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U NIVERSITY OF S T. T HOMAS HOUSTON TEXAS | WINTER 2010

A Shining Star Among the Brightest Stars in Houston

UST SALUTES

B.C. ROBISON, BA, Biology ’69 Chair, University of St. Thomas Science Advisory Council B.C. Robison’s varied careers in veterinary medicine, environmental consulting and journalism all developed from the same origin – a liberal arts education at the University of St. Thomas. Experts agree that today’s graduates will change careers five to seven times in their lifetime. Robison exemplifies how a liberal arts education gives graduates the framework and flexibility to explore different career options and prepares students for a lifetime of learning. “St. Thomas played a very pivotal role in my life; my UST education gave me an ethical foundation for all of my academic and professional pursuits later in life,” Robison said. “To this day, I still read Thomas Aquinas. People with a liberal arts education have a much broader context of literature, culture and history. Exposure to philosophy and theology, history and the classics adds such an extra dimension of education not found in many educational settings.” After graduating from UST, Robison earned degrees in veterinary science and medicine at Texas A&M. He practiced veterinary medicine for 10 years, returning to school for a master’s degree and doctorate in biology from Rice University and a postdoctoral fellowship in physiology and cell biology at the University of Texas Medical School in Houston. He currently serves as a principal consultant for ENVIRON International Corp. and has more than 20 years of experience in environmental site assessment, risk-based remediation and human health and ecological risk assessment.

Local nature enthusiasts and readers of the former Houston Post may recognize his name from his longrunning science and nature column, “Texas Naturalist,” or his book, Birds of Houston. Robison brings all of this science expertise back to the University of St. Thomas to chair the new Science Advisory Council, which will lead fundraising to establish an academic complex to consolidate at one site all science programs and the planned School of Nursing. “It’s an extremely smart decision for the University to pursue its science and nursing goals. The science center builds upon that tradition of a very high percentage of students going to medical school and graduate school in sciences, and coalesces the many strengths that UST has in the science and environmental science curricula,” Robison remarked. Robison is equally supportive of nursing initiatives at St. Thomas. “Nursing is the future of the medical profession in the country,” he said. “With the shortage of nursing schools and nursing faculty, I think St. Thomas is being very forward-looking by addressing the nursing opportunities in the next 25-30 years.” What St. Thomas has meant to B.C.

I have such fond memories of the UST students and faculty. I just remember what a great environment it was here to study and learn. The classes were small; the teachers were excellent. The student body was very high caliber. It has been great to see St. Thomas grow and really enhance its diversity and educational opportunities,” he said. – Elise Marrion

UNIVERSITY OF S T. T H O M A S

IN THIS ISSUE

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Mendenhall Summer Institute Reaches 100th Student The University of St. Thomas Mendenhall Summer Institute continues to bridge the gap between high school and college for incoming freshmen.

The University of St. Thomas is a shining star among the brightest stars in Houston. See page 9.

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Alumni Give Back and Help Others Reach Their Goals The Helen Guthrie FitzSimmons and John Cleary FitzSimmons Endowed Scholarship fulfills their wish to give back to the University of St. Thomas and will continue to help future students achieve their goals beyond graduation.

EDITORS

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Alumni Succeed in Performing Arts Guitarist Michael Whitebread, BBA ’03, BA ’06, plays on International Music Tour, and Faith Avilene “Avi” DePano ’10 attends The Shepherd School of Music at Rice University on a full scholarship.

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A Shining Star Among the Brightest Stars in Houston

HOUSTON TEXAS | WINTER 2010

ON THE COVER

Marionette Mitchell Director of Publications Sandra Soliz, MLA ’01 Director of Communications and Marketing CONTRIBUTORS Emilie Bierschenk Brenda Benkenstein Cooper ’05 Ryane Jackson Lana C. Maciel ’04 Elise Marrion Ronnie Piper Richard Vara Chris Zeglin

The University’s master plan offers a capital vision that establishes St. Thomas as an integral partner in the future prosperity of Houston and beyond.

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Herzstein Lecturer Speaks on Jewish Scholars and Scholarship In a Q&A with the 2010 Herzstein Lecturer, Rabbi Jacob Neusner, the professor of history and Jewish theology at Bard College describes his concerns as well as the changes that have taken place since he first entered the classroom in 1960.

DEPARTMENTS The University of St. Thomas Magazine is published four times annually for alumni and friends of the University. UST is a member of the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). The University of St. Thomas is committed to providing equal educational opportunities without regard to race, color, religion, sex, age, national or ethnic origin, disability or veteran status.

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On the Mall

UST President Recognized as Military Hero • Joint Admissions Medical Program • Nursing Progressive Dinner • American Chemical Society Chapter • Scholarship TeeUp Tournament • Mardi Gras 2011 • Cardinal-designate Donald W. Wuerl • Ethical Leadership Award Luncheon • Major Giving Society Dinner • Seekers and Sages 19

Faculty and Staff

UST honors Dr. Anna DeWald • Dr. Charlene Dykman Lectures in Malawi Copyright 2010 by the University of St. Thomas H. Ken DeDominicis, publisher VP for Institutional Advancement 3800 Montrose Boulevard Houston, TX 77006-4626 Phone: 713-525-3100 ken@stthom.edu www.stthom.edu

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Alumni Chronicles

Then & Now: Alumnae Patricia Teahan Thorpe and Margaret Goetz James • Spotlight: David G. Acosta ’88 and Lauri Vallone ’93 • Tom Colyandro, MA ’00, MDiv ’06, authors The Judas Syndrome • High Five Drive Inspires Alumni Involvement • Upcoming Alumni Events 24

Classnotes

Stay in touch with fellow alumni, and join the Celtic Connection Online Community 25

In Memoriam

UST remembers family and friends

ON THE MALL

UST President Recognized as Military Hero

Right: Dr. Robert Ivany and Houston Texans owner Bob McNair.

University of St. Thomas President Dr. Robert Ivany was back in uniform on Oct. 17 as the Houston Texans recognized him as a past military hero during the football organization’s gameday salute to the military. UST actively supports those who have served our country. Ivany was a major general in the U.S. Army prior to his retirement in 2003 and is committed to assisting men and women who have dedicated their lives to service, a sentiment strongly shared by Texans owner Bob McNair. McNair gave the UST commencement speech in 2001. Since UST created an Office of Veteran Services in 2009, the student-veteran community at UST has grown from fewer than 20 veterans to nearly 100. Phillip Butcher, director of veteran services, has accepted the responsibility on behalf of the University to enhance the St. Thomas studentveteran experience and increase the student enrollment of veterans and their family members. Butcher spent 4 ½ years as an aircrew member in the U.S. Air Force flying combat missions in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Afghanistan and Iraq.

Program Supports Texas PreMed Students

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The Joint Admissions Medical Program (JAMP) provides unique opportunities to UST students bound for a career in medicine. This year alumna Isioma Agboli ’09 became the second successful JAMP participant by starting medical school at The University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston. Created in 2001 by Senate Bill 940 of the 77th Texas Legislature, the program is a unique partnership between Texas students, undergraduate institutions, and medical schools that make medical school affordable for Texans. JAMP provides services to support and encourage highly qualified, economically disadvantaged Texas residents

pursuing a medical education. The law required the eight Texas medical schools to set aside 10 percent of their entering class for JAMP participants. Initially, participation extended only to public schools. Through the efforts of Dr. Carol L. McDonald, then president of the Independent Colleges and Universities of Texas, the 34 private schools in Texas were minimally included. However, the 80th Legislature expanded full participation to private schools. In 2002, UST President Fr. J. Michael Miller, CSB, asked biology professor Dr. E. Larry Nordyke to serve as JAMP faculty director for UST. In 2004, Liliana Nanez became the first JAMP participant from St. Thomas. The 2006 alumna enrolled in The University of Texas Southwestern Medical School at Dallas. In May 2010, Nanez was one of 23 JAMP participants in the first group of medical school graduates. “Current UST JAMP participants Truc Thi Le and Carlos Vences are applying to medical school,” Nordyke stated. “In 2009, sophomores Huda Khan, Steven Konstantin, and Faiza Zafar were accepted as JAMP participants, and six students have applied for the program this fall.”

UST Celebrates Support for Future Nursing School Supporters of the efforts to reopen the University of St. Thomas School of Nursing kept their eyes on the horizon at the “View from Above” Progressive Dinner held at 2727 Kirby High Rise in September. The stunning views of the city were courtesy of high-rise residents and hosts Margo Geddie, Judy and Darby Seré and Trini Mendenhall Sosa and Frank Sosa. The event culminated with dinner in the seventh floor Sunset Room. This underwriters’ event celebrated the support

Above: John Eddie and Sheridan Williams, who chairs the Founders Nursing Benefit; and Beth and Dr. Cristo Papasakelariou, co-chairs of the Nursing Advisory Council.

ON THE MALL

given to the University’s Founders Nursing Benefit at Tony’s Restaurant on Nov. 18. Sheridan Williams is chairing the benefit that honors the John S. Dunn Research Foundation. The University is raising $2 million for the Archbishop Joseph Fiorenza Endowed Chair in Nursing. Archbishop Fiorenza’s deep admiration and respect for the nursing profession began when he served as chaplain for St. Joseph Hospital. Among the 75 guests entertained by the UST Pop Singers were Beth and Dr. Cristo Papasakelariou, Dr. John Marcellus, Archbishop Joseph Fiorenza, Odis Peavy and Kathy Peavy Bailey, Charlotte and Dr. Stratton Hill, Margaret Alkek Williams, Raye White, Shirley and Jim Dannenbaum, Franco Valobra, David Lopez and Harris County Judge Ed Emmett.

American Chemical Society Chapter Honored The UST American Chemical Society (ACS) Chapter has been an active part of the Houston community and will soon be nationally recognized for its efforts. Based on the members’ exemplary community service, fundraising, career events, and regional and national meeting experiences, the National ACS has awarded them an “Outstanding” status, the highest ranking within the society. Fewer than 4 percent of the 980 chapters in the United States and Puerto Rico have received this ranking. The chapter will be listed in an upcoming issue of Chemical and Engineering News, the society’s official news magazine, as well as featured in the February/March 2011 edition of In Chemistry magazine, the ACS student magazine. The chapter has received an award every year since 2000 and has achieved the highest ranking award four out of the last five years. The chapter will present a poster and will be honored at the 241st National Meeting and Exposition in March 2011. Chapter members volunteer at events such as the National Chemistry Week and Earth Day festivities at the Children’s Museum and at the Education Rainbow Challenge Event. In addition, they have been active at the UST Science and Mathematics Summer Institute for incoming freshmen.

Left: Ed Jones of Mabee Foundation and Dr. Robert Ivany.

Golfers Raise $215,000 for Scholarships The UST Scholarship Tee-Up Tournament on Sept. 22 saw increased participation from Houston area UST alumni and friends. The event, held at Kingwood Country Club, grossed more than $215,000 for the Fr. Francis E. Monaghan Scholarship Fund. Joe Cleary, executive vice president of Harvey Builders, was the tournament chair. Presenting Sponsor was the Mabee Foundation, and underwriters were Marathon Oil Corporation, Harvey Builders, Sterling Bank, Universal Weather & Aviation, Mossy Nissan, Brookfield Properties and Bank of America.

Jazz it up UNIVERSITY OF ST. THOMAS MARDI GRAS 2011

Jazz It Up at the University’s 61st Mardi Gras Gala on March 8, 2011, at the InterContinental Hotel. Gala chairs Kathy and Ken Wells will take you on the ultimate New Orleans experience. Mardi Gras 2011 honors the Sisters of Charity of the Incarnate Word. Proceeds benefit the Fr. Francis E. Monaghan Scholarship Fund. For ticket and sponsorship information, contact Laura Dozier at 713-525-3118. 3

ON THE MALL

Cardinal Designate Wuerl Speaks at St. Thomas

View a video of Cardinal-designate Donald W. Wuerl’s lecture at stthom.edu/ cardinaldesignatewuerl.

On the same day he was named to the College of Cardinals, Cardinal-designate Donald W. Wuerl, Archbishop of Washington, D.C., spoke on UST’s campus on “Religious Faith’s Role in Building a Good and Just Society.” The event, on Oct. 20, marked the inaugural lecture for the UST Center for Faith and Culture’s Master of Arts in Faith and Culture Program. Cardinal-designate Wuerl is known for his catechetical and teaching ministry and for his efforts on behalf of Catholic education.

David Weekley Honored at 2010 Ethical Leadership Award Luncheon VIEW THE TRIBUTE TO DAVID WEEKLEY

Snap a photo of this tag with your smartphone to view the video, or go to stthom.edu/davidweekley.

On Oct. 26, David Weekley, chairman of David Weekley Homes, was honored at a luncheon as the 2010 recipient of the Ethical Leadership in Action Award for his selfless leadership, moral business acumen and unwavering level of social responsibility. Every two years the University of St. Thomas Center for Business Ethics at Cameron School of Business and the Greater Houston Partnership name an Ethical Leadership in Action Award recipient.

Alumni and Friends honored at Major Giving Society Dinner UST President Dr. Robert Ivany and first lady Marianne Ivany hosted the Major Giving Society Dinner and Induction Ceremony in October at the Omni Hotel. The annual event recognizes donors who have made significant contributions to the University. Below: UST Board Chair Michele Malloy, who served as moderator for the event, and UST benefactor Evelyn Griffin with UST Vice President for Institutional Advancement H. Ken DeDominicis.

Left: Bruce Wilkinson, Retired Chairman and CEO McDermott International Inc., and David Weekley, recipient of the 2010 Ethical Leadership in Action Award.

University of St. Thomas Seekers and Sages Tour San Jacinto Monument 2010 Seekers & Sages events included a trip in June to the San Jacinto Monument and lunch at the Monument Inn. Among those in attendance were (l to r) Rudy McClellan, Father James Keon, Vince D’Amico, Pat Hogan, Fred Korge, Father George Hosko, Mary Ann Fontana, Sal Fontana, Phil McGonigle, Margo Cooper, Teana Sechelski, Larry Miggins, Betty Kaffenberger, Patty Winkler, Kathleen Miggins, Doris Riette, Joan Hopkins, Mary White and Mary Elizabeth Donovan. Future Seekers and Sages activities include Luncheon & Lecture on Jan. 19, and the annual day trip on March 30. For more information, contact Lauren Summerville at 713-942-5082.

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Mendenhall Summer Institute Reaches 100th Student Looking around a packed room of confident, prepared UST freshmen, Trini Mendenhall Sosa does the math, and a glowing smile lights up her face. “We did it! If you add up the student cohorts from all three years, we hit the milestone,” Mendenhall Sosa said. “We helped 102 students, and we will keep going.” Over the last three years, the University of St. Thomas Mendenhall Summer Institute has bridged the gap between high school and college for incoming freshmen. The program began with 25 students in 2008, 44 in 2009 and 33 in 2010. The Summer Institute and The Mendenhall Achievement Center were established as the result of a generous gift to the University from Trini Mendenhall Sosa, former owner of Fiesta Mart, Inc. and a former board member at UST. The students had the opportunity to meet and express their gratitude to Mendenhall Sosa at a luncheon on Aug. 10. Mendenhall Sosa thanked the students for choosing to attend UST, saying the opportunity to see her gift in action is an event she looks forward to every year. The five-week program prepares students admitted to UST for the rigors of collegelevel studies while they earn six credit hours in mathematics and English. Students who

Above: Trini Mendenhall Sosa celebrates with the University of St. Thomas Mendenhall Summer Institute Class of 2010 at a luncheon in August.

successfully complete the program are eligible for Mendenhall grants based on academic performance and financial need. This year 12 students were awarded grants of $2,000 per year for four years. Also this year, the program introduced an orientation for the students’ families in English and Spanish. Students also benefited from additional mathematics and writing tutors as well as five student mentors who completed the Institute last year. Thinh Nguyen graduated from the DeBakey High School for Health Professions. She chose UST because she had

always gone to public schools and wanted to pursue a private, Catholic college education. “The classes in the Mendenhall Summer Institute are really insightful,” Nguyen said. “I really enjoyed getting hands-on experience getting ready for college.” Rebecca Fernandez, who graduated from Bishop Dunne Catholic High School in Dallas, had the honor of sitting at the table with Mendenhall Sosa during the luncheon. “The most important thing I learned was that UST is willing to help you and provide whatever you need to be successful academically,

spiritually and emotionally,” Fernandez said. Matthew Weatherford, who graduated from Sacred Heart Apostolic School in Indiana, said he chose UST because he wanted attend a Catholic university with a very strong liberal arts tradition. He said he feels much more prepared for the challenges of college life now that he has completed the Mendenhall Summer Institute. “The Mendenhall experience taught me to set realistic goals, to plan ahead, to schedule my time, to understand what is expected of me and to be responsible,” Weatherford said.

– Elise Marrion 5

Alumni Give Back to St. Thomas and Help Others Reach Their Goals The Helen Guthrie FitzSimmons and John Cleary FitzSimmons Endowed Scholarship fulfills their wishes to give back to the University of St. Thomas and will continue to help future students achieve their goals beyond graduation, reflecting what John and Helen stood for during their lives.

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Early in the fall semester of 1963, John FitzSimmons stopped in at the student center in Welder Hall to grab a cup of coffee before his economics class. Little did he know his life would forever change that morning. While talking with a classmate, Judy Arnold, he heard a distinct, melodious laughter from across the room that caught his attention. It was from Helen Guthrie, who happened to be a friend of Arnold’s. “Do you want to meet her?” she asked. Before even seeing Guthrie, FitzSimmons immediately said yes, then turned and saw what he would always describe as “a beautiful girl with glorious red hair.” The two were married two years later and spent 38 happy years together, sharing a lifetime of friendship, laughter and good works, said Andy Henderson, sister of the late John FitzSimmons. John and Helen’s lives were so closely bound that John passed away exactly six years to the day after his wife, on Feb. 9, 2010. John had a passion for the arts, while Helen was a teacher. Together, they opened the Fitz-Clary Art Gallery in 1971 (it closed in 1973), and a few years later, John served as director of the DuBose Gallery, one of Houston’s premier art galleries. Helen devoted her life to the needs of developmentally disabled adults, and in 1980, she and John founded Develo-Cepts, a company that specialized in providing training in independent living skills to developmentally disabled men and women with mental retardation who resided in two group homes located in Houston’s Montrose area. Helen became a leader in the field and a

respected spokeswoman on both the state and national levels. John and Helen’s legacy continues to live on through some of the students at the University of St. Thomas, the place where their lives together began. Upon his passing, FitzSimmons left a portion of his estate to the University, given in the form of the Helen Guthrie FitzSimmons and John Cleary FitzSimmons Endowed Scholarship. The scholarship, lasting in perpetuity, will help first-generation college students who seek the disciplined, Catholic education that influenced John and Helen’s lives at UST. Gifts such as this

“Many people don’t realize how easy it is to complete a gift,” Thornton said. “Some of our donors leave 5 or 10 percent of their retirement plan or life insurance policy, and only need to specify it on a beneficiary form.” Planned gifts provide the University with an opportunity to build its endowment and increase the support for scholarships to students, as well as for important programs and campus improvements. In addition, they often fulfill the wishes of those who want to give back to the University, which is a special place to them. “When our alumni and friends leave a gift to us, they have contemplated how much the University has meant to them, and are fulfilling their desire to leave a lasting legacy,” Thornton said. “Planned John FitzSimmons ’66 and Helen can be arranged through the Guthrie ’65 met in 1963 at the student gifts are often the dreams of a family to make their University’s Office of Planned center in Welder Hall. The two were mark on the world. Giving, which helps donors married two years later and spent 38 Individuals usually support meet their personal financial happy years together, sharing a lifetime organizations that are most goals while making a significant contribution of friendship, laughter and good works. in line with their values, and those who give to to the institution. UST believe in the importance of education or Planned gifts are usually deferred gifts that are many of the other ideals within our mission.” arranged now and fulfilled later, as in the case of Henderson said she believes leaving a gift in the John FitzSimmons. According to Henderson, form of a scholarship is a truly selfless act, one that FitzSimmons wanted nothing more than to best exemplifies the character of her late brother give back to the university that so profoundly and sister-in-law. impacted his life. “John and Helen loved being able to help those “When he was sorting through the details of who could not help themselves,” Henderson said. how to proceed with his affairs once he was no “Everything they did, they did with their whole longer with us, the question arose, ‘What do you heart. This scholarship is just what they would have think of establishing a scholarship in your name to wanted—to help someone who is in a situation the University?’” Henderson recalls. “John and where they can’t afford to go to college, but they Helen had no children, so there was no person want to learn and get a solid education.” dependent on what they built as a couple. When “What started there at the University won’t the idea of a scholarship came about, he had such end there,” she said. “It will continue all over peace in his mind and he absolutely shined. His the world. That’s what’s so precious and sweet immediate thought was, ‘That’s it!’” about this gift. It’s the perfect fit for the kind of In addition to giving through wills, donors may generosity John and Helen exhibited during their also give to the University through other bequests lives. Their legacy will touch so many people such as charitable gift annuities. And the process of through this scholarship.” planned giving is all very simple, said Diane – Lana C. Maciel ’04 Thornton, director of Planned Giving at UST.

For more information about UST Planned Giving, contact Diane Thornton, UST Director of Planned Giving, at 713-942-5080.

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Alumni Succeed in Performing Arts Michael Whitebread Plays on International Music Tour Guitarist Michael Whitebread recently returned from his second international tour with country singer Kareem Salama, sponsored by the U.S. State Department. They traveled to seven different countries in the Middle East, playing for workshops in refugee camps during the day and concerts at night. Whitebread, who earned a BBA in marketing in 2003 and a BA in music theory and composition in 2006, taught Kareem Salama guitar lessons a few years ago, and they became friends, he said. “In 2008, we went to Berlin and London and played some events there.” The Kareem Salama Tour was designed to bring rising American musical talent, representative of America’s diversity of faith and heritage, to audiences in the Middle East to serve as a bridge between their culture and that of America, the U.S. State Department website explained. “Kareem is an American-Egyptian Muslim,” Whitebread said. “We traveled around, and he would sing country songs in English and in Arabic.” On this tour, Whitebread was one of Salama’s backup guitarists. Whitebread has future plans for more international tours. A trip to Lebanon in the coming months is in the works. In addition to his recent tours, Whitebread has also made a name for himself in the Houston music community. The Burdener, an album produced by Whitebread for his friend and fellow UST alumnus Craig Kinsey, was named by the Houston Chronicle one of the “Best 12 Texas Albums This Year.” He also teaches guitar at the Christ United Methodist Fine Arts Academy in Sugar Land and plays with various groups around the city. Whitebread is returning to UST once again this semester as a guitar teacher for the UST Music Preparatory School, a community outreach that offers private instruction to pre-college music students and non-traditional hobbyists. “I am delighted that Mike has joined the faculty as a guitar instructor,” the School’s director, UST adjunct faculty member Paul Krystofiak, said. “He 8

is a remarkable ambassador for the university.” Whitebread ‘s UST education has given him the flexibility to work in both the business sector and the music industry. He advises students to “just do what you love and do what you enjoy. If you stay at it long enough, you’ll find the right path.” – Emilie Bierschenk

Hurricane Katrina Blows DePano Toward Musicology Career Faith Avilene “Avi” DePano had plans to study graphic design at Loyola University-New Orleans. Hurricane Katrina had other plans. Unable to return to New Orleans, she registered for classes at UST two weeks into the semester. This year, DePano graduated with a bachelor’s degree in music and a minor in theology. DePano is now pursuing a master’s degree in musicology at The Shepherd School of Music at Rice University on a full scholarship. The highly competitive program accepts fewer than five students per year, and DePano is among the first students to be admitted to the program in two years. DePano reflected on how Hurricane Katrina’s path of destruction derailed her original college plans but ultimately redirected her to a new college, a new major, new friends, and new career opportunities. “The first day of school, I was in tears, but I quickly found a home at St. Thomas,” she said. “Mentor/teacher Dr. Brady Knapp encouraged me to pursue music and was instrumental in finding scholarships.” When the time came to select a graduate program, DePano looked at musicology programs in cities around the country. “Dr. Ann Fairbanks’ and Dr. Knapp’s courses helped me to blossom and think about becoming a professional musician, which led to a love for musicology,” DePano said. “Without intention and knowledge of context, music is merely noise.” After graduate school, DePano plans to continue performing, pursue a doctorate, and parlay musicology into making classical liturgical music accessible to all. – Elise Marrion

SCIENCE ADVISORY COUNCIL

Environmental Science Students Design Community Garden

UST Graduate Tony Hetemi Prepares for Medical School

Drama Alumnus Joey Milillo Returns to Direct Macbeth

As urban gardens continue to sprout up across the city, state and nation, the University of St. Thomas is sowing the seeds of a new community vegetable garden project. “Our community gardeners will learn practical lessons on how to grow food, how to make decisions in a group and the discipline to maintain their crops,” said Sister Damien Marie Savino, FSE, chair of the UST Environmental Science and Studies Department. “I’m hoping this will also be a spiritual experience. The process of something growing from seed to harvest is amazing. There are also many analogies to gardening in the Bible; Christ referred to the mystery of the seed and soil.” The project was prompted by increasing interest from student clubs, classes, faculty and staff on campus. Students in the Environmental Science Authentic Development and Sustainability class designed and constructed the raised-bed garden located on campus across from Guinan Residence Hall. UST community members who requested a plot are now planting, watering, weeding and caring for their beds. The cost of soil, lumber, a garden shed, tools, and other construction materials was partially offset by a generous donation from UST alumnus Vince D’Amico and discounts from Parker Lumber in Shiner, Texas, and Cowboy Trucking in Houston. The group is still deciding how to best use their future harvest. Suggestions include giving some or all of the produce to local homeless shelters or setting up a farmers’ market on campus.

Attending a university in the United States was once an untouchable dream for Tony Hetemi. Growing up in war-torn Kosovo, he was denied access to schools or formal education after the government closed all Albanian schools in 1989. Hetemi has diligently persevered to overcome his educational obstacles. He is currently studying biology at St. Thomas, and he said that he will never take the opportunity to earn an education for granted. Working toward his goal of becoming a cardiologist, Hetemi is applying for medical school and expects to graduate from UST in May 2011. A family tragedy further solidified his desire to study in the United States. Hetemi had never heard of Houston until his mother had a severe heart attack in 1996. Local doctors lacked the facilities and technology to treat her advanced condition and suggested that the family bring her to the Houston Medical Center for a heart transplant. When his mother passed away in 2001, Hetemi set his sights on becoming a cardiologist. “Coming to UST is the best gift I could ask for,” Hetemi said. “Back home, it was considered impossible to think of getting out. When I compare what I have now to my life then, I am more and more inspired to push forward.” Hetemi came to Houston in 2003 and attended Lamar High School. He was accepted to Olivet College in Michigan, later transferred to Georgia Parameter College, and finally returned to Houston last year to attend UST. “Being at UST has been an incredible experience from day one,” Hetemi said. “The open and welcoming staff and professors made me feel like I was part of the community right away.”

When Joey Milillo agreed to direct the University of St. Thomas’ fall production of Shakespeare’s Macbeth, he needed no time to familiarize himself with the Jones Theater stage. Nearly seven years after earning a degree in drama from UST, Milillo says he could still find his way around Jones Theater with his eyes closed. “I feel this wonderful sense of home in directing here,” Milillo said. “It’s like settling back into your old armchair – it’s warm and comforting; you know it and it knows you.” “Macbeth is the mirror that connects the past and present and reflects the horrific consequences of greed, selfish ambition and autonomous power,” Milillo said. “By staging this timeless text, the Drama Program at UST hopes to be just such a mirror – one in which our culture can see itself both for what it is and what it should be.” Milillo has stayed close to his UST theatre roots. This marks his second return to the UST stage since he graduated in 2003. He directed Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing at UST in 2006. He also co-founded the Town Center Theatre in the Woodlands with fellow UST alumni Chris Tennison and Aaron Stryk. Milillo manages to make time for theater projects in both the Woodlands and at UST while holding a full-time position as the programs manager for the Bayou Bend Collections and Gardens. “You get here and they put you to work,” Milillo said. “Over the course of my time at UST, I also designed the costumes and lighting for several shows. I directed one short play for directing class and was able to direct a full-length show as an independent study. I was on stage four times my freshman year, and that is rare for freshmen at other universities.”

Dr. B.C. Robison, Chair K. Cody Patel, Vice Chair Dominic Aquila, D. Litt et Phil. Michael Bartolotta Evan Betzer Ray Casserly H. Ken DeDominicis Ebrahim Delpassand, MD Bert Edmundson, Jr. , MD Carlos Escobar Scott Ferguson James Gallogly Robert Ivany, PhD Sandra E. Lemming, MD Michael Marcon David McClanahan Jerome “Jerry” Mee Bela Patel, MD John Palasota, PhD Robert “Pete” Seale, Jr.

James E. Smith David Theis Jeff Thomas Dr. Kenneth Wells

SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS ADVISORY COUNCIL Herbert Edmundson, Jr., MD,PhD, Co-chair John Palasota, PhD, Co-chair Dominic Aquila, D. Litt et Phil. William Brinkley, PhD Eric Buxton, PhD Donald Carlton, PhD Dennis Clifford, PhD, PE Michelle Cocchia, PhD Carlos Escobar George Fox, PhD Thomas B. Horvath, MD Maia Lanos-Sanz, PhD Martin Lindenberg, MD Raymond A. Martin, MD Mary Rose Martinez

Joseph Naoum, MD Jacqueline Northcut Susan Osterberg Phillip Pinell, MD George Rizzo B.C. Robison, DVM, PhD Lawrence Ross, MD, PhD William Seifert, PhD Vicente Valero, MD Sheila Waggoner, PhD Richard Wainerdi, PhD, PE Ben Warner, DDS, MD

NURSING ADVISORY COUNCIL Cristo Papasakelariou, MD, Co-chair M. Elizabeth Papasakelariou, RN, BSN, JD, Co-chair Dominic A. Aquila, D. Litt et Phil. Kathy Peavy Bailey John E. Bertini, Jr., MD, FACS Karen Bertini Donna Breen, MD Donald R. Collins, MD Lavonne C. Cox, RPh Kay Crawford Denis A. DeBakey Azar Delpassand Susan Distefano Rick Dornhoefer Annette Edmonds Herbert Edmundson, Jr., MD Judy Etzel Fran Fauntleroy Kelli Cohen Fein, MD Fran Feltovich Ellie Francisco Barbara Franzheim Shara Fryer Elizabeth Ghrist Charlotte Hill Pat Holden-Huchton, PhD Robert Ivany, PhD George Kuhn, MD Vera Kuhn Judge Manual Leal Bettie Harding Lee Viola Gonzalez Lopez Cora Sue Mach John Marcellus, MD Ruth Metzger Mark Montondon Mary Helen McFerren Morosko Denise O’Connell Margaret M. O’Donnell Diane Paur Carol Moreau Peavy

Odis Peavy Louis Pelz Louis Provenzano William Riley, MD, PhD George Roccaforte Irene Ross Larry Ross, MD, PhD Rena Rossitto Kathy Sanchez, PhD Rick Slemaker Holliday Stone John Stone, MD Sr. Celeste Trahan, CCVI Poldi Tschirch PhD, RN, BC Pattie Dale Tye Donna Vallone Tamara K. Vogt Nancy Williams Sheridan Williams Pamela Wright

The University of St. Thomas is a shining star among the brightest stars in our city. Houston icons have established acclaimed museum and theatre districts, medical complexes and institutions of higher learning that rival and exceed the reputations University of St. Thomas Chapel of St. Basil

prosperity of Houston and beyond. To strengthen the academic excellence of our faculty and students, we are committed to this vision for the University

Marianne Ivany, Co-chair Priscilla Plumb, Co-chair

Ad Hoc Members Susan E. Bradford Ken DeDominicis Robert Ivany, PhD Brady K. Knapp, PhD Prof. Claire McDonald

plan offers a capital vision that establishes St. Thomas as an integral partner in the future

PERFORMING ARTS SOCIETY ADVISORY COUNCIL

Honorary Advisors Judy Collins Margaret Alkek Williams Elsa and Bernard Wolf Advisory Council Members Christie Billings, JD, PhD Patricia Gail Bray, PhD Dorothy E.F. Caram, EdD Alison Coriell Jane Cummins Katherine M. Davis Nancy Beck-Deane Jack Doherty Loli Kolber John E. Marcellus, MD Mary Ann McKeithan H. Joe Nelson, III James L. Phillips Kathi Rovere Walter Suhr Barbara Van Postman Drew Wilson Donna K. Yeager-Wood Diane Zola

of those worldwide. The University’s master

of St. Thomas that transforms our campus into a vibrant academic village and builds the endowment The Menil Collection

for faculty and students to sustain our reputation as one of the nation’s best Catholic universities. Recent expansion to the University’s 19-block campus includes the James and Maureen Hackett Athletic Field, Guinan Residence Hall, Louis Jarret and W.T. Moran Center, Campus Life Mall with its University Seal Plaza, Labyrinth and Gueymard Prayer Garden, and renovation to the Academic Mall designed by renowned architect Philip Johnson. The Edward White Memorial Plaza, featuring the last of Johnson’s designs, was completed in 2007. A successful $65 million

Memorial Hermann Hospital

capital campaign made these additions possible. UST was selected by the American Institute of Architects to receive the 2009 AIA 50 Year Award, honoring distinguished architecture of lasting value, for the University’s Welder Hall, Jones Hall and Strake Hall (1958-59), designed by Philip Johnson.

The U.S. Department of Education has awarded the University of St. Thomas in Houston a $3.25 million grant to increase the number of Hispanic and economically disadvantaged students through the development of a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree program. The grant is part of the Education Strengthening Institutions – Hispanic Serving Institutions Program (Title V) grant that will support the University’s current efforts to expand the pipeline of nursing students and improve access for Hispanic and low-income students to a high-demand program. In addition, the grant provides for development of a state-of-the-art Nursing Simulation Center and as well as pilot a Nursing Success Center to ensure academic success for all nursing students. The University of St. Thomas has begun the planning to reopen the School of Nursing to address the growing shortage of nurses nationwide. Following approval by the Board of Directors and accreditation by the Texas Board of Nursing, the University expects to begin offering a BSN degree and enrolling the first class of nursing students in the fall of 2012. Hiring Dr. Poldi Tschirch as the director of Nursing Program Development was part of the University’s first phase of a three-phase startup that includes plans to raise $25 million to build and endow the School, prepare for accreditation and begin faculty and student recruiting. Tschirch will also serve as Title V Program director. “This grant will provide the University of St. Thomas with vital resources to help us reopen the nursing school,” Tschirch said. “Our goal is to create an outstanding BSN degree program in Houston that will prepare graduates to meet the healthcare needs of the public in a rapidly changing healthcare system.” Title V Programs expand educational opportunities and improve the academic attainment of Hispanic students. These programs enhance the academic offerings, program quality and institutional stability of colleges and universities that are educating the majority of Hispanic college students. “To receive a grant of this size in such a competitive area provides the University of St. Thomas with the capability to offer a quality nursing degree program and recognizes its impressive potential impact on our students and on the Houston community,” said St. Thomas President Dr. Robert Ivany. “Preparing our students for nursing as a healing ministry complements the University of St. Thomas’ unique mission. As a faith-based institution, located only minutes from the Texas Medical Center and other hospitals and clinics, we can provide the highly educated and inspired nurses who are in such great demand.” For more information on the Nursing Program, contact Dr. Poldi Tschirch at 713-525-6991. As the University continues to lay the foundation for the School of Nursing, we welcome inquiries from prospective nursing students. Please complete our inquiry form at www.stthom.edu/nursing to receive updates.

H. Ken DeDominicis, VP for Institutional Advancement 3800 Montrose Boulevard • Houston, Texas 77006 713-525-3119 • ken@stthom.edu • www.stthom.edu Houston’s only Catholic University • Founded by the Basilian Fathers • Located in the Museum District

St. Thomas Receives Title V Grant to Develop Nursing Program

Wortham Theater Center

SCIENCE ADVISORY COUNCIL

Environmental Science Students Design Community Garden

UST Graduate Tony Hetemi Prepares for Medical School

Drama Alumnus Joey Milillo Returns to Direct Macbeth

As urban gardens continue to sprout up across the city, state and nation, the University of St. Thomas is sowing the seeds of a new community vegetable garden project. “Our community gardeners will learn practical lessons on how to grow food, how to make decisions in a group and the discipline to maintain their crops,” said Sister Damien Marie Savino, FSE, chair of the UST Environmental Science and Studies Department. “I’m hoping this will also be a spiritual experience. The process of something growing from seed to harvest is amazing. There are also many analogies to gardening in the Bible; Christ referred to the mystery of the seed and soil.” The project was prompted by increasing interest from student clubs, classes, faculty and staff on campus. Students in the Environmental Science Authentic Development and Sustainability class designed and constructed the raised-bed garden located on campus across from Guinan Residence Hall. UST community members who requested a plot are now planting, watering, weeding and caring for their beds. The cost of soil, lumber, a garden shed, tools, and other construction materials was partially offset by a generous donation from UST alumnus Vince D’Amico and discounts from Parker Lumber in Shiner, Texas, and Cowboy Trucking in Houston. The group is still deciding how to best use their future harvest. Suggestions include giving some or all of the produce to local homeless shelters or setting up a farmers’ market on campus.

Attending a university in the United States was once an untouchable dream for Tony Hetemi. Growing up in war-torn Kosovo, he was denied access to schools or formal education after the government closed all Albanian schools in 1989. Hetemi has diligently persevered to overcome his educational obstacles. He is currently studying biology at St. Thomas, and he said that he will never take the opportunity to earn an education for granted. Working toward his goal of becoming a cardiologist, Hetemi is applying for medical school and expects to graduate from UST in May 2011. A family tragedy further solidified his desire to study in the United States. Hetemi had never heard of Houston until his mother had a severe heart attack in 1996. Local doctors lacked the facilities and technology to treat her advanced condition and suggested that the family bring her to the Houston Medical Center for a heart transplant. When his mother passed away in 2001, Hetemi set his sights on becoming a cardiologist. “Coming to UST is the best gift I could ask for,” Hetemi said. “Back home, it was considered impossible to think of getting out. When I compare what I have now to my life then, I am more and more inspired to push forward.” Hetemi came to Houston in 2003 and attended Lamar High School. He was accepted to Olivet College in Michigan, later transferred to Georgia Parameter College, and finally returned to Houston last year to attend UST. “Being at UST has been an incredible experience from day one,” Hetemi said. “The open and welcoming staff and professors made me feel like I was part of the community right away.”

When Joey Milillo agreed to direct the University of St. Thomas’ fall production of Shakespeare’s Macbeth, he needed no time to familiarize himself with the Jones Theater stage. Nearly seven years after earning a degree in drama from UST, Milillo says he could still find his way around Jones Theater with his eyes closed. “I feel this wonderful sense of home in directing here,” Milillo said. “It’s like settling back into your old armchair – it’s warm and comforting; you know it and it knows you.” “Macbeth is the mirror that connects the past and present and reflects the horrific consequences of greed, selfish ambition and autonomous power,” Milillo said. “By staging this timeless text, the Drama Program at UST hopes to be just such a mirror – one in which our culture can see itself both for what it is and what it should be.” Milillo has stayed close to his UST theatre roots. This marks his second return to the UST stage since he graduated in 2003. He directed Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing at UST in 2006. He also co-founded the Town Center Theatre in the Woodlands with fellow UST alumni Chris Tennison and Aaron Stryk. Milillo manages to make time for theater projects in both the Woodlands and at UST while holding a full-time position as the programs manager for the Bayou Bend Collections and Gardens. “You get here and they put you to work,” Milillo said. “Over the course of my time at UST, I also designed the costumes and lighting for several shows. I directed one short play for directing class and was able to direct a full-length show as an independent study. I was on stage four times my freshman year, and that is rare for freshmen at other universities.”

Dr. B.C. Robison, Chair K. Cody Patel, Vice Chair Dominic Aquila, D. Litt et Phil. Michael Bartolotta Evan Betzer Ray Casserly H. Ken DeDominicis Ebrahim Delpassand, MD Bert Edmundson, Jr. , MD Carlos Escobar Scott Ferguson James Gallogly Robert Ivany, PhD Sandra E. Lemming, MD Michael Marcon David McClanahan Jerome “Jerry” Mee Bela Patel, MD John Palasota, PhD Robert “Pete” Seale, Jr.

James E. Smith David Theis Jeff Thomas Dr. Kenneth Wells

SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS ADVISORY COUNCIL Herbert Edmundson, Jr., MD,PhD, Co-chair John Palasota, PhD, Co-chair Dominic Aquila, D. Litt et Phil. William Brinkley, PhD Eric Buxton, PhD Donald Carlton, PhD Dennis Clifford, PhD, PE Michelle Cocchia, PhD Carlos Escobar George Fox, PhD Thomas B. Horvath, MD Maia Lanos-Sanz, PhD Martin Lindenberg, MD Raymond A. Martin, MD Mary Rose Martinez

Joseph Naoum, MD Jacqueline Northcut Susan Osterberg Phillip Pinell, MD George Rizzo B.C. Robison, DVM, PhD Lawrence Ross, MD, PhD William Seifert, PhD Vicente Valero, MD Sheila Waggoner, PhD Richard Wainerdi, PhD, PE Ben Warner, DDS, MD

NURSING ADVISORY COUNCIL Cristo Papasakelariou, MD, Co-chair M. Elizabeth Papasakelariou, RN, BSN, JD, Co-chair Dominic A. Aquila, D. Litt et Phil. Kathy Peavy Bailey John E. Bertini, Jr., MD, FACS Karen Bertini Donna Breen, MD Donald R. Collins, MD Lavonne C. Cox, RPh Kay Crawford Denis A. DeBakey Azar Delpassand Susan Distefano Rick Dornhoefer Annette Edmonds Herbert Edmundson, Jr., MD Judy Etzel Fran Fauntleroy Kelli Cohen Fein, MD Fran Feltovich Ellie Francisco Barbara Franzheim Shara Fryer Elizabeth Ghrist Charlotte Hill Pat Holden-Huchton, PhD Robert Ivany, PhD George Kuhn, MD Vera Kuhn Judge Manual Leal Bettie Harding Lee Viola Gonzalez Lopez Cora Sue Mach John Marcellus, MD Ruth Metzger Mark Montondon Mary Helen McFerren Morosko Denise O’Connell Margaret M. O’Donnell Diane Paur Carol Moreau Peavy

Odis Peavy Louis Pelz Louis Provenzano William Riley, MD, PhD George Roccaforte Irene Ross Larry Ross, MD, PhD Rena Rossitto Kathy Sanchez, PhD Rick Slemaker Holliday Stone John Stone, MD Sr. Celeste Trahan, CCVI Poldi Tschirch PhD, RN, BC Pattie Dale Tye Donna Vallone Tamara K. Vogt Nancy Williams Sheridan Williams Pamela Wright

The University of St. Thomas is a shining star among the brightest stars in our city. Houston icons have established acclaimed museum and theatre districts, medical complexes and institutions of higher learning that rival and exceed the reputations University of St. Thomas Chapel of St. Basil

prosperity of Houston and beyond. To strengthen the academic excellence of our faculty and students, we are committed to this vision for the University

Marianne Ivany, Co-chair Priscilla Plumb, Co-chair

Ad Hoc Members Susan E. Bradford Ken DeDominicis Robert Ivany, PhD Brady K. Knapp, PhD Prof. Claire McDonald

plan offers a capital vision that establishes St. Thomas as an integral partner in the future

PERFORMING ARTS SOCIETY ADVISORY COUNCIL

Honorary Advisors Judy Collins Margaret Alkek Williams Elsa and Bernard Wolf Advisory Council Members Christie Billings, JD, PhD Patricia Gail Bray, PhD Dorothy E.F. Caram, EdD Alison Coriell Jane Cummins Katherine M. Davis Nancy Beck-Deane Jack Doherty Loli Kolber John E. Marcellus, MD Mary Ann McKeithan H. Joe Nelson, III James L. Phillips Kathi Rovere Walter Suhr Barbara Van Postman Drew Wilson Donna K. Yeager-Wood Diane Zola

of those worldwide. The University’s master

of St. Thomas that transforms our campus into a vibrant academic village and builds the endowment The Menil Collection

for faculty and students to sustain our reputation as one of the nation’s best Catholic universities. Recent expansion to the University’s 19-block campus includes the James and Maureen Hackett Athletic Field, Guinan Residence Hall, Louis Jarret and W.T. Moran Center, Campus Life Mall with its University Seal Plaza, Labyrinth and Gueymard Prayer Garden, and renovation to the Academic Mall designed by renowned architect Philip Johnson. The Edward White Memorial Plaza, featuring the last of Johnson’s designs, was completed in 2007. A successful $65 million

Memorial Hermann Hospital

capital campaign made these additions possible. UST was selected by the American Institute of Architects to receive the 2009 AIA 50 Year Award, honoring distinguished architecture of lasting value, for the University’s Welder Hall, Jones Hall and Strake Hall (1958-59), designed by Philip Johnson.

The U.S. Department of Education has awarded the University of St. Thomas in Houston a $3.25 million grant to increase the number of Hispanic and economically disadvantaged students through the development of a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree program. The grant is part of the Education Strengthening Institutions – Hispanic Serving Institutions Program (Title V) grant that will support the University’s current efforts to expand the pipeline of nursing students and improve access for Hispanic and low-income students to a high-demand program. In addition, the grant provides for development of a state-of-the-art Nursing Simulation Center and as well as pilot a Nursing Success Center to ensure academic success for all nursing students. The University of St. Thomas has begun the planning to reopen the School of Nursing to address the growing shortage of nurses nationwide. Following approval by the Board of Directors and accreditation by the Texas Board of Nursing, the University expects to begin offering a BSN degree and enrolling the first class of nursing students in the fall of 2012. Hiring Dr. Poldi Tschirch as the director of Nursing Program Development was part of the University’s first phase of a three-phase startup that includes plans to raise $25 million to build and endow the School, prepare for accreditation and begin faculty and student recruiting. Tschirch will also serve as Title V Program director. “This grant will provide the University of St. Thomas with vital resources to help us reopen the nursing school,” Tschirch said. “Our goal is to create an outstanding BSN degree program in Houston that will prepare graduates to meet the healthcare needs of the public in a rapidly changing healthcare system.” Title V Programs expand educational opportunities and improve the academic attainment of Hispanic students. These programs enhance the academic offerings, program quality and institutional stability of colleges and universities that are educating the majority of Hispanic college students. “To receive a grant of this size in such a competitive area provides the University of St. Thomas with the capability to offer a quality nursing degree program and recognizes its impressive potential impact on our students and on the Houston community,” said St. Thomas President Dr. Robert Ivany. “Preparing our students for nursing as a healing ministry complements the University of St. Thomas’ unique mission. As a faith-based institution, located only minutes from the Texas Medical Center and other hospitals and clinics, we can provide the highly educated and inspired nurses who are in such great demand.” For more information on the Nursing Program, contact Dr. Poldi Tschirch at 713-525-6991. As the University continues to lay the foundation for the School of Nursing, we welcome inquiries from prospective nursing students. Please complete our inquiry form at www.stthom.edu/nursing to receive updates.

H. Ken DeDominicis, VP for Institutional Advancement 3800 Montrose Boulevard • Houston, Texas 77006 713-525-3119 • ken@stthom.edu • www.stthom.edu Houston’s only Catholic University • Founded by the Basilian Fathers • Located in the Museum District

St. Thomas Receives Title V Grant to Develop Nursing Program

Wortham Theater Center

SCIENCE ADVISORY COUNCIL

Environmental Science Students Design Community Garden

UST Graduate Tony Hetemi Prepares for Medical School

Drama Alumnus Joey Milillo Returns to Direct Macbeth

As urban gardens continue to sprout up across the city, state and nation, the University of St. Thomas is sowing the seeds of a new community vegetable garden project. “Our community gardeners will learn practical lessons on how to grow food, how to make decisions in a group and the discipline to maintain their crops,” said Sister Damien Marie Savino, FSE, chair of the UST Environmental Science and Studies Department. “I’m hoping this will also be a spiritual experience. The process of something growing from seed to harvest is amazing. There are also many analogies to gardening in the Bible; Christ referred to the mystery of the seed and soil.” The project was prompted by increasing interest from student clubs, classes, faculty and staff on campus. Students in the Environmental Science Authentic Development and Sustainability class designed and constructed the raised-bed garden located on campus across from Guinan Residence Hall. UST community members who requested a plot are now planting, watering, weeding and caring for their beds. The cost of soil, lumber, a garden shed, tools, and other construction materials was partially offset by a generous donation from UST alumnus Vince D’Amico and discounts from Parker Lumber in Shiner, Texas, and Cowboy Trucking in Houston. The group is still deciding how to best use their future harvest. Suggestions include giving some or all of the produce to local homeless shelters or setting up a farmers’ market on campus.

Attending a university in the United States was once an untouchable dream for Tony Hetemi. Growing up in war-torn Kosovo, he was denied access to schools or formal education after the government closed all Albanian schools in 1989. Hetemi has diligently persevered to overcome his educational obstacles. He is currently studying biology at St. Thomas, and he said that he will never take the opportunity to earn an education for granted. Working toward his goal of becoming a cardiologist, Hetemi is applying for medical school and expects to graduate from UST in May 2011. A family tragedy further solidified his desire to study in the United States. Hetemi had never heard of Houston until his mother had a severe heart attack in 1996. Local doctors lacked the facilities and technology to treat her advanced condition and suggested that the family bring her to the Houston Medical Center for a heart transplant. When his mother passed away in 2001, Hetemi set his sights on becoming a cardiologist. “Coming to UST is the best gift I could ask for,” Hetemi said. “Back home, it was considered impossible to think of getting out. When I compare what I have now to my life then, I am more and more inspired to push forward.” Hetemi came to Houston in 2003 and attended Lamar High School. He was accepted to Olivet College in Michigan, later transferred to Georgia Parameter College, and finally returned to Houston last year to attend UST. “Being at UST has been an incredible experience from day one,” Hetemi said. “The open and welcoming staff and professors made me feel like I was part of the community right away.”

When Joey Milillo agreed to direct the University of St. Thomas’ fall production of Shakespeare’s Macbeth, he needed no time to familiarize himself with the Jones Theater stage. Nearly seven years after earning a degree in drama from UST, Milillo says he could still find his way around Jones Theater with his eyes closed. “I feel this wonderful sense of home in directing here,” Milillo said. “It’s like settling back into your old armchair – it’s warm and comforting; you know it and it knows you.” “Macbeth is the mirror that connects the past and present and reflects the horrific consequences of greed, selfish ambition and autonomous power,” Milillo said. “By staging this timeless text, the Drama Program at UST hopes to be just such a mirror – one in which our culture can see itself both for what it is and what it should be.” Milillo has stayed close to his UST theatre roots. This marks his second return to the UST stage since he graduated in 2003. He directed Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing at UST in 2006. He also co-founded the Town Center Theatre in the Woodlands with fellow UST alumni Chris Tennison and Aaron Stryk. Milillo manages to make time for theater projects in both the Woodlands and at UST while holding a full-time position as the programs manager for the Bayou Bend Collections and Gardens. “You get here and they put you to work,” Milillo said. “Over the course of my time at UST, I also designed the costumes and lighting for several shows. I directed one short play for directing class and was able to direct a full-length show as an independent study. I was on stage four times my freshman year, and that is rare for freshmen at other universities.”

Dr. B.C. Robison, Chair K. Cody Patel, Vice Chair Dominic Aquila, D. Litt et Phil. Michael Bartolotta Evan Betzer Ray Casserly H. Ken DeDominicis Ebrahim Delpassand, MD Bert Edmundson, Jr. , MD Carlos Escobar Scott Ferguson James Gallogly Robert Ivany, PhD Sandra E. Lemming, MD Michael Marcon David McClanahan Jerome “Jerry” Mee Bela Patel, MD John Palasota, PhD Robert “Pete” Seale, Jr.

James E. Smith David Theis Jeff Thomas Dr. Kenneth Wells

SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS ADVISORY COUNCIL Herbert Edmundson, Jr., MD,PhD, Co-chair John Palasota, PhD, Co-chair Dominic Aquila, D. Litt et Phil. William Brinkley, PhD Eric Buxton, PhD Donald Carlton, PhD Dennis Clifford, PhD, PE Michelle Cocchia, PhD Carlos Escobar George Fox, PhD Thomas B. Horvath, MD Maia Lanos-Sanz, PhD Martin Lindenberg, MD Raymond A. Martin, MD Mary Rose Martinez

Joseph Naoum, MD Jacqueline Northcut Susan Osterberg Phillip Pinell, MD George Rizzo B.C. Robison, DVM, PhD Lawrence Ross, MD, PhD William Seifert, PhD Vicente Valero, MD Sheila Waggoner, PhD Richard Wainerdi, PhD, PE Ben Warner, DDS, MD

NURSING ADVISORY COUNCIL Cristo Papasakelariou, MD, Co-chair M. Elizabeth Papasakelariou, RN, BSN, JD, Co-chair Dominic A. Aquila, D. Litt et Phil. Kathy Peavy Bailey John E. Bertini, Jr., MD, FACS Karen Bertini Donna Breen, MD Donald R. Collins, MD Lavonne C. Cox, RPh Kay Crawford Denis A. DeBakey Azar Delpassand Susan Distefano Rick Dornhoefer Annette Edmonds Herbert Edmundson, Jr., MD Judy Etzel Fran Fauntleroy Kelli Cohen Fein, MD Fran Feltovich Ellie Francisco Barbara Franzheim Shara Fryer Elizabeth Ghrist Charlotte Hill Pat Holden-Huchton, PhD Robert Ivany, PhD George Kuhn, MD Vera Kuhn Judge Manual Leal Bettie Harding Lee Viola Gonzalez Lopez Cora Sue Mach John Marcellus, MD Ruth Metzger Mark Montondon Mary Helen McFerren Morosko Denise O’Connell Margaret M. O’Donnell Diane Paur Carol Moreau Peavy

Odis Peavy Louis Pelz Louis Provenzano William Riley, MD, PhD George Roccaforte Irene Ross Larry Ross, MD, PhD Rena Rossitto Kathy Sanchez, PhD Rick Slemaker Holliday Stone John Stone, MD Sr. Celeste Trahan, CCVI Poldi Tschirch PhD, RN, BC Pattie Dale Tye Donna Vallone Tamara K. Vogt Nancy Williams Sheridan Williams Pamela Wright

The University of St. Thomas is a shining star among the brightest stars in our city. Houston icons have established acclaimed museum and theatre districts, medical complexes and institutions of higher learning that rival and exceed the reputations University of St. Thomas Chapel of St. Basil

prosperity of Houston and beyond. To strengthen the academic excellence of our faculty and students, we are committed to this vision for the University

Marianne Ivany, Co-chair Priscilla Plumb, Co-chair

Ad Hoc Members Susan E. Bradford Ken DeDominicis Robert Ivany, PhD Brady K. Knapp, PhD Prof. Claire McDonald

plan offers a capital vision that establishes St. Thomas as an integral partner in the future

PERFORMING ARTS SOCIETY ADVISORY COUNCIL

Honorary Advisors Judy Collins Margaret Alkek Williams Elsa and Bernard Wolf Advisory Council Members Christie Billings, JD, PhD Patricia Gail Bray, PhD Dorothy E.F. Caram, EdD Alison Coriell Jane Cummins Katherine M. Davis Nancy Beck-Deane Jack Doherty Loli Kolber John E. Marcellus, MD Mary Ann McKeithan H. Joe Nelson, III James L. Phillips Kathi Rovere Walter Suhr Barbara Van Postman Drew Wilson Donna K. Yeager-Wood Diane Zola

of those worldwide. The University’s master

of St. Thomas that transforms our campus into a vibrant academic village and builds the endowment The Menil Collection

for faculty and students to sustain our reputation as one of the nation’s best Catholic universities. Recent expansion to the University’s 19-block campus includes the James and Maureen Hackett Athletic Field, Guinan Residence Hall, Louis Jarret and W.T. Moran Center, Campus Life Mall with its University Seal Plaza, Labyrinth and Gueymard Prayer Garden, and renovation to the Academic Mall designed by renowned architect Philip Johnson. The Edward White Memorial Plaza, featuring the last of Johnson’s designs, was completed in 2007. A successful $65 million

Memorial Hermann Hospital

capital campaign made these additions possible. UST was selected by the American Institute of Architects to receive the 2009 AIA 50 Year Award, honoring distinguished architecture of lasting value, for the University’s Welder Hall, Jones Hall and Strake Hall (1958-59), designed by Philip Johnson.

The U.S. Department of Education has awarded the University of St. Thomas in Houston a $3.25 million grant to increase the number of Hispanic and economically disadvantaged students through the development of a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree program. The grant is part of the Education Strengthening Institutions – Hispanic Serving Institutions Program (Title V) grant that will support the University’s current efforts to expand the pipeline of nursing students and improve access for Hispanic and low-income students to a high-demand program. In addition, the grant provides for development of a state-of-the-art Nursing Simulation Center and as well as pilot a Nursing Success Center to ensure academic success for all nursing students. The University of St. Thomas has begun the planning to reopen the School of Nursing to address the growing shortage of nurses nationwide. Following approval by the Board of Directors and accreditation by the Texas Board of Nursing, the University expects to begin offering a BSN degree and enrolling the first class of nursing students in the fall of 2012. Hiring Dr. Poldi Tschirch as the director of Nursing Program Development was part of the University’s first phase of a three-phase startup that includes plans to raise $25 million to build and endow the School, prepare for accreditation and begin faculty and student recruiting. Tschirch will also serve as Title V Program director. “This grant will provide the University of St. Thomas with vital resources to help us reopen the nursing school,” Tschirch said. “Our goal is to create an outstanding BSN degree program in Houston that will prepare graduates to meet the healthcare needs of the public in a rapidly changing healthcare system.” Title V Programs expand educational opportunities and improve the academic attainment of Hispanic students. These programs enhance the academic offerings, program quality and institutional stability of colleges and universities that are educating the majority of Hispanic college students. “To receive a grant of this size in such a competitive area provides the University of St. Thomas with the capability to offer a quality nursing degree program and recognizes its impressive potential impact on our students and on the Houston community,” said St. Thomas President Dr. Robert Ivany. “Preparing our students for nursing as a healing ministry complements the University of St. Thomas’ unique mission. As a faith-based institution, located only minutes from the Texas Medical Center and other hospitals and clinics, we can provide the highly educated and inspired nurses who are in such great demand.” For more information on the Nursing Program, contact Dr. Poldi Tschirch at 713-525-6991. As the University continues to lay the foundation for the School of Nursing, we welcome inquiries from prospective nursing students. Please complete our inquiry form at www.stthom.edu/nursing to receive updates.

H. Ken DeDominicis, VP for Institutional Advancement 3800 Montrose Boulevard • Houston, Texas 77006 713-525-3119 • ken@stthom.edu • www.stthom.edu Houston’s only Catholic University • Founded by the Basilian Fathers • Located in the Museum District

St. Thomas Receives Title V Grant to Develop Nursing Program

Wortham Theater Center

UNIVERSITY OF ST. THOMAS New Academic Center The University of St. Thomas intends to expand its campus facilities with the construction of a comprehensive center to enhance all science and health-related programs. This new complex will house the baccalaureate-level science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) programs and the UST School of Nursing, providing necessary program expansion to meet national needs in STEM education and nursing. In 2009, The National Science Foundation awarded the University of St. Thomas a $575,000 grant to provide scholarships to undergraduate students obtaining degrees in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) over the next five years. The University of St. Thomas S-STEM Scholars Program aims to reach the diverse communities in the Houston area and to recruit women and underrepresented groups to the STEM fields. Students receive mentoring from senior-level STEM students, career counseling and a hands-on undergraduate research experience.

Performing Arts & Conference Center The University fully embraces the fine and performing arts as an essential part of its educational mission to educate leaders of faith and character as we assist our students in understanding the world better, stimulating challenging thought within all academic disciplines. This commitment is reflected in the University’s core curriculum requirement for all students to take 3 credit hours in the fine arts. Home to the University’s drama and music productions, the Center will provide not only the required space for ABA W. A L

numerous performances, but also behind-the-scenes facilities so vitally important to quality productions and the student and community demand for state-of-the-art

New Academic Center Performing Arts & Conference Center

SE

academic colloquiums and conferences.

TRO

facilities for music and drama productions as well as

MON

student training. This performance venue will address

MA

IMAGES FOR ILLUSTRATION ONLY

UNIVERSITY OF ST. THOMAS New Academic Center The University of St. Thomas intends to expand its campus facilities with the construction of a comprehensive center to enhance all science and health-related programs. This new complex will house the baccalaureate-level science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) programs and the UST School of Nursing, providing necessary program expansion to meet national needs in STEM education and nursing. In 2009, The National Science Foundation awarded the University of St. Thomas a $575,000 grant to provide scholarships to undergraduate students obtaining degrees in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) over the next five years. The University of St. Thomas S-STEM Scholars Program aims to reach the diverse communities in the Houston area and to recruit women and underrepresented groups to the STEM fields. Students receive mentoring from senior-level STEM students, career counseling and a hands-on undergraduate research experience.

Performing Arts & Conference Center The University fully embraces the fine and performing arts as an essential part of its educational mission to educate leaders of faith and character as we assist our students in understanding the world better, stimulating challenging thought within all academic disciplines. This commitment is reflected in the University’s core curriculum requirement for all students to take 3 credit hours in the fine arts. Home to the University’s drama and music productions, the Center will provide not only the required space for ABA W. A L

numerous performances, but also behind-the-scenes facilities so vitally important to quality productions and the student and community demand for state-of-the-art

New Academic Center Performing Arts & Conference Center

SE

academic colloquiums and conferences.

TRO

facilities for music and drama productions as well as

MON

student training. This performance venue will address

MA

IMAGES FOR ILLUSTRATION ONLY

UNIVERSITY OF ST. THOMAS New Academic Center The University of St. Thomas intends to expand its campus facilities with the construction of a comprehensive center to enhance all science and health-related programs. This new complex will house the baccalaureate-level science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) programs and the UST School of Nursing, providing necessary program expansion to meet national needs in STEM education and nursing. In 2009, The National Science Foundation awarded the University of St. Thomas a $575,000 grant to provide scholarships to undergraduate students obtaining degrees in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) over the next five years. The University of St. Thomas S-STEM Scholars Program aims to reach the diverse communities in the Houston area and to recruit women and underrepresented groups to the STEM fields. Students receive mentoring from senior-level STEM students, career counseling and a hands-on undergraduate research experience.

Performing Arts & Conference Center The University fully embraces the fine and performing arts as an essential part of its educational mission to educate leaders of faith and character as we assist our students in understanding the world better, stimulating challenging thought within all academic disciplines. This commitment is reflected in the University’s core curriculum requirement for all students to take 3 credit hours in the fine arts. Home to the University’s drama and music productions, the Center will provide not only the required space for ABA W. A L

numerous performances, but also behind-the-scenes facilities so vitally important to quality productions and the student and community demand for state-of-the-art

New Academic Center Performing Arts & Conference Center

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academic colloquiums and conferences.

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facilities for music and drama productions as well as

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student training. This performance venue will address

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IMAGES FOR ILLUSTRATION ONLY

UNIVERSITY OF ST. THOMAS New Academic Center The University of St. Thomas intends to expand its campus facilities with the construction of a comprehensive center to enhance all science and health-related programs. This new complex will house the baccalaureate-level science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) programs and the UST School of Nursing, providing necessary program expansion to meet national needs in STEM education and nursing. In 2009, The National Science Foundation awarded the University of St. Thomas a $575,000 grant to provide scholarships to undergraduate students obtaining degrees in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) over the next five years. The University of St. Thomas S-STEM Scholars Program aims to reach the diverse communities in the Houston area and to recruit women and underrepresented groups to the STEM fields. Students receive mentoring from senior-level STEM students, career counseling and a hands-on undergraduate research experience.

Performing Arts & Conference Center The University fully embraces the fine and performing arts as an essential part of its educational mission to educate leaders of faith and character as we assist our students in understanding the world better, stimulating challenging thought within all academic disciplines. This commitment is reflected in the University’s core curriculum requirement for all students to take 3 credit hours in the fine arts. Home to the University’s drama and music productions, the Center will provide not only the required space for ABA W. A L

numerous performances, but also behind-the-scenes facilities so vitally important to quality productions and the student and community demand for state-of-the-art

New Academic Center Performing Arts & Conference Center

SE

academic colloquiums and conferences.

TRO

facilities for music and drama productions as well as

MON

student training. This performance venue will address

MA

IMAGES FOR ILLUSTRATION ONLY

SCIENCE ADVISORY COUNCIL

Environmental Science Students Design Community Garden

UST Graduate Tony Hetemi Prepares for Medical School

Drama Alumnus Joey Milillo Returns to Direct Macbeth

As urban gardens continue to sprout up across the city, state and nation, the University of St. Thomas is sowing the seeds of a new community vegetable garden project. “Our community gardeners will learn practical lessons on how to grow food, how to make decisions in a group and the discipline to maintain their crops,” said Sister Damien Marie Savino, FSE, chair of the UST Environmental Science and Studies Department. “I’m hoping this will also be a spiritual experience. The process of something growing from seed to harvest is amazing. There are also many analogies to gardening in the Bible; Christ referred to the mystery of the seed and soil.” The project was prompted by increasing interest from student clubs, classes, faculty and staff on campus. Students in the Environmental Science Authentic Development and Sustainability class designed and constructed the raised-bed garden located on campus across from Guinan Residence Hall. UST community members who requested a plot are now planting, watering, weeding and caring for their beds. The cost of soil, lumber, a garden shed, tools, and other construction materials was partially offset by a generous donation from UST alumnus Vince D’Amico and discounts from Parker Lumber in Shiner, Texas, and Cowboy Trucking in Houston. The group is still deciding how to best use their future harvest. Suggestions include giving some or all of the produce to local homeless shelters or setting up a farmers’ market on campus.

Attending a university in the United States was once an untouchable dream for Tony Hetemi. Growing up in war-torn Kosovo, he was denied access to schools or formal education after the government closed all Albanian schools in 1989. Hetemi has diligently persevered to overcome his educational obstacles. He is currently studying biology at St. Thomas, and he said that he will never take the opportunity to earn an education for granted. Working toward his goal of becoming a cardiologist, Hetemi is applying for medical school and expects to graduate from UST in May 2011. A family tragedy further solidified his desire to study in the United States. Hetemi had never heard of Houston until his mother had a severe heart attack in 1996. Local doctors lacked the facilities and technology to treat her advanced condition and suggested that the family bring her to the Houston Medical Center for a heart transplant. When his mother passed away in 2001, Hetemi set his sights on becoming a cardiologist. “Coming to UST is the best gift I could ask for,” Hetemi said. “Back home, it was considered impossible to think of getting out. When I compare what I have now to my life then, I am more and more inspired to push forward.” Hetemi came to Houston in 2003 and attended Lamar High School. He was accepted to Olivet College in Michigan, later transferred to Georgia Parameter College, and finally returned to Houston last year to attend UST. “Being at UST has been an incredible experience from day one,” Hetemi said. “The open and welcoming staff and professors made me feel like I was part of the community right away.”

When Joey Milillo agreed to direct the University of St. Thomas’ fall production of Shakespeare’s Macbeth, he needed no time to familiarize himself with the Jones Theater stage. Nearly seven years after earning a degree in drama from UST, Milillo says he could still find his way around Jones Theater with his eyes closed. “I feel this wonderful sense of home in directing here,” Milillo said. “It’s like settling back into your old armchair – it’s warm and comforting; you know it and it knows you.” “Macbeth is the mirror that connects the past and present and reflects the horrific consequences of greed, selfish ambition and autonomous power,” Milillo said. “By staging this timeless text, the Drama Program at UST hopes to be just such a mirror – one in which our culture can see itself both for what it is and what it should be.” Milillo has stayed close to his UST theatre roots. This marks his second return to the UST stage since he graduated in 2003. He directed Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing at UST in 2006. He also co-founded the Town Center Theatre in the Woodlands with fellow UST alumni Chris Tennison and Aaron Stryk. Milillo manages to make time for theater projects in both the Woodlands and at UST while holding a full-time position as the programs manager for the Bayou Bend Collections and Gardens. “You get here and they put you to work,” Milillo said. “Over the course of my time at UST, I also designed the costumes and lighting for several shows. I directed one short play for directing class and was able to direct a full-length show as an independent study. I was on stage four times my freshman year, and that is rare for freshmen at other universities.”

Dr. B.C. Robison, Chair K. Cody Patel, Vice Chair Dominic Aquila, D. Litt et Phil. Michael Bartolotta Evan Betzer Ray Casserly H. Ken DeDominicis Ebrahim Delpassand, MD Bert Edmundson, Jr. , MD Carlos Escobar Scott Ferguson James Gallogly Robert Ivany, PhD Sandra E. Lemming, MD Michael Marcon David McClanahan Jerome “Jerry” Mee Bela Patel, MD John Palasota, PhD Robert “Pete” Seale, Jr.

James E. Smith David Theis Jeff Thomas Dr. Kenneth Wells

SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS ADVISORY COUNCIL Herbert Edmundson, Jr., MD,PhD, Co-chair John Palasota, PhD, Co-chair Dominic Aquila, D. Litt et Phil. William Brinkley, PhD Eric Buxton, PhD Donald Carlton, PhD Dennis Clifford, PhD, PE Michelle Cocchia, PhD Carlos Escobar George Fox, PhD Thomas B. Horvath, MD Maia Lanos-Sanz, PhD Martin Lindenberg, MD Raymond A. Martin, MD Mary Rose Martinez

Joseph Naoum, MD Jacqueline Northcut Susan Osterberg Phillip Pinell, MD George Rizzo B.C. Robison, DVM, PhD Lawrence Ross, MD, PhD William Seifert, PhD Vicente Valero, MD Sheila Waggoner, PhD Richard Wainerdi, PhD, PE Ben Warner, DDS, MD

NURSING ADVISORY COUNCIL Cristo Papasakelariou, MD, Co-chair M. Elizabeth Papasakelariou, RN, BSN, JD, Co-chair Dominic A. Aquila, D. Litt et Phil. Kathy Peavy Bailey John E. Bertini, Jr., MD, FACS Karen Bertini Donna Breen, MD Donald R. Collins, MD Lavonne C. Cox, RPh Kay Crawford Denis A. DeBakey Azar Delpassand Susan Distefano Rick Dornhoefer Annette Edmonds Herbert Edmundson, Jr., MD Judy Etzel Fran Fauntleroy Kelli Cohen Fein, MD Fran Feltovich Ellie Francisco Barbara Franzheim Shara Fryer Elizabeth Ghrist Charlotte Hill Pat Holden-Huchton, PhD Robert Ivany, PhD George Kuhn, MD Vera Kuhn Judge Manual Leal Bettie Harding Lee Viola Gonzalez Lopez Cora Sue Mach John Marcellus, MD Ruth Metzger Mark Montondon Mary Helen McFerren Morosko Denise O’Connell Margaret M. O’Donnell Diane Paur Carol Moreau Peavy

Odis Peavy Louis Pelz Louis Provenzano William Riley, MD, PhD George Roccaforte Irene Ross Larry Ross, MD, PhD Rena Rossitto Kathy Sanchez, PhD Rick Slemaker Holliday Stone John Stone, MD Sr. Celeste Trahan, CCVI Poldi Tschirch PhD, RN, BC Pattie Dale Tye Donna Vallone Tamara K. Vogt Nancy Williams Sheridan Williams Pamela Wright

The University of St. Thomas is a shining star among the brightest stars in our city. Houston icons have established acclaimed museum and theatre districts, medical complexes and institutions of higher learning that rival and exceed the reputations University of St. Thomas Chapel of St. Basil

prosperity of Houston and beyond. To strengthen the academic excellence of our faculty and students, we are committed to this vision for the University

Marianne Ivany, Co-chair Priscilla Plumb, Co-chair

Ad Hoc Members Susan E. Bradford Ken DeDominicis Robert Ivany, PhD Brady K. Knapp, PhD Prof. Claire McDonald

plan offers a capital vision that establishes St. Thomas as an integral partner in the future

PERFORMING ARTS SOCIETY ADVISORY COUNCIL

Honorary Advisors Judy Collins Margaret Alkek Williams Elsa and Bernard Wolf Advisory Council Members Christie Billings, JD, PhD Patricia Gail Bray, PhD Dorothy E.F. Caram, EdD Alison Coriell Jane Cummins Katherine M. Davis Nancy Beck-Deane Jack Doherty Loli Kolber John E. Marcellus, MD Mary Ann McKeithan H. Joe Nelson, III James L. Phillips Kathi Rovere Walter Suhr Barbara Van Postman Drew Wilson Donna K. Yeager-Wood Diane Zola

of those worldwide. The University’s master

of St. Thomas that transforms our campus into a vibrant academic village and builds the endowment The Menil Collection

for faculty and students to sustain our reputation as one of the nation’s best Catholic universities. Recent expansion to the University’s 19-block campus includes the James and Maureen Hackett Athletic Field, Guinan Residence Hall, Louis Jarret and W.T. Moran Center, Campus Life Mall with its University Seal Plaza, Labyrinth and Gueymard Prayer Garden, and renovation to the Academic Mall designed by renowned architect Philip Johnson. The Edward White Memorial Plaza, featuring the last of Johnson’s designs, was completed in 2007. A successful $65 million

Memorial Hermann Hospital

capital campaign made these additions possible. UST was selected by the American Institute of Architects to receive the 2009 AIA 50 Year Award, honoring distinguished architecture of lasting value, for the University’s Welder Hall, Jones Hall and Strake Hall (1958-59), designed by Philip Johnson.

The U.S. Department of Education has awarded the University of St. Thomas in Houston a $3.25 million grant to increase the number of Hispanic and economically disadvantaged students through the development of a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree program. The grant is part of the Education Strengthening Institutions – Hispanic Serving Institutions Program (Title V) grant that will support the University’s current efforts to expand the pipeline of nursing students and improve access for Hispanic and low-income students to a high-demand program. In addition, the grant provides for development of a state-of-the-art Nursing Simulation Center and as well as pilot a Nursing Success Center to ensure academic success for all nursing students. The University of St. Thomas has begun the planning to reopen the School of Nursing to address the growing shortage of nurses nationwide. Following approval by the Board of Directors and accreditation by the Texas Board of Nursing, the University expects to begin offering a BSN degree and enrolling the first class of nursing students in the fall of 2012. Hiring Dr. Poldi Tschirch as the director of Nursing Program Development was part of the University’s first phase of a three-phase startup that includes plans to raise $25 million to build and endow the School, prepare for accreditation and begin faculty and student recruiting. Tschirch will also serve as Title V Program director. “This grant will provide the University of St. Thomas with vital resources to help us reopen the nursing school,” Tschirch said. “Our goal is to create an outstanding BSN degree program in Houston that will prepare graduates to meet the healthcare needs of the public in a rapidly changing healthcare system.” Title V Programs expand educational opportunities and improve the academic attainment of Hispanic students. These programs enhance the academic offerings, program quality and institutional stability of colleges and universities that are educating the majority of Hispanic college students. “To receive a grant of this size in such a competitive area provides the University of St. Thomas with the capability to offer a quality nursing degree program and recognizes its impressive potential impact on our students and on the Houston community,” said St. Thomas President Dr. Robert Ivany. “Preparing our students for nursing as a healing ministry complements the University of St. Thomas’ unique mission. As a faith-based institution, located only minutes from the Texas Medical Center and other hospitals and clinics, we can provide the highly educated and inspired nurses who are in such great demand.” For more information on the Nursing Program, contact Dr. Poldi Tschirch at 713-525-6991. As the University continues to lay the foundation for the School of Nursing, we welcome inquiries from prospective nursing students. Please complete our inquiry form at www.stthom.edu/nursing to receive updates.

H. Ken DeDominicis, VP for Institutional Advancement 3800 Montrose Boulevard • Houston, Texas 77006 713-525-3119 • ken@stthom.edu • www.stthom.edu Houston’s only Catholic University • Founded by the Basilian Fathers • Located in the Museum District

St. Thomas Receives Title V Grant to Develop Nursing Program

Wortham Theater Center

Herzstein Lecturer Speaks on Jewish Scholars and Scholarship Rabbi Jacob Neusner, one of the most distinguished scholars of Judaic studies in the world, came to the University of St. Thomas on Sept. 20, 2010, to deliver the Herzstein Lecture in Judaism. This annual lecture, sponsored by the Albert and Ethel Herzstein Charitable Foundation, is intended to foster a deeper understanding of Judaism and to promote interfaith relations between Catholics and Jews. Rabbi Neusner and his thought took on greater prominence for Catholics when Pope Benedict XVI devoted 20 pages of his book Jesus of Nazareth to a dialogue with Rabbi Neusner’s book A Rabbi Talks with Jesus. In his lecture at UST, entitled “Fifty Years of Jewish Learning: What has Changed, and What Difference Does It Make?” Rabbi Neusner questioned whether the considerable resources given to Jewish Studies at non-Jewish institutions has left Rabbinical Schools and Jewish institutions of higher learning without the level of support they deserve.

You have noticed differences between when you started college teaching 50 years ago and now. What are those differences?

Students are much better than they were 50 years ago. They are being taught at the high school level how to read and write and think. They come to college well prepared to engage the materials that we teach in a creative way. I am constantly amazed at how well they do with the sources that we teach. Are students more interested in Judaic studies than when you started?

Yes, very much so. They come with curiosity, and they have heard things, so they want to evaluate what they have heard. They are looking in the past for guidance for problems of the present and of the future. They have a sense that the past contains wisdom and mysteries of the present; problems are solvable in the wisdom of the past.

I

n a Q&A with Rabbi Jacob Neusner, pictured above with Pope Benedict XVI, the professor of history and Jewish theology at Bard College in New York looked back through his 50 years of college teaching to describe his concerns as well as the changes that have taken place on university campuses since he first entered the classroom in 1960. The conservative Jewish scholar has authored or co-edited more than 1,000 books in his career.

The Herzstein Foundation continues the work of Albert and Ethel Herzstein by providing grants to charitable efforts that offer individuals opportunities for advancement through education and enrichment of the human spirit.

You express a concern about an exodus of what you would consider top notch Jewish educators from some of the distinguished centers of Jewish learning, whether Hebrew Union College (Reform), Jewish Theological Seminary (Conservative) or Yeshiva University (Orthodox), to secular universities. Why is it a concern? You attract students through the appeal of your intellect. If you don’t have the best professors, you 17

“Catholic universities in general, and this would apply to St. Thomas in particular, have shown the present generation enormous respect for the Jewish religion. They have taught through actions, not only through words. Their attitudes of esteem have persuaded young Jews in their midst of the importance of their own tradition.”

don’t attract the best students. So I am concerned that the rabbinical schools are unable to hold their best faculty. When I went to the Jewish Theological Seminary, the best Jewish minds were pulpit rabbis. Nowadays the rabbinate is playing second fiddle to the professorships that are opening up all over the country. JTS, for example, finds it difficult to compete with salaries and the benefits that are routine in the college world. Draining those professors away might that lead to a less prepared and less challenged clergy in the rabbinate? That is exactly what I think. This new year that we just passed, the student rabbi at the synagogue where I belong really had no message in his sermon. It reminded me of the importance of talent in the pulpit rabbinate. Is there anything that can return power to the rabbinical schools?

Rabbinical schools have had a very difficult time in competing and matching the budgets of secular universities. I sent copies of my lecture here to the presidents of JTS and Hebrew Union College, who are friends of mine. They both responded that this is exactly their problem. They can’t convince people to give their money to the seminaries instead of giving their money to universities for Jewish studies. The seminaries have to have the top professors, the top scholars. Now the secular academy has supplanted the yeshiva and rabbinical seminary; that has made all the difference. What should non-Jewish universities do in this case?

It is the job of every university to get the best people it can get. Catholic universities, for example, make very good appointments in Judaic studies. They don’t settle for second best. Likewise, the secular colleges and universities have high standards, and they meet those standards. It is a question of encouraging competition and making sure the rabbinical schools can compete. So the free market of talent and ideas will level the playing field?

The free market is wonderful. The secular universities are winning the competition, and that is what concerns me. It is in the classroom that learning takes place; through asking tough 18

questions; through listening to the answers. It is not a competition in the abstract. It is a very concrete exchange of ideas. It is a quest for the ideas in another person for stimulation for yourself. It is those opinions and ideas that will give Judaism life for future generations. What have other universities, such as St. Thomas, contributed to Judaism?

Catholic universities in general, and this would apply to St. Thomas in particular, have shown the present generation enormous respect for the Jewish religion. They have taught through actions, not only through words. Their attitudes of esteem have persuaded young Jews in their midst of the importance of their own tradition. What the Catholic universities have to do is place the same demands and expectations of quality on Jewish studies that they place on Catholic studies, and they have to expect the best from their Jewish scholarship and the Jewish scholars on their faculties, not settle for opinions. In April, you met with Pope Benedict XVI in Rome. How do you describe him especially in view of your work?

He is very good natured. He is very warm and devoted. In fact he reminded me of pastoral rabbis. In his book Jesus of Nazareth, Benedict devotes 20 pages to a book of mine called A Rabbi Talks With Jesus. The purpose of my book was to outline the issues that preoccupied Judaism vis a vis Jesus and Jesus vis a vis Judaism. I explained in the preface that this was to make a Christian a better Christian and a Jew a better Jew by showing what the issues were and how each side expresses its deepest convictions, and defining what those convictions are. Benedict liked that very much. Since Pope John XXIII, the Catholic Church has been the most effective force for peace between Judaism and Christianity in the world. – Richard Vara

FACULTY AND STAFF

Chemistry Thomas B. Malloy, Jr., presented “Strengthening Higher Education through Shared Funding and Resources” at the 21st Biannual Conference on Chemical Education at the University of North Texas in Denton in August, a Symposium on Community College and University: Sharing Funding, Research, Students, Faculty, Instruments and Expertise. History Dr. Virginia Bernhard, professor emerita of history, chaired a session entitled “The Color Line, Class, and Society” at the Sixteenth Annual Conference of the Omohundro Institute for Early American History and Culture, University of Mississippi at Oxford, in June. Her article, “Religion, Politics, and Witchcraft in Bermuda, 1651-55,” will

appear in the fall issue of The William and Mary Quarterly. Human Resources Fawziyia Alsarraj presented “Ongoing Orientation Efforts and Crisis Management” at the NAFSA Regional Conference in New Orleans in October; Alsarraj and John A. Meuser presented “The International Student Initiative: Growing an International Student and Scholar Population from the Ground Up.” Meuser also presented “The Importance and the Benefits of Hiring Veterans” at the CUPA-HR regional conference held in New Orleans, in September. Philosophy Rev. Anthony Giampietro, CSB, is a fellow with the American Council on Education at The University of Scranton working with Fr.

Dr. Charlene Dykman Lectures in Malawi Dr. Charlene Dykman, professor of management, traveled to Malawi in southeast Africa for a month this past summer. As president of the local chapter of the Fulbright Association, Dykman delivered a series of lectures to classes on campuses of the University of Malawi, Malawi College of Health Sciences, and other venues. While in Malawi, she donated seed money from UST to begin the development of the St. Patrick Parish Micro Credit program. As a part of both University of St. Thomas and the Fulbright Programs of the U.S. State Department, she was able to encourage students to continue pursuing their educations and to contemplate opportunities to study abroad, particularly in the U.S.

UST honors Dr. Anna DeWald A reception in August honored Dr. Anna DeWald, professor emerita of education and dean emerita of the School of Education. She served as certification officer and as professor from 1981 through 1999. During this time, the Texas Education Agency recognized the School of Education as a Center for Professional Development, and the Houston Chronicle sang praises to the school’s 97 percent pass rate. She was instrumental in beginning the Pi Lamda Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi that recognizes excellence in education through programs that offer speakers, awards, and the Dr. Anna DeWald Scholarship.

Scott Pilarz, S.J., recently named president of Marquette University. Dr. Steven J. Jensen presented “Organ Transplantation and Death,” at the Catholic Bio-medical Ethics Seminar on End-of-Life issues, Vietnamese Dominican Sisters, in Houston in June; and “Omissions and Their Causes,” at the 45th International Congress on Medieval Studies, Western Michigan University in May.

Rev. Charles Talar presented “Mythologies, Empirical Data and Interpretive Ambiguities: Sociological Studies on Priests in the United States Since the Council” at the Colloque on Priesthood, I.C.E.S., La Roche sur Yon, in April; and “Salomon Reinach’s Orpheus: Catalyst for Debate over the History of Religions in France” at the conference on Science, Religion and Politics during the Modernist Crisis in Rome, in June.

Political Science

PUBLICATIONS

Dr. Jean-Philippe Faletta and Theresa L. Heard presented “Closing the Digital Divide: Integrating Service-Learning and Social Media at Colleges and Universities” at the Texas Campus Compact Community Service-Learning Professionals Conference, St. Mary’s University, in July.

Talar, Rev. Charles. “Modernism,” New Catholic Encyclopedia Supplement 2010, v. 2. “Swearing Against Modernism: Sacrorum Antistitum (September 1, 1910),” Theological Studies 71/3, 2010).

Theology Sr. Madeleine Grace, CVI, presented “St. Malachy of Armagh and the Revival of Monasticism in Medieval Ireland” at the Twentieth Annual Texas Medieval Conference at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, in September.

Delcoure, Natalya. “Survey of MBA Students with Concentration in Finance: Attitudes and Opinions,” with B. Mirshab & B. Wilbratte, GBDI, Spring 2010. Jensen, Steven J. Good and Evil Actions: A Journey through Saint Thomas Aquinas, The Catholic University of America Press, April 2010. 19

ALUMNI CHRONICLES

Patricia Teahan Thorpe and Margaret Goetz James study at the Link Lee Mansion the first week of classes in September 1947.

Patricia Teahan Thorpe keeps a piece of University of St. Thomas history in her scrapbook. As the first student to register for classes in 1947, Thorpe still treasures her registration card. In the first week of classes, Thorpe and Margaret Goetz James were photographed on the porch of the Link Lee Mansion. James and Thorpe later became roommates and have remained lifelong friends, and 63 years later the pair recreated the historic photo in June 2010. James met her late husband, Roy James, in Spanish class at UST. She went on to use her history degree to teach in Catholic and public schools and still lives in Houston. Thorpe, who now lives in Highland Beach, Fla., applied her double major in English and social studies to careers in real estate and public relations. “I have wanted recreate this photo for years,” Thorpe said. “When I look at that old photo, I think of how we have remained friends all these years. St. Thomas got me excited about learning. I still have a lot of curiosity about the world and a passion for learning, and if that isn’t education, I don’t know what is.”

They recreated the photo 63 years later in June 2010.

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S P O T L I G H T

David G. Acosta ’88, has been installed as 82nd president of the Houston CPA Society. Acosta, the Society's first Hispanic president, owns David G. Acosta, CPA, specializing in tax controversy-tax returns and accounting, audits, collections and litigation support for a client base that includes major sports and entertainment figures. He served as chair of the Society’s Relations with Taxing Authorities Committee for five years and on its Public Relations Committee before being elected to the board. “The theme for this year is ‘Youth, Diversity, and Energy,’’’ Acosta said. “I want to inspire kids from elementary school through college to become part of this honorable and respected profession. I want those who come from diverse backgrounds to know that it is possible to reach their career dreams regardless of where they come from or what their economic situation may be.” Acosta is a governor with The Recording Academy Texas Chapter. He is also a charter member of the Latin Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences, which presents the Latin Grammy Awards. He is a founding member of Sol y Luna, an early pioneer of Rock en Espanol, which was voted the Best Latin Band at the Houston Press Music Awards in 1994. He has served as chairman of the Board of Pacifica Radio, a nonprofit radio network with five wholly-owned stations and over 60 affiliates across the U.S. He serves in various positions with Festival Chicano, Greater Houston Fair Housing Center, Rusk Athletic Club and the George Foreman Youth and Community Center. He was inducted into the Latin Fast-Pitch Softball Hall of Fame in 2005 and in 2009 honored by the Houston Dynamo as one of 11 Outstanding Hispanic Leaders.

Colyandro authors The Judas Syndrome Tom Colyandro, MA ’00, MDiv ’06, has been splitting time between Houston, Rome and Worcester, Mass. Saint Benedict Press has recently published his book The Judas Syndrome: Seven Ancient Heresies Return to Betray Christ Anew. In it he highlights various Church doctrines using scripture and tradition, explains how certain early heresies arose against them, shows how the Church Fathers responded to them, and demonstrates how these heresies are reappearing in social and political movements today. He has two more books on the horizon.

ALUMNI CHRONICLES

High Five Drive Inspires Alumni Involvement As a communication graduate, Gloria Luna knows the importance of getting the word out to her fellow alumni about staying active with the University of St. Thomas. Luna received her BA in communication in 2003 and

her MBA in 2006, and is currently Program Manager of Community Relations at Centerpoint Energy. Since graduating, she has continued to bless the St. Thomas community with her dedication to volunteering and providing a path to an education just as she received. “I have many fond memories of UST, and I am very lucky to have been provided so many opportunities here,” Luna said. “Education is a priority in my family, and I think everyone deserves to be able to obtain a college education. I know that my contributions help students who might not otherwise have been able to attend UST because of financial constraints.”

Luna’s passion for education and support of St. Thomas is why she has been selected as one of the faces of the University’s new High Five Drive. The High Five Drive is a year-long alumni-driven campaign in which former UST students of all classes have joined together in an effort to rally their fellow alumni to help raise awareness and support of the University’s Annual Fund. The Annual Fund is the operating budget of the entire University and is responsible for providing all the needed resources to ensure an ideal learning environment for St. Thomas students. The Annual Fund provides updated books in the library, updated technology in classrooms and provides tuition assistance when needed. Luna stresses the importance of supporting one’s alma mater. “As alumni, you don’t have to give a lot to make a big impact. Many alumni probably don’t realize that alumni giving percentage directly affects national school rankings in publications such as U.S. News & World Report,” Luna said. “The stronger alumni affinity UST has, the higher we can rank. Ultimately, higher rankings only make your degree more valuable.” Before graduating, Luna was an active undergraduate student. She served as a member and eventually chair for the Program Council, now known as the Student

Activities Board. Luna cites her student leadership role as having had a tremendous impact on her UST experience. “Not only did I obtain invaluable leadership and management skills, but it is how I met some of my best friends,” Luna said. “I was on campus at all hours of the day and night ensuring that programs and events ran smoothly. I wanted everyone on campus to have a positive collegiate experience and be proud of where they went to school.” Alumni involvement has been one of the keys to the

growing reputation of St. Thomas. With active alumni such as Luna, the school continues to be known as the Shining Star in the Heart of Houston. Alumni who return to campus are often amazed at the many changes. “I encourage all alumni to at least visit the campus and see all of the exciting changes. Bring your family out to the alumni reunion, or attend an athletic event. There are many ways to give back and help. I want people everywhere to know the University of St. Thomas.” –Ryane Jackson

The University of St. Thomas is excited to announce the High Five Drive, exclusively for alumni. Alumni are invited to make a gift of at least $5 to the UST Annual Fund or increase their previous gift by an increment of $5. Through the High-Five Drive, our goals are to improve our alumni participation rate and set an alumni record by raising $250,000 for the Annual Fund. We are giving a big High-Five to all alumni who help make this a successful campaign! Every gift makes a difference, and you can help St. Thomas continue to educate students in the Basilian tradition! When you make your gift of at least $5 in support of the High-Five Drive, please tell us your reason for giving. We will post alumni responses online to inspire fellow alumni to give. To view the High-Five Drive video or make your gift, visit www.stthom.edu/highfive.

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ALUMNI CHRONICLES

Become a Class Agent

Go Celts! Fans in the stands will not be the only ones to hear the game playby-play. UST is now partnering

The Alumni Association Board of Directors and the Office of Alumni Relations invite you to become a UST Class Agent. Each class agent will work as a liaison between alumni and the University and serve as a UST ambassador to the greater community. Agents will promote Homecoming and help increase alumni engagement with UST through communication, involvement, fundraising and recruitment. For information or to RSVP, e-mail classagents@stthom.edu.

with Legacy Sports Network to offer an internet broadcast of the Celts games. Log on to www.legacysportsnetwork.com at game time and search for the St. Thomas Celts game under the category: 2010 NAIA/JUCO Basketball.

Join The Friends of Doherty Library In 1954, students demonstrated support for the library by forming a human chain to move books from Link Lee Mansion to Murphy Hall. Today, the collection is housed in the Robert Pace

and Ada Mary Doherty Library on the University’s Academic Mall. With more than 240,000 books and access to approximately 50,000 periodical titles and electronic databases, the Doherty Library is a major learning resource for students, faculty and the Houston community. Members of The Friends of Doherty Library are committed to strengthening the library through the giving of time, financial and in-kind support, and the maintenance of the library as a forum for a shared interest in the world of letters. For membership information and benefits, contact James Piccininni, director, 713-525-2192 or jpicci@stthom.edu.

spring 2011, and alumni mentors are needed. The Alumni Relations and Career Services offices will pair up to 25 graduating undergraduate and graduate students with alumni mentors. Alumni in all areas and fields are invited to apply to be mentors for the students. Mentors will provide resume assistance, career advice and job search tips. Alumni should commit to attending three required oncampus meetings and two optional networking socials to share their experiences as the students work toward their career goals. Applications are now being accepted for mentors for January 2011. For program dates and to apply: stthom.edu/alumni.

USTinsights Seeks Alumni Mentors

Austin Alumni attend Gruene Music & Wine Fest

The USTinsights Alumni Mentoring Students program will have its seventh cohort in

The Austin Alumni Chapter hosted an informal gathering to eat, drink and be merry at

Festa Italiana The 32nd Festa Italiana attracted about 18,000 people to the University of St. Thomas campus on Oct. 1517. The Alumni Association managed a tent at the festival as a place for alumni and friends to gather. Alumni also sold leather goods provided by Vince D’Amico ’52, raising money for the Alumni Association. With entertainment such as the grape stomp, pasta-eating contest, Italian-American Idol Contest, I Madonnari chalk art contest and plenty of children’s activities, there was something for everyone. 22

ALUMNI CHRONICLES

the 24th Annual Gruene Music and Wine Festival on Saturday, Oct. 9. During this event, UST alumni from the Austin area gathered to enjoy the great wine and music available at the festival. Austin-area alumni proudly wore their UST shirts and hats to represent their alma mater. For pictures and information about upcoming Austin Alumni Chapter gatherings, see the “UST Alumni Association– Austin Chapter” at www.facebook.com.

Family & Alumni Weekend More than 200 alumni, students and their families attended the weekend events, Oct. 22-23. Highlights included a presentation by Dr. Hans Stockton on “Cultivating a Global Mind,” St. Augustine’s birthday celebration and a special Family and Alumni Weekend Mass during the Saturday Vigil. The Music Department presented an Opera Workshop, and the Drama Program performed Shakespeare’s Macbeth.

Alumni Social Hours The Tasting Room was the host for the first fall social on Sept. 29, providing free appetizers to the more than 50 alumni who attended. Alumni Night at the Theatre on Oct. 28 included the University’s performance of Macbeth. Free appetizers and wine were served.

Saint Arnold Brewing Company is where alumni met on Nov. 17, for the last social hour of the semester. For information on the spring schedule, contact Hank Emery at 713-525-3111 or alumni@stthom.edu.

$5 donation you will receive breakfast goodies and coffee. Donations benefit the UST Alumni Association. Are you running in the marathon or half-marathon?

Sports Update

Alumna Lauri Vallone ’93 applies the psychology degree she earned at the University of St. Thomas every day – not in a traditional clinical or research setting, but as a subtle undercurrent that guides her daily interaction with the customers and employees of her family’s restaurant business. Since graduation, Vallone has served as business manager for her family’s restaurants, Tony’s Restaurant and Catering, Ciao Bello and the new Caffe Bello, which opened in July only a few blocks away from the St. Thomas campus, at 322 Westheimer. “Psychology is applicable to any career field you choose,” Vallone said. “In my business, my educational background helps me build better relationships with employees and customers, and helps me to understand the finer details which allow us to give customers the best dining experience possible.” The quality education and personal attention she received as a student at UST are congruent with her family’s commitment to customer service and fine cuisine. “What drew me to the University of St. Thomas was their steadfast attention to the student,” Vallone said. “From my initial meeting with my counselor, I knew my years at UST would be personal. I was overwhelmed by the individual attention my professors allotted to me. The curriculum focuses on giving the student the best well-rounded education. I was encouraged to think outside my comfort zone and challenge myself to fulfill my college dream. I am proud to call myself an alumna, and I always have the highest praise for UST.” Outside of work, Vallone is devoted to philanthropy. The University recognized her commitment to the community by honoring her at the 2008 Alumni Fashion Show. She joined the Junior League of Houston in 2002, and through the League has volunteered at various non-profit organizations in Greater Houston, including Habitat for Humanity, Child Advocates, American Diabetes Association, Bo’s Place and Dress for Success.

The UST volleyball program entered its fifth season boasting back-to-back conference championships. Men’s soccer, in its fourth season, is primed for its own conference championship run. Men’s basketball enters its second season building on the success of its first year. With the success of women’s volleyball, men’s soccer, and men’s basketball over the last three years, the University of St. Thomas is preparing to take the next step into intercollegiate athletics by introducing a women’s basketball program in the 2011-2012 season. Get information about team members, coaching staff and schedules at ustcelts.com. Also, to find out about alumni tailgate and pre-game events, contact Hank Emery at 713-525-3111 or alumni@stthom.edu.

Marathon Cheer Party Get a front-row seat for the Chevron Houston Marathon on Jan. 30, 7-10 am, as the Alumni Association cheers on members of the UST community at the Link Lee Mansion, 3800 Montrose Blvd. The location is right on the race route, and for a

Send us your name, and we will make signs and cheer for you! Plus, we will enter you in a drawing for a UST hat. E-mail: alumni@stthom.edu and let us know.

S P O T L I G H T

23

CLASSNOTES

1952 Betty Fischer has been an integral part of the St. Thomas High School community for many years. At the Reunion Weekend President’s Luncheon in October, she received the St. Thomas High School Distinguished Service Award. Read more at www.sths.org/news. 1953

Reinvention Essay Competition. Visit her at stephaniebarko.com/blog. 1978 Marlena Berger of Prudential Gary Greene Realtors in Houston has been named to the Leading Edge Society for 2010 by Prudential Real Estate and Relocation Services, Inc., ranking among the top 6 percent of the Prudential Real Estate Network. She serves as Planning & Zoning Commissioner for the City of Sugar Land. 1979

Two cousins, John Oppie and Larry Ewing ’61, met for the first time at the Austin Alumni Chapter Reception in May. They discovered they live just miles apart in Sun City, in Georgetown, Texas. 1972

Laurie Kassir, MBA ’88, is living in Roseville, Calif. working for Adventist Health West as an RN Clinical IT Analyst, rolling out Physician Order Entry to 16 hospital facilities. 1980

Russell C. Longmire is Senior Staff Landman at LINN Energy in Houston. 1974 Literary Publicist Stephanie Barko was a national finalist in More Magazine’s

Dr. Robert Cooper’s short stories and stand-up comedy material are gathered in Pruning the Family Tree, now available at Amazon.com. His new novel, Abel, an offbeat thriller set in Houston with UST characters and settings,

Celtic Connection Online Community • Search for friends • Post a classnote • Update your contact information REGISTER TODAY: 24

alumniconnections.com/ust

will be released before Christmas. In 2011, he will record a live comedy CD in Houston and a music CD in Philadelphia of his Contemporary Christian songs. Visit his website at robertcooperonline.com. 1980 Daniel Stoecker is Chief Operating Officer of BPSOS, a national non-profit organization headquartered in the Washington, D.C., area that assists Vietnamese refugee populations in the U.S. He also chairs the Board of the United Nations Association of the United States of AmericaHouston Chapter. 1981 Judy (Kaderka) Warne won a third term as 257th Judicial District Court judge in Harris County in the November election. She is also the administrative judge of the Family Trial Division. 1982 Demara Williams, MBA ’05, will complete her MA in psychology from the University of the Rockies with an emphasis on mediation and conflict resolution in May 2011. 1988 Rev. Fr. Jesse Santiago, a behavior detection officer with the TSA, was recognized in 2008 for helping initiate a nationwide, organization-wide Diversity Day. A former member of the Basilian Fathers, he ministers in Houston as a priest of the

Apostolic Catholic Church of Antioch. 1991 Teresa M. Scott, DDS, has been honored since 2005 as one of America’s Top Dentists, and since 2007 as one of Houston’s Top Dentists. Her private practice is in Spring, Texas, and she and husband, Daniel, have three daughters. 1992 Josie L. Williams, CPA, MBA, is an international examiner for the Internal Revenue Service. She is in the Large & Mid-size Businesses Division. 1995 Jennie Blankenship Huerta and Javier Huerta celebrated their first wedding anniversary on June 6. She is a freelance television reporter in Austin at KVUE, the ABC affiliate. 1996 Robert “Bob” Gibson, Jr., moved to Wichita, Kansas, to accept a position as General Counsel of Koch Chemical Technology Group, LLC. 1998 Danielle Forget Shield, MBA, is the co-author of Exceeds Expectations: Take Control of Your Performance Review, outlining strategies employees should use to get the feedback, bonus, raise and/or promotion they want. 1999 Paul and Melissa (Menzies) Neumann announce the birth of their second child, daughter Audrey Elizabeth, on May 10.

IN MEMORIAM

2000 Sharon Kimble-Kramchak, MSA ’03, and husband Garry are Certified CanCare Volunteers, providing support to others facing cancer. Paul Negrete received an MBA in Finance from UST in August 2010. Angela Young MLA, CFRE was promoted to Senior Director of DevelopmentTeam Lead at Rice University. She leads the fundraising efforts at the George R. Brown School of Engineering. 2001 Claire Mulcare began a PhD program in applied statistics at UT San Antonio. 2003 Nathan Zimmermann is working toward an MA in International Relations with a concentration in conflict resolution and management, and a certificate in intelligence studies at American Military University.

Sarah Khan and Peter Stuhldreher were married on April 17 in the Chapel of the Sacred Heart, Duchesne Academy. They currently reside in Houston.

Cindy Elena Rodriguez was selected to serve on an upcoming medical mission in Guatemala with HELPS International. 2006

Jennifer Tatiana Flores announces her engagement to Michael with wedding plans for New Year’s Day.

Raul D. Avalos will marry Jodie Jinnette of Lafayette, Colorado. They were engaged on July 17.

Meredith Stasny is engaged to Ben McCrary.

2007

2005 Nicole (Toval) Palmer and Bryan Palmer announce the birth of son Cameron Tramane, born on April 14. Amber (Martinez) Pilkington, BA, MPsy, and her husband, Dr. Steven Pilkington, moved to San Antonio to start Dignity Women’s Center. Amber is a licensed professional counselor intern and Steven is a natural family planning OB/GYN and NaPro Medical consultant.

IN MEMORIAM Mildred Herring Anderson, the mother of Msgr. James Barlow Anderson, professor of theology, died on Oct. 11. Lenora Post Carlson, daughter of Dr. Don Post, adjunct professor of sociology, died on July 30. Richard Gaede, father of Neil Gaede, Central Computing Services, died on Aug. 20. Ruben Aparicio Gonzalez, father of Dr. Ana-Lisa Gonzalez, School of Education, died on Aug. 7. James Keirnan ’71 died on July 24. He is survived by his brother and sister-in-law,

Lieutenant Michael Baugh returned on the USS Cole in September after a 7-month voyage. Here is Michael on the quarterdeck of his ship that went to the Canary Islands, Naples, Rome, Greece, the Suez Canal, Djibouti, off Somalia, Bahrain, Seychelles, Dubai and Sicily. The ship chased and returned fire at pirates, and rescued refugees.

Catherine and John Keirnan ’78/’77, and sister Margaret Farrar ’74. Thomas E. Nicotre ’84 died on Aug, 23, 2009. Peter Signorello, father of Dr. Rose Signorello, Counseling and Disability Services, died June 29. James Joseph Sommers, the father of Dr. Mary Catherine Sommers, Center for Thomistic Studies, died on June 17. Ann E. Tschirch, the mother of Dr. Poldi Tschirch, Nursing Program Development, died on July 2.

Erin McClarty graduated from South Texas College of Law and sat for the Texas State Bar Exam. While awaiting results, she will intern at the Museum of Fine Arts. 2008 Mary Caro and Joseph Colvin, Jr., were married on June 19 at St. Anne’s Catholic Church. Fr. Anthony Giampietro, CSB, celebrated the Mass. Mary teaches English at Strake Jesuit College Preparatory, and Joseph is a 2011 Juris Doctor candidate at South Texas College of Law. Saniha (Kamruddin) Lakhpaty married Ally Lakhpaty on July 10. 2009 Cimela Kidonakis owns and operates a video production company, Optix Studios LLC.

Antonio Quintero, father of Maria Quintero ’81, budget coordinator, and Helen Quintero ’84, died on July 30. Dr. Robert Joseph Yankow, former associate professor in the Modern and Classical Languages Department, died Aug. 8. In 1986, he accepted a position at UST as an assistant professor of classical philology, and taught until 2008. Yankow also served as the director of the Master in Liberal Arts Program from 1989-1997 and chair of the Modern and Classical Languages Department. A Funeral Mass of the Resurrection was held in Chapel of St. Basil.

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Board of Directors Michele Malloy, Chair

Gloria Kalman

Marathon Oil Company

Community Volunteer

David Harvey, Jr., Vice Chair

Kelli Kickerillo

D.E. Harvey Builders

Kickerillo Companies

Dr. Robert Ivany, President

Paul Layne

University of St. Thomas

Brookfield Properties

Cecilia Abbott

Raymond A. LeBlanc

Harden Healthcare

Retired, Keystone International

Minnie Baird

Dr. Sandi Lemming

Community Volunteer

Village Family Practice

Rev. Robert J. Barringer, CSB

Cora Sue Mach

University of St. Thomas

Mach Industrial Group

Rev. Michael Buentello, CSB

Phyllis Mandola

University of St. Thomas

Tony Mandola Enterprises

Rev. Patrick Braden, CSB

Rev. Joseph Pilsner, CSB

University of St. Thomas

University of St. Thomas

J. Downey Bridgwater

Rev. Thomas Rosica, CSB

Sterling Bank

Salt and Light Catholic Media Foundation

Rev. Brendan J. Cahill

Kim Ruth

Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston

Bank of America

Sr. Mary Roberta Connors, FSE

Rev. Ronald G. Schwenzer, CSB

University of St. Thomas

St. Thomas High School

Michael Cordúa

Robert J. Signorelli

Cordúa Restaurants, LP

Retired, Anheuser Busch, Inc.

Rev. Robert W. Crooker, CSB

Randy E. Velarde

University of St. Thomas

The Plaza Group

His Eminence Daniel Cardinal DiNardo Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston

Don Wang

Dr. Herbert P. Edmundson, Jr.

Dr. Kenneth Wells

Memorial Neurological Association

Allied Health Resources

George Farris

Raye White

Private Investor

Fayez Sarofim & Co.

Michael P. Fleming

A. Martin Wickliff, Jr.

Michael P. Fleming, PC

Epstein Becker Green Wickliff & Hall, PC

Rev. Anthony Giampietro, CSB

Bruce Wilkinson

University of St. Thomas

Retired, McDermott International, Inc.

John E. Hagale

Fred Zeidman

The Methodist Hospital System

Corporate Strategies, Inc.

Metro Bank

Vision 2010 Executive Cabinet

Honorary Committee

Elizabeth Lyons Ghrist, Chair Dr. Robert Ivany, President Gerardo Chapa Michael Cordúa George DeMontrond III Marjorie E. Evans Madelyn Farris Joseph A. Hafner, Jr. Raymond A. LeBlanc Patrick Moran Gloria M. Portela Bill Slick Trini Mendenhall Sosa Tom Standish Charlie Thomas Raye White

Joan and Stanford Alexander The Honorable Bill and Mrs. Sharon Archer Ginger and Jack Blanton His Eminence Daniel Cardinal DiNardo Most Reverend Joseph Fiorenza Maureen and Jim Hackett Barbara and Charles Hurwitz Bette and Leo Linbeck, Jr. Cornelia and Meredith Long Most Reverend J. Michael Miller, CSB George Mitchell Annette and George W. Strake, Jr. Ellie and Jack Sweeney Bishop James Tamayo Lynda and David Underwood In Memoriam Cynthia Woods Mitchell Mrs. Lloyd P. Webre


UST MagWinter2010