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True aesthetics


No.6

We create uniquely designed furniture that is shaped and crafted by true enthusiasts. Always with a focus on personality, pride and sustainability. It is a vision uniting the finest carpentry traditions with modern and classical furniture design through the fusion of timeless steel, brass, copper or bronze components and high quality wood. Wood is our main source and the love of the organic material and uncompromising focus on quality is evident throughout the process, from the first design sketches to working in our carpentries, where the furniture is finished and surface treated by hand. dk3 was established in Denmark in 2009, and it is with great pride, that we manufacture furniture pieces from such great Danish architects and designers as Poul Cadovius, Jeppe Utzon, Kaare Klint, Børge Mogensen and more.


Less is more


PLANK SOFA Design by Knudsen / Berg / Hindenes & Myhr, 2013


LITTLE WING Design by Knudsen / Berg / Hindenes, 2012


dk3_3 TABLE Design by Jacob Plejdrup, 2009 I BM1 CHAIR Design by Børge Mogensen, 1958


LOWLIGHT TABLE Design by Jacob Plejdrup & Ole Kristoffersen, 2014 I BM2 CHAIR Design by Børge Mogensen, 1958


SHAKER TABLE Design by Børge Mogensen, 1958 I BM2 CHAIR Design by Børge Mogensen, 1958


Poul Cadovius, 1911-2011


- Poul Cadovius -

Man of the World and King of Furniture The 1950s and the 1960s was the golden age of Danish furniture design. It was a time, when the whole world longed for designs from Wegner, Jacobsen, Juhl, Kjærholm and all the other well known star designers. We have heard this story so many times, but there is today one name in this succession of kings, which all too often is missed - Poul Cadovius. His ROYAL SYSTEM was the greatest export success with showrooms and factories worldwide. You will remember the special wall hung shelves, once you see them, but for many, the name is forgotten. Re-launching of the system is, however, about to change that.

Poul Cadovius (1911-2011) possessed a unique talent for both design and business. He was an inventor and a producer, and was equally at home both in the Danish world of business as in the Worldwide forum. Not very many would embody all these skills, and no one with the same degree of success as Poul Cadovius. He personally took out nearly 400 Patents and had sales organizations all over the World. He was a one-off, but therewith also an outsider in a world of furniture, where handcrafted work was setting the agenda. Trained as a Painter and Decorator you would not have expected, that he - in 25 years - would create the largest furniture emporium in Scandinavia. It began just after the 2nd World War. After the War the black-out blinds were discarded, and this is when Poul Cadovius had the idea of replacing these with Venitian blinds.

The System Abstracta could be assembled in numerous ways and was the ideal display system.

He was employed at the wallpaper factory, Fiona in Faaborg, and together with one of his colleagues, Hother Brønner, he begun the production in a very small workshop -only 120 m2 – in Aarhus. At the time, Venetian blinds were a novelty in Denmark, but they soon became sought after and as early as 1947 the business was able to expand the premises in Aarhus.

The Abstracta System was further developed by Poul Cadovius to also encompass the construction of exhibition halls, the so called “dome houses”. These were the forerunners to international exhibitions. In 1962 at the Cologne Exhibition, he built 4 of these halls, where not only his own furniture collection was exhibited, but they also housed the entire Danish furniture exhibition. This was the year when Poul Cadovius became the one the World’s Press was talking about.

ROYAL SYSTEM Poul Cadovius soon had new ideas and already a few years later the company was able to present a complete furniture collection, consisting of bookshelves, tables, plantholders etc.. But, in 1948 he developed his idea of that shelving system ROYAL SYSTEM - which during decades would prove to be the golden egg for his business. Two wooden rails, which together with brass fittings supports shelves or cabinets. Shelves without legs! After the War, flats were often small and with fitted carpets, so this system proved to be a brilliant solution. It took up less room, made cleaning underneath easy, contrary to traditional bookcases. Furthermore, it was easy to add to the arrangement with new cabinets. Poul Cadovius designed many of the pieces of furniture, produced at the factory, himself - but also engaged outside designers. However, he did prefer to do everything himself. He thus developed much of the machinery himself - for instance to produce the venetian blinds. This is why he became a regular visitor at “The Patent Office”. Poul Cadovius sought functional solutions, when developing new designs, but he also had a clear idea of, what the customers wanted for their home. Contrary to many of the contemporary Danish designers he was not afraid of experimenting with new materials. Teak and mahogany were the main materials for ROYAL SYSTEM, but he also worked with both steel tubes, aluminium and fibre glass. Poul Cadovius’s experimenting bore fruit, especially creatively. In 1956 Poul Cadovius exhibited at the IX Triannale in Milan - with his System Ultra, for which he was presented with a silver medal. The same year, during one sleepless night, the idea came to him for a new shelving system, which gained nearly as much recognition as ROYAL SYSTEM. Again it was based on a completely simple but genius basic principle. Chrome finish metal tubes held together with connectors.

It was during these years that Poul Cadovius’s name begun to appear in the Press. His infectious energy and numerous projects proved exciting material in the press during a period where the country was experiencing a major up-turn and an enormous rise in living standards. His ROYAL SYSTEM became within everyones reach, but he became equally known for his visions and inventions. Furthermore he was one of the major employers in the country, employing more than 600 people at factories in Randers and Tønder, and when Poul Cadovius in 1966 took over the large furniture manufacturer, France & Søn in Hillerød, it made his Furniture Empire the largest in Scandinavia.

FROM FURNITURE TO HOUSES AND SAILINGBOATS Already in 1958 Poul Cadovius opened a fashionable showroom on Third Avenue in New York, and during the following years Poul Cadovius opened branches all over the World. More than 80% of his furniture Empire’s turnover originated either from abroad, was generated by export or was due to the fact that ROYAL SYSTEM and System Abstracta were produced on license in 26 countries. No other Danish furniture producer was taking advantage of this business model, but this was the key to Poul Cadovius’s fast expansion. Already in 1958 Poul Cadovius opened a fashionable showroom on Third Avenue in New York, and during the following years Poul Cadovius opened branches all over the World. ROYAL SYSTEM and System Abstracta were good businesses, but as the visionary businessman, he was, Poul Cadovius reinvested in new projects and technology. For instance he used the relatively new fibreglass material for a new collection of furniture, but he also used it as the basis for a completely new company, CADOMUS, which produced building components, and especially the still today iconic busstop shelters - of course, his own design - which still today can be seen scattered all around the Danish landscape. Poul Cadovius had already in the 1950s built his first yacht at his factory in Aarhus, but in 1963 he opened his first real shipyard, where he developed and mass produced the so called Sagitta sailing boats - up to 35 feet. Firstly in Randers and later in Svendborg. Sailing was a long-term passion, and being an entrepreneur, of course he had to build his own boats, in which he utilized his knowledge of fiberglass.

The impressive expansion experienced by Poul Cadovius’s many businesses, were followed up by just as impressive exhibition venues, such as his private home, Christianshus at Hørsholm. In 1972 he bought and modernized the old Student Society building at H.C. Andersen’s Avenue in Copenhagen - and based his new Head office there: The CADO Center. The 1970s were difficult for the Danish furniture industry, even Poul Cadovius’ furniture business experienced a down-turn during the oilcrisis, which later let to the closure of most of the production, although he carried on with a smaller design company until 1996. RELAUNCH ROYAL SYSTEM came close to becoming a nationalwide phenomenon at the height of its heyday, and many homes invested in these shelves in order to be able to add to them further in the future. The system was not cheap, but it would last you for years. However, the production ceased, and likewise the press news regarding Poul Cadovius’s projects also disappeared. New generations of furniture customers knew about ROYAL SYSTEM from their parent’s or grandparent’s homes, but have forgotten the name behind the design. In 2010 the newly started furniture business, dk3 was scouting for new products. Originally, they were not interested in relaunching old products, but were looking for new designs, but - as founder, Jacob Plejdrup recounts: We were astounded that there was no shelving system amongst our furniture classics - apart from Mogens Koch’s boxshelves. We did not come upon Poul Cadovius at all, and had only vaguely heard of him, but as one acquaintance happened to mention ROYAL SYSTEM, we became deeply interested in the history behind the person. dk3 put ROYAL SYSTEM into production just one year before the death of Poul Cadovius, aged 99 years, and it was reintroduced at the Formland Exhibition in Denmark, where the Press showed some interest. However, it was not until they showed it at Milan, that they realized, just what they had started. “Here the interest was completely overwhelming, also from the international furniture markets. Interest in the ROYAL SYSTEM was significant in the USA and Asia. In the USA, the name of Poul Cadovius ranked high as a Danish furniture Icon, contrary to in his home country, where he was almost forgotten. For them the shelves are cool and Scandinavian, and they think it is groovy, that they are designed back in 1948”, says Jacob Plejdrup.

Text by Frank C. Motzkus for Antik & Auktion


ROYAL SYSTEM速 Design by Poul Cadovius, 1948


ROYAL SYSTEM速 Design by Poul Cadovius, 1948 I COPILOT BAR STOOL Design by Asger Soelberg, 2015


“Most of us live on the bottom of a cube. If we put the walls even with the floor, we get a lot of space to live on� Poul Cadovius


CADOVIUS BUTTERFLY SHELF速 Design by Poul Cadovius, 1958


ROYAL SYSTEM速 Design by Poul Cadovius, 1948 I STEEL COPILOT CHAIR Design by Asger Soelberg, 2015


ROYAL SYSTEM速 Design by Poul Cadovius, 1948


“Over the last several thousand years almost every shape, color and size of table has been made – and as a designer it can be both daunting and tempting to try and outdo all of them.” Jeppe Utzon


- Jeppe Utzon -

Thoughtful Design in Denmark Jeppe Utzon founded his architecture and design firm in 2004. He was educated at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Architecture in Copenhagen, Denmark, and spent a year studying in Paris as part of an architecture exchange program. After graduating with a degree in architecture in January 1999, Jeppe worked with his uncle, Kim Utzon, and father, Jan Utzon, at their respective architectural firms. His grandfather, Jørn Utzon, was the architect who created The Sydney Opera House, and Jeppe Utzon continues a rich family tradition through his work in the art of architecture.

WHERE THE ROAD TAKES YOU Jeppe Utzon’s journey took some interesting twists and turns after school. After a short time at his uncle’s firm, he left architecture for three years to start a company called Flicker Motion Graphics with an artist friend. “It was a lot of fun because it was totally different from architecture since we were working with different aspects of design,” he notes. This experience gave Jeppe invaluable hands-on time with graphic arts and motion design, which would later influence his work. He returned to the eld of architecture in 2002 and incorporated more design work into his portfolio. Jeppe now designs both residential and larger housing projects as well as kitchenware and electronics. How does he view architecture versus product design? “It’s like the difference between doing one sound effect and a whole score,” he says. “In a house there are a lot of small design projects that all have to come together in symphony while in [product] design it’s basically just one.” He enjoys both. Jeppe comes from a family of well- known architects and designers. “Everybody is into something creative,” he notes. His great- grandfather was a boat designer, and his grandfather Jørn was the 2003 Pritzker Architecture Prize Laureate. When family discussions turn towards architecture, the architects all share the same basic ideology. “We pretty much agree - it’s kind of hard to start a debate when you all agree. Rather than talk about particular projects, we discuss the ideology in architecture - like what’s good architecture and what’s bad architecture, what’s the wrong way to do it and what’s the right way to do it - philosophical subjects,” he says. “So in a way we communicate very well as we can separate style from ideology when discussing architecture. And our architectural styles do indeed differ in my family - we sculpt differently. For instance, I could do a more curvy architecture while my uncle would tend more towards straight lines. So we have a slightly different artistic tendency but we all try for honest architecture.” “If you expect to go out and make the perfect building, you’re going to be really disappointed. Some things will go wrong or not be affordable so you just have to accept that you’ll get those hurdles; you won’t get exactly what you wanted. But I think it’s also very interesting to not be in complete control.” Jeppe was drawn to architecture because of its blend of creative and mathematical aspects. “I’ve tried painting in art but it’s really difficult when I don’t have a brief. I’m more suited for solving problems.” Amazingly, Jeppe’s famous grandfather first discouraged him from becoming an architect. When Jeppe decided to abandon his lifelong dream of becoming a marine biologist to instead pursue architecture, Jørn urged him to reconsider, arguing that the field of architecture is a frustrating one as it is overwhelmingly likely that you will not design a single building with which you’ll be completely satisfied. At least that was his experience. “And I think that’s actually true,” says Jeppe. “If you

expect to go out and make the perfect building, you’re going to die a very disappointed architect. Architecture is probably one of the most complex creative ends because so many people and trades have to collaborate to make a building. And the more people involved and the more complex the project, the harder it will be for you as an architect to stay in control. And basically some things will escape even the most diligent architect in each and every project. So you’re never going to get exactly what you wanted. But I also think it’s very interesting to not be in complete control. I think it is one of the most important aspects of architecture - one that makes architecture so interesting. You can’t control everything - even though you try to some people will make decisions without asking you; you’re going to think that something will work and it won’t; you’ll get some surprises that you didn’t plan for. In fact, if you just get exactly what you expect, I think it would probably be boring. In the end, I firmly believe that what makes architecture frustrating is also what makes it so interesting. And as you mature as an architect it also seems you somehow learn to make the unpredictable or uncontrollable aspects work to your advantage in the respect that they make your designs even better.” Jeppe’s philosophy has yielded some happy and unexpected results. For his innovative take on the barbecue - the Electrolux Jeppe Utzon BBQ - Jeppe won an Australian International Design Award in 2006 from Good Design Australia, a prize also bestowed upon products from well-known brands like Samsung and Philips. He also received the U.S. Bottom Line Design Award in 2006 for “Ingenuity in Business Success,” an honor also conferred upon Apple®. In 2010 Jeppe earned a grant from the Danish National Arts Foundation to further pursue design work. And in 2011-2012 he was appointed the architectural ambassador of Bo Bedre - the premier Danish design magazine. INSPIRATIONS AND ASPIRATIONS “Of course, my grandfather and my family” Jeppe says when asked who has inspired him most. He also mentions 1987 Pritzker Architecture Prize Laureate Kenzo Tange, the late Japanese architect who was credited for conceiving structuralism. And he’s nostalgic for the past. “Today, I think there’s a tendency to rush things too much. I don’t know why, actually. I think every architect wants as much time as possible, but maybe the clients are pushing and the architects aren’t demanding enough time. I think it’s important to have enough time to make it as good as you can make it. Time to contemplate and let your projects mature and evolve.” Jeppe’s views have changed since he first entered the eld of architecture. “When you go to school you’re very idealistic and then when you come out the world works differently. I think with architecture, the bigger the project the more chance that it won’t go through. It only takes one thing to stop a project, and the bigger the project, the more things can stop it.

“So I think if you play it safe and don’t challenge the client or the normal methods there’s a bigger chance that your project will go through but your project will also be more boring. And generally life is much too short to do boring projects.” JEPPE UTZON TABLE #1 In 2014 the historical Danish high end furniture design shop Illums Bolighus in Copenhagen, suggested Jeppe Utzon contact dk3 for a possible collaboration. Jeppe Utzon and dk3 founder Jacob Plejdrup instantly found common grounds and started a process, which until now has generated the JEPPE UTZON TABLE #1. Jeppe Utzon explains: “To me, a table is not only one of the oldest types of furniture but also one of the purest in function. Over the last several thousand years almost every shape, color and size of table has been made - and as a designer it can be both daunting and tempting to try and outdo all of them.” He elaborates: “With this table I have done the opposite. I’ve let the beautiful solid wood, the high quality workmanship, and the pure function itself take the center stage, while at the same time scaling down the traditional design signature to a bare minimum”. The solid wood table is made as a “sandwich construction”, which significantly minimizes natural movements compared to other solid tables. This e.g. means that the corner crack between leg and table top remains more stabile throughout the table’s life span. Beneath the table is a discrete steel cable, which can be adjusted with an ordinary wrench to achieve stability and prevent deflection over the years. The solid wild walnut and wild oak table balances a sublime contrast between the naked wooden material and the selected crafted details. With sizes up to 300 cm, the table is robust enough to serve a natural gathering point in both meeting rooms and dining halls, yet detailed enough to stand out. In October 2015 the JEPPE UTZON TABLE #1 was exclusively pre-launched through handpicked retailers worldwide, before becoming part of dk3’s product portfolio on the Stockholm furniture fair in February 2016. As his grandfather, Jeppe Utzon allows detail and totality to work together in a unified expression that has genuine global appeal, and this design philosophy is truly embodied in JEPPE UTZON TABLE #1.

Text by Nemetschek Vectorworks, Inc.


JEPPE UTZON TABLE #1 Design by Jeppe Utzon, 2015 I COPILOT CHAIR Design by Asger Soelberg, 2015


JEPPE UTZON TABLE #1 Design by Jeppe Utzon, 2015 I COPILOT CHAIR Design by Asger Soelberg, 2015


ROYAL SYSTEM in London

420cm TREE TABLE

LITTLE WING prototypes

PLATEAU TABLES at the dk3 office

Asger Soelberg

Hand polished brass sign

Børge Mogensen

BM2 armrest detail

Surface treatment by hand

COPILOT CHAIR

BM1 Chair in Taipei

ROYAL SYSTEM ad from 1962

Jeppe Utzon visiting the dk3 office

SoHo New York City

Denmark

New wood arriving

ROYAL SYSTEM in Seoul

Knudsen / Berg / Hindenes

Chicago

Factory back then

Søren Juul

ROYAL SYSTEM at the Hotel Alexandra, Copenhagen

Sydney Australia

At the carpentry

Taking a break in Copenhagen

Raw brass JEWLEL TABLE cubes

Jacob Plejdrup

West Hollywood

Bus shelter design by Poul Cadovius, 1962

Kaare Klint

CHURCH CHAIRS at Grundtvigs Church,Copenhagen

Salone Internazionale del Mobile, Milano

Alternative edge profile to the LOWLIGHT TABLE


“There’s a crack, a crack in everything. That’s how the light gets in” Anthem, Leonard Cohen


TREE TABLE LIMITED Design by Jacob Plejdrup, 2015 I CHURCH CHAIR Design by Kaare Klint, 1936


TREE TABLE LIMITED Design by Jacob Plejdrup, 2015


PLATEAU SIDE & COFFEE TABLE Design by Søren Rose Studio, 2015


PLATEAU COFFEE TABLE Design by Søren Rose Studio, 2015


JEWEL TABLE Design by Søren Juul, 2013 I BM2 CHAIR Design by Børge Mogensen, 1958


JEWEL TABLE Design by Søren Juul, 2013 I COPILOT CHAIR Design by Asger Soelberg, 2010


LESS IS MORE TABLE Design by Jacob Plejdrup, 2012 I COPILOT CHAIR Design by Asger Soelberg, 2010


Almost all tables are made in different standard sizes but can also be customized up to 500cm. Available surface treatments are lacquer, oil, white oil, grey oil or soap. For further product information please see our website: www.dk3.dk

TREE TABLE / TREE TABLE LIMITED / dk3_3 TABLE Design by Jacob Plejdrup, 2015 A solid wood plank table made in many standard sizes with different tabletops such as whole planks, glued-stick-planks, with natural and straight edges. Also available as a coffee table. Available in smoked oak, oak, wild oak, ash, elm and walnut. Legs in brushed steel, black lacquered steel and bronze plated steel. Two extension leaves á 50cm are available. Custom sizes can be produced.

LOWLIGHT TABLE Design by Jacob Plejdrup & Ole Kristoffersen, 2014

JEWEL TABLE Design by Søren Juul, 2013

PLANK SOFA Design by Knudsen / Berg / Hindenes & Myhr, 2013

LESS IS MORE TABLE Design by Jacob Plejdrup, 2012

A solid wood plank table in standard and custom sizes with glued-stick-planks and two edge profiles. Available in oak, wild oak, ash, elm and walnut. The steel legs are black lacquered. Two extension leaves á 50cm are available.

A solid wood table available in square and round. Standard sizes 140-160cm. Custom sizes are possible. The cube base comes in black lacquered steel, stainless steel or solid untreated brass. There is one extension leaf available for the round version and two for the square version. Available in oak, wild oak, ash, elm and walnut.

Wooden base and back made of solid oak or walnut. Solid wood feet with or without solid untreated brass or stainless steel cups. In almost any fabric or leather available. D77 x L265cm. Seat height 40cm. Seat depth 58cm. The cushions are made of foam with polydown wrap.

19mm solid wood planks on base of stainless steel or black lacquered steel. Width 90cm or 100cm. Length 200-240cm. Two black MDF extension leaves á 50cm available.

SHAKER TABLE Design by Børge Mogensen, 1958

BM1 CHAIR Design by Børge Mogensen, 1958

BM2 CHAIR Design by Børge Mogensen, 1958

CHURCH CHAIR Design by Kaare Klint, 1936

STEEL COPILOT BAR STOOL Design by Asger Soelberg, 2015

Solid wood table in oak. Width 90cm. Length 140-300cm. Custom sizes available. Two black MDF extension leaves á 50cm available.

Solid oak chair. Also in black stained oak available. Seat of natural or black colored hand woven paper cordel.

Solid oak armchair. Also in black stained oak available. Seat of natural or black colored hand woven paper cordel.

Solid oak chair or armchair. Also in black stained oak available. Seat of natural or black colored hand woven paper cordel.

Bar stool in two heights with a black lacquered steel frame and adaptive felt shoes. In almost any fabric or leather available. Width 40cm, height 104cm, seat height 88cm, footrest height from floor 40cm or width 40cm, height 86cm, seat height 70cm and footrest height from floor 22cm.


COPILOT CHAIR Design by Asger Soelberg, 2015 Black lacquered steel legs (Steel CoPilot Chair) with adaptive felt shoes or legs of solid finger joined wood (CoPilot Chair). The wood types available for this chair are walnut, smoked oak, oak and black stained oak. In almost any fabric or leather available.

JEPPE UTZON TABLE #1 Design by Jeppe Utzon, 2015 Solid wood table made with a so called sandwich construction tabletop, which minimizes natural movements compared to other solid tables. Two extension leaves á 50cm are available. Available in wild oak and wild walnut. Width 95 or 100. Length 160-300cm. Custom sizes can be produced.

CADOVIUS BUTTERFLY SHELF® Design by Poul Cadovius, 1958 Made of solid oiled oak or oiled walnut. Comes with laser cut branding on one side. W25 x L25 x D19cm. Screws for wall mounting included.

PLATEAU SIDE- & COFFEE TABLE Design by Søren Rose Studio, 2015

LITTLE WING COFFEE TABLE Design by Knudsen / Berg / Hindenes, 2012

Solid wood tables in oak or walnut with frames of stainless steel, black lacquered steel or corten treated lacquered steel. Comes with rubber savers to prevent scratches on the floor. H45 x Ø35cm, H50 x Ø35cm, H35 x Ø80cm.

Coffee table in 2 sizes. The tables are partly handmade, therefor minor differences will occur from table to table. Available in 4mm adonized aluminium in different colors and in the exclusive 4mm solid untreated hand polished copper version. Comes with rubber savers to prevent scratches on the floor. High version: H42 x Ø41,5 cm. Low version: H38,5cm x Ø51,5cm.

ROYAL SYSTEM® Design by Poul Cadovius, 1948 A shelving system based on rails being mounted on the wall, where different types of cupboards and different types of shelves can be hung onto the rails. These cupboards and shelves can be placed and replaced as the need for storage changes with time. The number of configurations are endless. The rails are 100cm or 200cm long, but can be customized. The width of cupboards and shelves is 80cm.


dk3 | Spinderigade 11 | DK-7100 Vejle | Tel 0045 7070 2170 | info@dk3.dk | www.dk3.dk We assume no liability for typographical errors and we reserve the right to change product specifications | Graphic design: strups-studio.dk

dk3 brand catalog 2016  

Graphic design by Strups-studio.dk for danish design furniture company dk3

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