 21 Book Reading Challenge

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6-8

Understanding Your Legacy

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Character

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Culture

Communication

Preparation

Community

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Wellness

Conviction


WHAT IS THE BROTHERHOOD? The Brotherhood is an interactive curriculum and community based network.

The Mission The Brotherhood is determined and dedicated to providing our young men with the tools and resources to increase achievement and success.

The Brotherhood of Achievers Determined and Dedicated aka “The Brotherhood” is a learning and lifestyle challenge interactive curriculum. The program challenges our young men to be dedicated to making a positive difference in their lives and their community by providing them the tools and resources they need to be successful.

As a result, we developed a brotherhood interactive curriculum around seven distinct researched based challenges, Character, History, Communication, Preparation, Community, Wellness, and Conviction, that endorses excellence, inspires learning, and increases achievement and success. Our Brothers Keeper concept of positivity, influence, and outreach infused with the reciprocal interactive curriculum can be used with elementary, middle, and high school aged students across platforms using the same template with one major goal increasing achievement and success. Success is measured through achievement, attendance, and attitude.

We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit. Aristotle 5

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The goal of the 21- Book Reading Challenge is to motivate you to realize the importance of being well read and to develop a lifelong love of reading. We want you to get excited about reading and experiencing the rewards from reading. Learning and reading are fundamental to success, as you journey through life you should never lose the urge to read, know and acquire new knowledge. The process of reading and learning should not stop, but continue until you can no longer read or make sense of what you read. Strive to learn facts, information, knowledge, understanding, instructions, rules, etc. Separate your reading into three categories edification, education, and entertainment.

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Practically everything you do requires you to read. The ability to read is the single most significant predictor of success in school and in life. For example, to complete math problems you have to know how to read the formulas. In order to be a good driver you have to know how to read directions and road signs. Success and preparation for life depends on your ability to read and read well. Just like a good athlete has to practice, you have to practice to be a good reader. Your challenge is to read the 21- Books from our recommended reading list but you can substitute other books with the tenants and characteristics of the recommended books and the approval of your coaches.

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The goal of the 21-book Reading Challenge is to motivate you to understand the importance of being well read and to develop a lifelong love for reading. As you journey through life the ability to read is the single most significant predictor of success in school and in your life. Reading is necessary in everything that we do. You need to know how to read to be able complete math problems or to be a good driver. In order to get your drivers license you have to be able to read the manual to prepare for the test. Success and preparation for life depends on your ability to read and read well. Just like a good athlete has to practice, you have to practice to be a good reader.

Pledge to Become a Volunteer Reader, Tutor, or Mentor. Click on the YSA/United Way icon to become a volunteer reader or for other volunteer opportunities in your area:

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Understanding Your Legacy The Challenge Section of the Program is designed to challenge you to be your best. These 21 activities will begin your journey to from character to conviction.

Brotherhood Challenges

Activity

Challenge 1: Character

1. 2. 3.

Challenge 2: Culture

1. 2. 3.

Challenge 3: Communication

Challenge 4: Preparation

Challenge 5: Community

Challenge 6: Wellness

Challenge 1 Instilling Integrity Personal Board of Directors Character Counts Challenge 2 My Culture Making the Connection Looking Inward Challenge 3

1. Non-verbal Communication 2. Verbal Communication 3. Written Communication Challenge 4 1. Personal Library 2. Passage to Post-Secondary 3. E-Coach Challenge 5 1. Non-Verbal Communication 2. Verbal Communication 3. Written Communication Challenge 6 1. Physical Wellness 2. Health Wellness 3. Nutritional Wellness

Challenge 7: Conviction

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Challenge 7 1. Personal Convictions 2. Leadership Within 3. My Brother’s Keeper THE BROTHERHOOD COPYRIGHT Š 2013


About Me Complete this exercise and share with your group members so they know a little more about you before getting started with the program. 1. My full name is: ______________________________________________

2. I prefer to be called: ___________________________________________

3. My birth date and birthplace are: _______________________________

4. Something I enjoy doing is: _____________________________________ _

5. Something that I can’t part with is: _______________________________

6. My favorite television show (or movie) is: ___________________________

7. My favorite food is: ____________________________________________

8. The person I most admire is:

9. Being a man means:

10. The one thing that I value most in life is:

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THE BROTHERHOOD MEN CREED

As a Young Man, I realize that character is the  Foundation for my success. I will learn from my  History to help me endure the present  and to prepare for the future. I will seek to become an effective communicator so I can understand and be understood. I will prepare for life so I can be ready for  the opportunities of success. I will respect the community in  which I live and strive to make a positive difference. I will embrace wellness by keeping My mind, body, and soul healthy. I will live with purpose and follow my honest convictions.

I Am My Brother’s Keeper. 

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character |ˈkariktər| noun:

1 The mental and moral qualities distinctive to an individual: running away was not in keeping with her character.

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This challenge helps you to examine the behavioral traits that make up your character. The Character Challenge is centered on the six pillars of Character Education: • Trustworthiness • Respect • Responsibility • Fairness • Caring • Citizenship

These pillars will help you shape your attitudes, values, and beliefs, which will lead to your future success. Character is learned at an early age from your parents, teachers, and friends. This learning usually comes from direct instruction or from observations of others.

The foundation stones for a balanced success are honesty, character, integrity, faith, love and loyalty. Zig Ziglar

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CHARACTER CHALLENGE

Character Challenge


Although character represents the type of person you are, it does not necessarily reflect the kind of person you have to be. Your character is developed as a child and it can change based on your personal situations and experiences. A good example of this statement could be your behavior in school versus your behavior at home.

Character is the real foundation of all worthwhile success. John Hays Hammond

The Character Cornerstone Challenge will help you develop skills that will help you in the classroom and beyond. 14

This development will take place through reading, discussions, debates, and activities that will provide you with tools and a better understanding for decision-making. As a young man, you know your behavior and probably the behavior of your friends, and what drives it. You will be challenged to think about solutions to moral conflicts, resolve inconsistencies, and reach solutions that reflect good moral principles. This challenge will provide you with basic values and principles of right and wrong; however, no character education program has the ability to control your will or freedom to choose how you will behave.

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CHARACTER CHALLENGE

Character Cornerstone


The following activities are geared towards developing independent thinkers who are committed to following moral principles, and who are likely to do the right thing even under challenging circumstances.

I have a dream

The goal of the Character Challenge is to help you make decisions based on good moral principles and values.

that my four After successfully completing this challenge you will be qualified to receive the Character Challenge Badge of Honor.

little children will one day live in a Nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. Martin Luther King, Jr.

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Be sure you put your feet in the right place, Then stand firm. Abraham Lincoln

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CHARACTER CHALLENGE

You can choose to show respect, kindness, self-discipline, and concern for others; or you can choose acts of violence, theft, or dishonesty.


Understanding Your Legacy Male Identification Profile Sometimes it helps us to keep our focus on achieving certain goals if we can see or relate to someone who is actually practicing or have had successful experiences in the endeavor to which we aspire. Think about the questions below and respond by circling either “Yes” or “No.” 1. I know a man who is a teacher.

Yes

No

2. I know a man who is a lawyer.

Yes

No

3. I know a man who is a straight “A” student.

Yes

No

4. I know a man who is a dentist

Yes

No

5. I know a man who is a doctor.

Yes No

6. I know a man who is a preacher.

Yes

No

7. I know a man who is a plumber.

Yes

No

8. I know a man who is an electrician.

Yes

No

9. I know a man who is a college professor.

Yes

No

10. I know a man who is an entrepreneur.

Yes

No

11. I now a man who is a mechanic.

Yes

No

12. I know a man who is an engineer

Yes

No

13. I know a man who is a rapper.

Yes No

14. I know a man who is a professional athlete.

Yes

No

15. I know a man who is a CEO of a major company.

Yes

No

16. I know a man who is a member of a fraternity.

Yes

No

17. I know a man who is a pilot.

Yes No

18. I know a man who is a musician.

Yes

No

19. I know a man who is a carpenter.

Yes

No

20. I know a man who owns a TV station.

Yes

No

21. I know a man who will be successful in the future

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Yes No


Young people need guidance from caring adults to build strong, positive character traits—but they can also build their own. This book by the best-selling author of The Kid’s Guide to Social Action invites children and teens to explore and practice honesty, kindness, empathy, integrity, tolerance, patience, 17

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This book made me: What you stand for:

Ideas

WISH THAT REALIZE THAT DECIDE THAT WONDER ABOUT

SEE THAT BELIEVE THAT FEEL THAT HOPE THAT 18

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CHARACTER BOOK PROJECT I

Complete each of these eight ideas with material from the book “What do You Stand For?


The Eagles who Thought They were Chickens chronicles the journey of a great eagle, historically perched at the right hand of the great king in her native Africa, who is captured and taken aboard a slave ship. During the journey between Africa and the Americas, the great eagle lays three eggs before dying as a result of her captivity. The eggs are hatched in a chicken yard and are scorned and ridiculed because they are different.

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Construct puppets and present a storytelling show to a group of younger students of one or more interesting parts of the “Eagle Story.”

You Will Need:

• Cardboard box • Scissors • Straight edge ruler • Craft blade • Paper • Craft glue • Colored socks

• Craft paint • Paintbrush • Permanent marker • Duct tape • Wiggle eyes • Hot glue gun

STEP 1 Cut out part of the front and side panels of a cardboard box. Draw on the unfinished side of the cardboard. Repeat these steps to create an identical cardboard piece. Cut out the cardboard along the solid lines. These cardboard segments will become the eagles and chickens puppet's body.

STEP 3

STEP 2 Place the puppet’s body segments down on a piece of scrap cardboard. Lay a straight edge ruler over the dotted line and score along the line with a craft scissors.

Fold over the beak segments so that the two long ends touch. Cut a strip of paper that is the same length as the beak. Place glue on one side of the paper, and adhere it to the inside of the beak segment to connect these ends.

STEP 4 Cut off an old sock several inches away from the toe. Discard the toe piece of the sock and keep the rest to create the body of the puppet. 20

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CHARACTER BOOK PROJECT II

Book Project:


Using real stories from teens around the world, author Sean Covey covers the tough challenges teens face on a daily basis. With the help of teens from all over the world, Sean provides advice on how to make wise and informed decisions. The book focuses on six key decisions that can make or break a teens’ future. 21

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Book Project: The Ten-Year Experiment

List at 4 things that were important to you 10 years ago such as: 1. Food _________________________________________________ 2. Friends _______________________________________________ 3. Games/Sports ________________________________________ 4. Books ________________________________________________

List at least 4 of “The 6 Most Important Decisions You’ll Ever Make” and state why they are important to you today. 1. ______________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ 2. ______________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ 3. ______________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ 4. ______________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ List 4 things you hope for 10 years in the future such as: 1. Career _______________________________________________ 2. Home ________________________________________________ 3. Car __________________________________________________ 4. Personal Victory ______________________________________ 22

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CHARACTER BOOK PROJECT III

-10 -9 -8 -7 -6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1 -0 +1 +2 +3 +4 +5 +6 +7 +8 +9 +10


Teens don’t often realize that their daydreams can be transformed into real accomplishments. If they take those dreams seriously, and turn thoughts into action, even some of the wildest notions can become reality. Reaching Your Goals: The Ultimate Teen Guide show readers how important setting goals can be to accomplishing whatever they want to. Through the use of “No Sweat Quizzes” and other unique methods, such as creative visualization and affirmations, Anne Courtright provides teens with the tools to help them achieve not only short-term goals but to realize their greatest potential. Filled with commentary from notable figures in sports, music, film, and business, this book also shows teens how to turn failures into positive stepping-stones to future success. 23

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Specific: The goal should identify a specific action or event that will take place.

Measurable: The goal and its benefits should be quantifiable.

Achievable: The goal should be attainable given available resources.

Realistic: The goal should require you to stretch some, but allow the likelihood of success.

Timely: The goal should state the time period in which it will be accomplished. SMART Goals 1. ___________________________________________________ 2. ___________________________________________________ 3. ___________________________________________________ 4. ___________________________________________________ 24

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CHARACTER BOOK PROJECT IV

DEVELOP 4 SMART GOALS


YOUR PERSONAL BLUEPRINT SECTION 1: STRENGTHS These are my strengths as a young man: 1. ________________________________________________________________________ 2. ________________________________________________________________________ 3. ________________________________________________________________________ 4. ________________________________________________________________________

SECTION 2: AREAS FOR IMPROVEMENT These are aeas where I need improvement:

The challenges that can help me in this are:

Date I plan to start:

Date I plan to Complete

1. _________________________________________________________________________ 2. ________________________________________________________________________ 3. ________________________________________________________________________ 4. ________________________________________________________________________

STUDENT SIGNATURE ______________________________________________ PARENT SIGNATURE ______________________________________________ MENTOR SIGNATURE ______________________________________________ 25

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YOUR PERSONAL BLUEPRINT When I complete all of the Principles in this program I plan to have learned and improved in the following areas: 1. _____________________________________________________________ 2. _____________________________________________________________ 3. _____________________________________________________________ 4. _____________________________________________________________

SECTION 4: REVIEW I am excited to complete the following principles: 1. _____________________________________________________________ 2. _____________________________________________________________ 3. _____________________________________________________________ 4. _____________________________________________________________

STUDENT ______________________________________________ PARENT

_____________________________________________

MENTOR ______________________________________________ 26

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CHARACTER ACTIVITY I

SECTION 3: OUTCOMES


CHARACTER ACTIVITY Your Personal Board of Directors This activity will help you to develop your Personal Board of Directors. Your board should be a group of accomplished individuals who you can turn to for inspiration, advice, and encouragement. It is recommended that you have 5-7 members with one or more of the following roles: Advisor: One who will advise Analyst: One who will provide Challenger: One who will you in the area of obtaining information related to your challenge you to be deterknowledge ie. education, ficareer, social, and emotional mined and focused in your nance, etc. needs. actions. Inluencer: Be careful of the influencer they are wild cards and they can nudge their way on the board whether it be positive or negative influences! ie. Who influences your clothing, language, etc.? Mentor: One who provides Motivator: One who you can Wise Elder: One whom you growth by sharing resources turn to for encouragement will turn to for knowledge and and networks. wisdom.

Complete the chart on the next page by identifying individuals you would like to serve on your Personal Board of Directors. Use this list to turn to when facing daily decisions and for personal inspiration. You don’t have to personally know the members on your board. The members may include persons living or deceased, old or young, male or female. Communicating with your board members is important to help you make decisions and learn from their experience.

By the establishment of your board, you are the top executive As the Chief Executive Officer, CEO you will oversee your money, time and resources (nutrition, sleep, etc). Your personal journey will be a constant balancing act between day-to-day operations and big-picture decision-making.

“Example is not the main thing in Influencing others, it is the only thing.” Dr. Albert Schweitzer

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As the CEO your primary task is to research, listen, learn, and apply what is offered. Ask yourself, “What would your board members suggest?” And start incorporating their daily habits, values, and principles into your life. Be careful of the influencer, they are wild cards and they can nudge their way on the board whether it be positive or negative influences.

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Board Member

Roles on Board

Contact Information

□ Advisor □ Career Rep □ Challenger □ Influencer □ Mentor □ Motivator □ Wise Elder □ Advisor □ Career Rep □ Challenger □ Influencer □ Mentor □ Motivator □ Wise Elder □ Advisor □ Career Rep □ Challenger □ Influencer □ Mentor □ Motivator □ Wise Elder □ Advisor □ Career Rep □ Challenger □ Influencer □ Mentor □ Motivator □ Wise Elder □ Advisor □ Career Rep □ Challenger □ Influencer □ Mentor □ Motivator □ Wise Elder □ Advisor □ Career Rep □ Challenger □ Influencer □ Mentor □ Motivator □ Wise Elder □ Advisor □ Career Rep □ Challenger □ Influencer □ Mentor □ Motivator □ Wise Elder

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Last Board Meeting

CHARACTER ACTIVITY II

Personal Board of Directors Student: Chief Executive Officer


6 PILLARS OF CHARACTER Trustworthiness Be honest • Don’t deceive, cheat, or steal • Be reliable — do what you say you’ll do • Have the courage to do the right thing • Build a good reputation • Be loyal — stand by your family, friends, and country

Respect Treat others with respect; follow the Golden Rule • Be tolerant and accepting of differences • Use good manners, not bad language • Be considerate of the feelings of others • Don’t threaten, hit or hurt anyone • Deal peacefully with anger, insults, and disagreements

Responsibility Do what you are supposed to do • Plan ahead • Persevere: keep on trying! • Always do your best • Use self-control • Be self-disciplined • Think before you act — consider the consequences • Be accountable for your words, actions, and attitudes • Set a good example for others

Fairness Play by the rules • Take turns and share • Be open-minded; listen to others • Don’t take advantage of others • Don’t blame others carelessly • Treat all people fairly

Caring Be kind • Be compassionate and show you care • Express gratitude • Forgive others • Help people in need

Citizenship Do your share to make your school and community better • Cooperate • Get involved in community affairs • Stay informed; vote • Be a good neighbor • Obey laws and rules • Respect authority • Protect the environment • Volunteer

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Pillars of Support

Personal Commitment

Support/ Resources

Trustworthiness

Respect

Responsibility

Fairness

Caring

Citizenship COMMENTS: _____________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ 30

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CHARACTER ACTIVITY III

CHARACTER COMMITMENT


Tips for Writing the “Letter of Gratitude” 1. Don’t delay: Saying thank you to someone should happen soon after the event, gift, favor or other action for which you’re thankful. Etiquette demands that you observe a three-day rule for sending a thank-you note or letter.[1] However, it’s always better to say thank you late than to never get around to it. 2. Choose a format: An emailed or typed note may be faster, but a handwritten letter is generally more appreciated. Judge the intimacy of your connection with the recipient, and choose accordingly - for instance, you might send a handwritten letter to your mother, but an emailed letter to your teacher or boss. 3. Write a salutation. Most letters start with the greeting “Dear,” but you can vary that according to the nature of the letter and the person you’re writing it to. Know the recipient’s title. Informal letters, to close friends or family members, can start with “Dear Dad” or “Dear Kyle.” However, letters to business associates or people you don’t know well should include a title in the salutation as well. 4. End the letter. Orient the end of the letter toward the future. For instance, you can say that you look forward to seeing this person again, or that you’d be pleased to repay the favor however you can. Add a closing such as “With love,” “Affectionately,” or “Yours” for close friends and family members; for business and distant contacts, use “Sincerely,” “Cordially,” or “Best wishes.” 5. Deliver the letter. This could be as simple as clicking “Send” on an email, or as complicated as delivering the letter personally. For handwritten letters, sending them through the post office is the standard. Whatever you do, make sure it gets out in a timely manner. 6. Follow Up. Make sure you confirm that your recipient received the letter. Follow-up is often as important as the initial letter in gaining continuance of contact with your VIP. 31

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The objective of this activity is to show appreciation and write a letter of gratitude to someone important in your life. This skill reinforces the skill of writing a personal letter, demonstrating the skill of caring in a thoughtful way and recognizing that valuable gifts don’t always have monetary value.

Materials: · · · ·

Paper Pen Colored or fancy paper (optional) Envelopes or pieces of ribbon (optional)

___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ 32

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CHARACTER ACTIVITY IV

LETTER OF GRATITUDE


CHARACTER REFLECTION JOURNAL Your Reflection Journal is the key to getting meaning from your Character Cornerstone experience. Your Journal should be filled with concerns, insights, doubts, fears, and critical questions about issues, people, and, most importantly, yourself. Honesty is the most important ingredient to successful journaling. NAME ________________________________ LOCATION: ____________________ DATE: ________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

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The Brotherhood Certificate of Achievement Awarded To ___________________________________ In Recognition of Your Pursuit of Excellence, Self-Improvement and Ongoing Commitment to the Character Challenge

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________________________________________________________________________ PARENT/GUARDIAN MENTOR/COACH

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THE BROTHERHOOD RESOURCES

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The resources section provides additional information that can be used for support in delivering the Mentor Excellence Network. This section also outlines the responsibilities of students, parents, mentors and facilitators. Dynamic links are connected to the Mentor Excellence Network. The resources in this section provide “how to guides” for some of the basic skills that a young man will need to know how to do. We have all had a moment or situation come up where we needed to know how to repair something specific. This section is a great teaching tool and a resource guide that you can maintain and add additional “how to” information

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Changing a Flat Tire 1. Find a safe spot to pull over. If you're on the freeway, getting off is the safest bet, even if you have to drive on a blown tire. Otherwise, pull as far onto the shoulder as possible. Don't park in the middle of a curve, where approaching cars can't see you. Also choose a flat spot; jacking up your car on a hill can be a disaster. If you have a manual transmission, leave your car in gear. Be sure to set your parking brake! 2. Turn on your hazard lights. Get the jack, wrench, and spare tire from the trunk of the car and bring them over to the tire that is flat. Use other tools or supplies if needed. 3. Use the wrench to loosen the lug nuts. You may need to remove the hubcap. Don't remove the lug nuts at this point; simply loosen them by turning the wrench to the left (counter-clockwise). If the lug nuts are really tight, try placing the wrench on the nut and standing on the wrench arm to use your full weight on it. You can also try hitting the wrench arm with a rock. 4. Use the jack to lift the vehicle off the ground. Different car models may have different places to put the jack; consult your owner's manual for specific locations. Once the jack is securely in the correct spot, jack up the car until the tire is about six inches off the ground. 5. Remove the lug nuts and pull the tire off the car. Make sure to place the lug nuts in a pile that won't get scattered, and pull the tire straight toward yourself to remove it from the wheel base. 6. Place the spare on the car. Line up the lug nut posts with the holes in the spare, and push the spare all the way onto the wheel base until it can't go any farther. Put on the lug nuts. Don't put them on tightly, just make sure they're on enough for the spare to stay on the car for a moment. 7. Lower the car back to the ground. Use the jack to bring the car back down to ground level. Remove the jack from underneath the car. 8. Make sure the lug nuts are tightened. With the car back on the ground, you can now tighten the lug nuts. Rather than tightening them one by one in order, start with one lug nut, tighten it about 50%, move to the opposite nut (across the circle) and tighten that one about the same amount. Keep tightening opposite lug nuts gradually in turn until each lug nut is as tight as it can be. Put your flat tire and tools back in your trunk. Make sure you don't leave anything on the side of the road. 37

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Change Oil and Filter

Every 3000 miles you can commune with your car when you change the oil. Warm the engine to stir up any sediment in the crankcase, then raise the car on stands or ramps. Put a pan under the drain and re-move the plug; let it drain for 10 minutes. Remove the filter, and let it drain into the pan; make sure the O-ring comes off. Use your finger to coat the new filter’s O-ring with a little oil. If the angle of the new filter allows, pref-ill it with oil and screw it on. Tighten a three-quarter turn after the gasket touches. Reinstall the drain plug with a new crush washer or seal. Add all but the last quart of oil, start the engine and check for leaks. Turn off the car, let it sit for a few minutes, then check the oil level. Top off to the fill mark. Source: www.popularmechanics.com

Maneuver a Car Out of a Skid Although there isn’t much you can do when your car is pirouetting out of control, you can maneuver out of two basic types of skids before things get messy. When the front tires slip, you’re under-steering or plowing (A). This occurs when a motorist takes a turn too fast, at too sharp an angle or uses the brake or throttle excessively. The tires lose grip and the car’s momentum pushes it straight instead of through the curve. When you lose traction up front, steering has no effect; so slow down by gently reducing throttle. The tires will eventually grip and pull you in the direction you want to go. Rear-wheel slippage is called over-steering or fishtailing (B). It happens during cornering when your rear wheels exceed the limit of their lateral traction before the front tires do, causing the rear of the vehicle to head toward the outside of the corner or front of the car. For rear-wheel slippage, you need to apply “CPR”--correction, pause and recovery. Correct by steering into the direction of the skid. Pause to let the unsprung weight of the car settle and the tires grip. Recover by steering the car straight; make your movements slow but sure. Source: www.popularmechanics.com

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Navigate With a Map and Compass Though GPS may seem ubiquitous, it doesn’t work everywhere. Mountains and dense tree cover can knock out sat signals--and batteries can die. Here’s how to roam the backcountry with a compass and map. Orient the Map by aligning its magnetic north (MN) indicator with your compass’s reading of MN. Pencil the MN Line across the map, then anchor the map in this north-facing position; instead of turning the map as you head toward your destination, pivot around it as if switching seats at a table. Draw a Line between where you are and where you want to go. Once you turn toward the destination, the line of travel should be perpendicular to your chest. Fold the Map parallel to your line of travel, leaving a 2-in. margin on the side that you hold. Place the map between thumb and index finger and begin “thumbing the map”--use your thumb to check off terrain features as you travel so you can look away from the map without losing your bearings. Source: www.popularmechanics.com

How to Patch A Radiator Hose

Steam hissing from a ruptured radiator hose? Here’s a relatively easy, temporary fix with duct tape. Wait for the engine to cool off. Open the hood and locate the source of the steam--i.e., the rupture (A). Clean and dry the area around the fissure; the tape won’t stick as well on a damp, dirty surface. Wrap 2 to 3 in. of duct tape around the hose over the hole; press firmly (B). Overwrap the patch (the hose will be under intense pressure) from 2 to 3 in. above the original piece to about 2 or 3 in. below, then work your way back (C). Check your radiator level before cranking the engine. “If it’s seriously low and you don’t have a can of coolant, use water or, in an emergency, diet soda,” says Tony Molla of the National Institute of Automotive Service Excellence and former pro wrench jockey. “Avoid using fruit juice or anything with sugar or acids in it. It’ll corrode the radiator and hoses.” Source: www.popularmechanics.com

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HOW TO TIE A FOUR IN HAND KNOTTED TIE: The Four-in-Hand is the perfect tie knot for the novice tie wearer. The knot is easy to tie, holds a good shape and will go well with most shirt collars and necktie styles. The Four in Hand is actually the oldest of all the popular tie knots that are still in common use today. The Four in Hand knot was invented by British horsemen during the end of the 19th century who tied their scarves with one hand while holding the reigns of the four horses drawing the carriage in the other – hence the name four in hand. The Four in Hand is slightly smaller in size, is somewhat asymmetrical, and has a longish shape. IT is best suited for traditional striped ties, such as British regimental ties, and formal solid color ties The Four in Hand looks best when combined with dress shirts that have a narrow to medium collar spread or have button down collars.

1. Flip up your collar, button down the top button, and lay the necktie around your neck so that the wide end of the tie hangs 5-6 inches lower than the narrow end. Make sure that the inseam of the tie faces you body. Place the wide end of the necktie over the narrow end, and wrap around. Hold the narrow end down with your other hand. Then, wrap the wide end over the narrow end. Don’t pull it tight, but create a loop at front of the unfinished tie knot. 2. Then, loop the wide end of the tie through the gap between unfinished tie knot and your collar. Then take this wide end of the tie and pull it through the loop you created on step #3. 3. Give the Four-in-Hand knot some final adjustment, pull it tight, center it between the collars, and flip the collar back down. You are done! 40

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MARION COUNTY MEN RESOURCES

HOW TO SET A TABLE (FORMAL & INFORMAL)

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MARION COUNTY MEN RESOURCES 42

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Lightning Storm

Ninety-eight percent of lightning fatalities occur outside, so “when thunder roars, get indoors,” says lightning safety expert John Jensenius of the National Weather Service. Once inside, stay away from sinks, TVs, computers— anything connected to the wiring or plumbing. Don’t touch doors or windows and avoid corded phones. (Mobiles are okay.) If you’re stuck outdoors, try to get into a hardtop vehicle; the metal framework will conduct lightning around you. Failing that, stay away from tall, isolated trees, which tend to draw bolts. www.popularmechanics.com

Tornado

Set aside your basement—or another low area away from exterior walls and windows—as a storm shelter. Flying debris is the primary killer, so wear a bicycle or batting helmet and cover yourself with a mattress or couch cushions. “Most people killed by tornados are either in a mobile home or a vehicle,” says Rick Smith of the National Weather Service. If you’re in one, get out. If you can’t find sturdy shelter, as a last resort, lie face-down in a low area—avoid overpasses, which could collapse—and cover your head. www.popularmechanics.com

Flood

If rising waters approach your home, get your family together, grab whatever flotation devices you can find and wade to higher ground fast. Don’t try to drive out of trouble—according to Marshall Frech, director of the Flood Safety Project, 60 percent of flood deaths involve vehicles. “It takes only 12 to 18 in. of flowing water to wash away almost any kind of vehicle.” www.popularmechanics.com

Cold

Generate body heat by eating high-fat or high-carb food and by performing isometric exercises—pushing one set of muscles against another. Isometrics cause minimal sweating and can be performed inside a snow cave or a small debris shelter. Avoid aerobic exercise. www.popularmechanics.com

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To find dry fuel, look for standing deadwood and broken branches stuck in tree limbs, says Tom Laskowski, director of Midwest Native Skills Institute. Place the material next to your cheek; if it feels cool, it’s too wet to burn efficiently. To fuel a 1-hour fire, gather two large fistfuls of tinder-such as cattail down and crushed pine needles--and about 30 twigs, 20 pencil-size sticks and 10 wrist-thick pieces. Form a tepee with three 6-in.-tall sticks and place smaller sticks on the floor as a platform for the tinder. Lean the smallest sticks on the tepee, leaving a doorway to face the wind. Place the next size of sticks on top; repeat twice. Pack the tepee with the tinder and light it. Slowly add the 10 largest sticks in a star pattern. TIP: If it’s raining, Laskowski uses a cotton ball smeared with Vaseline (or ChapStick) as a foolproof fire starter. Source: www.popularmechanics.com

How to Put Out a Fire

According to the National Fire Incident Reporting System, 94 percent of the time a fire extinguisher is employed, a blaze is snuffed out within 2 minutes. A simple acronym— PASS—helps firefighters remember how to use an extinguisher properly. Stand back from the flames—about 8 ft. if possible—near an exit, and pull the pin in the handle. Keeping the extinguisher upright, aim the nozzle at the base of the fire (hitting the flames directly does nothing to put out the blaze). Squeeze the lever to discharge pressurized dry chemical and sweep from side to side until the fire is out. “One of the worst things you can do if a grease fire starts, is to try to move the skillet to the sink. You’ll splash flaming grease everywhere and run a high risk of burning yourself—not to mention spreading the fire.” Source:www.popularmechanics.com 44

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MARION COUNTY MEN RESOURCES

Build a Campfire


sh or traveler’s checks and change

portant family documents such as copies of insurance policies, entification and bank account records in a waterproof, portable container

et food and extra water for your pet

fant formula and diapers

rescription medications and glasses

Additional Items to Consider Adding to an Emergency Supply Kit:

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oks, games, puzzles or other activities for children

per and pencil

ess kits, paper cups, plates and plastic utensils, paper towels

minine supplies and personal hygiene items

atches in a waterproof container

re Extinguisher

usehold chlorine bleach and medicine dropper – When   diluted   nine   parts   water    one  part  bleach,  bleach  can  be  used  as  a  disinfectant.  Or  in  an  emergency,  you  can  use  it  to   eat   water   by   using   16   drops   of   regular   household   liquid   bleach   per   gallon   of   water.   Do   not   se  scented,  color  safe  or   bleaches  with  added  cleaners.  

omplete change of clothing including a long sleeved shirt, long ants and sturdy shoes. Consider additional clothing if you live in a old-weather climate.

leeping bag or warm blanket for each person. Consider additional bedding you live in a cold-weather climate.

mergency reference material such as a first aid book or information om www.ready.gov

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www.ready.gov

          Emergency Supply List        


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Battery-powered or hand crank radio and a NOAA Weather Radio with tone alert and extra batteries for both

Food, at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food

Federal Emergency Management Agency Washington, DC 20472

All Americans should have some basic supplies on hand in order to survive for at least three days if an emergency occurs. Following is a listing of some basic items that every emergency supply kit should include. However, it is important that individuals review this list and consider where they live and the unique needs of their family in order to create an emergency supply kit that will meet these needs. Individuals should also consider having at least two emergency supply kits, one full kit at home and smaller portable kits in their workplace, vehicle or other places they spend time.

Through its Ready Campaign,

the Federal Emergency Management Agency educates and empowers Americans to take some simple steps to prepare for and respond to potential emergencies, including natural disasters and terrorist attacks. Ready asks individuals to do three key things: get an emergency supply kit, make a family emergency plan, and be informed about the different types of emergencies that could occur and their appropriate responses.

MARION COUNTY MEN RESOURCES

q Moist towelettes, garbage bags and plastic ties for personal sanitation q Wrench or pliers to turn off utilities q Can opener for food (if kit contains canned food) q Local maps

Dust mask, to help filter contaminated air and plastic sheeting and duct tape to shelter-in-place

q Flashlight and extra batteries q First aid kit q Whistle to signal for help

q

Water, one gallon of water per person per day for at least three days, for drinking and sanitation

Recommended Items to Include in a Basic Emergency Supply Kit:


The Brotherhood Glossary of Terms The glossary is a tool to enable you to learn the meaning of unfamiliar words used throughout this book. You can create your own personal library of words and definitions. This is a great way develop your vocabulary while learning.

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Advisor. An advisor is normally a person with more and deeper knowledge in a specific area and usually also includes persons with cross-functional and multidisciplinary expertise. An advisor's role is that of a mentor or guide and differs categorically from that of a task specific consultant. An advisor is typically part of the leadership, where as consultants fulfill functional roles.

CEO. A chief executive officer (CEO) is the highest-ranking corporate officer (executive) or administrator in charge of total management of an organization. An individual appointed as a CEO of a corporation, company, organization, or agency typically reports to the board of directors. Character Education. Character education is an umbrella term loosely used to describe the teaching of children in a manner that will help them develop variously as moral, civic, good, mannered, behaved, non-bullying, healthy, critical, successful, traditional, compliant and/ or socially acceptable beings. Concepts that now and in the past have fallen under this term include social and emotional learning, moral reasoning/cognitive development, life skills education, health education, violence prevention, critical thinking, ethical reasoning, and conflict resolution and mediation Citizenship. Citizenship denotes the link between a person and a state or an association of states. It is normally synonymous with the term nationality although the latter term may also refer to ethnic connotations. Possession of citizenship is normally associated with the right to work and live in a country and to participate in political life. A person who does not have citizenship in any state is said to be stateless. Cornerstone. The cornerstone (or foundation stone) concept is derived from the first stone set in the construction of a masonry foundation, important since all other stones will be set in reference to this stone, thus determining the position of the entire structure.

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GLOSSARY

Analyst. An individual who examines the needs and concerns of clients and stakeholders to determine where potential problems and opportunities lie.


Etiquette. Etiquette is a code of behavior that delineates expectations for social behavior according to contemporary conventional norms within a society, social class, or group.

Excellence. Excellence is a talent or quality which is unusually good and so surpasses ordinary standards. It is also used as a standard of performance as measured e.g. through economic indicators. Gratitude. Thankfulness, gratefulness, or appreciation is a feeling or attitude in acknowledgment of a benefit that one has received or will receive. Influencer. Influencing occurs when others affect one’s emotions, opinions, or behaviors. Mentor. An experienced and trusted adviser: an experienced person in a company, college, or school who trains and counsels new employees or students. Poignant. Evoking a keen sense of sadness or regret: a poignant reminder of the passing of time; sharp or pungent in taste or smell. Quantifiable. ( quantifies, quantifying, quantified ) 1 express or measure the quantity of: it's very hard to quantify the cost. Respect. 1 a feeling of deep admiration for someone or something elicited by their abilities, qualities, or achievements; the state of being admired in such a way; due regard for the feelings, wishes, rights, or traditions of others: respect for human rights. Responsibility. The state or fact of having a duty to deal with something or of having control over someone: women bear children and take responsibility for child care; the state or fact of being accountable or to blame for something; a thing that one is required to do as part of a job, role, or legal obligation

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Revelations. 1 a surprising and previously unknown fact, esp. one that is made known in a dramatic way; the making known of something that was previously secret or unknown; used to emphasize the surprising or remarkable quality of someone or something:

Service Learning. Service learning is a method of teaching that combines classroom instruction with meaningful community service. This form of learning emphasizes critical thinking and personal reflection while encouraging a heightened sense of community, civic engagement, and personal responsibility. Teambuilding. Team building is a philosophy of job design in which employees are viewed as members of interdependent teams instead of as individual workers.[1] Team building (which is correctly spelled with two words)[citation needed] refers to a wide range of activities, presented to businesses, schools, sports teams, religious or nonprofit organizations designed for improving team performance. Trustworthiness Trustworthiness. Trustworthiness is a moral value considered to be a virtue. A trustworthy person is someone in whom you can place your trust and rest assured that the trust shall not be betrayed. A person can prove their trustworthiness by fulfilling an assigned responsibility - and as an extension of that, not to let down expectations. A trustworthy person is someone that you can tell your worries and secrets to and know they won’t repeat them without your permission.

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GLOSSARY

Self-inventory. A person’s particular nature or personality; the qualities that make a person individual or unique; one’s own interests or pleasure:


MEN Reference List 2007: Engagement, achievement, and transition. Louisville, KY: University of Louisville. Afterschool Alliance: Afterschool for All. (2009). Afterschool programs: Making a difference in America’s communities by improving academic achievement, Keeping kids safe and helping Bakia, M., Shear, L., Toyama, Y., and Lassseter, A. (2012). Understanding the Implications of Online Learning for Educational Productivity (PDF). Barron, B., & Darling-Hammond, L. (2008). Teaching for meaningful learning: A review of research on inquiry-based and cooperative learning (PDF). Powerful Learning: What We Know About Teaching for Understanding. Berkowitz, M.W. & Bier, M. (2005). What works in character education: A research-driven guide for practitioners. Washington DC: Character Education Partnership. Bottoms, G., Young, M., & Han, L. (2009). Ready for tomorrow: Six proven ideas to graduate. Cheung, A., and Slavin, R.E. (2012). The Effectiveness of Educational Technology Applications for Enhancing Reading Achievement in K-12 Classrooms: A Meta-Analysis. Collard, M. (2005). No props: Great games with no equipment. Beverly, MA: Project Adventure. DeRoche, Edward F., and Mary M. Williams.Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press, Inc. 1998 Edited by Edward T. James. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons. 1964 Educating Hearts and Minds: A Comprehensive Character Education Framework.

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MEN Reference List

Hernandez-Ramos, P., & De La Paz, S. (2009). Learning history in middle school by designing multimedia in a project-based learning experience (Abstract). Lickona, T. (2004). Character matters: How to help our children develop good judgment, integrity, and other essential virtues. New York: Simon and Schuster. Lickona, T., & Davidson, M. (2005). Smart and good high schools. Washington DC: Character Education Partnership. Liu, M., Hsieh, P., Cho, Y. J., & Schallert, D. L. (2006). Middle school students’ self-efficacy, attitudes, and achievement in a problembased learning environment (PDF). Journal of Interactive Learning Research. 17(3). 225-242 National Research Center for Career and Technical Education. (2008). Major research findings 2000Peterson, Christopher, and Martin E. P. Seligman. 2004. Character strengths and virtues: A handbook and classification. New York: Oxford Univ. Press prepare more students for college and 21st century careers. Atlanta, GA: Southern Retrieved Rohnke, K. & Butler, S. (1995). Quicksilver: Adventure games, initiative problems, trust activities, and a guide to effective leadership. Dubuque, IO: Kendall-Hunt. The American Plutarch: 18 Lives Selected from the Dictionary of American Biography. working families.

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REFERENCES

Fleischer, H. (2012). What Is Our Current Understanding of One-toOne Computer Projects: A Systematic Narrative Research Review [Abstract].


Internet Resources Association for Career and Technical Education https://www.acteonline.org/‎ A national education association dedicated to the advancement of education that prepares youth and adults for careers. Its mission is to provide educational.

Character Counts www.charactercounts.org

Character Development Group www.charactereducation.com

The Giraffe Project www.giraffe.org

High Schools That Work - Southern Regional Education Board www.sreb.org/hstw‎

National Dropout Prevention Center/Network | www.dropoutprevention.org/‎ The mission of the National Dropout Prevention Center/Network is to increase high school graduation rates through research and evidence-based solutions.

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Internet Resources President Obama Speaks on Technology in Schools | The White ... www.whitehouse.gov/.../president-obama-speaks-technologyschools‎ Jun 6, 2013 - Remarks by the President at Mooresville Middle School -- Mooresville, NC. Mooresville, North Carolina. 3:03 P.M. EDT. THE

Project Adventure www.pa.org/‎ Offers adventure education for corporate, educational and other groups. Information about workshops, consulting and memberships are included

Career Clusters www.k12.wa.us/careerteched/Clusters/‎ The 16 clusters were established at the national level by the States’ Career Clusters Initiative and are recognizable across the United States in middle schools,...

Technology in Schools - Chapter 7: Technology Integration ... nces.ed.gov/pubs2003/tech_schools/chapter7.asp‎ Chapter 7: Technology Integration, Technology in Schools: Suggestions, Tools, and Guidelines for Assessing Technology in Elementary and Secondary .

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REFERENCES

PRESIDENT:


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MA K RI R O

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The Mentor Excellence Network is an interactive curriculum and community based network. MEN provides resource and on-site professional development to help you establish and implement your mentoring program with fidelity.

Copyright Š 2013 by M Marketing Group All rights reserved. No part of the material protected by this copyright notice may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without the written permission of the copyright owner. Publisher - Multimedia Marketing Group

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