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ISSUE 01

LIMITED EDITION 1

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S T R AY Stray {df} Verb. “To deviate from the direct course, leave the proper place, or go beyond the proper limits�

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The Stray Story e. st issu r fi r u its f o tage o y Story” awa r s t f a r o tra l d e fina t us. “The S here to begin ll. h t t a a te w re e we a s stare back f us is sure hat to w So her ge r o ank pa and neithe l b o w T ration There are a few reasons why we decided to call the its nar

magazine Stray but we may as well start with the most superficial one – we wanted a ‘cool’ name, one that would stick in the minds of our fellow creative and future followers. The three of us sat down (yes, in the beginning there were three; us and marketing guru, Gen) and began the epic brainstorm that would begin our journey. Hundreds of names were flown across the table; lasso, prohibit, decoy to mention a few. One meeting turned into three and eventually daily emails with multitudes of options and definitions took over. Stray was eventually thrown into the mix and placed in the ‘maybe pile’. In the meantime soul searching had begun which would form the basis of our skeleton and story. We were a lot of things it seemed. We were a group of passionate people who had originally met on another publication which wasn’t moving mountains.

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Photos - Colin McDonald www.flickr.com/photos/colinmcdonald/


We were a group of young people with no magical bank accounts who wanted to produce a magazine that stood proudly amongst its well developed and big budget neighbours. We were an opportunity for other creative minds to showcase their projects and process, offering opportunities and inspiration to other established and existing artists. We were a group that weren’t interested in following the norm’ by way of fashion, arts or music. We were and are Stray Magazine.

Have we achieved everything we set out to do? Fuck knows. Have we busted our guts to give it a red hot go anyway? You bet ya. As you sit here and flick through these pages, thank and think about all the talented crew that made this possible. From core writers to featured artists, from administration to graphics teams, from mentors to good advice givers met along the way; not one did it for the money and every single one deserves the glory. Last time we strayed off the beaten path… we produced a sweet ass first issue. We hope you like it. Bec & Kate

Co-Editors

Stray Magazine

Oh and a special mention to all those who told us we couldn’t do it or thought we should just give up – we hope you enjoy it all the more xx 5

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C O N T R I BU TO R S Head Honchos Kate Drennan & Rebecca Pattison Chiefs Genevieve Kovesi, Adam Nowland, Sara Gregory, Delilah Carter Indians Alex Dieckmann, Alsha Coppolina, Kirstyn McMullan, Rhiannon Sloan, Nicole Saw, Shannon Malone, Kema Rajandran, Josefine Wang, Romany Pope, Sebastian White, Nathalia Lindvall, Ben Parkinson Helpful Tribes All contributing artists that submitted their works or let us probe them with questions, Propel Youth Arts WA, Healthway, Koro Fine Australian Jewellery, Sj Finch, Emma Bergmeier, Nokturnl Events, Geisha Bar, Indulge Clothing, our supportive families and partners, and most of all; our amazing Stray readers and supporters!

Printed in Australia by OMNE Publishing www.omne.com.au

Stray Magazine is an Australian publication based in Perth, Western Australia. www.stray-mag.com www.facebook.com/straymag info@stray-mag.com ABN 64 134 092 016 For full credits of editorial shoots shown, please visit our website. Disclaimer No part of this publication may be reproduced in whole or part without permission from the publishers. The views expressed in STRAY MAGAZINE are those of the respective contributors and are not necessarily shared by the publication or its staff. Information and credits are accurate at the time of print, but are subject to change. For more detailed credits please refer to our website: stray-mag.com/credits

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HADP1085B

Using even a small amount of cannabis can increase your risk of mental health problems, including anxiety, paranoia, panic attacks and schizophrenia. 1 in 7 cannabis users report experiencing mental health problems. This risk increases the earlier you start and the more you use.


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HADP1085A


12 12 12 Nope, we didn’t see her either!

H igh B row FK N CH O GM

Where’s Queenie?


NYE

on the

FORESHORE

From the creators of Black & White party, Perth’s ultimate NYE party is back in 2011

East Perth Foreshore (behind Gloucester Park) 6pm – 2am (Happy Hour until 7.30pm)

www.nokturnlevents.com Tickets on sale 1 November 2011 through Moshtix.

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low brow 14 14 14

Aleksandar Jason Kostadinoski


Parklife

Aleksandar Jason Kostadinoski www.adamnoteve.net

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Harry & Tom

Harry & Tom http://harryxtom.blogspot.com/

Kirstyn King

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Lloyd Stubber

worb wol

Lloyd Stubber www.lloydstubber.com/

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Art

OFF THE TESTED PATH... ART VS SCIENCE HAS BEEN STIRRING SOMETHING IN THE LAB AND EXPLODED WITH THEIR Tell us about your music making process NEW ALBUM THE on your latest album. We plug in the instruments and see EXPERIMENT. what sounds come out. Other times we try out different chords and things DAN MAC FILLS that have come to us. Other times, again we get really excited about a US IN. certain song we’re listening to and How does it feel having an album under your belt now after so much success with your EPs? It feels like a relief! We worked really hard on it. But we’re already gathering ideas from each other to write the next one - we don’t want to sit back and relax just yet. There’s more trouble a brewin’. How did you come up with the name Art vs Science? Teddy said to Mick - “Mick, mate, what about the name ‘Art vs Science’ as a band name?”. Mick nearly dropped his schooner. “Maaate! That’s a bloody awesome name! Let’s register it or something ASAP in case anyone else gets it before us”. Teddy said, “Nah mate, let’s have beer to celebrate! We finally thought of a decent name for our acoustic duo - let’s have another beer!” And so they order another five rounds to celebrate. But little did they know, Dan Mac was crawling under their table looking for a 5 cent coin he dropped nearby when Teddy revealed the awesome name. He nearly bumped his head when he heard the band name “Art vs Science” and knew it would be perfect for a live electronic dancing band. He rushed off to tell Dan W and Jim Finn and register the name before someone else did. The rest is history.

that becomes a big flavour. It’s all different. Who/what inspires your music? Good artists and musicians. The Prodigy, Chemical Brothers, Fatboy Slim, Daft Punk, Gerling, AC/DC, Gustav Holst, Wagner, Glenn Miller, Motley Crue, Van Halen, Jimi Hendrix, Steel Panther and the Beatles. How would you describe your music style? Distorted electronic and pop sounds played by humans, live. How many rounds do you reckon you owe Triple J? At least ten. What is your favourite song you have released? That is very hard to answer - it’s like asking which is your favourite child. However two favourites come to mind: Parlez Vous Francais and Magic Fountain. PVF is our little baby and she’s done great things. Magic Fountain had a traumatic birth and took several months for it to grow into a popular song. So I like Magic Fountain because he never gave up. Where will we see Art vs Science in a year from now? Hopefully just happy whatever we’re doing. What did you want to be when you grew up? A scientist, then an air force pilot like Tom Cruise, then a rock star like Kurt Cobain.

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What is your favourite festival you have performed at? Future Music in Melbourne was a recent favourite. The rain was howling in. Jim had to wipe down his keyboard in between any notes where he managed to have a free hand. It was slippery and crazy. Then later on we played laser tag with the other bands. Good day. Tell us about The Experiment tour. It’s been lots of fun. At this point we have just finished the capitals which was great - big rooms. Way bigger than we’ve ever played in for our own tour. So it was all very professional but we still had a lot of fun and hopefully put on a good show. We also played a long set with several new songs, including a softer one called “With Thoughts”. We’ve never really had one of those moments in a set before so it was quite nervous for us - even though we like the song, we weren’t really sure how it would go down, but everyone seemed to like it so we’re very happy. What music are you listening to right now? Uranus, The Magician by Gustav Holst. We all went and saw the Sydney Symphony Orchestra play the entire planets suite by Holst last night and this was one of the highlights for a few of us. What do you get up to when you are not making music? Dan W is trying to finish a uni degree. I like reading about new technologies and alternative philosophy, and Jim enjoys a good sleep like no one else. Tell us about something you would happily do again? Splash about in Cuban waterfalls with my friends with “The Blue Danube” playing at full bore in my head. What’s something you know you do differently than most bands? We buy $400 synths off ebay then run them into guitar amplifiers and effects pedals.


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If you had one day to live, what would you do? Repent!! What do you sing in the shower? Don’t worry be happy. Would you rather change your past or know your future? Know my past and change my future.

Early or late? Preferred or most common?

Hot or Cold? Warm body, cool face.

Scrunch or Fold? Fold

Last time I strayed off the beaten path I...

Sweet or Sour? Both Black or white? Both again - it’s the yin and yang.

Saw an old man collecting pine cones for his fire and a crow eating a deceased ibis. It was in the pine forest in Centennial park. A very eerie sight. - Alsha Coppolina. 19 19 19

Photo: Cybele Malinowski

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PDI’S: Not just motivated but actually moved by someone or something. Tonight I had one of those evenings where it made me think about what this magazine really is about and that is; that raw artist process. The beginning, the learning, the becoming. I was privileged enough to enjoy some fine wine and decadent food with artist Mike Hewson and curator of his first Melbourne exhibition Pip Milne. It is easy to get lost in hours of conversation when in good company, and no media will ever come close to these intimate moments. It is in these moments that further momentum is built. Further want and desire. An essence of being about why you’re an artist and what your works do for not only yourself but for the people that appreciate them. Being a good artist is finding the balance between creating something that is truly meaningful and has depth behind it, and combining that with something that just came out of you naturally. It is completely organic and has the potential to be born without reason. Reason, however, can be the catalyst which turns something great into something mind-blowing. Not everything has to have meaning and occasionally wondrous works are born from no other reason than you just felt like painting that picture today or filming that scene or recording that sound. Nonetheless, even without thought, whatever you create is in direct line with where you were at that time, reflecting things that had never even crossed your conscious mind. It is about accepting what is for what is; with or without meaning, the painting is still a painting. That is the value of a true artist. One who can create work that will blow someone’s mind whether they intended it do so or not. It’s about finding that equilibrium between human nature which is “I don’t give a fuck” and human spirit which is “I definitely do”. 20 20 20

public displays of inspiration.

There are few times in this life where you are truly inspired.

I think the relationship between artist and curator is a pretty amazing and unique one that doesn’t really get touched on enough in mainstream media. Witnessing a hint of it tonight was a special moment. It was like watching the pulse behind the artists’ body of works and showmanship. Together you go through the ups and downs, trying to find funds, sponsorship, spaces etc. When you’re putting something like an exhibition together, you’re trying to find those artistic pieces that ‘pop’, trying to find something that is both passionate for your heart and worthwhile for your career. That delicate balance between love and art and…the cost of living. Seeing Mike Hewson’s work and realising what his latest exhibition is about, as well as the passion and emotion behind something as intense as the Christchurch earthquakes is a pretty extraordinary thing to be a part of. To see such talented work come out of such tragic circumstances is really, really special.


There are so many times when I look at an art piece and think, “fuck, I could have done that myself” (we are all guilty of it) but I look at Michael’s work I think “wow, there is something really amazing and significant to the world and the events within it”. As we go to print this first issue, we are in the lead up to Mike’s exhibition and it is nice to be a part of the process and remember that ultimately this is what Stray wants to be about; documenting that process, not just the final product. How did that artist get there? What were the trials and tribulations for the artist and those involved? And how did they feel after achieving that moment of completion/ exhibition/performance/sale? Because that ‘moment’ is a beautiful thing in this industry. I hope you join with me in appreciating and celebrating artists such as Mike and at the same time, are motivated and inspired to become your own artist in whatever facet of creative industry that you may be in. Find your time to shine and let Stray facilitate you in that. - rebecca pattison

Mike Hewson’s first Australian exhibition, Under Standing Loss, runs from 29 November - 10 December 2011 at Fortyfive Downstairs. You can also catch his work on ACDC Lane, Melbourne and across New Zealand. For more information, please head to mikehewson.co.nz

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Ph o to gra p hy

St ylin g

B e a ut y

w w w. a l l o f t h e a b o v e c r e a t i v e . c o m Photogra phy by Li b by E d w a rds Be auty by R e b e c c a Jo a n n e Styling by Em m a B e rg m e i e r Mod el is A my fro m Sc ene 22 22 22


Lauren Dietze - Stylist

Lauren Dietze has spent the last few years showcasing her talents as a Stylist across Australia and is now ready to take on London town. After studying Visual Merchandising at RMIT, she has worked her way up through a number of different magazines, fashion and interior styling projects, and most of all a strong work ethic. Described by her friends as “a bit of a nanna”, Lauren has managed to get to the top of her art by avoiding the ‘fash pack’ social scene, preferring to swap champagne sipping for an evening of knitting. Lauren’s work is clearly reaping the benefits and the UK better brace itself for another Aussie talent invasion!

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Daniel Gurton - Photographer

Web: www.danielgurton.com

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Claire Hocking - Fashion Designer

What inspired you to become a fashion designer? I knew I wanted to do something in a creative field when I was in my late teens; it was a toss up between interior design and fashion. My obsession with clothes won! Where do you call home? My studio in Melbourne...because I never leave it. Who are your fashion icon’s? Daphne Guinness, Roisin Murphy and Anna Dello Russo because they are so adventurous with what they wear. What is the best part about being a designer? Having a job that allows me to express myself creatively and challenges me on a daily basis. Which designer do you idolize? There are so many designers out there doing amazing things that I am constantly in awe of, but I think it is designers such as Vivienne Westwood and Rei Kawakubo that I really idolize. Not because they are necessarily my favourite designers, but because of the way they have shaped the fashion industry.

How would you describe your personal style? My personal style is very much reflected in the clothing I design; sophisticated sexiness with a touch of grunge. Most people don’t know that I.…love listening to heavy metal music. Do you believe in love at first sight? Only with a pair of shoes. What is your advice for aspiring designers? You are constantly told that it will be too hard when you are starting out, that it’s really competitive and you’re likely not going to make it and to the most part its true. But if it’s really what your driven to do you will be able to put the one hundred no’s behind you and focus on that one yes that will help you move forward.

Last time I strayed off the beaten track, I…. Found myself on a reality TV show.

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Fa b l e d a n d Tr u e - Apparel

Brissie based label Fabled and True pride themselves as being “Born of a love of vintage and days gone by, Fabled and True is a sweet little label made for girlie girls and is best worn while sipping tea, eating lolly pops or getting up to mischief”. With an enticing intro like that, we had to know more! How did Fabled and True come about? I started designing while I was in Vancouver working at a big vintage store. My boss said that I could use the machines and put some stuff in the store so I customised some old jeans and singlets, just simple stuff but it grew from there. When I came home I did bits and pieces under the label Miss J Wolfe in between trips overseas and finally started Fabled and True about 2 years ago when we decided we were done with travelling and home for good. What is your favourite piece? Probably the ‘back in my day’ dress, it’s a really simple backless style with a high neckline and full skirt that I’ve been doing for a while. It’s just really sweet and I’ve changed the pattern a bunch of times and done it in sooo many different combinations! I just never get sick of it…it’s the mullet dress, all business in the front and party in the back.

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What sets your label apart from others? I think the fabrics, I love the fact that I can only get a few dresses out of each piece. I can make the same dress a thousand times in different combinations of fabrics and it can look completely different. I make to order, every piece is unique and girls don’t have to worry about turning up to a function wearing the same outfit as someone else. What fabrics do you use? Mostly previously loved or vintage, there are a few new fabrics in there too but they are usually mixed with the vintage ones. What is your advice to aspiring designers? Be good to the people that are good to you. You will meet some wonderful people along the way… photographers, models, bloggers, make-up artists, store owners…. who are willing to help you when you’re starting out so do what you can in return. There is a saying that I read the other day ‘It’s nice to be important but more important to be nice’, I like that.

What do you do in your free time? Go Vinnies shopping! I go looking for fabrics but I always find other great stuff, my last find was a gorgeous little teapot with painted flowers. Most of my house is decorated with second hand finds and they usually end up as props in my photo shoots. Where do you call home? Just moved back to Brisbane and I’m loving it. What is something that makes you cringe? When I see two girls wearing the same thing, worst nightmare! Who would you tell first? My cat….he hangs out with me all day so he’s always the first to know Do you believe in love at first sight? Yes...especially when it comes to vintage!

Last time I strayed off the beaten path I... Tripped on a stick and fell over. - Alsha Coppolina

Web: http://www.fabledandtrue.com.au/


Pippa McManus - Illustrator

Josefine Wang plays Q+A with artist Pippa McManus. What’s on your desk right now? Bills, jobs, things waiting to be framed and about 12 magazines waiting to be read or drawn from. What inspires you? Other creative’s I think are my biggest inspiration. I have surrounded myself with artists much more than usual this year and they have inspired me to try new techniques or research great artists. It has been the best thing for my work. Where’s your favourite place to gain inspiration? Probably just at home! My boyfriend is a jazz pianist and I love just being a homebody, trawling the internet and flipping through magazines listening to him play. It’s my happy place, ha-ha! What’s your favourite art medium to work with? At the moment just Winsor & Newton black ink. I try and branch out into other colours every time I go to my local art supplies shop but I keep going back to the black. I like working over the top of it with charcoal pencils. How was it working with Zara Bryson? I had never met Zara before I worked

for her and we hit it off straight away. She let me have complete creative freedom which is so rare when being hired for a wall mural. We also share a bag obsession. What’s your earliest art memory? My mum drawing the most beautiful horses for me (we are both obsessed). Then she would give me the picture and I would get to draw rainbow wings on them. Who do you look up to? I am by far David Downton’s biggest fan. If I could have a career anywhere near like his I think that would be incredible. Do you think you inspire others? Why?

Web: http://pippasworkablefixative.blogspot.com/

If I do then I’m doing something right. I think being an artist is such a selfish profession that it would be great to think that it may help someone else. Are you mess head or a neat freak? I’m not really either, I’m just lazy. I’m a Piscean and I live up to my sign quite well, just daydreaming and not doing much of this or that. I let things pile up then have a big clean. Do you have any hidden talents? Well I can’t cook or clean (or maybe I’m too lazy, ha-ha!) but I can make a mean friendship band! A hidden talent since 1990.

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Rachel Harris - Stylist

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Location: Melbourne VIC Website: www.rachelharris.com.au With a sweet portfolio and sense of style, Rachel is definitely a stylist to look up when shooting in and around Melbourne Town. Her use of colour and texture brings out her own unique quirky style to the shoot and overall look. Adopted from the Philippines, Rach feels luckier than your average person. “I’m proud to be adopted and so blessed to be living the life I do”

When asked about any secret talents, Rach reckons she’s not too bad on the vocals. We are yet to confirm or deny. Last time I strayed off the beaten path I... “Quit my uni course after a mere month and pursued my lingering passion for fashion ( how cliché) and it’s brought me to styling and now I’ve never looked back”

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Uscari - Apparel

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USCARI is an innovative label that pushes boundaries, is effortless to wear and exudes a real directional sense of style Tell us about the fabrics you use? I use fabrics that I source from all over the world, I am always looking for something different but a lot of the time some of the most simple fabrics are the ones that just drape beautifully or just feel amazing to wear. I really pride myself on the fabrics used and I have fabrics custom made to my specifications for collections. To name a few I have created knits, rippled & pleated leathers and silks – I’m a real textural person so anything raw and unusual really inspires my design ideas. Most exciting experience with the label? There have been many exciting moments for the label to date. I guess the most exciting was opening our flagship store in the Mid City Centre. Working with interior designer Greg Natale and coming up with a complete identity for the label is actually really difficult but so rewarding at the same time. It is an amazing looking store and it compliments the complete look of the label. Any celebs wearing Uscari? We have had Nicole Richie wear multiple USCARI pieces on her trip out to Australia last year. We have also spotted Megan Gale, Jess Hart, Shelly Craft & Zoe Badwi to name a few others.

What was your reaction when you were announced 2Threads best up and coming designer? At first I was completely shocked I really don’t expect to win when in competitions like that. It was such a great step forward for the label and it really does help to gain recognition in the industry (and it’s a tough one at that). What can we expect from Uscari in the coming seasons? More timeless pieces immersed in details telling a new story. Favourite Quote? “Be daring, be different, be impractical, be anything that will assert integrity of purpose and imaginative vision against the play-it-safers, the creatures of the commonplace, the slaves of the ordinary.” “Cecil Beaton”

Last time I strayed off the beaten path I...

Would have been in Hawaii and I came across the most incredible secluded beach to spend the day at!

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Ali Mitton - Photographer

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website: www.alimitton.carbonmade.com location: Queensland info@mycupoftea.com.au Our first thought when we stumbled across this Gold Coast ladeh’s work was “fuck she’s good”. Her playful pastel colours and old world tones make Ali’s work stand out from the rest. From nakey bodies laying in the daisies to her out of this world landscapes, Mitton brings a narration to each shoot which is almost fairytale like, a world in which she creates in that moment. Ali graduated from photography in 2004 and spent the next couple of years traveling and seeking inspiration before launching her first online portfolio in 2009. Through photography she explores the essence of youth culture, comparing both the natural and man built world around us demonstrates a whimsical, childlike perspective. “The images I make are a combination of the world I am a part of, and the way my mind sees the world - not as it actually is but the way I imagine it should be. Being completely present to any given moment enables me to view it from an entirely fresh perspective - as if opening my eyes for the very first time”

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Rosie Tupper By Kirstyn McMullan

Favourite Book - a million little pieces Band - Kings of Leon

Food -- I love falafels

Person - my best friend

Item - would be a painting of my sister Chloe's self portrait Pleasure - cooking scones and eating them!

Motto- take each day as it comes. I try not to take

things too seriously.

Bright eyed Aussie model Rosie Tupper chatted to Stray about her love of Australian fashion and being an Aussie model in the Big Apple. At only 19 this innocent-faced beauty has graced the cover of Australian Vogue, shot in campaigns for DKNY, Clarins, Marc and Sweden’s ELLE May cover. Being shorter (5’8’’) than most models hasn’t stopped her raise to join other Aussie beauties such as Abbey Lee, Miranda Kerr and Catherine McNeil on the international scene “People say Australian’s always seem very laid back, and easy to get along with” Rosie says about other Aussie models. The pressure of being up to everyone’s expectation in the fashion industry is something that gets to a lot of people but Rosie is keeping positive. “I would like to be a bit taller but one could pick fault with themselves all day so I try to stay away from that and keep a positive body image by keeping fit and eating healthy.” But flying is hurdle Rosie still struggles with despite her busy international schedule, “flying is a challenge for me as I find it really hard to sleep on planes and cope with the time differences.” The former Padbury High School student was signed to Vivian’s agency at 16 after going in to see her older sister who was a model there and says she doesn’t know what she would do now if she weren’t a model. Vivien’s manager Christine Fox said she knew Tupper, who has been likened to Russian supermodel Natalia Vodianova, was going to be successful the first time she walked into the agency.

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“I got started after doing my first test shoot. The photographer sent the pictures to vogue and they booked me for a job. I was very lucky to start off with something like that.” When I asked Rosie if she believes in luck or just hard work in the fashion world, “I believe in both. Obviously you have to have a good work ethic but I think a bit of luck always helps- right place, right time.” 35 35 35


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“Street art has direct engagement from the artist to the viewer. It is a great opportunity to make a difference.” Adrian Doyle works in the street art scene and opened the doors of Blender studios at the end of 2001. “I was a little graffiti punk when I was a kid. I must have started tagging at about 12”. He then went off and studied painting at uni and hooked up with Ha Ha and Psalm in 2000. They started doing stencils together and now they do large street productions all over Melbourne. Even though each artist has their own artistic process, Blender allows for great collaborative projects, constructive criticism and a supportive community. What sets them apart from other studios is that at the Blender they share the space with painters, video artists, installation artists and sculptors. “This creates a conducive environment to push your art into a research genre and become the most contemporary artist in your medium.” Blender has Friday arvo drinks and in summer there are even drinks on a Monday morning!

It wasn’t all smooth sailing for the Blender, “It was pretty trashed, filled with rubbish and shit. It used to be a printing factory. I almost lost it a couple of times, because I couldn’t pay the rent.” The doors closed for Blender in 2004 while Adrian was going through a breakup, and was sent an eviction notice when he was living in Shanghai, leaving him with nothing. After living on Ha Ha’s couch for six months he re-opened and now calls it home along with Piya and Ha Ha. “I love the Blender so bad... I am so glad I got to re-open it again. It really helps support a lot of artists.”

By Alsha Coppolina


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Learnt a new language. I don’t care to walk on paths anyway! As an artist we should be building our own paths….. Fight the Powers that be…”

“Last time I strayed off the beaten path I...

Adrian’s other hobbies are “Sex, Drugs and Aussie Hip Hop” and his advice for all the aspiring street artists out there is “Work as hard as you can (Everyone else is) and always make the most of every opportunity. Oh! And make sure you understand where your work fits into the art scene. You need to see your art as research and make sure your art is unique.”

But it doesn’t end there! Blender runs The Melbourne Street Art tours which gives people an insight on the street art world and they can even watch artists at work in their studios. They have three famous street artists as the tour guides and, “Even the Melbournians agree that there is a side to Melbourne that they don’t understand.”

Adrian also directs along with Joel Gailer and Stephen Nall the recently merged Koro Galleries and Dickerson gallery this is now ‘DarkHorse Experiments’. The change is towards a traditional heart and they now represent artists with a more commercial focus, yet it still retains the art focus that Michael Koro worked so hard to achieve, exhibiting the most contemporary art that they can find!

Inspired by Frankston-“It is in the suburban landscape that Australia finds its identity. Australians love to celebrate mediocrity,” Adrian uses dollies, sponges and anything else he can find to create art. “I drip paint on my works, I spray free hand, and work for hours with a tiny brush. I will use anything. I love going to cake decorating shops. They are so awesome.” Adrian’s personal style tries to define the Australian identity and loves to reference tradition. “In my paintings I use Acrylics, oils, stencils, ink, and spray paint, it’s always on canvas.” He works with Australian suburban icons with his installations and reinvents them in new ways. His favourite pieces are the one he just finished in Collingwood and one in Richmond that they are still working hard on. Best part about being a street artist? “I love that it is a medium that bypasses the gallery process. It goes direct to the viewer. It has helped take the snobbery out of art. Everyone knows about street art and most people care about it. We need to build on this. Because art should always be for the people.” Most challenging? “There is a lot of ego in all art. Street art is no different. I believe that ego is important when you are young as it helps you a lot. But as you get older it can get in the way. I also find the late nights and cold mornings a challenge.”


San Cisco by Nicole Saw. Promo Photo’s by Lisa Businovski. The first thing you expect when you walk into Josh Biondillo’s house is someone baking muffins or singing songs to birds out the back. His East Fremantle home looks like something out of a 70’s coming-of-age film set in suburbia, where the grass is always a lighter shade of green and the sun is always tinged a yellowish golden colour. The first thing Josh, lead guitarist and mastermind behind the music of Fremantle-born indie pop four piece San Cisco, says to me when I walk through the gates of his home is, “Hi, I’m Josh. Don’t mind the dog.” In his backyard there is a red car with its trunk open, and bassist Nick Gardner and his girlfriend are loading equipment – guitar cases, amplifiers, more guitar cases – into it. After a warm greeting from everyone including the dog but excluding lead singer Jordi Davieson, we mull about awkwardly as I’m trying to get the recorder on my iPhone to work. Drummer and vocalist Scarlett Stevens is already making small talk about university life, and tea – she is also wearing a plastic Hello Kitty necklace I can’t get my eyes off.

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The guys of San Cisco feel more like friends than interviewees already, and it’s easy to see why – they’re practically kids, with Josh being the eldest at the old age of 19 and Jordi being only 17 and on his way home from school. Josh rings him twice and tells him to hurry, because “that girl from Stray Magazine is here.” There is a lazy comfort between these friends – they’re like family, almost, but it’s not surprising considering they’ve been together for a long time. “The band started…when did the band start?” Josh asks Scarlett, but Scarlett shrugs. “Was it two years ago? “I don’t know, I think so? Or longer, because there was King George.” She turns to me. “We used to be called King George, but we changed it before we launched our EP. San Cisco doesn’t mean anything though—I guess, in a way, we wanted something that didn’t mean anything so we could sort of evolve into it. “Our style was different, it was changing,” she says. “It sort of seemed appropriate to change it, I don’t think ‘King George’ suited our new style.”


We all retire to the kitchen for some last minute banter before the band has to leave; there are homemade cookies in a glass jar and a tray of freshly cut watermelon sitting in the centre, and the band members take turns nibbling on each, discussing all the alternative band names they’ve ever considered. “We’ve had a lot we thought of,” Scarlett says. “What was the one I liked? Meow Meow?”

The guys of San Cisco may not be household names worldwide just yet, but they’re certainly on their way. Deemed “prolific”, “promising”, and “impressive” in their earliest stages, the band boasts a seriously impressive gig count, including playing in big guns Big Day Out and Laneway Festival. The first (and only) time I’ve seen San Cisco live was when I saw Architecture in Helsinki play at Capitol – where Kellie Sutherland herself beamed “so young, so talented” about the band on stage. But with all the good vibes come the bad—“Yeah, someone didn’t like our band and wrote on another band’s fan page and was like, San Cisco in Spanish means pretty boring. And we were like…aww.” Scarlett says the last part sarcastically with a pout. “And I think someone wrote a review and called us too indie? It was a weird review, it wasn’t even about the music.”

“Not Meow Meow!” retorts Jordi. “That’ll be alright for you to get into – a girl band. There was another one, Tetris something?” “Tetris Soup?” Scarlett suggests. A plethora of subjects pass us: car crashes, radio talk shows, fights (Scarlett says “we don’t fight” in unison to Jordi’s “yes we do”), and school: “It does suck [being 17],” Jordi says about being the only one still in high school. “In the next two months or so we’re going to have to stop playing gigs for a bit because I’ve got exams on.” It’ll be worth the wait. San Cisco has big plans – in 10 years time Nick wants to be on the moon (but won’t bet on it with me), Jordi wants world domination, and Josh wants the band “hopefully not here”. “There’s no point doing this band stuff if you’re not going to try and get yourself somewhere.” Jordi says. Luckily half the battle is won – San Cisco is most definitely on their way to something big.

“Yeah,” Josh says. “For the gig at PIAF—they said we were the ‘definition of indie’. What the hell is indie? I’ve never worked that out.” “People call us indie a lot, but like…what is it? I don’t even know. Is that a compliment, or are you trying to attack us? I can’t tell! I don’t know what indie means!” Josh shrugs. “We don’t really get a lot of bad press, but when we do it’s pretty funny.”

There, Scarlett tells me how all their parents are supportive of San Cisco’s endeavours. “It’s really good to have that support,” she says. Despite being busy with the band, all three high school graduates are off doing further education at university, while Jordi is stuck in the ever-lasting hell that was finishing year 12. He comes home right after Josh is done showing me his kazoo, and giving me a free EP he found lying around under a stack of paper.

See page 92 for Strays inter view with Josh Biondillo

While Nick is drinking tea in the kitchen, Josh and Scarlett take me on a tour of their studio – i.e. awesome garage with a vintage motor memorabilia and a handful of microphone stands and keyboards that look like they’re from the 60’s, but apparently remain untouched. “It’s usually less empty, but we’ve packed everything up for the gig tonight.”

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Spilt Cities is an alternative rock band made up of Shaun Rodan, Zac Ward, Tim ‘Mad Dog’ Jenkins and James Porteous. The band is influenced by genres spanning from underground 90’s rock, progressive and experimental as well as classic rock bands from the 60’s and 70’s. Bringing together elements of fierce vocals inspired by Brand New and Crime in Stereo, as well as simplistic interweaving guitar sounds from bands like Built to Spill and Modest Mouse, Spilt Cities endeavor to strike a new chord with each song. Forming in February this year, the band have spent the last two months recording a demo CD for free distribution at gigs, as well as a free online download in an attempt to gain more exposure. Spilt Cities continue to find a balance between loud and melodic, as well as focusing on creating a raw atmosphere in a live setting. Spilt Cities? Explain? Despite being mistaken for S-p-l-i-t Cities on numerous occasions, we just brainstormed and really liked the imagery of a spilt city. We try to create an atmosphere with our music and wanted to do the same thing with a band name. What/where is your hometown? Tim is from Harvey. For all you city kids, this is where milk and OJ comes from. The rest of us grew up in Perth. Who writes the songs, what are they about? We all write the songs collaboratively, usually coming up with one part to begin with and then jamming it out. The subject matter usually centers around human emotions, be it anger, longing or understanding, starting out fairly personal but made to be interpreted in different lights. What’s your claim to fame? Oh how our drummer can dance.

Last time I strayed of the path I.... Fell down a hole.


Black Birds We invite Perth band Black Birds to finish off our sentences. As told to Shannon Malone. Favourite thing about being in a band… Shaun: Getting up on stage, and playing guitar really loud with two of my best buds. I’m easily pleased. Free drinks are great too (Thanks Lise)! Jaya: You don’t have a boss to bow down to. Alex: Creating music! I’m inspired when… S: I’m listening to a great record, or watching a top live band! There’s nothing like seeing a great band live and thinking “I need to practice”. J: I listen to music or hear sounds that give me a real adrenaline rush A: I’m seeing great players play great music

The best advice anyone has given me is… S: Turn the guitars up! J: The best advice anyone has given me is not to get married. A: If you win something you don’t buy it.

If I wasn’t in a band I’d be… S: Trying to staunch my way into a good band, watching reality TV, being sad. J: Living in the bush becoming a yetti man. A: Full time conspiracy theorist.

People say I look like… S: I might not know what I’m doing. J: A ferret. A: Thirsty Merc.

Right now I’m listening to… S: Junip, Black Country Communion, My Morning Jacket. J: Graveyard. A: Defeater, Miles Davis, Junip.

In five years I hope to… S: Be listening to the Black Birds album on the J’s, and basking in the glory of being a thousandaire! J: Have made a change to our society, whether through music or not. A: Still be playing around the place and enjoying the poor musician life. As a child I used to… S: Not worry about the bigger picture…nothing has changed. Should I be worried? My girlfriend will tell you I’m a big kid. J: Be a cheeky little shit, nothing’s changed. A: Eat dirt and various other things in the garden.

I never thought I… S: Could drink that much beer. I showed them. J: Would be playing in 4 bands. A: Would be playing in one of Jaya’s 4 bands. Favourite thing to make in the middle of the night… S: Pizza pockets. J: Mum’s left over spring rolls. A: Nutella and a spoon.

Last time I strayed off the beaten path I… S: We decided to break up the band, start a new one and call it Black Birds. Going well so far! J: I tripped over a dead moose while reading these questions. A: I got back on again, as the saying goes.


Make Me Photography: Tintin Hedberg I Photography Assistant: Roxanne Hartridge Styling: Nixi Killick I Hair & Makeup: Erin O’Brien I Model: Emma V @ Scene

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Le Fleur Noir Photographer: Peter Rosetsky Creative Direction: Ivana Martyn-Zyznikow and Kate Carnegie Assistant stylist: Sara Trevisan Model: Mina@FRM Management Makeup: Tanya Guccione Hair Stylist: Julie Bukeri


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We RUN THE NIGHT


Photographer: Jason Henley www.jasonhenleyonline.com Fashion: Jana Bartolo @ Lizard Management Makeup: Felicia Yong @ Network Agency using MAC Hair: Lyndall Vile Retouched by Mirijam @ FauxPink.com Models: Emily T @ Priscillas & Zoey @ Chadwick

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Stev i e

Photography: Phillip Papadis @ www.phillippapadis.com Retouching - Peter Orlik @ www.peterorlik.com

Styling - Natasha Darling I Styling Assistant - Kate Ryder Hair & Make Up - Lauren R @ www.laurenr.com.au Model - Alexandra Ford @ Chadwick's & Dally's. Special Thanks to Melissa Gibson


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Photographer Stylist

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Make Up & Hair

Samantha Jarrett

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Bianca Christoff

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Yvonne Borland

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samanthajarrett.co.uk biancachristoff.com

yvoneborland.viewbook.com

Assistant stylist: Sophie Strangio / Make Up & Hair Assist: Sharon McBean Model: Isabel Macmaster

/ Chadwick Models / chadwickmodels.com


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DESIGNING SPACES THE CONSERVATORY Stray’s Alex Dieckmann visits Perth’s newest venue, The Conservatory, and finds out exactly what it took to get the place up and running. The Conservatory Roof Top Bar opened its doors (and roof) for the first time on June 18th and we have a feeling it is going to be one of our favourite venues this spring. Located along busy Murray Street and above iconic Perth bar Carnegies, The Conservatory has something new and exciting to offer to the people of Perth. The bar, restaurant and night-spot features a 14 metre retractable roof, panoramic views of the city, a state of the art contemporary bar, a deluxe barbecue area, a beer garden and more. So where did the idea for Perth’s first roof top bar come from? Conservatory General Manager Gavin Behan reveals Carnegie’s CEO Karl Buller, who lives here in Perth, was the man behind it all. “The plan was to just have more so an open beer garden on the roof and with noise restrictions we had to put in walls and a roof, we then decided to go the full hog and make the whole roof retractable and turn it into a classy joint,” Mr Behan says. “We wanted to have the venue with an open airy feeling, so we put in glass around the whole perimeter… the design was to have a lot of greenery inside, plants, synthetic lawn etc., hence the name the Conservatory.” The idea first came about in early 2009. Yep that’s right; it took just over three years from initial brainwave to doors open! Baltinas Architects, also behind the refit of popular WA venues the Court Hotel and Gold Bar, were key players in making it all happen. Of course, the retractable roof is the Conservatory’s most impressive feature. An aluminium frame supports the Danpalon sheet structure (a super tough plastic) that staff can open and close in moments. With Perth’s fabulous weather patterns, the Conservatory’s roof is sure to be open for the most part of spring and summer. The synthetic lawn is fitted inside and out, and it really sets the theme of the place. The grass covered stools outside are a nice touch too. Park style benches and pot plants are carefully placed around the yard to provide an ultra-social atmosphere.

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The state of the art barbeque tables are another of our favourite features at the Conservatory, and, are an Australian first. Bring along your own food to cook on the mini grills that are built into two of the picnic style tables in the yard. Or if you’re not keen on cooking up your own grub, opt for a chef cooked fare. The glass walls surrounding the bar area and garden are designed to let in all the lights and colours from Perth city, and has been cleverly designed to stay within government noise regulations. “The building has been acoustically rated to stop noise escaping,” Mr Behan explains. “The whole point of building walls and roof was so we could trade past 10pm. With the doors and roof open you can hear some city sounds, not that there are many from Perth!.” Inside, the colourful walls are fitted with big TV screens, and you can choose to perch on many a variety of seat while you catch up with friends or a have bite to eat. High bar stools, comfy leather couches or crushed velvet-look chairs are all available inside. Food choices are a-plenty, whether you fancy something from the barbeque, a selection of tapas, or another of the chef’s Aussie-inspired dishes. Mr Behan is expecting the Conservatory’s vibe will attract the type of people looking for the finer things in life. But of course, opening a new bar does not come without challenges. “Originally we were to open end of summer but as the deadline ran over and into winter, the rain was a difficult task to deal with considering the conservatory was the roof protecting Carnegies below,” Mr Behan says. Before the construction could even start, the team had to wait more than two and a half years for council approval. The GM explains this included development approval, liquor licence approval and a building licence. Ouch!


But, it seems it was all worth the wait, as Mr Behan says the end result is better than he expected. “[I’m] still amazed every time I climb the stairs to the entrance,” he says. Besides the striking décor and design, the Conservatory has even more to offer as a venue. Open from 11am Tuesday to Sunday, and on weekends until 3am, visitors can admire the city views til the wee hours. House music is the main flavour for the ears, with a bit of something for everyone during busy times. The Conservatory holds bragging rights to being the most upmarket venue of the Carnegies group – the other venues keeping a more casual vibe. This means you will find nothing but premium bevvies on the menu. Of course there is a selection of beer and cider on tap, as well as boutique varieties from around the globe. Or choose from the 23-strong cocktail menu, mixed up in front of your eyes by some of Perth’s best bar tenders with fresh ingredients and the finest liqueurs and spirits. Still thirsty? The impressive wine list has something for every taste; including local, national and international whites, reds, champagnes and blends.

Like every good bar, The Conservatory also caters for parties and functions, and can host groups as small as 10 and up to 200. The venue also boasts a stylish meeting room and private dining area for intimate or corporate groups. Coming up: Mr Behan has big plans for the not too distant future. “I aim to make it one of the most wanted bars in Perth to come to and be seen in,” he says. “In spring I hope to have Jazz on the roof every Sunday on our open balcony.” He’s also hoping to go all out for major events like Melbourne Cup Day. So if you haven’t yet bailed on this article to go check out Perth’s exciting new venue for yourself, WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FOR?! With a private entry from Prince Lane and a giant illuminated sign, you can’t miss it. The Conservatory is located at 356 Murray St, Perth and the 40-odd stair climb is well worth it.

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The Reveal Words - Alex Dieckmann Illustration - Tiffany Atkin / www.tiffanyatkin.com Revealed body parts play a big role in fashion history. Showing some flesh can really make an outfit work, and various body parts have come in and out of fashion over the years. It seems it all started in the 1960’s, an era dominated by youth culture and vast social change. So you can thank your mum and dad, the “baby boomers”, for making fashion what it is today. The midriff refers to the piece of flesh from under the bust to the top of the hips, and baring this area for fashion first became acceptable during the sexual revolution that was the 1960’s. Since then, showing off the stomach has never completely gone out of fashion and reappears on catwalks around the world every few seasons. By the 80’s, even men began sporting a bare midsection. Hemmed or cut-off oversized t-shirts were worn just above the naval, usually to show off a six-pack. Thankfully this look hasn’t made a comeback this decade! In the late 90’s naval piercings became a popular trend among young women, therefore a new need for a naked midriff was born. Today, baring the midriff for fashion is a lot more subtle. Super high waisted shorts or pants teamed with a cropped top are a lot less promiscuous than the midriff trends seen in the early days. The latest look ensures only a centimetre or two of the abs are revealed, and any potential muffin tops are nicely tucked away – a much classier look.

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Like the midriff, ankles have come in and out of fashion in various forms. Capris were among the first type of pants worn by women, ever. They are a very modest piece of clothing as only the ankle is revealed, but are great for showing off some hot shoes. Although capris, or ¾ pants, are still found in most women’s wardrobes today, another ankle baring item has become popular. Footless tights – they not only show off the ankle but also allow you to gain extra value on your summer and spring clothes during the colder months of the year. Slap on a pair of tights under your favourite skirts, shorts or dresses for a fresh new look. Men have also embraced the naked ankle in the latest wave of hipster fashion. Think Huckleberry Finn pants and boat shoes with a striped t-shirt, funky hat and dirty mo’. Rolled up jeans are also on the hipster scene right now. Or perhaps they just don’t want to rip their pants while riding their fixed-gear bikes. On the other end of the leg scale, literally, bare thighs are seen in fashion summer after summer. Hot pants and mini skirts reveal a lot of leg, and when worn with sky high heels or tall boots make for a hot and fearless look. Celebrities like Kylie Minogue, the Spice Girls, Wonder Woman and Anna Kournikova, just to name a few, have turned many a head with their naked thighs. Last summer in Australia, cut off jeans – often so short a bit of bum cheek was hanging out – were a huge hit among young women on the music festival scene. And the stinking hot weather made it completely acceptable. This style is much less common amongst guys, however pool shorts did make a comeback last summer. These midthigh high swimming shorts serve the same purpose as your regular knee length “boardies”, but allow for a much higher tan line and sometimes have built in undies (how convenient!). Bring on the warmer weather!

Next we have naked shoulders. Baring this body part goes back much further than the 1960’s. The ancient Romans invented the one-shouldered look, and it has been reinvented many times over the centuries. Cut outs, asymmetrical necklines, halters and strapless are all newer versions of revealing the shoulder and are worked on the catwalk, on a formal evening gown, on a cute party dress or a casual top with a pair of jeans. An exciting neckline allows for a simple rest-of-outfit. Straight lines and plain patterns for the bottom half will ensure everyone can focus on the shoulders. This is also one of the few ways you can show some skin without being too provocative. Alexa Chung and Sharon Stone have both rocked this look on the red carpet, and they’re definitely not the only ones. The bare chest is a more daring look than the nude shoulders, yet is very commonly worn. It also dates back way before the 1960’s, to the 11th century when women were often seen with an exposed neck and top of chest. It was in the 60’s however, when lower necklines and revealing cleavage really became popular. Since then, the fashion world has welcomed a bare chest, and some women use their cleavage as an important fashion item. If you’ve got it, flaunt it, right? Even if you don’t, enhancements to this area are not uncommon. Extra cleavage can be achieved with a push-up bra, chicken fillets or even breast implants. Bare chests have also appeared in men’s fashion many times over the years. In early fashion the shirt with a few top buttons undone and chest hair flowing out was quite a manly look. Today we see men in oversized v-neck or crew neck t-shirts. A little bit of manly is exposed, and almost gives onlookers a sneak preview of what’s underneath. In later years we have seen more extreme cases of the naked chest – eg. Rebecca Twigley in ‘that’ red dress. She got the nation’s attention alright, with a neckline that exposed her from the neck, to the chest, and then kept going all the way down to the naval. This look does not demand a busty cleavage though. In fact, it works better with a small bust as there is less to fall out of this dangerous neckline. Something important to remember when revealing flesh as part of an outfit, is don’t over reveal. To show your chest, midriff and thighs all in one outfit, in this day and age, might make you look like a stripper. You might have a great body and can totally pull it off, but a bit of balance is good. If you’re showing a lot of one part, show a little less of another. One final tip, that you probably already know: double sided tape is your friend. Not only will it hold your revealing clothing in place but will help you avoid embarrassing moments like a nipple falling out.

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Social Responsibility The World Peace Game

Musician, teacher, filmmaker and game designer, John Hunter from Virginia America, has dedicated his life to helping children realize their full potential. John is the inventor of the World Peace Game, a handson political simulation that gives players the opportunity to explore the connectedness of the global community through the lens of the economic, social, and environmental crises and the imminent threat of war. John’s own life story is one of a never-ending quest for harmony, as a student, he studied comparative religions and philosophy while travelling through Japan, China and India. In India, inspired by Ghandi’s philosophy, he began to think about the role of the schoolteacher in creating a more peaceful world. Employing his background as a musician composer and filmmaker during a three-decade career as a teacher, Hunter has combined his gifted teaching and artistic talents to develop unique teaching programs using multimedia software programs in creative writing and film courses. John seeked incorporating ways to explore harmony in various situations. This exploration took form in the framework of a game, something students enjoy but would also be challenged, while enhancing collaborative and communication skills. The goal of the game is to extricate each country from dangerous circumstances and achieve global prosperity with the least amount of military intervention.

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“The World Peace Game is about learning to live and work comfortably in the unknown,” John said. “The game is not very realistic, nor is it meant to be, it is merely a pretext for inspiring children to create, develop and practice the tools and processes of problem-solving, and creative and critical thinking.” “By competent and insightful practice, I would hope that the children may ultimately be able to use these experiences to help reduce suffering and increase compassion in the world.” Through this game, beliefs and values evolve and/or completely unravel as the players begin to experience the positive impact and windows of opportunity that emerge through effective collaboration and refined communication. “Every game we play is different. Some games are more about social issues, some are more about economic issues. Some games are more about warfare. But I don’t try to deny the students the reality of being human. I allow them to go there and, through their own experience, learn in a bloodless way,” John said. “And they find out what is right their own way, their own selves. And so in this game, I’ve learned so much from it, but I would say that if only they could pick up a critical thinking tool or creative thinking tool from this game and leverage something good for the world, they may save us all. If only.” - Kema Rajandran


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Stray’s Alex Dieckmann has a chat with Mim D’Abbs about the ins and outs of life as a tattoo artist in Darwin. She’s been tattooing in our Northern Territory for 17 years and has truly developed a love for her job, for art and for life in general. Tell me a bit about yourself – Where are you from & what is your background? I was born in Perth, and raised in Darwin, where I was lucky enough, due to proximity, to be able to travel a bit through Asia as a child. Due to having a sociologist father who worked primarily in indigenous issues, I was also able to travel through a lot of remote areas in the territory. I loved this aspect of my childhood and it certainly shaped who I am today. I love living somewhere as relaxed and multicultural as Darwin. What are your interests, both professional and non-professional? I love tattooing; it is deeply satisfying in a creative sense and immensely rewarding. I also love to travel, which inspires me artistically, painting, and drawing. Other than that, I cook loads and breed fish! What inspired you to become a tattoo artist? A love of art, ancient culture and a desire to spend my life creating beautiful things. What training, education, and professional experiences have you gained during/ had prior to becoming a tattoo artist? I went straight from school into a tattoo studio at 17, so all my skills I have learnt in the studios where I have worked.

What is your most memorable tattoo given and why? A miniature MCG cricket ground on a girls back complete with halogen lights! She said she was the first lady to use the gents bathroom where you can still see the pitch while you use the facilities. Have you tattooed any famous Australians/ international people? If so, who? Franch Gohier and his wife Chayni Henry – both artists and Leah Flanagan – musician. What is your favourite tattoo on yourself and why? My favourite tattoo on myself is a multi coloured nautilus shaped female alien on my calf by my business partner Blue – and purely because I think it’s beautiful. What is your proudest accomplishment as a tattoo artist? Becoming part owner of my own studio. What is the most difficult part about being a tattooist? Having to explain to people why we won’t do certain things because of how it will age in the body. What is your favourite part about being a tattooist? Being entrusted to permanently decorate people’s bodies with my own artwork.

How would you describe your style of tattoo art? Colourful and bold, and with my pattern work flowy and delicate.

What other artistic skills do you have or enjoy? I love to paint – mainly with acrylic – and I also enjoy airbrushing with inks.

Where do you get your design inspiration from? Middle Eastern art, nature, old folk art, art deco designs and street art.

What do you think you’d be doing if not tattooing? If I hadn’t become a tattooist I would have studied journalism.

What makes your designs unique from any others? I try to add a unique touch via my use of colour and pattern work, while crafting what my client wants.

What are your goals for the next 6-12 months? We would like to travel to one of the overseas conventions – I would like to have another art exhibition and continue to tattoo beautiful custom pieces!

Who are your influences? In art and tattooing. Mucha, Joe Capabianco, Angelique Houtcamp, Mark Ryden, Fafi, Grime, Banksy and Geoff Todd. Tell me about your first ever tattooing experience? One of the people I learnt from had just outlined a large piece of tribal on one of his friends and he handed me the machine and said “colour inside the lines, I’m having a cuppa!”.

What advice would you give to someone wanting to start a career as a tattoo artist? Draw, draw, draw, it’s not just a job; it’s a passion and never stop learning about your trade.

Last time I strayed off the beaten path I...

Climbed an extinct volcano in Borneo, and rewarded myself with a hand rendered tattoo. Mim’s studio, Darwin City Tattoos is located at Shops 5-6, 1 Edmunds St, Darwin, NT. THE place to get inked in Darwin-town.

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Josh Biondillo of San Cisco spills all to Nicole Saw. What/where do you find inspiration for your music? The inspiration for most of the music I write tends to come from bands I am listening to at the time. For example, we just recorded some new music over in Melbourne and at the time I was listening to a lot of Beach House and I think that comes through on the record. There is a bit of “ambient” guitar in the mix for a few songs that are very Beach House-esque. At the moment I have been listening to Ratatat, who is a band from New York; it’s just two guys but I don’t think there is a song they have written that I don’t like. So consequently, I think I am starting to write some Ratatat style music.

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Is there a common process you take when writing songs? These days, San Cisco songs usually come about when I have some chords/melody and we start to jam on that, and then Jordi will sing/write some words and a song is born. Are you musically trained or self taught? I have had guitar teachers in the past which helped a lot with the foundation of me playing music and all. But on the new recordings I play a lot of keys. I have never had any piano lessons or anything that has led me to have a weird playing style. My fingers are usually very disorganised when I play keys and I have these weird made up chords where my fingers are all crossed over each other and stuff.


What are your thoughts on the Perth music scene? I think its pretty rad. I tend to compare it to New York, which has produced some of my favourite bands (MGMT, The Strokes, Ratatat, Darwin Deez). So in comparison Perth is quite up there having produced the likes of Empire of the Sun/Sleepy Jackson, Tame Impala/Pond - Incredible music. And then there are smaller Perth bands which I am absolutely loving at the moment, such as Sugarpuss and The Chemist and others who are making some great music. How difficult was it breaking out as a small Perth band? I don’t think we have really “broken out” yet. I think it is because we only have 1 EP out which only has 4 songs on it, it is pretty hard to gain any more interest with such a small about of material for people to listen to. Where did you guys meet? Me, Nick and Jordi all went to high school together and then Scarlett has been friends with Jordi since forever.

You guys are all really young – how do you think you guys have matured/progressed over the course of your being together? Musically I definitely think the band has furthered my knowledge of music and making music. Obviously when you have a very large interest in something you are going to want to further you knowledge about it. So I have found myself reading a lot of articles and watching a lot of YouTube videos about recording styles and music gear etc. What’s next for the band? At the moment things will probably be pretty quiet because we are all back at uni and Jordi is still doing year 12. We have a few support shows coming up with Kimbra, Owl Eyes and will be playing some music festivals this season. What are you listening to now? Ratatat, Beach House, Flaming lips, Sugarpuss.

The last time I strayed from the beaten path I…. Found myself doing this interview.

MODULAR pEOP L By Josefine Wang

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l s i n k i h ave b e e n u n d e r t h e M o d u l a r Rec or

E

They look like the dorky kid at school who wrote love letters and then scrunched them up but secretly hoped someone would read it. They play music with passion and a hint of irony. They dress so casually cool they could put Chloe Sevigny to shame. And they rock! Architecture in Helsinki were hipsters before the term was even coined. They ooze cool and have a great sense of fashion and boy, can they make music. The first gig I saw was at Capitol smack bang in Perth city, and the place was rocking. It was packed to the ceiling (literally, Capitol has a top floor balcony) with people ready to sing along to hits such as Hold Music, Debbie and That Beep. I thought of myself as a diehard fan (yep, I was wearing my ‘Dumb is Back’ Architecture in Helsinki merchandise t-shirt) but I had no chance of getting up the front and past the ‘real’ fans. Besides, the soles of my shoes were more or less permanently stuck to the super sticky floor. Its five years ago since I saw them and this five-some has taken the world by storm since then. Their uber-cool record label Modular Recordings is known for signing up some of the least known best talent around the world. With names such as New York rockers the Yeah Yeah Yeah’s and The Rapture, to our very own WA indie darling Grace Woodroofe, Modular Recordings knows who to bag up the right bands before the competition. And not only that, the record label is proudly Aussie grown and owned. They’ve been snapping up great bands for over 13 years and even in the tough business c ite of music, they’re still making a killing. h c Ar

n g s w i n g o n l y f o r t h e p a s t y e a r but their latest record d i Moment Bends came in at number 12 on the ARIA chart – better than any of their previous albums. Some might put this down to their growing popularity but Modular Recordings is infamous for releasing chart topping albums. The first two records Modular ever produced were The Living End’s debut self-titled album and Ben Lee’s Breathing Tornadoes. Both instant classics and Breathing Tornadoes was nominated for an ARIA for best album of year. Architecture in Helsinki band members have stayed quite consistent with only three members jumping ship since the formation of the band and all members play more than just one instrument. And it shows. Their performances are always filled with energy, laughter, and, most importantly, great music (in my opinion).

When they closed the show with Heart it Races even my semi-permanently stuck shoes made a break for it and danced uncontrollably to every beat on the intricate percussion system they had set up. Both Architecture in Helsinki and Modular Records have made a great choice in teaming up and I don’t doubt they’ll both do very well from the partnership. Modular Recordings are always looking for new talent, so if you’re in a band trying to make it – who you gonna call? 93 93 93


Obnoxious Owl's Top Stress Beating Tips

GET SOME SLEEP.

Every singles 'how to beat stress' list has this on it. Forgive me for being predictable, but the other day after 2 hours sleep I burst into tears because the hanger broke when I went to hang up my jacket. I was like 3 weeks away from my period and I wasn't particulary fond of that hanger it was all because I needed some shut eye.

GET TO WORK 10 MINUTES EARLY.

SAY NO MORE OFTEN.

There is no shame at all in spending a Saturday night in on the sofa doing your nails, watching flicks and having an early night. You won't miss out on anything and the same shit will happen the following weekend. Sometimes its good to say no, regroup and recharge. You'll feel better for it, I promise.

Getting in early and getting all your ducks in a row takes a HUGE amount of pressure off the day. Plus you feel totally smug. Smug is such an underrated feeling. It has such negative connotations but only from people who have nothing to feel smug about. Screw those people. Get into work early and drink your coffee out ya smug mug.

APPRECIATE ART.

MASTURBATE.

GIVE PRAISE AND TAKE PRAISE

Seriously guys and girls, rub one out. I always just assume a highly strung person is not getting laid. After an amazing orgasm the lest thing you feel like doing is running around like headless chook. Sex is the answer to all your stress related problems, it puts you in touch with your sensual side and teaches you to lighten up. So use the two hands that God gave you and learn to lighten your own load. 94 94 94

Take time out to look at something beautiful or interesting. You don't have to be 'arty' to attend an art show or visit a gallery. I even recommend attending these things on your own and lose yourself for a while. Give the brain a rest and enjoy some alone time. Just don't become an art wanker. Nobody likes those. Dude. It's like SO annoying when you pay someone a compliment and instead of just going 'yeah thanks' they go 'Noooooooooo' or 'Don't be silly'. TAKE A COMPLIMENT GRACIOUSLY! And while you're at it, throw one out there.

AVOID NEGATIVE PEOPLE.

They are more of a drain on your life than parking fines hey. I'm not saying don't be there for a friend in need but know the difference between someone who is going through a tough time and someone who just takes the piss.

MAINTAIN YOUR WEIGHT.

Not everyone is skinny, granted. And you don't have to be in order to be happy. But if you have stacked on a few and it is making you miserable then sort it out. Eating pasta and chocolate everyday is gonna make you unhappy. You know it does, so get to know old mate 'moderation'.

SMILE.

It won't hurt you.

xxxx http://obnoxiousowl.com/


Join the dots 95 95 95


STNESTTN O C TENTONCOC SNTEN STNETNOC OC STNSETTNNETNOC ST ET OO CC SN TN EN TN TN NEETNOC SST TNOC STN ETONC N OC T E N ST

Around the back stevie 66-73

you beauty 74-81

designing spaces 82-83

behind the lens 84-85

social responsibility 88

josh biondillo interview 92 1/2

96 96 96

modular people 93 1/2

body reveal 86-87

mim d’abbs 90-91

obnoxious owl 94

join the dots 95


Near the front stray story 4-5

low brow 14-17

art vs science 18-19

pdi’s 20-21

features 23- 33

Something -

Something -

Something -

Something -

blender studios 36-37

san cisco 38-39

More the middle rosie tupper 34-35

bands 40-41

le fleur noir 50-57

make me 42-49

we run the night 58-65

Something -

Something -

97 97 97


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But then they’re going to ask questions like.. “how much are we getting paid? “what skate photographer is shooting it?” “how is our culture being represented by this magazine?” “what is this magazine doing for skateboarding? In terms of advertising and talent exposure” “what’s for lunch?” You see the “casual skate shoot” has been done a thousand times and hardly ever has it been done in a way that is tastefully respectful of the skate community.. This is because so often have people tried to betray skateboarding on face value alone without understanding the mechanics, pride and technical subdivisions that s ateboarders ta e er seriousl hen an one dares to misrepresent their integrit lso there is a fine art to s ate photograph and usuall it is amongst the s ate community, thought to be best left to underpaid professional skate photographers who are well aware of the dos and don’ts. Like for example when mountain dew publish a photo of a skater mid-trick... Most people think “oh a trick” skateboarders are usually talking about all the little details that make the photo all wrong, and can tell the photographer knows zilch about the industry in a 2 second glance.. Basically My loyalties will always be to skateboarding so therefore I can only speak for the skate communit as a hole hen sa if ou ant a piece of erth s finest the ou re either gonna ha e to earn it or pa for it ther ise our local has s atepar has plent of fine oung ulnerable easil e ploitable talent to offer n a orld here fashion maga ines and materialism outsell ph sical abilit interest a million times o er e thin it s only fair that ‘we’ should expect full respect for ‘our’ abilities and talents in the form of dollar dollar bills. When the mag drops maybe we can talk about coordinating a proper skate shoot where no subcultures are being exploited or misrepresented. Best of luck and kind wishes, Joel 17 hours ago Joel Sorry had a bit to drink.. But basically, you can’t expect me to coordinate an event without getting paid.. I do this for a living and so do the skaters I represent. Sorry but I get these requests a lot. If you have to pay models for shoots then skaters should expect the same treatment and the right thing to do would be have the mag publish a photo by a skate photographer not a fashion photog shooting s ating ? eriousl thats ridiculous and its gonna piss ppl off onestl f ou reall ant to get in ol ed in culture then don t half ass it pl are clued on these days and they can smell an imposter from miles away. The multimedia professionals that work in the skate industry are so talented and so underexposed and underpaid. Take my advice and don’t fuck with skateboarding or any subculture for that matter without doing your research if you want the mag to do well. There’s so many that ha e done it rong and that s h the onl stic around for a fe ears our photograph is on point of course so ou e got that side of the mag nailed othing sa s bad ournalism li e an outsider perspecti e on a er comple subculture o our approach ould be fine if ou ere tal ing about a fashion editorial but ou ent there and ou re doing a maga ine ou cannot half ass culture ther ise ppl get that feeling as if a stranger as breast feeding our ne born child reall ould lo e to see a good publication come out of Perth my hometown but it has to be done right.. And asking for free skate models.. Wearing there own clothing without promoting or in ol ing an local s ate retailers and running s ateboarder inter ie s ithout pa ing for an s ate photos and it s not about the mone is definitel not doing it right rust me I’m doing you a favor explaining this. Otherwise forget skate and street culture forever.if you think this is harsh Just read a hypebeast.comforum to know how fast todays culture and fashion fanatics ill bur ou er one ho no s an thing about fashion and editorial no s ho ate rennan is but to an one else ou re ust a chic ith a camera... And until it’s out your mag has zero credibility so start earning it before you spend it. Stick to what you do the best and if you want to explore elsewhere seek professional ad ice and follo the guidelines so not to offend ther than that m more than illing to help in an a can ou e definitel got the talent to ma e this happen ate our photos are incredible ad lu and encouragement for ha ing the guts to commit to a cool pro ect li e this oel oel hours ago rgh feel terrible about m previous msgs.. If you still need some guys let me know how many, place and time and I’ll make it happen. 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Stray Magazine Issue 01