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St Stephen’s School Duncraig UNITING CHURCH IN AUSTRALIA

Senior-School Curriculum Handbook 2012

Art illustrations in this Handbook are taken from Design Education Publications. These and other graphics produced with permission under CAL Licence with AISWA.


Table of Contents Introduction Curriculum Council Certificates Exemption from Examinations WACE Breadth of Study List 2012 WACE Requirements and beyond Post Year 12 Options Study Requirements & Study Skills for Senior School Selecting Subject for Senior School University Entry Requirements Training College (TAFE) Requirements Curriculum Team Subjects Listed Alphabetically with Learning Areas Subjects English Learning Area English English English Literature English English English English Literature Faith and Values Learning Area Faith and Values Faith and Values Health and Physical Education Learning Area Physical Education Studies Physical Education Studies Physical Education Studies Physical Education Studies Physical Education Studies Languages Other than English (LOTE) French French Mathematics Learning Area Mathematics General Mathematics General Mathematics General Mathematics General Mathematics Specialist Mathematics General Mathematics General Mathematical General Mathematical General Mathematics Specialist Science Learning Area Biology Chemistry Environmental and Earth Sciences Human Biological Science Physics Psychology Certificate 2 Sampling & Measurement Biological Sciences Chemistry Environmental and Earth Sciences Human Biology Physics Certificate 3 Sampling & Measurement Society & Environment Learning Area

4 4 5 5 7 9 9 10 11 13 14

15 Year 11 Year 11 Year 11 Year 11 Year 12 Year 12 Year 12 Year 12 Year 12

English1A/1B English1C/1D English 2A/2B Literature 2A/2B English 1C/1D English 2A/2B English 2C/2D English 3A/3B Literature 3A/3B

Year 11 Year 12

Faith and Values Faith and Values

Year 11 Year 11 Year 12 Year 12 Year 12

Physical Education Studies 1A/1B Physical Education Studies 2A/2B Physical Education Studies 1C/1D Physical Education Studies 2A/2B Physical Education Studies 3A/3B

Year 11 Year 12

French 2A/2B French 3A/3B

Year 11 Year 11 Year 11 Year 11 Year 11 Year 12 Year 12 Year 12 Year 12 Year 12

Mathematics General 1B/1C Mathematics General 2A/2B Mathematics General 2C/2D Mathematics General 3A/3B Mathematics Specialist 3A/3B Mathematics General 1D/1E Mathematics General 2C/2D Mathematics General 3A/3B Mathematics General 3C/3D Mathematics Specialist 3A/3B

Year 11 Year 11 Year 11 Year 11 Year 11 Year 11 Year 11 Year 12 Year 12 Year 12 Year 12 Year 12 Year 12

Biology 2A/2B Chemistry 2A/2B Environment & Earth Science 2A/2B Human Biology 2A/2B Physics 2A/2B Psychology 2A/2B Certificate 2 Sampling & Measurement Biology 3A/3B Chemistry 3A/3B Environment & Earth Science 3A/3B Human Biology 3A/3B Physics 3A/3B Certificate 3 Sampling & Measurement

19

20

22

24

27

32

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Economics Geography Modern History Politics and Law Geography Unit Modern History Politics and Law Technology & Enterprise Learning Area Applied Information Technology Applied Information Technology Automotive Engineering and Technology Children Family and Community (Caring for others) Computer Science Design Graphics Food Science and Technology Food Science and Technology Materials Design Technology (Wood) Applied Information Technology Applied Information Technology Applied Information Technology Automotive Engineering and Technology Children Family and Community (Caring for Others) Children Family and Community (Independent Living Adolescent Focus) Computer Science Design Graphics Food Science and Technology (Hospitality) Food Science and Technology (Hospitality) Materials Design and Technology (Metals) The Arts Learning Area Visual Art Stage 2 Media Production and Analysis Stage 1 Media Production and Analysis Stage 2 Drama Stage 2 Music Stage 2 Visual Art Stage 3 Media Production and Analysis Stage 2 Media Production and Analysis Stage 3 Drama Music Stage 3 Workplace Learning WPL Workplace Learning WPL Vet Courses available externally through a TAFE or Registered Training Organisation Inspire

Year 11 Year 11 Year 11 Year 11 Year 12 Year 12 Year 12

Economics 2A/2B Geography 2A/2B Modern History 2A/2B Politics and Law 2A/2B Geography 3A/3B Modern History 3A/3B Politics and Law 3A/3B

Year 11 Year 11 Year 11 Year 11 Year 11 Year 11 Year 11 Year 11 Year 11 Year 12 Year 12 Year 12 Year 12 Year 12 Year 12

Applied Information Tech 2A/2B Applied Information Tech 1C/1D Automotive Engineering 1A/1B Children Family Community 1C/1D Computer Science 2A/2B Design 1C/1D Food Science Technology 2A/2B Food Science Technology 1C/1D Materials Design Technology 1C/1D Applied Information Technology 1C/1D Applied Information Technology 2A/2B Applied Information Technology 3A/3B 12 Automotive Engineering 1C/1D Children Family and Community 1C/1D Children Family and Community Independent Living 1C/1D Computer Science 3A/3B Design 2A/2B Food Science Technology 1C/1D Food Science Technology 3A/3B Materials Design Technology 1C/1D

Year 12 Year 12 Year 12 Year 12 Year 12

36

43 Year 11 Year 11 Year 11 Year 11 Year 11 Year 12 Year 12 Year 12 Year 12 Year 12 Year 11 Year 12 Year 11/12 Year 12

Visual Art 2A/2B Media Production Analysis 1C/1D Media Production Analysis 2A/2B Drama 2A/2B Music 2A/2B Visual Art 3A/3B Media Production Analysis 2A/2B Media Production Analysis 3A/3B Drama 3A/3B Music 3A/3B Workplace Learning 1A/1B Workplace Learning 1C/1D Inspire

48 49 49 50

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Introduction This booklet contains information to help you decide which direction to take after Year 10. Details are provided on various post school alternatives, for Year 11 and Year 12 courses and the West Australian Certificate of Education. It is essential you select a program that provides you with: • reasonable likelihood of success • clearly defined opportunities to enter employment, training or high education (University, Training College (TAFE) etc) in your preferred career field. Note While every effort has been made to ensure that the information in this handbook is current and correct, it is ultimately the student’s responsibility, in consultation with parents, to ensure that the entry requirements for Training College (TAFE) and university courses are met. Before selecting courses of study for next year, students, in association with their parents, should: 1. seek advice from their teachers and seriously consider their recommendations 2. check the Tertiary Information Service Centre Summary of Undergraduate Admission Requirements (available from the Careers Adviser) to identify prerequisites for certain courses at universities 3. ATAR cut-offs for entry into courses at the various Western Australian universities 4. be fully aware of Training College (TAFE) requirements for entry into these courses, available from the Careers Adviser, Mr Kernutt. 5. carefully consider the degree of personal satisfaction and enjoyment you obtain from the various subjects, for you are more likely to have success in subjects you enjoy 6. be realistically aware of your capabilities since the study of a subject beyond the scope of your ability will most likely not result in success, regardless of the effort you put into it. It is essential that students seek career guidance from appropriate staff at our School before deciding on a course of study for next year. For Career Advice – Career Adviser or Deputy Head of Secondary– Learning & Curriculum, Heads of Learning Areas, and teachers. For examination advice, Mr Mark Downsborough. For most students there is no short cut to career choices. They must spend time and effort in assessing their own abilities, interests and values, seeking accurate, up-to-date information and examining alternatives.

Curriculum Council Certificates Year 12 students 2012 A WACE Certificate of Results will be issued to all Year 12 students after WACE examinations are processed. It is a cumulative record which includes information about: • • • • • • • •

grades achieved in Curriculum Council subjects (A, B, C, D or E); marks achieved in the examination and school assessments for each course studied (course report); course units completed; achievement of the English language competence requirement; completion of requirements for secondary graduation for the awarding of the WACE VET Units of Competency successfully completed; Workplace Learning programs completed; WACE score

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Exhibitions and Awards Exhibitions and awards are granted to students in recognition of academic excellence. The names of the award winners are published through the media in early January. Exhibitions and awards include a)

Beazley Medal WACE - Award to the highest ranked eligible student with a General Exhibition.

b)

Beazley Medal - VET - Excellence in studies that include training qualifications & workplace learning. The Award goes to the eligible student who has demonstrated the best results in a vocational education and training program.

c)

Curriculum Council VET award score – Achievement in the AQF level, WACE program and other certificates

d)

General Exhibitions to the forty eligible students who obtain the highest Curriculum Council Award Scores.

e)

Awards for Outstanding Achievement in a Course i) Course exhibition: to the eligible student obtaining the highest combined mark for each WACE course provided that the mark is equal to or greater than 95 ii)

Special Course Award: to a student who has not achieved the general criteria for ‘eligibility’ but has achieved the academic requirements for a course exhibition

iii) VET exhibitions: to the top student in each industry area e)

f)

Certificates of Distinction i) WACE courses to eligible students who are in the top 0.5 percent of candidates sitting the examination or the top two candidates (whichever is the greater) in an Examination subject provided at least one hundred students sat the examination. The determination is based upon the WACE score ii)

Special Certificate of Distinction: to a student who has not achieved the general criteria for ‘eligibility’ but has achieved the academic requirements for a distinction award. Only two candidates within the top 0.5% can be given this award

iv)

VET Distinction: eligible provided there is completion of AQF VET Certificate 11 or higher

Certificate of Excellence Certificate of Excellence Awarded to eligible students in her/his last two consecutive years of post-compulsory education in Western Australia in recognition of achieving a set number of A grades.

Exemption from Examinations Is only available if: • students are taking three or less pairs of units at Stage 2 or Stage 3 and • students complete Certificate I or above of an AQF (VET) Qualification. • students will be required to sit at least five examinations and exemptions by application for sixth and seventh subjects will be available.

WACE breadth-of-study list For a student to achieve a WACE in 2012 and beyond, the student must complete, in their final WACE year (Year 12), at least one course from each of the following lists. For this purpose, completion of a course means that the student has: • received a grade in at least two units in their final year of senior secondary schooling in that course • attempted the examination, unless exempt, for that course.

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Note If 50% of a student’s final year of senior secondary schooling comprises endorsed programs, including VET, then the breadth-of-study requirement is waived. # indicates subjects available at St Stephen's School. List A (arts/languages/social science) ARA ABL AIS BME CAE CFC CBS CSL VCS VAR VME VMU DAN DRA ECO ENG ELD GEO FRE GER HEA HEB HIS HAM IBS IND ITA JBS JSL LIT MBS MPA MOD MUS PAE PAL REL VAR WPL

Arabic Aboriginal Languages of Western Australia

Aboriginal and Intercultural Studies Business Management & Enterprise Career and Enterprise Children, Family and the Community # Chinese: Background Speakers Chinese: Second Language Community Services Creative Industries: Art Creative Industries: Media Creative Industries: Music Dance Drama # Economics # English # English as an Additional/DQJXDJH Geography # French # German Health Studies Hebrew History – Modern # History – Ancient Indonesian: Background Speakers Indonesian: Second Language Italian Japanese for Background Speakers Japanese: Second Language Literature # Malay for Background Speakers Media Production and Analysis Modern Greek Music # Philosophy and Ethics Politics and Law # Religion and Life Visual Art # Workplace Learning #

List B (mathematics/science/technology) ACF AIT VAU AET AET APS AVN CSC BIO BCN VBU CHE VCO DES EES EST FST VHO HBS VIT ISC MMT MDT MAT MAS OED PES PHY PPS VPI PSY VSR VTO

Accounting and Finance Applied Information Technology # Automotive Automotive Engineering # Engineering and Technology Animal Production Systems Aviation Computer Science # Biological Sciences # Building and Construction Business Services Chemistry # Construction Design # Earth and Environmental Science # Engineering Studies Food Science and Technology # Hospitality Human Biological Science # Information Technology Integrated Science Marine and Maritime Technology Materials Design and Technology # Mathematics # Mathematics Specialist # Outdoor Education Physical Education # Physics # Plant Production Systems Studies Primary Industries Psychology # Sport and Recreation Tourism

If schools have students in their final year of senior secondary schooling (Year 12) who may not meet the above breadth-of-study requirement, then they can apply for special consideration to the special provisions committee. Note Endorsed programs are unlisted. When VET industry courses are developed they will be allocated to a list (e.g. Construction will be in list B).

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2012 WACE requirements and beyond Breadth and depth requirement • • • •

Complete a minimum of 20 course units or the equivalent. The 20 course units must include at least: four course units from English, Literature and/or English as an Additional Language/dialect, studied during Year 11 and Year 12 (at least two of these units must be completed in Year 12) one pair of course units from each of List A (arts/languages/social sciences) note 5 and List B (mathematics/science/technology completed in Year 12.

Achievement standard requirement • •

Achieve a C grade average or better across the best 16 course units of which at least eight must be completed in Year 12. Endorsed programs and/or VET credit transfer (stand alone) can reduce the required number of course units by up to six units.

English language competence requirement •

Achieve a C grade or better in any Stage 1 or higher course unit from English, Literature and/or English as an Additional Language/Dialect (except 1A and 1B for English as an Additional Language/Dialect). For students who have not achieved a C grade in one of their English, Literature and/or English as an Additional Language/Dialect course units, schools will need to compare a selection of the student’s work with the work samples to verify the student has demonstrated the required standard.

Notes 1. Up to 10 unit equivalents may comprise endorsed programs, including VET credit transfer (stand alone), as indicated below: 2. Nominal hours Unit equivalent Less than 54

0

55 - 109

1

110-164

2

165-219

3

220-274

4

275-329

5

330-384

6

385-439

7

440-494

8

495-549

9

550-604

10

605+

10

3. Each full-year D or E code subject completed prior to 2010 equates to two course units. 4. Students can repeat course units. However, those course units that have the same code, e.g. 1AENG, and are repeated do not contribute to the WACE requirements more than once. If the course unit is repeated, the highest grade recorded for the unit will contribute to the C grade average.

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5. If students repeat course units which have a different context and thus a different unit code, e.g. 1AMDTM and 1AMDTW (Materials Design and Technology: Metals and Wood) then each of these course units can contribute to the WACE requirements. 6. Part-time students or students completing WACE over three years or more must complete two units from English, Literature and/or English as an Additional Language/Dialect in their final year if they have not already completed four units over two years, post Year 10. 7. A pair of units from English, Literature and/or English as an Additional Language/Dialect can be used to meet the List A requirement. 8. Grades from course units which have a different context and thus a different unit code, e.g. 1AMDTM and 1AMDTW (Materials Design and Technology: Metals / Wood), contribute towards the calculation of the C grade average. 9. Full-time Year 12 students enrolled in a pair of Stage 2 or Stage 3 course units must sit the examination in that course, unless exempt. If they do not sit, or do not make a genuine attempt in the WACE examination, the grades for the pair of units completed in that year will not contribute to the calculation of the C grade average. 10. Full-time Year 12 students who are enrolled to complete, in the current year, at least 220 nominal hours of VET (which must be from a single industry area) and are enrolled in three or fewer Stage 2 and/or Stage 3 pairs of units are eligible to apply for an exemption from sitting the examinations. 11. Completion of a Preliminary Stage unit does not contribute to the C grade average, but reduces the number of course units over which the average is calculated in the same way as VET credit transfer (stand alone). 12. Endorsed programs and/or VET credit transfer (stand alone) can reduce the required number of course units as follows: Total number of unit equivalents completed over Years 10 – 12 (and Years 8 and 9 if granted permission) Less than 2

Total number of course units over which the average is calculated

Total number of course units that must be completed in Year 12 (or over Years 12 and 13)

16

8

2 or 3

16

8

4

14

6

5

12

6

6 to 9

10

6

10 or more

10

4

As demand for recognition of student achievement in programs with a larger proportion of vocational education and training increases, the Curriculum Council will review this table. 13. The D and E code English subjects completed before 2010 can be used to meet the English language competence requirement. 14. The Council’s SIRS database is set to automatically check the student’s results and will indicate English language competence where a C grade is achieved. 15. The Special Provisions Committee will consider requests from schools and/or students for exemption from the above general arrangements under the following circumstances: • • •

repetition of units counting towards the WACE requirement due to special circumstances additional VET or endorsed programs being studied, thus reducing the total number of course units available for the calculation of the ‘C’ grade average exemption from examinations due to special circumstances

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appeals from students who considered they made a genuine attempt in an examination when the Curriculum Council considered they did not. The Committee will meet in February and early December each year.

Post-Year 12 Options Employment

Training

Full time Part time Apprenticeship Traineeships

Private organisations e.g. business college, health clubs, nanny school, hospitality & tourism colleges, golf management etc

Training College (TAFE) (Restricted Entry) Part time Full time (certificate courses only)

Senior School Completion of Year 12 leading to.... Employment TAFE study Apprenticeship Traineeship University study

Overall Structure of Senior School Studies The paths of study for Year 11 and Year 12 students at St Stephen’s are; 1.

University directed students who will be studying; a) b) c)

in Year 12, a minimum of five subjects with at least four WACE stage 2 or 3 subjects (paired units) including NCOS English or English Literature in Year 11, a total of six subjects with at least four WACE stage 2 (paired units) or NCOS subjects including NCOS English or NCOS Literature Achieve a scaled mark of at least 50 in specified WACE courses

Note To gain entrance to University, students must achieve C Grade in English or Literature. Students who choose to study any course from Unit 2A and beyond will sit University entrance examinations for that course at the end of Year 12. The WACE is required by all universities for entrance. 2.

Training College (TAFE) directed students such as; a)

students not participating in a workplace learning program (VET in schools units of competency embedded)

b)

students who will be participating in a workplace learning program and attending the workplace for 20 to 30 days throughout the year (VET in schools program)

c)

students who will be attending the workplace for approximately 15 days throughout the year, and attending a course of study at Training College (TAFE) for approximately 15 days throughout the year (VET in schools program – off the job training).

Study Requirement and Study Skills for the Senior Years Students in Year 11 and 12 must be able to demonstrate independent learning skills from week one of Term 1. This program of learning in each Course of Study will move along quite rapidly and build upon knowledge from week to week. Students will also be receiving more homework than in previous years and the quantity of work completed in each lesson will increase. It is assumed that students will have Senior School Curriculum Handbook 2012

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completed their own daily revision of concepts and material learned in their own time – this is regarded as study. The brain will only recall information if it has the chance to synthesise it. It also recalls information more readily if that information has been presented more than once. The aim of a good study program is to repeatedly expose the brain to the information so that recall will be quicker and more comprehensive each time. Study is not a technique or activity reserved solely for the night before a test or the week before exams. Effective study is on-going and regular throughout each school term. To assist with developing a good study habit, the School requested that every student purchase a Student Planner. These Planners are sturdy and designed to last for many years. Students will use the Student Planner slightly differently each year they progress through the School. Using the Student Planner carefully can assist with allocating appropriate time during the week for each course of study. There are also useful tips and hints on the reverse side of the Planner. Study Skills Resources There are numerous study skills learning programs available through the educational community and most of these are conducted in school holiday time. Visit the Study Skills Website on the School Intranet. Having trouble with remembering the information in a particular Course of Study? • •

• • •

Ask the class teacher for hints and tips on how to remember the information. Keep a weekly tally of how many 30 minute sessions you actually spend revising that course of study. If it is a very low total, then you may not be spending enough time for the information to be remembered. Increase the amount of time you spend in each session on that course of study, aim for a total of 2 – 3 hours per week on each course of study. Make use of your Student Planner the A-Z laminated poster you received. Seek help again from the class teacher or your Dean or Mr Kernutt.

Students should also be familiar with the assessment policy of the school.

Selecting Subjects for Senior School Before selecting subjects for study in Year 11 or Year 12, students must note the following: •

Faith and Values is a compulsory subject in both Year 11 and Year 12.

Students must observe the minimum entry standards for subjects.

At universities some courses have pre-requisite subjects, whilst for other courses certain subjects are strongly recommended. Students should be aware of these requirements before making their choice of Year 11 subjects. (Information may be obtained from the Careers Adviser or individual universities.)

Students intending to study at Training College (TAFE) should be aware of the pathways they intend to follow for these will guide their choice of subjects. Information is available from the Careers Adviser.

Students who contemplate staying until the end of Year 12 should have a clear idea of the subjects they intend to take over the two year period. In some learning areas it would not be recommended for students to study the Year 12 course without having studied the Year 11 course.

In developing a timetable grid, the subjects offered and the number of classes in a particular subject are dependent upon the number of staff and rooms available at any one time, and student selection.

Students need to consider that they may not be permitted to study a course in Year 12 if their Year 11 achievement in that subject was not satisfactory.

Students should note that stage 2 and 3 units will require examinations to be sat in order to attain graduation (not just for tertiary entrance), unless exempt.

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Students studying stage 3 units will be awarded a 15 point bonus to their mean scores to facilitate scaling in relation to students studying stage 2 units. Students studying Mathematics Specialist 3C+3D will have the 15 point bonus over Mathematics Specialist 3A+3B.

Students studying the Mathematics General courses will have a 10 point increment between every course starting from the paired stages 2A and 2B, then 2C and 2D, then 3A and 3B with stage 3C+3D having an accumulated 30 point increment ie: 2C + 2B = 10pt increment 3A + 3B = 20pt increment 3C + 3D = 30pt increment

• • •

Note When students make unwise choices of subjects and then desire to change subjects, difficulties may arise as classes may be full or there may be no other suitable option on the same grid line. It is important, therefore, that students and parents give the most serious consideration to the recommendations made by teachers regarding the subjects that students should study in Years 11 and 12.

General Recommendations for Selecting Subjects Students for whom University study is a realistic consideration Students who desire to undertake university study and who are reasonably capable academically should consider taking five or six WACE University directed subjects and one or none of the stage 1 subjects. Students must choose to do English or Literature. Students should also note points 8 and 9 under selecting subjects for Senior School. Students should select one subject from List A and one from List B. Students should also check the TISC website to note any prerequisites required for entry into a University course. Note Year 12 students who study at least five stage 2 and 3 NCOS subjects may choose to study six subjects or the sixth subject time becomes a study period.

University Entry Requirements Western Australian Certificate of Education (WACE) WACE is required by all university undergraduate degrees and also Tertiary bridging courses for school leavers. Prerequisites A scaled mark of at least 50 at stage 3 in specified courses. Some courses will accept 2C/D Mathematics as a prerequisite. St Stephen’s School strongly advises that you check prerequisites at the following TISC address www.tisc.edu.au and check under the heading University Admissions. The University of Notre Dame have prepared a 2014 entry guide called Year 10 Information Sheet available at http://www.nd.edu.au/downloads/future%20students/Admissions/year10info april2010.pdf Competence in English A scaled combined mark (50% school mark + 50% WACE Examination mark) of at least 50 in English or Literature. There are a number of other ways a student can demonstrate English Language competence and this can be addressed in Year 12 with the Careers Counsellor if required. The Universities will also concede competence in English on the basis of standardised exam or standardised moderated school assessments. Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR) The sum of four best scaled score results will produce a Tertiary Entrance Aggregate (TEA) which is then converted into an Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank (ATAR). The TEA may contain any combination of courses at Stage 2 and Stage 3 subject to unacceptable combinations. No course can be counted more than once. Stage 2 and Stage 3 of the same WACE course cannot both count. Students can accumulate scaled scores from past TEE subjects and courses from 2006, subject to unacceptable combinations.

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There are unacceptable course combinations (see below). There are also certain Mathematics combinations which will not be permitted, These are outlined in the Mathematics subject descriptions in this booklet. • •

Biological Science with Human Biological Science English with Literature

Stage two and stage three units can be used to produce a TEA. Note Stage two units are conceptually easier than stage three units. The scores achieved count equally in the calculation of the TEA. However to adjust for the comparative difficulty an increment of 15 is added to the stage three scores. University of Notre Dame (NDA) Is an independent Catholic university with a multi-faceted selection system. Application is through the University. It; • • •

Considers Academic Records over years 11 and 12 Requires students to have an interview with NDA staff member Considers recommendations from schools and employers

Minimum Entrance Requirements Secondary Graduation (WACE) English Language Competence An ATAR of 70 or higher Entrance requirements/prerequisite courses for 2014 entry may be found at http://www.nd.edu.au/downloads/future%20students/Admissions/year10infoapril 2010.pdf 2014 Dentistry Entry In 2014 there will be NO undergraduate Dentistry course offered in Western Australia. Dentistry becomes a postgraduate course at the university of Western Australia from 2013 and students must complete a broad initial degree for consideration. There will be an Assured Pathway offered to 42 students who receive an ATAR > 98. For further information see www.meddent.uwa.edu.au 2014 Medicine Entry In 2014 there is unlikely to be any undergraduate Medicine courses offered at any Western Australian tertiary institution. Alternatives in Western Australia are the postgraduate medicine courses offered at the University of Notre Dame and the University of Western Australia. Entry to these courses will require a consistently high GPA (Grade Point Average) through the first degree, completion of the FGAMSAT and attendance at a structured interview. There will be an Assured Pathway offered to a small number of students who receive an ATAR of > 99. For further information see www.eddent.uwa.edu.au Undergraduate Medicine is offered at the following Australian and New Zealand institutions:The University of Adelaide ………………………………………. http://health.adelaide.edu.au/school medicine/ The University of Newcastle/University of New England ……… http://www.newcastle.edu.au/school/medicine-public-health/ The University of New South Wales …………………………….. http://www.med.unsw.eduau/medweb.nsf/page/ Future%20Students

The University of Western Sydney ……………………………… http://future.uws.edu.au/undergraduatecourses/medicine Bond University …………………………………………………… http://www.bond.edu.au/degrees-andcourses/undergraduatae-degrees/list/bachelor-of-medicinebachelor-of-surgery/index.htm Griffith University …………………………………………………. http://griffith.edu.au.health/ The University of Queensland ………………………………….. http://www.uq.edu.au/study/program.html?acad_prog=2046 Monash University ……………………………………………….. http://www.medicine.utas.edu.au/ University of Tasmania …………………………………………… http://www.medicine.utas.edu.au The University of Auckland ……………………………………… http://www.fmhs.auckland.ac.nz/som/ University of Otago ………………………………………………. http://micn.otago.ac.nz/

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Students wishing to apply for consideration to any of the above Universities for 2013 entry must register for the UMAT test (Undergraduate Medicine Admissions Test) in May of 2012 and follow other application procedures set out by the individual institution.

Training College (TAFE) Entry Requirements Training College (TAFE) entrance requirements and selection criteria •

How do I get into Training College (TAFE)? To get into training College (TAFE) you need to meet the entrance requirements for your chosen course. For a number of courses, you will also need to address selection criteria. Courses that require selection criteria to be addressed will clearly indicate this below the entrance requirement information.

What are the entrance requirements? Entrance requirements are the lowest level of school results you need to be allowed into a full-time course at Training College (TAFE). Entrance requirements will be either: A lower level qualification. For example, to enrol in a Certificate IV in Disability Work you need a Certificate III in Disability Work Or Communication (reading, writing, speaking and listening) and maths skills.

How are my communication and maths skills determined? Your communication and maths skills are determined by your school results. For example, your result in Year 11 English may be equivalent to developed skills. In this case, you can enrol in any course where the entrance requirement is basic skills or developed skills. Don’t forget that if the course requires you also to address selection criteria then you will need to do that in your application.

What are Selection Criteria? Selection criteria are academic and other criteria (e.g. work experience, industry involvement and current and previous employment) which are used to rank eligible applicants competing for entry into a course where there are more applications than places available. Prospective entrants score points across three areas; Qualification Pathways (29 points), Work Experience (29 points), Secondary Education Grades (incl. English) (42 points). If a student is choosing subjects for a Training College (TAFE) pathway and is interested in a course with selection criteria requirements, it would be wise to combine school studies with a VET Certificate and/or a Structured Workplace Learning Program thereby acquiring points for qualification pathway and work experience.

How do I meet the selection criteria? If the course for which you are applying asks you to address selection criteria you need to submit additional information with your application form. The types of documents required are listed on the Training College (TAFE) website at www.training.wa.gov.au and will be included in the annual Training College (TAFE) Full Time Studies Guide. Find out more T: 1800 999 167.

Training College (TAFE) Entry Requirements For full time courses on the website (except those which require a lower level qualification) at Training College (TAFE) www.training.wa.gov.au. and in the Training College (TAFE) full Time Studies Guide you will see one of these symbols:

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Basic communication / maths skills Developed communication /maths skills Well developed communication / maths skills Highly developed communication / maths skills

These symbols show clearly what communication and maths skills are required for the course. You can enter your school results on the website and you will be able to work out whether you have met the skill level required for entry into the course (that is, basic, developed, well developed or highly developed). Then you can easily work out if you meet the requirement for the course in which you are interested. Specific questions can be directed to the school Careers Counsellor, Mr Kernutt.

Curriculum Team The following people will be able to help with enquiries regarding curriculum decisions.

Deputy for Curriculum and Learning:

Mrs Sheevaun Darby

Learning Areas/Departments

Heads of Learning Area/Department and Coordinators

The Arts

Ms Carol Wohlnick (HOLA) Ms Amanda Crewes (Drama co-ordinator) Mr Ben Mettam (Media Co-ordinator) Ms Marion Jamison (Music Co-ordinator - Instrumental) Ms Andrea Stimson (Music Co-ordinator - Curriculum)

English

Mr Phillip Taylor

Faith and Values

Rev Hollis Wilson

Health and Physical Education

Mrs Nerina Cordner

Languages other than English (LOTE)

Mrs Michelle Rainer

Mathematics

Mr Phil May

Science

Mr Charles Biddle

Society and Environment

Ms Bernadette Lhota

Technology and Enterprise

Mrs Penny Herd

INSPIRE Department Coordinator

Ms Debbie Davies

Careers Department

Mr Stephen Kernutt (Careers Adviser) Mrs Sondra Turner (VET Coordinator) Mrs Cathy Trethowen (Workplace Learning Coordinator)

Timetabler

Mrs Barbara Marshall, Mr Mark Downsborough

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Subjects Listed Alphabetically with Learning Areas

English Head of Learning Area: Contact details:

Phill Taylor

9243 2191

Phil.taylor@ststephens.wa.edu.au Year 10 (2011) English Extension English Development English Foundation

Year 11 (2012)

Year 12 (2013)

Literature 2AB

Literature 3AB

English 2AB English 1CD

English 3AB

English 1CD English 1AB

English 2CD English 2AB English 1CD

The shaded area is the preferred University Pathway. Stage 2CD in Year 12 is University Directed. Stage 2AB in Year 12 is for those students who have completed 1CD in Year 11, but who are either not university bound or are applying for an alternative entry pathway.

English Department Mission Statement With insight into and sensitivity for the differences of all students in our care, the English Department at St Stephen’s School Duncraig is committed to striking a balance between functional and critical literacy. We promote the imaginative, analytical and cultural aspects of language to develop powerfully literate citizens who are well equipped to understand themselves and the world. Utilising the latest digital technologies, we engage students with local, national and world issues while maintaining links to the past and to the rich heritage of Australian culture. English Course Structure Year 11 Course 1AB (Stage One) Course 1CD (Stage One) Course 2AB (Stage Two) Prerequisite (Course 1AB) – Nil (Course 1CD) – B Grade in English Foundations or a C Grade in English Development (Course 2AB) – B Grade in English Development or permission from the HOLA – students below 60% in English Development will not be considered eligible for the 2AB course.

Year 12 Course 1CD (Stage One) Course 2AB (Stage Two) Course 2CD (Stage Two) Course 3AB (Stage Three) Prerequisite (Course 1CD) – Nil (Course 2AB) – Nil (Course 2CD) – B Grade in Year 11 1CD (Course 3AB) – B Grade in Year 11 2AB or permission from the HOLA – students below 60% will not be considered eligible for the 3AB course. Overview The English department at St Stephen’s School Duncraig acknowledges that language plays a central role in human life and that it provides a vehicle for communication, a tool for thinking, a means of creativity and a source of pleasure. We believe that, through language, people shape understandings of themselves and their world. It gives them access to knowledge, enables them to play an active part in society and contributes to their personal growth. In this sense, students learn the conventions of the English language to:

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• • • •

communicate ideas and emotions;

• •

explore and develop ideas;

explore values, beliefs and attitudes; effectively interact with others; cope with increasingly complex communication demands; access an increasing range of knowledge and ways of thinking.

In English, students learn how to become competent, reflective, adaptable and critical users of language. Note English or Literature is compulsory in both years 11 and 12. It is possible to meet the English Language Competence criteria studying any of the Paired Unit Combinations offered by the school. Paired Unit Combinations may not be repeated. To achieve graduation and a WACE certificate a C pass is required in English. Students not studying Literature 2AB and/or 3AB across Year 11 and 12 must complete two Paired Units from the following Paired Unit Combinations: Unit 1AENG (Year 11) The focus for this unit is skill building. Students develop their language in the context of their future needs, aspirations and areas of interest. They further develop reading, oral, viewing and writing skills to meet their specific needs and achieve their goals. They will work with a variety of everyday and work-based texts that they will be expected to use once they leave school. And Unit 1BENG (Year 11) The focus for this unit is strengthening skills. Students continue to develop language skills and concepts in the context of post-school destinations and interests. They will continue to work with a variety of everyday and work-based texts and accessible literary texts. Or Unit 1CENG (Year 11 and 12) The focus for this unit is language and self. Students learn to use language to present their experiences, ideas, opinions and responses more effectively, exploring how language can be used differently in different situations. They develop the ability to express responses to texts by exploring how language is used to convey personal information, opinions and experiences.

They develop the skills and knowledge needed to expand the range of texts and types of language used for communication and in mass media texts. Students study workplace documents, mass media texts and popular culture texts. And Unit 1DENG (Year 11 and 12) The focus for this unit is language and society. Students explore and develop language skills to assist their participation in work and society, such as finding, accessing, using and evaluating information. They also develop skills needed for more general social and cultural participation such as comprehending, interpreting and evaluating mass media, popular culture and literature texts, identifying ideas, attitudes and opinions in such texts and discussing their responses and those of other people. Students study more complex workplace documents as well as mass media texts, popular culture texts and less complex literary texts. Or Unit 2AENG (Year 11 and 12) The focus for this unit is language and action. Students develop their language skills by exploring issues of concern or controversy, past or present, and by examining how language is used in relation to these topics: how language can be used to influence attitudes and bring about action or change, and how such uses of language can be challenged and/or resisted. They consider the relationship between language and power; representations of power through language; how particular uses of language can be empowering or disempowering and how they can empower themselves through language. Students study literary texts, mass media texts and popular culture texts. And Unit 2BENG (Year 11 and 12) The focus for this unit is language and the world. Students examine the relationship between language and the world by exploring how language offers particular ideas and information about topics, events or people. They listen, view and read critically, identifying and critiquing particular uses of language and representations within the texts, substantiating their views in written, visual and oral form. They shape language to produce texts that offer particular ideas and information about topics, events or people. Students study literary, mass media and popular culture texts.

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Or Unit 2CENG (Year 12) The focus for this unit is language and communities. Students develop an understanding of the way language operates in a community (e.g. workplaces, subcultures, sporting groups, interest groups, professions, political groups, religious groups etc.) to transmit understandings, create identities, establish power and operate effectively. Students will examine a range of texts and text types to explore the ways a community may create its own language structure in order to influence attitudes and values. They will also examine how language structures/protocols can be used to marginalise, privilege and/or exclude individuals and subgroups. And Unit 2DENG (Year 12) The recommended focus for this unit is language as representation. Students develop an understanding of the way language is used to offer particular representations of topics, events, places or people. They will also consider how these responses are mediated by cultural/social structures. They listen, read and view critically in order to examine the way we make meaning of representations in texts and to account for the different meanings available within textual representations. Students will use language to explore how purpose, context and audience may or Unit 3AENG (Year 12 The focus for this unit is language and identity. Students study how identities are expressed, constructed, represented and critiqued through language. They learn to critically interpret the relationship between particular uses of language and texts on the one hand and conceptions of identity on the other. They develop oral, visual and written language skills by learning to produce texts in a range of genres which explore, produce, challenge and/or subvert conceptions of identity. Students study literary, mass media and popular culture texts. And Unit 3BENG (Year 12) The focus for this unit is language and ideas. Students explore the way language is used in relation to ideas and how this varies among particular fields, genres, and discourses. They study the way in which ideas are expressed, constructed and critiqued through language.

They analyse the assumptions underlying language use and how knowledge is presented in selected fields, genres and discourses, and the attitudes, values and ideologies associated with these assumptions. Students demonstrate their understandings and language skills by learning to analyse language use and produce selected ideas in a range of language forms used in particular fields, genres and/or discourses, and how language is used in relation to ideas and the assumptions that underlie language use. Students study literary, mass media and popular culture texts. Literature Course Structure Year 11 Course 2AB (Stage Two) Prerequisite C Grade in English Extension; A Grade in English Development or permission from the HOLA – students below 70% in English Development will not be considered eligible for the 2AB Literature course. Year 12 Course 3AB (Stage Three) Prerequisite C Grade in 2AB Literature in Year 11; A Grade in 2AB English in Year 11 or permission from the HOLA – students below 70% will not be considered eligible for the 3AB Literature course. Overview 2AB In Literature students learn to appreciate the many perspectives on life, which are powerfully imagined and memorable. This course encourages students to relate their experience of literature to their experience of life generally and to learn that ways of reading texts and their readings of texts enrich their understanding of identity, culture and society. The opportunity to read, enjoy and respond to literary texts, to which the genres of poetry, prose and drama are central, are also provided. The Course is designed to stimulate intellectual curiosity and to promote creative, logical and analytical thinking. Students are encouraged to be literate and articulate; to be competent in the expression of ideas and feelings; and to engage initially with texts. Responses to texts during the course could be personal, reflective, discursive, creative and analytical. The reading, critical thinking and production skills encouraged by this course will be useful in students’ other studies, in their further studies, in their chosen careers and in their lives generally.

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Overview 3AB In these units, students explore the different ways in which literary texts relate to the historical conditions, value systems and cultural life of particular societies. They explore the various contexts of particular texts and consider how literary texts sometimes challenge and at other times naturalise the ideas of the society in which they are produced, as well as influencing the judgements we make about these ideas. They consider the ways that a nation or culture comes to recognise itself through the literary texts that it produces. Students consider how literary texts might challenge the ideology of some groups within society while supporting the views of others. They consider how literary texts might conform to, or challenge generic expectations. Students continue to explore how language works in more complex literary texts and how readers are positioned. This involves a closer study of the relationship between language and meaning which includes the relationship of language with point of view, tone, diction, imagery and figurative language. Students consider how the context of readers will influence the way they understand and perhaps challenge the ideas offered in a text. They examine how literary texts may be read out of their time and place and still reflect and produce culturally significant ideas. In this way, students engage with and develop the notion of multiple readings. Students are asked to produce competent analytical, discursive and reflective responses and to discuss other readings of texts as presented in critical reviews. They continue their analysis of the ways that writers use language and adopt or adapt generic conventions. They are also required to create their own literary pieces, that is, stories, poems or plays of their own as part of their continuing development of their understanding of what is literary and how works of literature are produced. Students are encouraged to experiment with language, to draft and edit and to adopt or adapt the conventions of genre to their purpose in the texts that they produce.

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Faith &  Values  

Head of Learning Area: Contact details:

Rev Hollis Wilson

9243 2402

Hollis.Wilson@ststephens.wa.edu.au Year 10 (2010) Crossroads

Year 11 (2011) Faith Matters World Religion

Year 12 (2012) Faith Matters Body/Mind/Spirit

Year 11 Faith Matters! (Bible study units embedded into Semester 1 & 2 F & V) A course where students are freely able to engage in the biblical, theological, spiritual, and social justice issues of the day (and those timeless issues as well). This will include, but not be limited to, an overview of Ethics, Theology, and Biblical Studies. Students will actively collaborate on the design of the course as it unfolds throughout the year. The Bible study units will be embedded into the current course with the flexibility for modification and extension, dependent on student interests Written work (i.e., short reflections) and classroom discussion is required Or World Religion Film Festival/Cults, Crimes & Crazies (Semester 1 & 2 F & V without Faith Matters units)

Students will actively collaborate on the design of the course as it unfolds throughout the year. The Bible study units will be embedded into the current course with the flexibility for modification and extension, dependent on student interests Written work (i.e., short reflections) and classroom discussion is required Body/Mind/Spirit (3 Terms F & V without Faith Matters units) Students will examine the complexity of human existence through the three facets of: Body - Sport/Physical Activity, Healthy Lifestyle, Sexuality Mind - Mental Health, Mental Illness Spirit - Spirituality, Survey of Religious Traditions (including Excursions)

Students will view a variety of criticallyacclaimed motion pictures as a gateway to understanding the specifics of the world's major religions. In addition, the theme of "Cults, Crimes & Crazies" will provide a platform for examining those historical events that have distorted or otherwise corrupted the central beliefs of these major religions. Classroom discussion is required. Year 12 Faith Matters! (Bible study units embedded into Semester 1 & 2 F & V) A course where students are freely able to engage in the biblical, theological, spiritual, and social justice issues of the day (and those timeless issues as well). This will include, but not be limited to, an overview of Ethics, Theology, and Biblical Studies.

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Heath &  Physical  Education   Head of Learning Area: Contact details:

Nerina Cordner

9243 2121

Nerina.Cordner@ststephens.wa.edu.au Year 10 (2011) Sport Science*

Year 11 (2012) Physical Education Studies Physical Education Studies Physical Education Studies

PES 1AB PES 1AB PES 2AB

Year 12 (2013) Physical Education Studies Physical Education Studies Physical Education Studies

PES 1CD PES 2AB PES 3AB

The shaded area indicates a University Pathway Vocational Education and Training (VET) competencies will be embedded in Stage 1 courses where relevant

Physical Education Studies Course Structure - Year 11: Stage 1AB Stage 2AB Prerequisites Stage 1AB: Students should be competent sports persons with positive communication skills and an ability to work effectively in group situations. Students should be enthusiastic, responsible and cooperative. Commitment to both theoretical and practical components of the course must be demonstrated. Stage 2AB: Positive attitude and participation in General Physical Education; Successful completion of Year 10 Sport Science (minimum ‘B’ Grade); ‘B’ grade in English, Science, Maths or permission from the HOLA Course Structure - Year 12 Stage 1CD Stage 2AB Stage 3AB Recommendations Stage 1CD: Successful completion of Stage 1AB (‘C’ Grade) Stage 2AB: Successful completion of Stage 1AB (‘C’ Grade) Stage 3AB: Successful completion of Stage 2AB (‘C’ Grade)

Course information (relevant to all stages) The Physical Education Studies course content is divided into six interrelated content areas: • developing physical skills, strategies and tactics • motor learning and coaching • functional anatomy • biomechanics • exercise physiology • sports psychology. Each stage is defined with a particular focus and a selection of learning contexts through which the specific content can be taught and learnt. The difficulty of the content increases with each stage and is referenced to course outcomes. Throughout the course, students learn through integrated written, oral and active learning experiences. The course also provides students with opportunities to develop skills that will enable them to pursue personal interests and potential in physical activity as athletes, coaches, officials, administrators and/or volunteers. Physical Activity Students have the opportunity to develop physical skills and an in-depth knowledge of strategies by participating in a range of sports depending upon the course selected. Current sports are identified in the table below. The sport in each course may change. The sport is dependent upon staffing, facilities and the cohort.

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Physical Education Studies: 1AB Physical Education Studies: 2AB

Year 11 Surfing Squash Team Games e.g. Basketball

Year 12 Physical Education Studies: 1CD

Volleyball Triathlon Physical Education Studies: 2AB

Physical Education Studies: 3AB

A brief overview is provided for each stage. More specific information relating to course content can be found on the Curriculum Council website. The link is provided below. Further information regarding the practical (performance) external examination and written examinations is also available. The current list of sports for practical (performance examination includes: AFL Artistic Gymnastics* Athletics* Badminton Basketball Cricket Equestrian (evening)* Golf Hockey Netball Soccer Softball Squash Swimming Tennis Touch Volleyball *Probationary sports http://www.curriculum.wa.edu.au/internet/Senior Secondary/Courses/WACE_Courses/Physical_ Education_Studies Stage 1AB (Year 11) Students will focus on learning the skeletal, muscular, respiratory and circulatory body systems. Biomechanics will be studied to develop an understanding of motion and the role of biomechanics in improving performance in physical activity. The relationship between fitness, skill development and performance will be investigated. There will be opportunities for

Badminton Team Games: dependent upon cohort Badminton Sport: as selected by student in preparation for WACE Practical Exam Tennis Sport: as selected by student in preparation for WACE Practical Exam

coaching/teaching a skill, assessing performance and solving tactical problems relating to the chosen sports. Through physical activity students will have the opportunity to extend their knowledge preparing physically and mentally for physical activity. Stage 1CD (Year 12) Students will focus on simple movement, biomechanical, physiological, psychological, functional anatomy and motor leaning concepts. The content will provide a basis for assessing and enhancing their own and others’ performance. The relationship between skill, movement production and fitness will be studied allowing students' to build upon their knowledge of training principles, nutrition and goal setting concepts to enhance performance. Stage 2AB (Year 11 and Year 12) The focus of this stage is to explore anatomical and biomechanical concepts, the body’s responses to physical activity, and stress management processes to improve their own and others’ performance in physical activity. The relationship between skill, strategy and the body will be studied in order to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of performance. Stage 3APES (Year 12) Opportunities will be provided for students to build upon their acquired physical skills and biomechanical, physiological and psychological understandings to improve their own and others’ performance in physical activity. The focus is to extend students’ understanding of complex biomechanical, psychological and physiological concepts to evaluate their own and others’ performance.

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Languages Other  Than  English   Head of Learning Area: Contact details:

Mme Michelle Rainer

9243 2197

michelle.rainer@ststephens.wa.edu.au Year 10 (2011 French

FRE 1AB

Year 11 (2012) French

FRE 2AB

Year 12 (2013) French

FRE 3AB

The shaded area indicates a University Pathway. Course Structure Year 11 Unit 2AB (Stage 2) Prerequisite Successful completion of Year 10 French. Course structure Year 12 Unit 3AB (Stage 3) Prerequisite Successful completion of French 2AB. Unit 2AB – Year 11 only This Course aims to develop further students’ ability to communicate in French, both orally and in writing. It also aims to broaden their knowledge and appreciation of French culture. The Course integrates linguistic and cultural components by focusing on: • •

Lifestyle and Travel through the themes of The Individual, The French-speaking Communities and The Changing World.

In this Course students typically engage in a range of activities and are exposed to a variety of authentic models of spoken and written French in order to develop greater confidence and fluency in using the language in different contexts. VET units of competency

requirements are met. Some suggested units of competency suitable for integration are: LOTE2003 Access basic services in the target country in a LOTE (French) LOTE3001 Communicate routinely, with customers in the workplace, in a LOTE (French) THTLANO106A Conduct basic workplace oral communication in a language other than English (French) THTLANO206A Conduct routine workplace oral communications in a language other than English (French) Note Any reference to qualifications and units of competency from training packages and nationally accredited courses is correct at the time of accreditation Unit 3AB –Year 12 only This Course aims to promote further students' communicative skills in both spoken and written French. It also aims to extend their understanding of the cultures and ways of life in countries where French is spoken, as well as in those communities within Australia where French is used. In this subject students typically engage in a range of activities and are exposed to a variety of authentic models of spoken and written French in order to develop greater confidence and fluency in using the language in different contexts.

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The Course integrates linguistic and cultural components by focusing on: • •

The Media The World Around Us through the themes of The Individual, The French-speaking Communities and The Changing World.

Careers/Further Study Further courses in French are offered at UWA and Edith Cowan University. They are also offered at TAFE Colleges. With world travel increasing, it is to one’s advantage to master another language. Students thinking of a teaching career will find teaching at primary level more interesting if they can offer their class a foreign language. At high school level, one can teach a language in combination with another subject. Students considering a political career with the Diplomatic Service, Immigration or a job involving legal studies, travel, tourism or hospitality, would be wise to continue French into Years 11 and 12. French is a widely spoken international language. Employers are attracted to applicants who have a foreign language as an extra skill to offer their company. VET units of competency Units of competency may be delivered in appropriate learning contexts if all AQTF requirements are met. Some suggested units of competency suitable for integration are: LOTE3002 Communicate routinely, with colleagues in the workplace, in a LOTE (French) LOTE3004 Access routine services in the target country, in a LOTE (French) THTLANO206A Conduct routine workplace oral communication in a language other than English (French) THTLANO306A Conduct workplace oral communication in a language other than English (French) Note Any reference to qualifications and units of competency from training packages and nationally accredited courses is correct at the time of accreditation.

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Mathematics Head of Learning Area: Contact details:

Phil May

9243 2150

phil.may@ststephens.wa.edu.au Year 10 (2010) Mathematics Extension Mathematics Development Mathematics Development Mathematics Foundations

Year 11 (2011) Mathematics Specialist 3AB Mathematics General 3AB Mathematics General 2CD Mathematics General 2AB Mathematics General 1BC

MAS 3AB MAT 3AB MAT 2CD MAT 2AB MAT 1BC

Year 12 (2012) Mathematics Specialist 3CD Mathematics General 3CD Mathematics General 3AB Mathematics General 2CD Mathematics General 1DE

MAS 3CD MAT 3CD MAT 3AB MAT 2CD MAT 1DE

The shaded area indicates a University Pathway. Mathematics General Prerequisites Unit 1BC – At least 10 Mathematics Foundations Grade C Unit 1DE – At least 11 Mathematics General 1BC Grade C Unit 2AB – At least 10 Mathematics Foundations Grade A or at least 10 Mathematics Development Grade C Unit 2CD – At least 10 Mathematics Development Grade A or Extension Grade C or at least 11 Mathematics General 2AB Grade B ! , preferably A Unit 3AB – At least 10 Mathematics Extension Grade B or at least 11 Mathematics General 2CD Grade B Unit 3CD – At least 11 Mathematics General 3AB Grade C Unit 1BC Students use decimals, fractions and percentages for practical purposes. They apply mathematics for personal budgeting, banking and shopping. They estimate and measure length and mass of objects using a variety of instruments, and derive and use methods for calculating perimeter and basic areas. They translate, reflect and rotate shapes in design. Students use repeated measurement to collect data relevant to them, display data in tables and graphs and interpret the displays. They calculate using mental strategies, written methods and calculators. Students use decimals, fractions,

percentages and ratios for practical purposes. They apply mathematics to financial matters in the workplace. They write and use algebraic rules for number patterns. They measure volume and other attributes of objects, and derive and use formulas for area and volume. They read and draw maps with scales, describe and draw shapes in three dimensions. Students describe likelihood for chance events, and design and test simple probability devices. They collect time-series data relevant to them, display data in tables and graphs and interpret the displays. They calculate using mental strategies, written methods and calculators. Unit 1DE Students use integers, decimals, fractions, percentages and ratios for practical purposes. They apply mathematics in making financial decisions. They write word sentences algebraically and solve simple algebraic equations. They calculate area and perimeters of circles and use the Pythagoras’s theorem for calculating the length of the sides of right triangles. They describe the effects of reflecting, rotating and translating shapes in design, and enlarge, reduce and distort figures. They interpret detailed maps. Students collect measurement data from fair samples, display data in tables and graphs, calculate averages and describe spread of data, and compare datasets. They use mental strategies, written methods, calculators and computer-technologies where appropriate. Students use positive and negative numbers and numbers with powers for

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practical purposes. They calculate interest and repayments for loans. They draw graphs to represent real situations, and use them to describe how quantities are related. They use trigonometry to calculate measurements in right triangles, and calculate volume and surface area of shapes. They analyse networks. Students simulate everyday chance events, calculate probabilities and predict using probabilities. They collect bivariate data relevant to them, display the data in tables and graphs, and describe trends. They use mental strategies, written methods, calculators and computer technologies where appropriate. Unit 2AB Students apply ratios, rates and direct proportion in practical situations. They calculate profit, loss, discount and commission in financial contexts. They study introductory algebra and linear relationships in numeric, algebraic and graphical forms. They use Pythagoras’s theorem for the sides of triangles and analyse the reflection, rotation and translation of shapes in design. Students collect data from fair samples, and represent and interpret the data. They use mental and written methods and technologies where appropriate. Students study and apply exponential relationships. They develop skills for solving equations algebraically and graphically, and investigate and generalise number patterns. They use coordinate geometry in two dimensions. They use formulas directly and inversely for calculations involving shapes threedimensional. They apply trigonometry in right triangles. They represent information using network diagrams. Students simulate everyday chance events, calculate and interpret probabilities, and collect and analyse bivariate and time-series data. They use mental and written methods and technologies where appropriate. Unit 2CD Students calculate interest and repayments in order to make decisions about savings and loans, and they interpret information on financial statements that are part of everyday living. They study and apply quadratic relationships. They extend their knowledge of coordinate geometry, and represent information in networks and interpret network diagrams. Students calculate and interpret probabilities for events with more than one chance component. They analyse and compare datasets, determine trends in data and use trend lines for prediction. They use mental and written methods and technologies where appropriate. Students study functions and their graphs. They formulate recursion rules and apply recursion in practical situations. They explore patterns, making conjectures and testing them. They use trigonometry for the solution of right and acute triangles. Students simulate chance events on technologies, and calculate

and interpret probabilities for chance events that occur in two- or three- stages. They plan random samples, collect, and analyse data from them, and infer results for populations. They use mental and written methods and technologies where appropriate. Unit 3AB Students explore and analyse the properties of functions and their graphs. They develop and use algebraic skills for solving equations. They apply recursion in practical situations, including for finance. They use trigonometry for the solution of triangles. Students use counting principles to calculate probabilities and analyse normally-distributed data. They plan sampling methods, analyse data from samples and infer results for populations. They use mental and written methods and technologies where appropriate. Students study differential and integral calculus of polynomial functions and use calculus in optimisation problems. They develop algebraic skills for solving equations and apply them in linear programming. They analyse and construct project networks. They reason deductively in algebra and geometry. Students analyse bivariate data, and argue to support or contest conclusions about data. They use mental and written methods and technologies where appropriate. Unit 3CD Students develop their knowledge of calculus concepts and their algebraic, graphing and calculus skills, and apply these in mathematical modelling. They use counting techniques and probability laws, and calculate and interpret probabilities for the binomial, uniform and normal random variables. They use mental and written methods and technologies where appropriate. Students extend and apply their understanding of differential and integral calculus. They solve systems of equations in three variables and linear programming problems. They verify and develop deductive proofs in algebra and geometry. Students model data with probability functions and analyse data from samples. They justify decisions and critically assess claims about data. They use mental and written methods and technologies where appropriate. Mathematics Specialist Prerequisites Unit 3AB – At least 10 Mathematics Extension Grade B Unit 3CD – At least Mathematics Specialist 3AB Grade C and Mathematics General 3AB Grade C

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Unit 3AB The focus for this unit is on representation and students use a variety of forms. A strong distinction is drawn between exact and approximate results and their practical applications in particular contexts when solving problems. Students use mathematical models to understand situations defined in terms of change. Mathematical reasoning is introduced and used to establish laws and investigate functions. Students explore new ways of expressing and analysing change, including limiting behaviour and continuity. Students establish and use properties to develop deductive proofs. By building strong algebraic skills to support mathematical arguments, supplemented by the use of appropriate technology, students investigate more complex models to solve practical problems. Unit 3CD The focus for this unit is the abstract development of a range of sophisticated relationships. Spatial contexts are extended from two dimensions to three dimensions. This unit develops abstraction as an increasingly powerful way of expressing and analysing change and introduces exhaustion and contradiction as methods of proof to be explored. Also the focus for this unit is on the use of differential and integral calculus to understand a range of phenomena. By increasing familiarity with transformation and the use of matrices, students can extend their theoretical understanding of growth and decay models. This unit introduces mathematical induction to complete the suite of proof processes developed in mathematical reasoning to a satisfactory, pre-tertiary level. Note Students may choose both a Mathematics General course and a Mathematics Specialist course and both courses will count as separate subjects for the WACE. For further information, please access the Curriculum Council website at http://www.curriculum.wa.edu.au/internet/Se nior_Secondary/Courses/WACE_Courses/Ma thematics Or http://www.curriculum.wa.edu.au/internet/Se nior_Secondary/Courses/WACE_Courses/Ma thematics_Specialist

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Science Head of Learning Area:

Charles Biddle

Contact details:

9243 2406

charles.biddle@ststephens.wa.edu.au Year 10 Biology Chemistry Ecology/Earth Sciences Human Biology Physics

Year 11 Biology Chemistry Earth &Environmental Science Human Biology Physics Certificate 2 Sampling and Measurement

2AB 2AB 2AB 2AB 2AB

Year 12 Biology Chemistry Earth &Environmental Science Human Biology Physics Certificate 3 In Laboratory Skills

3AB 3AB 3AB 3AB 3AB

All courses run concurrently which means they are not discrete units. Units A and B are not separate units. Year 11 is the stage 2 and Year 12 is the stage 3. All courses have a university pathway however the certificate courses are primarily geared for a TAFE or Registered Training Organisation (RTO) pathway.

Biological Science

Students will investigate genes as the basis of heredity and they will study the patterns of inheritance and the influence of the environment to explain variations in living things. In semester 2 a biology camp is undertaken as part of the curriculum council requirements, which allows the students to explore many of the concepts covered in the class room. Excursions and incursions are also a significant part of the Semester 2 course. Prerequisites To successfully undertake studies in Biology a student will need to have achieved a solid “C” grade average in Year 10.

Stage 2 (Year 11) Biology is the study of living things and its holistic approach offers all students an excellent grounding in the life sciences. Semester 1 will focus on experimentation and how science is done from a life science perspective, short term investigations will be carried out. Students will also explore cell processes, DNA and its role in life on earth. Photosynthesis, cellular respiration and their role in the energy systems of all living things will also be a key aspect of student investigation. Semester 2 will look at populations, how we measure and study them and how we can use this data to make predictions about the future of the survival of ecosystems. The interrelationship of organisms and their adaptations that enable them to survive and flourish are also examined.

Stage 3 (Year 12) In Semester 1 students will explore the notion that human survival and quality of life depends on maintaining biodiversity through conservation. Preservation of food supply, educational opportunities, access to medicines and natural resources are all part of the modern understanding of conservation of ecosystems. Students will learn how survival depends on an organisms ability to respond to change and students will develop an understanding of the principles and mechanisms of homeostasis. Students recognise and analyse the range of cellular functions and how these are critical to an organisms survival. A Biology camp is also undertaken in Semester 1 to consolidate the

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material covered in the conservation and environmental sections of the course. In Semester 2 evolution will be the main focus of our investigations. Students relate natural selection and speciation to the development of evolutionary theory. Students will also examine Biotechnology and how this aspect of Biology is at the forefront of many breakthroughs in medicine, food production, animal and plant conservation and provides many exciting opportunities for the advancement of human understanding in some of the big questions in science.

usage of microscopes, biological procedures, tissue culture are all undertaken during the year.

Prerequisite

Prerequisites

To successfully undertake studies in Year 12 Biology a student will need to have achieved a “C” Grade in Stage 2 Biology.

Certificate 2 in Sampling and Measurement.

Certificate 2 in Sampling and Measurement Students undertaking studies in this qualification will be considering pathways into industry and TAFE. This qualification is very practical and will include a range of investigations that will enable students to fulfil the requirements of the qualification. Field trips to Star Swamp and other metropolitan areas of interest, collecting samples, communicating with people, laboratory and field workplace safety, data analysis and presentation are just some of the skills gained in this qualification. Certificate 2 in Sampling and Measurement will assist students in gaining credit towards their WACE requirements as well as providing credits when choosing a TAFE directed pathway. Students will also be work ready and able to move directly into employment possibly within the mining, manufacturing and environmental sectors. This qualification also provides a pathway to University entrance in a wide variety of disciplines.

Certificate 3 in Laboratory Skills will assist students in gaining credit towards their WACE requirements as well as providing credits when choosing a TAFE directed pathway. Students will also be work ready and able to move directly into employment possibly within the mining, manufacturing and environmental sectors. This qualification also provides a pathway to University entrance in a wide variety of disciplines.

Chemistry Stage 2 (Year 11) In Semester 1 students will study kinetic theory of gasses, how elements bond to form compounds, the various properties of solutions, electrolytes and a range of other properties of liquids and gasses. Students will also examine the properties of atoms and how these properties can be used to predict the characteristics of chemicals and chemical reactions. Students will also cover chemical formula, rates of reaction and the various types of chemical reactions that take place in the home, environment and industry. Semester 2 will cover acid base reactions, oxidation reduction chemistry, organic chemistry and applied chemistry. Students will explore these concepts through calculations, experimentation and research. Prerequisite To successfully undertake studies in Chemistry a student will need to have achieved a “B+” grade average in Year 10.

Prerequisites Stage 3 (Year 12) There are no prerequisites for this course.

Certificate 3 in Laboratory Skills After completion of Certificate 2 in Sampling and Measurement the students move on to Certificate 3 in Laboratory Skills. This provides technical and laboratory skills applicable to a wide variety of industries. It is the entry level required for laboratory personnel across all industrial sectors. Laboratory skills are further enhanced in this qualification and will cover such things as simple glass blowing techniques and calibration of equipment to carry out investigations. Advanced

The focus for this unit is chemical processes. A sustainable chemical industry is important to the well-being of an industrialised society. Students will learn how to interpret observations, such as the colour changes of physical and chemical systems at equilibrium. They will also apply rules to make predictions about solutions and the results of reactions within a solution. To be able to explain the structure of the atom in terms of protons, neutrons and electrons. Students will explore the bonding arrangements of atoms and molecules and examine how these influence the types of reaction, rate of reactions and how Le Châtelier’s principle can be used to predict the impact of changes to a system. This study is multi-faceted, and includes laboratory work as well as students exploring ways that chemists

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assist in monitoring and controlling processes in the environment, highlighting links to the importance of chemistry to society. Earth and Environmental Science

Stage 2 (Year 11) Students will explore the structure and composition of the atmosphere, oceans and Earth’s crust. Students will also be able to identify the main geological features of Australian mineral provinces including a precious metal-producing locality and an iron ore-producing region. Student will learn about geological time, the formation and preservation of fossils and their role in reconstructing past environments and climatic conditions. Students will also be able describe the methods of locating and extracting fossil fuels such as crude oil, coal and natural gas. Students will also learn how to identify a range of rocks, minerals and gems. In Semester 2 the mode of formation of igneous rocks will be examined and discussions relating to regional resource development in terms of impacts on ecosystems e.g. rock lobster fisheries, aquaculture, tourism, urbanisation, forestry and horticulture will be undertaken. The rehabilitation of ecosystems using case studies e.g. after mining, agriculture or similar events will also be covered. Student will recognise that features of the ocean floor (magnetic patterns, age, and sea-floor topography) provide evidence of plate tectonics. We will discuss why and how earthquakes occur and the scales used to measure their intensity and magnitude Students will also learn about the location and major characteristics of volcanoes and other major events in the Earth’s crust. There will also be a significant 3 day field trip that student will undertake along with excursions to points of geological interest in the Perth metropolitan region. Prerequisites To successfully undertake studies in Earth and Environmental science students will need to achieved a solid “C” grade average in Year 10.

pollution issues caused by human activity including CFCs, acid rain, waste accumulation and land degradation are all topics covered in this course. Waste management of extraction processes e.g. cyanide from gold extraction, sodium hydroxide (caustic) associated with aluminium extraction from bauxite will be investigated and related to the ecological sustainability of a resource. Student will also cover biodiversity changes based on past major events (e.g. flood basalts, asteroid impacts) and current activities such as land clearing and introduction of species and discuss social and heritage issues relating to extractive industries, such as native title and heritage, and health impacts. Prerequisite To successfully undertake studies in Year 12 Earth and Environmental Science students will need to achieve a “C” Grade in Stage 2 Earth and Environmental Science. Human Biology Stage 2 (Year 11) In Semester 1 the course looks at how human structure and function supports cellular metabolism and how lifestyle choices impact body functioning. Students will learn how cells operate in a dynamic environment to cater for the changing needs of their activities. Cells contain structures that carry out a range of functions related to metabolism, including anabolic and catabolic reactions. Students will also investigate personal questions about problems associated with factors affecting metabolism. Students will investigate various systems such as the circulatory system, respiratory system, digestive system and reproductive system. The transfer of genetic information from parents to offspring involves the replication of DNA, meiosis and fertilisation. In semester 2 the focus will be on DNA, reproduction, genetics and evolution. Students will investigate reproductive technologies, human development, human evolution and genetic disease. Prerequisites

Stage 3 (Year 12) Students will study the formation of deep Earth materials and processes including mantle hot spots, lamproite/kimberlite pipes associated with diamonds, and black smokers which form the origins of oceanic mineralization. Students will learn about the formation of intrusive igneous rock bodies (dykes, sills, plutons and batholiths) and their relationship to the surrounding rocks. Dating techniques including nuclear decay and application to a geological timescale, how Earth's climate has changed over time, global

To successfully undertake studies in Human Biology students will need to have achieved a solid “C” grade average in Year 10. Stage 3 (Year 12) The complex interactions between body systems in response to changes in the internal and external environments facilitate the optimal functioning of cells. Feedback systems involving the autonomic nervous system, the endocrine

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system and behavioural mechanisms maintain the internal environment within tolerance limits for body temperature, body fluid composition, blood sugar, gas concentrations and blood pressure. These are some of the issues that will be studied in Semester 1. In semester 2 the structure and function of the nervous and musculo-skeletal systems provides for human movement and balance as the result of the coordinated interaction of the many components of each of these systems. Students will also investigate genetics and biotechnological techniques that are being developed and used for a range of applications such as treatment of genetic disorders by gene therapy, cell replacement therapy and tissue engineering by the cloning of stem cells. Prerequisites To successfully undertake studies in Biology students will need to have achieved a solid “C” grade in year 11 Human Biology.

Physics Stage 2 (Year 11) Students will learn about Motion and Forces and Nuclear Physics. Within the context of motion in one dimension students will solve both qualitative and quantitative problems concerning Newton’s Laws and Equations of Motion, Momentum and Impulse and Conservation of Mechanical Energy. Through the study of Nuclear Physics students will learn, amongst others, about radioactive decay, half-life of radioisotopes and nuclear energy from fusion and fission through the technologies of nuclear power and nuclear bombs. In semester 2 the focus is Heating and Cooling and Electrical Fundamentals. Within the context of heating and cooling our environment, students gain insight into temperature measurement, internal energy, and heat transfer by means of conduction, convection and radiation in different types of materials. Students also examine the thermal properties of substances including thermal expansion, specific heat capacity and latent heat. The unit, Electrical Fundamentals, introduces the concepts of electrical charge and energy transfer in series and parallel electrical circuits. Students learn about the relationship between voltage, current and resistance in circuits within the context of working safely with electricity in the home.

Stage 3 (Year 12) In Semester 1 the focus is Motion and Forces in a Gravitational Field and Electricity and Magnetism. Motion and Forces in a Gravitational Field describes the motion of objects within gravitational fields which includes the motion of projectiles, orbiting bodies such as satellites, planets and moons and ways in which forces affect the stability of structures. Electricity and magnetism explores the interrelationship between electricity and magnetism and how the motor effect and electromagnetic induction enable the generation and distribution of electricity on a large scale. Students develop research questions to plan, conduct and evaluate investigations. Problem solving techniques include combinations of concepts, principles and calculations. In second semester students focus on Particles, Waves and Quanta and Motion and Forces in Electric and Magnetic Fields. Students learn how waves apply in many technologies such as musical instruments, communication and sensing systems and medical diagnosis and treatment. Extending their knowledge of atomic structure, students learn how to analyse spectra and explain a range of physical phenomena such as fluorescence and X-ray emission. Students learn about some aspects of modern Physics such as fundamental particles, cosmology and special relativity.

Supernova and spiral galaxy Prerequisite To successfully undertake studies in Year 12 Physics students will need to have achieved a high “C” Grade in Stage 2 Physics. Psychology

Prerequisite

Stage 2 (Year 11)

To successfully undertake studies in Physics students will need to have achieved a “B+” grade average in Year 10.

Students will explore factors that affect behaviour such as heredity and hormones they will look at intelligence and the history of intelligence testing and the relationship between

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physical, cognitive, emotional and social development. The psychology of personality and the impact of the presence of others on individual behaviour such as social facilitation and inhibition will be examined during the first semester. Students will also be required to master summarising and displaying of data in an organised way using graphs and tables. In Semester 2 cultural influences on attitude development toward minority groups and difference in people and how these are measured will be studied. As will psychological concepts and processes associated with memory. Developmental issues as they relate between personality, motivation and human performance along with status and power of individuals in groups and between groups will also be explored. Prerequisites To successfully undertake studies in Psychology students will need to have achieved a solid “C” grade average in Year 10.

perspectives on topical social issues such as poverty, welfare and social inequality are also investigated. In this unit students focus on contexts related to diversity and community that may range from sex role orientation, music and culture, body piercing and branding to disabilities. Student will also investigate the contributions and limitations of personality theories and explore the anatomy and physiology of the brain and nervous system. The role of the experimenter, participants’ rights such as confidentiality, voluntary participation and withdrawal rights; informed consent procedures; deception in research; and professional conduct will also be looked at. Altered state of consciousness and experiencing and controlling pain, distortions of visual perception and illusions are areas students always find interesting and will be examined during the semester. Current understanding of nature/nurture on our development, communication and social skills development will also be explored during the course of this unit.

Stage 3 (Year 12)

Prerequisites

In Year 12 students will look at the links between cognitive skills and behaviour, such as in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and other factors that affect behaviour, emotion and thought such as exercise and drugs. Group behaviours such as cooperation and competition will be explored along with factors that influence group behaviour such as group size, communication and closeness. Students will also examine values conflict in society and the overt and covert influences on social values and practices. Changes in technology and its influence on social structure,

To successfully undertake studies in Psychology students will need to have achieved a “C” grade average in year 11.

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Society &  Environment   Head of Learning Area: Contact details:

Bernadette Lhota

9243 2119

bernadette.lhota@ststephens.wa.edu.au Year 10 (2010) Economics Geography History

Year 11 (2011) Economics Geography Modern History Politics & Law

ECO2A/2B GEO2A/2B HIM2A/2B PAL2A/2B

Year 12 (2012) Economics Geography Modern History Politics and Law

ECO3A/3B GEO3A/3B HIM3A/3B PAL3A/3B

The shaded area indicates a University Pathway Economics Year 11 11 Economics 2A/2B The Economics course is designed to facilitate the achievement of three outcomes. The first outcome is economic enquiry where students use economic information and data to communicate an understanding of economic events, issues and decisions. The second outcome is the operation of the economy where the students need to understand that there are economic forces behind decision making. The third outcome is economic policy and actions that the government undertakes in an economy. 2AECO The focus is on markets. It explores the key role markets play in determining the wellbeing of individuals and society, as well as its limitations.

Prerequisites To have achieved a B grade in any Year 10 Economics Unit or with the permission of the HOLA. Career Pathways RBA, Banking, Education, Government, Private Business, Accounting, Law and Economists Geography Year 11 11Geography 2A/2B The course is designed to introduce students to the physical and human components of the world in which we live. It aims to develop an understanding of global concepts, mapping and practical skills, fieldwork skills and a values approach to the study of geographical processes and issues.

2BECO to macroeconomics and the government’s role in the economy. It explores problems such as economic growth, unemployment and inflation with a focus on the Australian economy. Assessment Assessment Types for both 2AECO and 2BECO Short Answer Long Answer Examination

30 - 50% 30 - 50% 20 - 30%

Unit 2AGEO The focus of this unit is the geography of natural hazards and impact minimisation. The increasing incidence of hazards, together with their impact on standards of living, has prompted the active search for proposed solutions. This unit investigates the spatial patterns of selected natural disasters and the varying management strategies implemented on a global scale. Unit 2BGEO The focus of this unit is the geography of sustainable resource use. The unprecedented demand for global resources will require the application of sustainable management practices to resource development. This unit explores the spatial availability and use of

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selected resources and the social, economic and environmental impacts that result from their usage. Assessment types for both 2AGEO and 2BGEO Geography inquiry (investigation, observational methodology) 20 - 30% Fieldwork and Practical Skills 10 - 20% Short and extended responses 25 - 35% Examinations 25 - 40% Prerequisites To have achieved a B grade in any Geography Unit or with the permission of the HOLA. Note

Assessment Assessment types for both 2AHIM and 2BHIM Historical Inquiry Explanation Document Study Examination

20 - 30% 20 - 30% 20 - 30% 20 - 30%

Prerequisites To have achieved a B grade in any Year 10 History Unit or with the permission of the HOLA. Career Pathways Education, Government – Diplomacy, Tourist, Research, Commerce, Media, Law and Historian.

Students will be expected to attend fieldwork in the form of a camp or excursion. Career Pathways Town Planning, Geology, Tourism, Education, Environmental Science and Government. Modern History Year 11 11 Modern History 2A/2B History is the study and practice of making meaning of the past with a view to understanding the present. It engages us with the ideas, beliefs and values that shape and influence our lives. Modern History enables students to become critical thinkers and promotes skills of research, hypothesis testing and analysis of information as they engage with investigations. 2AHIM The focus of this unit is societies and change. Students learn about the evolving nature of societies and the various forces for continuity and change that exist. Students will learn that some values, beliefs and traditions are linked to the identity of a society. The unit of study is USA Between the Wars

Politics and Law Year 11 11 Politics and Law 2A/2B Politics and Law is a critical study of the processes of decision-making concerning society’s collective future. The Politics and Law course aims to develop knowledge and understanding of the principles, structures, institutions, processes, and practices of political and legal systems, primarily in Australia and where appropriate, other systems. The course aims to support all students in developing a sense of identity, and a sense of political, legal, cultural and social awareness. 2APAL The focus for this unit is political and legal systems. Students critically examine the principles, structures and processes of political and legal systems. 2BPAL The focus for this unit is representation and justice. Students critically examine and assess political and legal systems in relation to representative democracy and justice. Assessment

2AHIM Assessment Types for both 2PAL and 2PAL The focus of this unit is historical trends and movements. Students will be given the opportunity to justify their choice of sources, draw inferences based on key elements; communicate findings in ways that show consideration of differing perspectives and justify a particular viewpoint. The unit of study is Nazism in Germany 1918 - 1945

Investigation Explanation Source Analysis Examinations

20 - 40% 20 - 40% 20 - 40% 20 - 30%

Prerequisites To have achieved a B grade in any Year 10 History Unit or with the permission of the HOLA.

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Career Pathways

3AGEO

Media, Education, tourism, Political Advocacy, Commerce, Barrister, Criminology, Government and Politician.

The focus of this unit is the geography of planning cities. Students will examine concepts, processes and roles of planning by comparing Perth with a selected megacity.

Economics - Year 12 12 Economics 3A/3B

3BGEO The focus of this unit is the geography of climate change over geological time. Students will investigate policies and strategies designed to guide future action used to address the effects of the climate change.

The Economics course is designed to facilitate the achievement of three outcomes. The first outcome is economic enquiry where students use economic information and data to communicate an understanding of economic events, issues and decisions. The second outcome is the operation of the economy where the students need to understand that there are economic forces behind decision making. The third outcome is economic policy and actions that the government undertakes in an economy.

Geographical inquiry Fieldwork/practical skills Short and extended responses Examinations

3AECO

Recommended entry level

The focus for this unit is Australia and the global economy. It explores Australia’s economic relationships with other economies, and contemporary global economic events and issues of significance to Australia.

Either a C Grade or better in Year 11 Geography or by permission of the HOLA

20 – 30% 10 – 20% 25 – 35% 25 – 40%

Note It is expected that students will participate in fieldwork.

3BECO The focus for this unit is economic policies and management. It explores how economic policies and actions of the government and other authorities, such as fiscal policy, monetary policy and microeconomic reform operate in the pursuit of the economic objectives of the government. Assessment Types Short Answer Long Answer Examination

Assessment

30 - 50% 30 - 50% 20 - 30%.

Prerequisites Either a C Grade or better in Year 11 Economics or by permission of the HOLA. Geography Year 12 12 Geography 3A/3B

Modern History Year 12 12 Modern History 3A/3B History is the study and practice of making meaning of the past with a view to understanding the present. It engages us with the ideas, beliefs and values that shape and influence our lives. Modern History enables students to become critical thinkers and promotes skills of research, hypothesis testing and analysis of information as they engage with investigations. 3AHIM The focus for this unit is cohesion and division. Students learn that there are internal and external forces that result in cohesion and/or division within societies and these have consequences for continuity and change. The unit of study is Australia 1950s-1990s 3BHIM

Geography is a field of inquiry that brings together the human and physical dimensions of the world in the study of people, places and environments. This includes the study of interrelationships between natural and human environments and the spatial patterns that result from and account for these processes over time.

The focus for this unit is ideas that shaped history. Students will explore the power of ideas and ideologies as forces for change and/or their use to reinforce dominant elements in society. The unit of study is the Chinese Revolution— from Nationalism to Maoism (1920s–1980s)

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Assessment Historical Inquiry Explanations Document Study Examinations

20 - 30% 20 - 30% 20 - 30% 20 - 30%

Prerequisites Either the achievement of a C Grade or better in Year 11 History or by permission of the HOLA. Politics and Law Year 12 12 Politics and Law 3A/3B Politics and Law is a critical study of the processes of decision-making concerning society’s collective future. The Politics and Law course aims to develop knowledge and understanding of the principles, structures, institutions, processes, and practices of political and legal systems, primarily in Australia and where appropriate, other systems. The course aims to support all students in developing a sense of identity, and a sense of political, legal, cultural and social awareness. Unit 3APAL The focus for this unit is political and legal power. Students critically examine the roles of political and legal institutions in maintaining and developing law and government policy Unit 3BPAL The focus for this unit is rights and governance. Students critically examine how political and legal systems respond to human rights issues the ways countries can uphold or undermine democratic values. Assessment Assessment Types for both 3APAL and 3BPAL Investigation Explanation Source Analysis Examinations

20 - 40% 20 - 40% 20 - 40% 20 - 30%

Recommended entry level Either a C Grade or better in Year 11 Politics and Law or by permission of the HOLA.

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Technology and  Enterprise   Head  of  Learning  Area:    Penny  Herd     Head of Learning Area: Contact details:  

Penny Herd

9243 2146

penny.herd@ststephens.wa.edu.au Year 10 2011 Food Technology

Children, Families & Personal Management Future Focus

Introduction to Applied Information Technology/Computer Science

Commercial Design

Year 11 Food Science and Technology (Hospitality) Food Science and Technology Children, Family and Community (Caring for Others - Child focus)

Applied Information Technology ^VET Cert 2 Applied Information Technology ^ VET Cert 2 Computer Science ^ VET Cert 2 # Certificate 2 in Visual Arts and Contemporary Craft – Design focus

2A/B 1C/D 1C/D

1 C/D 2 A/B 2A/B Vet Cert

Year 12 Food Science and Technology (Hospitality) *Food Science and Technology Children, Family and Community (Independent LivingAdolescent Focus)

3A/B 1 C/D 1C/D

* Children, Family and Community (Caring for Others - Child focus) *Applied Information Technology ^VET Cert 2 Applied Information Technology ^ VET Cert 2 Computer Science ^ VET Cert 2 # Certificate 2 in Visual Arts and Contemporary Craft – Design focus Design Graphics

1C/D

1C/D 3A/B 3/AB Vet Cert

2 A/B

Materials Design and Technology

Materials Design and Technology (Wood) ^VET Cert 1

1C/D

Materials Design and Technology (Metal) ^VET Cert 1

1C/D

Applied Engineering Systems

Automotive Engineering and Technology ^ VET Cert 1

1A/B

Automotive Engineering and Technology VET Cert 1

1C/D

The Shaded area is the preferred University Pathway * These courses are offered to Year 12 students who have not studied them in Year 11. ^ This is a VET course embedded in Curriculum Council course. See specific course for details. #This is a standalone VET certificate. See specific course for details.

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Applied Information Technology Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) are very quickly changing ways of living and working in Australia. They are changing the nature of communication; approaches to entertainment, lifestyle decisions, and in so many other ways are increasingly influencing the lives of all Australians. Almost every area of employment involves some understanding and use of ICT to allow for greater productivity and creativity. Every school graduate needs to be capable of using ICT in his / her personal, community and future professional lives. This course aims to address that need by providing students with opportunities to be creative through interesting practical experiences using exciting and innovative software and equipment. Year 11 Units 1C/D (Stage 1) Prerequisite Nil The focus for this course is on using technology (productivity and communications software) to meet personal computing needs and on using software that is commonly required in the operation within Small Office / Home Office (SOHO). This includes productivity software; some graphics and basic principles of networking. Units 2A/B (Stage 2) Prerequisite A/ B grade in Year 10’s Introduction to AIT / Computer Science or knowledge of how to create web pages and basic graphic editing/creation and/or permission from HOLA. The course focuses on the application of computer technologies to living in the community and working in industry and business environments, and the resulting impact on workplaces, individuals and society. They also consider the ethical implications of ICT solutions and develop an appreciation of the role and impact of these technologies on their own personal values and on the values within a democratic and ethnically diverse society. From a practical perspective students learn how to design and build various types of multimedia. Year 12 Units 1C/D (Stage 1) cannot be repeated Prerequisite Nil

Units 2A/B (Stage 2) Prerequisite Successful completion of Applied Information and Technology Stage 1 or A/ B grade in Year 10’s Introduction to AIT / Computer Science or Knowledge of how to create web pages and basic graphic editing/creation and/or permission from HOLA Unit 2A/B The course focuses on the application of computer technologies to living in the community and working in industry and business environments, and the resulting impact on workplaces, individuals and society. They also consider the ethical implications of ICT solutions and develop an appreciation of the role and impact of these technologies on their own personal values and on the values within a democratic and ethnically diverse society. From a practical perspective students learn how to design and build various types of multimedia. Unit 3A/B This course focuses on evolving information and communication technologies. The use of applications to create, modify, manipulate, and use ICT, particularly for business, training, education, infotainment and edutainment purposes. Students consider the nature and impact of technology change when creating ICT products for a particular purpose and audience. It also considers information and communication technologies in industry where students focus on the production of an ICT product for a particular industry of interest. Students will combine both practical and creative skills in the use of ICT to produce solutions to challenges commonly found in the industry that may relate to areas such as information management or promotion. Students justify the computer systems selected for their product and understand the social and legal implications, and the impact of its use in industry. VET – Students will gain a Certificate 2 of Information Technology if they successfully complete 2 stages otherwise a certificate of attainment will be achieved if just one stage is completed. Careers and Further Study This is a dynamic area of study which builds skills and techniques that can be used in all area of life and work. Courses in Multimedia and Information Technology are also available at TAFE and students hoping to build a career in the small business or management area would find this possibly an essential. The course provides an excellent general grounding in ICT for the future study aspirations and professional lives of all students.

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Careers and Further Study Automotive Engineering & Technology Automotive vehicles are an important part of our culture and have dramatically changed the way in which we live and travel within our environment. We use cars, trucks, plant and equipment for everyday purposes, to commute to work, and for holiday flights and cruises. Primary and secondary producers use plant and equipment to work the land, haul raw materials to manufacturers and finished products to consumers locally, nationally, and globally. This course exposes students to the component parts, accessories, systems and technologies of the automotive vehicle. They develop the principles underpinning the operation of vehicle systems and subsystems. They also develop the knowledge and skills needed to service, maintain, and repair these systems. Workshop activities provide them with opportunities to learn about the range of components and materials used in the manufacture of automotive vehicles. Year 11 Units 1A/B (Stage 1) Prerequisite Nil The focus for this unit is automotive systems where students understand automotive vehicles and the basic principles and systems around which an automotive vehicle is constructed and assembled as well as considering the outer shell. Automotive servicing is the second focus where students develop knowledge and skills involved with servicing automotive vehicles for purposes of maintenance and repair. Year 12 Units 1C/D (Stage 1) Prerequisite Nil The focus for this year is automotive tuning where students develop knowledge and skills involved with tuning automotive engines of different types and automotive components where students understand automotive vehicles and the basic systems and principles around which an automotive vehicle is constructed and assembled

The course caters for the learning needs of all students, from those seeking a career in the automotive vehicle or technological discipline. They can choose a course that allows them to achieve post-school destinations into a range of disciplines including engineering; science; mechanical, fabrication and electrical trades; drafting; urban planning, business, management and other technical and technology-related professions. Children, Family & the Community Caring for Others – Child focus Year 11 or Year 12 (cannot be repeated) Units Stage 1 C/D Prerequisite Nil Caring for others is a practical course that focuses on child development and it provides opportunities to develop an understanding of the diversity of Australian society. Social, economic and technological factors impact on families and their ability to develop skills in children. Individual, family and societal factors influence the development, health status and wellbeing of infants and children. Through the application of developmental theories, students’ understandings of human growth and development will be developed and applied. They engage in a critical analysis of the interrelated factors that affect the development and wellbeing of children, families and communities and apply them to practical situations. Support services that are available and benefit families and the practices that govern the provision of support are examined. They develop an understanding of the ethical and legal issues and practices that impact on the wellbeing of all children and families. It is hoped that students will continue to actively interact with children in the Primary school in order to give hands on experience of the theories learnt in the classroom. Independent Living – Adolescent focus Year 12 only Units Stage 1 C/D Prerequisite Nil

VET – Students will gain a Certificate 1 in Automotive when they successfully complete Stages 1A/B and 1C/D.

Independent Living is a practical course that provides opportunities to develop an understanding of the social, economic and technological factors that impact on the ability of adolescents to develop skills to live independently. Individual, family and societal

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factors influence the development, health status and wellbeing of adolescents. Examination of developmental theories will extend students’ understandings of adolescent issues as they engage in a critical analysis of factors that affect the wellbeing of adolescents. They recognise the diverse nature and interdependence of societal groups; and that the creation of environments that promote optimal growth and development of individuals affects society as a whole. Students examine support available to adolescents. They will develop an understanding of the ethical and legal issues and practices that impact on the wellbeing of all individuals, families and communities. There is a practical focus on cooking and food skills for independent living. Careers and Further Study

a B or higher in Mathematics and Science in Year 10 will be accepted given they meet the first requirement above. Units 2A/B Year 11 or Year 12 The focus for these units is developing systems solutions for computer-based systems in an industry context (including programming) and the design and development of database applications and communication systems. Students are introduced to networking concepts. Year 12 Units Stage 2 A/B or 3 A/B Prerequisites Successful completion of Computer Science 2A/2B or see above for Stage 2 entry.

Health, education and community service industries offer strong vocational opportunities for young people from volunteer and entry level to tertiary qualified positions. These courses caters for all students, from those seeking career pathways in related industries to those aiming for personal development, parenting and life skills.

Units 2A/B Year 11 or Year 12

Computer Science

Units 3A/B Year 12 only

Information and communication technologies st are integral to the 21 century global village and economy. Whilst we all use computer systems as a means to an end, it is vital to develop an interest in the workings of computer systems so that future generations have the knowledge, understanding and skills to create and maintain computer systems. The Computer Science course aims to take students beyond the use of computers at an application level into the realm of creating Information Technology solutions which might include software, hardware, networking and database design. These courses aim to stimulate students’ awareness of the nature and scope of computer science. In the process it provides “value adding” as the skills developed will be useful in the word or work and tertiary study. Finally, they give students practical and interpersonal skills that equip them to function effectively in a world where these attributes are vital for employability and daily life in a technological society.

The focus for these units is on developing a conceptual understanding of how a computer works and appreciate how large-scale systems are designed, developed and maintained. This includes program and database design; communication systems, including security, protocols and the implications for web-based systems.

Year 11 Units Stage 2 A/B Prerequisites An interest in how a computer works, not just “playing” on a computer is an essential motivating requirement for this subject. Achieving a B grade for Introduction to AIT/ Computer Science at Year 10 and/or achieving

The focus for these units is developing systems solutions for computer-based systems in an industry context (including programming) and the design and development of database applications and communication systems. Students are introduced to networking concepts.

VET – Students will gain a Certificate 2 of Information Technology if they successfully complete Stage 2 and Stage 3 courses otherwise a certificate of attainment will be achieved if just Stage 2 is completed. Careers and Further Study Computer science is a wide-ranging discipline that leads to many different professional and non-professional careers. This course covers a variety of topics to appeal to a diverse range of students interested in academic or vocational pathways. This course aims to stimulate students’ awareness of the nature and scope of computer science. Design Certificate II in Visual Arts and Contemporary Craft Course Structure – Two-year course over Year 11 and 12

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Compulsory Core Units § Participate in OSH processes § Develop and articulate concept for own work § Use drawing techniques to represent the object or idea § Source information on history and theory and apply to own area of work

Year 12 Design Graphics Units 2A/2B ( Stage 2) Prerequisite A B grade in Design 1C/D

Seven units of competency from a teacher selection of electives, including but not limited to such units as: § Apply techniques to produce prints § Apply techniques to produce textile/fibre work § Apply techniques to produce ceramics § Apply techniques to produce digital images § Apply techniques to produce glass work § Apply techniques to produce sculpture Prerequisites There are no prerequisites for this course, but it is recommended that students have achieved a C grade in Year 9 and/or Year 10 Commercial Design, and have completed the first half of the course in Year 11 for entry into Year 12; but this is not essential. A student may be permitted to start this course in Year 12, with the suitability and eligibility determined by the Head of Learning Area. Students leaving after Year 11 would receive a full Certificate I, as would a student entering into the course in Year 12. Certificate II in Visual Art and Contemporary Craft This course is taken from the Visual Arts Craft and Design Training Package and offers a practically based, foundational course within the concepts of Design. It covers a wide range of practical disciplines, but always from a commercial perspective as a designer. It offers core competencies in drawing skills, developing concepts, the history and theory of design and OSH processes, before applying these across a number of media disciplines. Careers/Further Study It is envisaged that students will be able to use this Certificate as entry into the Design Fundamentals (Cert IV) and other Design courses available at TAFE. It allows students advanced standing with their WACE Certificate for the TAFE Admissions process. With up to one year in a Certificate IV course, students have the option to consider degree pathways at a second year or even third year level at Curtin University, ECU, UWA or other interstate institutions, such as RMIT or SIT. Such pathways are advantageous in reducing HECS fees also.

In the Design course, students develop a competitive edge for current and future industry and employment markets. Students are equipped with the knowledge and skills to understand design principles and processes, analyse problems and devise innovative strategies through projects. Students are able to focus the concepts of design through the context of graphics. This course encourages students to develop problem-solving skills together with creative and analytical ways of thinking. Innovation is encouraged through a process of inquiry, exploration and experimentation. Students transform and shape ideas to develop resolved design works. Unit 2A – Cultural Design Students understand that society is made up of different groups of people that share different values, attitudes, beliefs, behaviour and needs; and that cultural communication communicates these values and beliefs, maintaining a sense of identity and community for different cultural groups. Within the graphics context, projects communicate cultural identity, values and beliefs in communication situations including, but not limited to posters, newsletters, leaflets and other two-dimensional contexts. Unit 2B – Economic Design Students understand that the commercial world is comprised of companies, consumer products, services and brands which are all competing for economic exchange and market share. They are introduced to ethical and legal issues, particularly those to do with copyright, censorship and intellectual property. Within the graphics context design projects may focus on corporate identities, labels and packaging, branding, advertising and universal design. Food Science & Technology Food impacts on every aspect of life. It is used by the body to meet functional needs and is essential for overall health and wellbeing. Food is also eaten in a variety of situations for purposes other than nourishment, such as when celebrating significant cultural events, recognising important personal milestones and in response to psychological needs. The application of science and technology plays an important role in understanding how food properties are used in processing to meet

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identified needs of consumers and producers. The use of foods by consumers and producers is governed by laws and regulations to ensure the supply and distribution of safe foods. Students have the opportunity to explore and develop food-related interests and passions which shape personal and professional goals, enhance problem-solving abilities and build personal resilience and self-esteem. Year 11 Unit 1C/D Prerequisite Nil The hospitality context of this course enables students to develop their food preparation, production and presentation skills. Self management and interpersonal skills are practiced to plan and prepare meals and food items for personal use and to cater for functions. The course is structured for students to relate to food resources on a personal level. This includes, personal nutrition and indentifying factors affecting choice and their selection of foods, as well as their own nutrient requirements and recommended daily intakes. In a broader view, the course also looks at food related laws and requirements needed for safe food production in the community. In the hospitality context of this course, students learn skills relating to identifying consumer needs and how to modify and adjust to clients and a changing market. Stage 2AB Prerequisite A high B-grade in Food Science and Technology 1CD or A or B in lower school Food Technology and a B in Yr 10 Science or permission from the HOLA. The hospitality context of this course enables students to extend their food preparation, production and presentation skills. Self management and interpersonal skills are further developed through the design and production of food products in a group situation. Students learn valuable skills in food and customer service, to an industry standard, through a variety of large-scale food productions. Enterprising capabilities such as creativity, initiative, innovation and risk management are addressed in practical contexts. Students explore the relationship between food science; the physical and chemical properties of food; to meet specified performance requirements. Through this they apply their knowledge to understand the various food habits and trends of different groups in society. Students will also examine and assess trends, ethics and advertising; the use of foods by

consumers and producers is governed by laws and regulations to ensure the supply and distribution of safe foods. Year 12 Unit 1C/D Prerequisite Nil The hospitality context of this course enables students to develop their food preparation, production and presentation skills. Self management and interpersonal skills are practiced to plan and prepare meals and food items for personal use and to cater for functions. The course is structured for students to relate to food resources on a personal level. This includes, personal nutrition and indentifying factors affecting choice and their selection of foods, as well as their own nutrient requirements and recommended daily intakes. In a broader view, the course also looks at food related laws and requirements needed for safe food production in the community. In the hospitality context of this course, students learn skills relating to identifying consumer needs and how to modify and adjust to clients and a changing market Stage 3AB Prerequisite Successful completion of Stage 2 Food Science and Technology The hospitality context of this course allows for students to further develop their understanding of food science and technology through examining issues such as food diversity and equity in Australian society and food innovations. Students will investigate food consumption patterns in society and the many reasons behind new food creations on the market. Students appreciate the underpinning reasons for innovative food developments to meet local and global needs for the sustainable supply of safe food for all. They understand how ethics, food laws and regulations have key roles in informed decision-making about factors that impact on consumers and enterprises and the supply of food. Critical thinking strategies, data analysis and enterprising capabilities are a few of the valuable skills students will learn throughout this course.

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Careers and Further Study Food and allied health sectors represent a robust and expanding sector of the Australian and global employment markets. This course connects with further vocational education and training, university and employment pathways. This course enhances employability, leading to further training and employment opportunities in areas that include food processing, hospitality, retail, community services, health and education. Materials Design &Technology This course focuses on design techniques where students develop an understanding of the elements of design and it’s impact on everyday lives. They discover the importance of ergonomics, functionality and aesthetics in the design process, and the impact on the final product and its usability. They also consider the intended user’s requirements and reflect these in their design. Creativity and innovation are emphasized. Safety skills form an integral part of the course, and students learn to use tools and machinery in a safe and considerate manner at all times. Year 11 Units

This unit focuses on various aspects of metals, including the importance of metals in today’s society; how different metals are produced and refined; and the characteristics of different metals and how they function. Special attention is given to the theoretical and practical aspects of welding and fabrication and students learn a variety of different welding techniques. In this course, students design and construct a large mild steel tool box using a variety of workshop machinery, power tools and hand tools. The design phase is undertaken using AutoCAD software, giving students an appreciation of the use of technology in the design process and an understanding of technical graphics. Safety skills form an integral part of the course, and students learn to use tools and machinery in a safe and considerate manner at all times. VET – At the successful completion this course students will attain a Certificate I in Engineering. Careers and Further Study This course also connects to the world of work, further vocational education and training and university pathways.

1C/D Wood Context (Stage 1) Prerequisite Nil In this course, students design and construct a jarrah barstool and a personal project of their own choice using a variety of workshop machinery, power tools and hand tools. The design phase is undertaken using AutoCAD software, giving students an appreciation of the use of technology in the design process and an understanding of technical graphics. Students also undertake extensive research into materials selection. As part of this learning area, students consider the environmental aspects of timber production and usage. VET – Students will gain a Certificate 1 in Furnishings after successful completion of the course. Year 12 Units 1C/D Metals Context(Stage 1) Prerequisite Nil

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Arts  Head of Learning Area: Contact details:

Carol Wohlnick

9243 2144

carol.wohlnick@ststephens.wa.edu.au Year 10 (2010) Visual Art Media Production & Analysis Media Production & Analysis Drama Music

Year 11 (2011) Visual Art Media Production & Analysis Media Production & Analysis Drama Music

Visual Art Course Structure Year 11 Unit 2A/B (Stage 2) Prerequisite Unit 2A/B Successful completion of Year 10 Visual Art with a minimum C grade pass or permission from the Head of Learning Area. Unit 2AVAR The focus for this unit is differences. It covers different forms of visual art from past and present contexts and provides students with a range of sources of inspiration and stimulus for developing ideas and producing original artworks. They explore different materials, media and techniques when exploring and expressing their ideas. Unit 2BVAR The focus for this unit is identities. In this unit students explore concepts or issues related to personal, social, cultural or gender identity. Students investigate themes of personal interest and a range of observational, conceptual and/or imaginative starting points for visual exploration. They become aware that art may give form to ideas and issues that concern the wider community and develop understandings of how the visual arts may be both socially affirming and challenging. Career Pathway Visual Art aims to develop the ability for students to be visually literate and creative. Occupations

VAR2AB MPA 1CD MPA 2AB DRA 2AB MUS2AB

Year 12 (2012) Visual Art Media Production & Analysis Media Production & Analysis Drama Music

VAR3AB MPA2AB MPA3AB DRA3AB MUS3AB

that require creativity and a high level of visual literacy include: Artist (Fine) Art Teacher Graphic Design Web Design Photographer Illustrator Advertising Architect Fashion Design Textile Design Theatrical Design (costume and set) Jewellery Design Industrial Design Landscape Architect Interior Design Visual Merchandiser Arts Management Course Structure Year 12 Unit 3A/B (Stage 3) Prerequisite Unit 3A/B Successful completion of Year 11 Visual with a minimum C grade pass or permission from the Head of Learning Area. Unit 3AVAR The focus for this unit is commentaries. It offers students opportunities to engage with the social, political and cultural purposes of art making and art interpretation. Students have flexibility to select learning contexts that reflect their own cultural milieu and promote the production of a unique and cohesive body of work. Broad and

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innovative inquiry includes the conceptualisation and documentation of experiences within contemporary society. They research issues, events, and ideologies and examine their own beliefs, considering how the visual arts have reflected and shaped society and values.

Students view, listen to, and analyse relevant media texts as their experience of the language of media is reinforced. They examine how audiences’ cultural experiences to texts, such as, reality television influence their responses to media. They build upon basic production processes and create their own productions.

Unit 3BVAR

Unit 1DMPA (Stage 1)

The focus for this unit is points of view. It provides students with the opportunity to identify and explore concepts or issues of personal significance in the presentation of a sustained, articulate and authentic body of work. They research and analyse factors affecting points of view such as time, place, culture, religion and politics, synthesising this knowledge to express and communicate their personal viewpoint or position. In the critical analysis and interpretation of their own work and the work of others, they reflect on the relationships between artworks, audiences and contextual factors, considering how these contribute to the development of different perspectives.

The focus for this unit is infotainment. A range of non-fiction commercial and non-commercial media styles and genre provide opportunities to examine how reality is dramatised and represented whilst engaging and informing audiences. Students create their own non-fiction media works learning about aspects of production.

Career Pathways Visual Art aims to develop the ability for students to be visually literate and creative. Occupations that require creativity and a high level of visual literacy include: Artist (Fine) Art Teacher Graphic Design Web Design Photographer Illustrator Advertising Architect Fashion Design Textile Design Theatrical Design (costume and set) Jewellery Design Industrial Design Landscape Architect Interior Design Visual Merchandise Arts Management Media Production & Analysis Course Structure Year 11 Unit 1C/D (Stage 1) Unit 2A/B (Stage 2)

Unit 2AMPA (Stage 2) The focus for this unit is popular culture such as that demonstrated by, texts representing social, historical and political change over time and how the wider audience consume such media texts. Students learn to interpret how codes and conventions are used to create meanings in a variety of ways in different forms of media. They create their own productions as they apply their understanding of media language and work in specific contexts. Unit 2BMPA (Stage 2) The focus for this unit is press and broadcasting in forms such as television, press or photojournalism. Students explore journalistic or documentary texts as they research how cultural groups and issues are represented and reported. They become increasingly aware of production responsibilities and independent, as they manipulate technologies to express ideas in their productions. Year 12 Unit 3A/B (Stage 3) Unit 2A/B (Stage 2) Prerequisite Unit 2A/B (Stage 2) Successful completion of Year 11 MPA Unit 1/D with a minimum C grade pass or permission from the Head of Learning Area. Prerequisite Unit 3A/BMPA

Prerequisite Unit 1C/D (Stage 1) Unit 2A/B (Stage 2) Successful completion of Year 10 MPA with a minimum C grade pass or permission from the Head of Learning Area. Unit 1CMPA (Stage 1) The focus for this unit is entertainment.

Successful completion of Year 11 Unit 2A/B with a minimum C grade pass or permission from the Head of Learning Area.

Unit 3AMPA (Stage 3)

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The focus for this unit is exploring film as art. Students develop an understanding of aesthetics by exploring meanings and values depicted in contemporary and traditional film styles. They develop competence in expressing their own ideas in creative forms by experimenting with production technologies, codes and conventions. Unit 3BMPA (Stage 3) The focus for this unit is power and persuasion in diverse fiction and non-fiction media forms ranging from the seductive nature of popular media forms to propaganda material. Students consider the purposes and values of producers and audiences and examine the role of the media in reflecting, challenging and shaping values, beliefs and ideologies. They create media productions that express their views and show a distinct flair or personal style. Career Pathway Occupations that require high levels of creativity, communication and technical expertise in creative film production and editing include: Film & Television Production Stage Management Camera Operator Public Relations Film & Television Technician Scriptwriter Actor Web Designer Film & Television Director Multimedia Director Sound and Lighting Technician Audio Visual Technician Announcer Teacher Film Editor Entertainer Disc Jockey Broadcast Technician Drama Course Structure: Year 11 Unit 2A/B (Stage 2) Prerequisite Unit 2A/BDRA Successful completion of Year 10 Drama and English with a minimum C grade pass or permission from the Head of Learning Area. Stage 2 Unit 2A/B In unit 2A the focus is dramatic action. This unit covers representational and/or realistic drama forms and styles. Students explore techniques of characterisation through different approaches to text interpretation, particularly

those based on the work of Stanislavski and others who followed. In unit 2B the focus is challenge and identity. Students consider the dynamic role of drama in shaping cultural and personal identity and how drama can provide a commentary or critique that may challenge conventional thinking. They extend their knowledge of drama forms and styles and learn about the work of particular practitioners whose approaches to drama encompass presentational and/or non-realist drama. Career Pathway Occupations that require high levels of creativity, communication and confidence in presentation include: Actor Film & Television Producer Film & Television Director Stage Management Mime Artist Sound and Lighting Technician Announcer Teacher Film Editor Entertainer Make up Artist Public Relations Course Structure: Year 12 Unit 3A/B (Stage 3) Prerequisite Unit 3A/BDRA Successful completion of Year 11 Drama and English with a minimum C grade pass or permission from the Head of Learning Area. Stage 3 Unit 3A/BDRA The focus for this unit is text and style. In this unit students perform and produce a published drama work incorporating a detailed study and interpretation of text, subtext, context and style. They learn about different theoretical approaches to representational and presentational or non-realist drama and the ways that drama texts can be reworked for contemporary performance contexts and audiences. In unit 3B the focus is drama perspectives. Students apply conventions and techniques of drama forms and styles in original ways to develop original works that may be either celebratory and/or critical in their perspective. They show understanding of how a range of practical and theoretical approaches manipulates the elements of drama. They work independently or collaboratively to devise and perform an original work. Career Pathway

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Occupations that require high levels of creativity, communication and confidence in presentation include: Actor Film & Television Producer Film & Television Director Stage Management Mime Artist Sound and Lighting Technician Announcer Teacher Film Editor Entertainer Make up Artist Public Relations Music Course Structure: Year 11 Unit Music 2A/B Western Art Music (Stage 2) Prerequisite Unit 2A/B Western Art Music Successful completion of Year 10 Music with a minimum C grade pass or permission from the Head of Learning Area. As Performance is an important aspect of the course, students who have been studying their instrument for several years are at an advantage; students must be receiving regular tuition on their chosen instrument and have competent performance skills. Music 2A/B Western Art Music These units are studied concurrently and are divided into two areas, Performance and Musicianship, each worth 50% of the total course mark. Stage 2 of Western Art Music involves the study of the European tradition of music and its development over time. Students study orchestral works from the genres of Concerto and Symphonic music, spanning the Baroque, Classical and Romantic eras. Students develop aural skills, further their knowledge of music theory and composition and learn to analyse music both aurally and visually. Music technology is used throughout the music course. Individual weekly tuition is a requirement for the Performance content of this course. In addition to a weekly instrumental/vocal lesson, students must be committed to regular practice in order to continually improve their performance skills.

setting develops musical excellence in the student and reinforces the musicianship being studied in the classroom program. Students studying a band or orchestral instrument must also be a member of one of the following Ensembles: Concert Band, Orchestra or Wind Ensemble. Course Structure Year 12 Unit Music 3AB Western Art Music (Stage 3) Prerequisite Unit 3A/B Western Art Music Successful completion of Year 11 Music with a minimum C grade pass or permission from the Head of Learning Area. These units are studied concurrently and are divided into two areas, Performance and Musicianship, each worth 50% of the total course mark. As Performance is a very important aspect of the course, students who have been studying their instrument for several years are at a distinct advantage; students must be receiving regular tuition on their chosen instrument and have competent performance skills. Stage 3 of Western Art Music involves the study of the European tradition of music and its development over time. Students study works from the genres of Chamber music and Concerto. Students develop aural skills, further their knowledge of music theory and composition and learn to analyse music both aurally and visually. Music technology is used throughout the music course. Individual weekly tuition is a requirement for the Performance content of this course. In addition to a weekly instrumental/vocal lesson, students must be committed to regular practice in order to continually improve their performance skills. Attendance at High School Choir rehearsals is a compulsory aspect of this course for Semester One. The ability to pitch well and to read music are vital parts of musical development; research has demonstrated that using these skills in a choral setting develops musical excellence in the student and reinforces the musicianship being studied in the classroom program. Students studying a band or orchestral instrument must also be a member of one of the following Ensembles: Concert Band, Orchestra or Wind Ensemble. Careers/Further Study/Music for Life

Attendance at High School Choir rehearsals is a compulsory aspect of this course. The ability to pitch well and to read music are vital parts of musical development; research has demonstrated that using these skills in a choral

The study of Music leads to a career in many areas. Former St Stephen’s students have gone on to become music educators, solo performers, members and directors of church worship

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teams, orchestral, jazz and contemporary musicians, music theatre performers, accompanists, composers, singer/songwriters, orchestrators, conductors, audio engineers and arts industry managers. Many of our former students who do not undertake tertiary music studies but have completed Stage 3 Music use their highly developed musical ability in the wider community in both Christian and secular contexts. Course Structure: Year 11 Unit 2AB (Stage 2) Western Art Music Prerequisite Music 2AB is recommended for students who have gained a ‘C’ grading or higher in Year 10 Music and have strong performance* skills. *In certain circumstances instead of studying Performance as an elective, students may study composition, or divide their study between composition and performance. This will be done in consultation with the Director of Music Curriculum. Course Structure Year 12 Unit 3AB (Stage 3) Western Art Music Prerequisite Music 3AB is recommended for students who have gained a ‘C’ grading or higher in Music 2AB and have strong performance* skills. *In certain circumstances instead of studying Performance as an elective, students may study composition, or divide their study between composition and performance. This will be done in consultation with the Director of Music Curriculum.

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Workplace Learning Course (WPL) – Year 11 and Year 12 Endorsed Programs (WPL and Work Skills) Off-the-Job Training – Year 11 and Year 12

11Workplace Learning 1A/1B 12 Workplace Learning 1C/1D Costs In both Years 11 and 12, a levy will be imposed for the delivery and supervision of WPL programs and Off The Job Training Courses and is separate from the School’s tuition fees and charges.

complement the skills from Units 1AWPL/1BWPL. While in the work placement, students are assessed on work related skills by the workplace supervisor. Students reflect on the skills assessed.

All achievement gained through WPL and Off the Job Training is recorded on the Western Australian Certificate of Education (WACE).

Off the Job Training involves the student attending an external provider such as TAFE or RTO during school time. This may involve one day a week, or blocks of up to five days, which may occur during school holidays.

Workplace Learning Course Year 11 Unit 1AWPL This unit is to introduce workplace learning. Students prepare for, and are placed in, a suitable workplace. While in the work placement, students are assessed on work related skills by the workplace supervisor. Students reflect on the skills assessed. Year 11 Unit 1BWPL This unit is designed to build on workplace learning and follows on from Unit 1AWPL. Students prepare for, and are placed in, a suitable workplace. The workplace could be in the same or a different industry area. Skills are selected to complement the skills from Unit 1AWPL. While in the work placement, students are assessed on work related skills by the workplace supervisor. Students reflect on the skills assessed.

Year 12 Unit 1CWPL The unit is designed to consolidate workplace learning. Students prepare for, and are placed in, a new workplace. Skills are selected to

Year 12 Unit 1DWPL The unit is designed to extend workplace learning. Students prepare for, and are placed in, a suitable workplace. Skills are selected to complement the skills from Units 1AWPL/1BWPL/1CWPL. While in the work placement students are assessed on work related skills by the workplace supervisor. Students reflect on the skills assessed. Paid employment is not suitable for the purpose of this course. To enable all the teaching, learning and assessment for each unit to take place 2 periods per cycle are allocated within the timetable.

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Vet Courses available externally through a TAFE or Registered training Organisation

Off the Job Training involves the student attending an external provider such as TAFE or RTO during school time. This may involve one day a week, or blocks of up to five days, which may occur during school holidays. Off The Job Training gives students in Year 11 and Year 12, the opportunity to achieve industry level qualifications through a program of study external to the school that is incorporated into the school year. The hours given to successful completion of the competencies in the industry level qualifications are assessed as subject equivalents and contribute to Secondary Graduation achievement. The program involves 15 to 30 days of study in which the students have the opportunity to achieve a national qualification. Students attend a TAFE or other Registered Training Organisation (RTO) for one day a week. Some of the partnerships that have been developed are: Australian Centre for Advanced Studies (Mt Pleasant Baptist Community College)

Courses can include: Automotive Marine Tourism (Outdoor Recreation) Sport Development Music (Electronic, Ensemble, Technical Production) Community Services (Aged Care/Disabilities/Enro lled Nursing/Teacher Assistant) Multimedia

Retail Beauty Children’s Services Hospitality/Tourism Business Trades (Bricklaying/Stonemaso nry, Wall/Floor Tiling, Plastering, Ceiling Fixing)

Costs A small levy per subject in each year is imposed for this program

The Polytechnic of Western Australia Institute of Training (formerly West Coast TAFE Stirling Business College Institute of Tech (formerly Central TAFE) Cambridge International College

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Inspire - Learning Support

Head of Learning Area:

Debbie Davies

Contact details:

9243 2401

debbie.davies@ststephens.wa.edu.au

Years 8-12 Duration of program One year Year 8: 5 periods per cycle. Year 9 and 10: 3 or 6 periods per cycle. Year 11 and 12: 9 periods per cycle. Overview of program: Students have timetabled access to Inspire staff who provide support to complete homework and assignments, re-teach concepts, give students strategies to problemsolve and provide opportunities for them to succeed. The program aims to empower students with the motivation and skills to learn in the schooling environment and beyond, and to help them cope with the pressures of high school. Assessment No additional assessment. Prerequisite Students must meet Inspire Program criteria (i.e. have a funded disability or a Specific Learning Disability with significant additional needs). Note Students who do not choose Inspire in place of a subject may still access support during weekly or fortnightly individually negotiated times. For further information about the Inspire Program please contact the Coordinator, Ms Debbie Davies at Duncraig on 9243 2401.

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Senior School Handbook Duncraig  
Senior School Handbook Duncraig  

Senior School Handbook Duncraig

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