Page 1

franchise greats cleveland indians hall of fame


“

I never thought that I could belong to a prestigious group of players that have given everything to the city of Cleveland

�

in an Indians uniform.

Omar Vizquel on his induction


T

he Cleveland Indians franchise is deeply rooted in the rich history of baseball. As one of its oldest traditions, baseball in Cleveland has become much more than just a game. It is in many ways the principal heritage of the city— and it all starts with the players. They are the franchise greats that have distinguished this ball club through all of their accomplishments and significant moments.


L

eague Park sits at the northeast corner of E. 66th Street and Lexington Avenue in the Hough neighborhood. It was built in 1891 as a wood structure and rebuilt using concrete and steel in 1910. League Park was built for the Cleveland Spiders, who were founded in 1887 and played first in the American Association before joining the National League in 1889. Team owner Frank Robison chose the site for the new park, at the corner of Lexington Avenue and Dunham Street, later renamed E. 66th Street, in Cleveland’s Hough neighborhood, because it was along the streetcar line he owned. The park opened May 1, 1891, with 9,000 wooden seats, in a game against the Cincinnati Reds. The first pitch was made by Cy Young, and the Spiders won 12–3.

Est.

league park

1891


The

Cleveland Indians Hall of Fame

The Cleveland Indians franchise has been graced by many outstanding players and coaches, but there are a select number of those men that have left a legacy behind them. Their accomplishments, milestones, and contributions to the organization laid the groundwork for generations to come.

This book serves as a dedication to the 44 players and managers that have made Cleveland baseball what it is today. Each featured inductee has a short biography page dedicated to their time with the franchise. They are separated in groups by the decade in which they played and further sorted in a timeline manner by the date they left (or retired from) Cleveland. Notice the shift in jersey style and logo progression from one decade to the next. A brief summary of each individual's career with the Indians is accompanied by an image of their days in a Cleveland uniform. A section of icons notes their achievements throughout their entire Major League Baseball career. Statistics located at the bottom of each biography page indicate that specific inductee's stats in their seasons with Cleveland alone.

See reverse for icon descriptions


Cap Logo

MLB Hall of famer

00

Retired cleveland #

ROY

rookie of the year

MVP

most valuable player

AlL-Star

cy young

triple crown

gold glove

silver slugger

WORLD SERIES


The

Cleveland Indians Hall of Fame


Louis sockalexis CLEVELAND CAREER

1897-1899

right fielder

History

Sockalexis signed a contract with the Cleveland Spiders in 1897 and became the first Native American, and first recognized minority, to play in the National League. Manager Patsy Tebeau was so impressed with Sockalexis early on that he started referencing the team as "Tebeau's Indians." Later, it would become inspiration for the new name of the franchise in 1915.

He was a multi-talented athlete who excelled in football and track as well as baseball. Sockalexis' sensational play caused attendance to increase, but many fans were more interested in mocking his Native American heritage rather than witnessing the former. However, he contracted a drinking problem and later found himself with diminished playing time, which eventually led to his release from the league.

First NAtive american player

CLEVELAND STATISTICS

5

G

AB

R

H

HR

RBI

BB

SO

SB

AVG

OBP

SLG

94

367

54

115

3

55

20

48

16

.313

.355

.414


( bill )

william BRADLEY CLEVELAND CAREER

1901-1910

third baseman

History

Bradley made his professional debut on August 26, 1899 with the Chicago Orphans. After playing for two seasons in Chicago, Bradley moved to Cleveland to play for the newly formed American League. He spent the next decade with the Cleveland franchise, his best season coming in 1902 when he had a batting average of .340, 12 triples, and 11 home runs. After the 1910 season, Bradley spent three seasons with the Toronto Maple Leafs of the International League before returning to the Federal League in 1914, playing for the Brooklyn Tip-Tops that year and the Kansas City Packers the following year. He led American League third basemen in fielding four times, setting a league record of seven putouts in one game in both 1901 and 1909. Bradley was the first Cleveland baseball player to hit for the cycle on September 24, 1903. In 1902 he hit home runs in four straight games and finished the year with a .340 batting average.

First to hit for the cycle

CLEVELAND STATISTICS

7

G

AB

R

H

HR

RBI

BB

SO

SB

AVG

OBP

SLG

1231

4648

649

1265

27

473

242

435

157

.272

.317

.373


ELMER FLICK CLEVELAND CAREER

1902-1910

right fielder

History

Flick was brought up to the Phillies in 1898, but was largely expected to come off the bench because of Philadelphia’s veteran outfield. On April 26, future Hall of Fame outfielder Sam Thompson went down with an injury. Flick entered the game, recorded two hits and began his 13-year career. In four full seasons with the Phillies, Flick hit .345, with a career best .378 in 1900. Following the 1901 season, Flick was one of several National League players who jumped to the year-old American League. He appeared in 11 games for the Philadelphia Athletics that spring, but was prohibited from playing any more when the Pennsylvania Supreme Court ruled that any players under contract to the Phillies could not play for another team. Flick played the rest of his career in Cleveland, where he led the league in stolen bases twice and triples three times. He also won the batting title in 1905.

batting avg. title

CLEVELAND STATISTICS G

AB

R

H

HR

RBI

BB

SO

SB

AVG

OBP

SLG

935

3537

535

1058

19

376

355

412

207

.299

.371

.422

8


( ADDIE )

ADrian JOSS CLEVELAND CAREER

1902-1910

pitcher

History

Joss never experienced a losing season in the nine years he pitched in the major leagues. His unconventional corkscrew technique found him great success, including a 1.89 lifetime earned run average and four seasons in a row of 20 or more wins. Joss' biggest accomplishments came in 1908, when he was 2411 with a 1.16 earned run average and nine shutouts. In his 11 losses, his team scored a total of only 11 runs in support of him. On Oct. 2, 1908, Joss threw the fourth perfect game in baseball history, a victory over future Hall of Famer Ed Walsh. He accomplished the feat with just 74 pitches. It was the first of two no-hitters he would throw, the second coming in 1910. Both games were against the Chicago White Sox, and he is the only pitcher to no-hit the same team twice. Of his 160 career wins, 45 of them were shutouts. His career earned run average is ranked second all-time and he led the American League twice in the same category while he was playing.

Perfect game

2x ERA title

CLEVELAND STATISTICS

9

W

L

ERA

G

GS

CG

SHO

SV

IP

H

R

ER

BB

SO

160

97

1.89

286

260

234

45

5

2327

1888

730

488

364

920


( CY )

DENTON young CLEVELAND CAREER

1890-1898, 1909-1911

pitcher

History

The right-hander won 511 games during his tenure in baseball, almost 100 more than any other pitcher in history. He recorded 30 victories on five occasions and won more than 20 games 15 times. Young’s best season came in 1901 when he led in strikeouts, wins and earned run average. It was the first year of the American League and he set the bar high, winning its Triple Crown. In 1903 he won two games in the first modern World Series, helping Boston to victory. On May 5, 1904, Young pitched the first perfect game of the 20th century, a day he considered to be his greatest in baseball. The pitcher totaled three no-hitters throughout his time in the sport. He still holds the records for most career innings pitched with 7,356, games started with 815 and complete games with 749. He is the fourth all-time with 76 career shutouts.

2x ERA title

CLEVELAND STATISTICS W

L

ERA

G

GS

CG

SHO

SV

IP

H

R

ER

BB

SO

270

164

3.36

483

430

394

28

7

3857

3957

1931

1295

823

1201

10


( nap )

napoleon lajoie CLEVELAND CAREER

1902-1914

second baseman

History

Napoleon Lajoie, hitter extraordinaire, sublime fielder, manager and executive, has been described as “the first superstar in American League history.” And indeed, to concentrate on his hitting or his fielding is to miss his allaround talent as a player. Lajoie broke in with the Phillies in 1896, hitting .326 in 39 games, and would hit over .300 for the next six full seasons. He won a Triple Crown, leading the league with a .426 batting average, 14 homers, and 125 runs batted in. He also led the league in runs, hits, and doubles. In Cleveland, Lajoie literally became the face of the franchise, when the fledgling club, which had been known as the Bronchos, renamed itself after him—the “Naps.” For his career, Lajoie batted .338, topping the .300 mark 15 times and leading the league five times. He cranked out 3,243 hits, 657 doubles, scored 1,504 runs, and drove in 1,599.

3x batting title

CLEVELAND STATISTICS

11

G

AB

R

H

HR

RBI

BB

SO

SB

AVG

OBP

SLG

1614

6034

865

2047

33

919

408

222

240

.339

.389

.452


( shoeless )

Joe Jackson CLEVELAND CAREER

1910-1915

outfielder

History

Jackson began his professional baseball career in 1908 with the Philadelphia Athletics organization. For his first two years, he was up and down between the minor and the major leagues, playing only 10 games with the Athletics. Becoming increasingly unhappy, Jackson was traded to the Cleveland Naps in 1911 where he played his first full season. In 1915, Jackson compiled a .408 batting average, a record that still stands for rookie seasons. Coming into the prime of his career Jackson batted .395 and led the American League in triples in 1912. The next year Jackson led the league with 197 hits and .551 slugging average. In August of 1915, he was traded to the Chicago White Sox. Even with his new surroundings his tremendous career continued. In 1908, Jackson was playing semi-pro ball with the Greenville Spinners. He played in new spikes that quickly wore painful blisters on his feet. Jackson took off his spikes to ease his aching feet. In the seventh inning, he hit a triple. As he pulled into third base a fan of the opposing team shouted, “You shoeless son-of-a-gun!� It was the only time Joe played 'shoeless' in a game.

CLEVELAND STATISTICS G

AB

R

H

HR

RBI

BB

SO

SB

AVG

OBP

SLG

674

2502

474

937

24

353

267

140

138

.375

.441

.542

12


1928

1929- 1932

1933-1938

1939- 1945

1946- 1947

1946- 1950

1951- 1972

1973- 1979

1980-Present


( ray)

raymond chapman CLEVELAND CAREER

1912-1920

shortstop

History

Chapman broke into the Major Leagues in 1912 with Cleveland, then known as the Naps. He led the American League in runs scored and walks in 1918. A top-notch bunter, Chapman is sixth on the all-time list for sacrifice hits and holds the single season record with 67 in 1917. He was also an excellent shortstop who led the league in putouts three times and assists once. He batted .300 three times, and led the Indians in stolen bases four times. In 1917, he set a team record of 52 stolen bases, which stood until 1980. Chapman was hit in the head by a pitch thrown by Yankees pitcher Carl Mays, and died 12 hours later. He remains the only Major League Baseball player to have died from an injury received during an MLB game.

CLEVELAND STATISTICS G

AB

R

H

HR

RBI

BB

SO

SB

AVG

OBP

SLG

1051

3785

671

1053

17

364

452

427

238

.278

.358

.377

14


( jim )

James Bagby, Sr. CLEVELAND CAREER

1916-1922

pitcher

History

Bagby began his playing career with the Cincinnati Reds in 1912. His pitching records that year were not impressive, so the Reds let him go, but he returned to major league baseball with the Cleveland Indians in 1916. Bagby posted 23 wins in 1917, following with 17 wins the next two campaigns. On September 2, 1920, Bagby won his 31st game of the season, which is one of only four 30-victory seasons after that date. And on October 10 in the World Series of the same year, he was the first pitcher to hit a homerun in modern World Series history. In a nine-season career, Bagby posted a 127–87 record with 450 strikeouts and a 3.10 earned run average in 1821.2 innings pitched. In World Series play, he had an 1–1 record with an earned run average of 1.80.

CLEVELAND STATISTICS

15

W

L

ERA

G

GS

CG

SHO

SV

IP

122

86

3.03

290

201

131

16

26

1735

.2

H

R

ER

BB

SO

1772

714

584

424

424


( steve )

stephen o’neill CLEVELAND CAREER

1911-1923

catcher

History

O'Neill started out his career in Cleveland where he made his only World Series appearance in 1920. He hit .333 in seven games as the Indians took home the championship. As a big league manager with four teams—the Indians, Tigers, Red Sox and Philadelphia Phillies—O'Neill never had a losing record. His Tigers won the 1945 World Series and he was known for turning around under-performing teams, often in mid-season. His career winning percentage over 14 seasons was a stalwart .559 (1,040 victories against 821 lost). He also served as a coach for Cleveland from 1935-1937.

CLEVELAND STATISTICS G

AB

R

H

HR

RBI

BB

SO

SB

AVG

OBP

SLG

1365

4182

394

1109

11

458

491

382

30

.265

.348

.341

16


( stan )

stanley coveleski CLEVELAND CAREER

1916-1924

pitcher

History

Coveleski was signed into pro ball in 1908 after playing just five amateur games. He surfaced briefly with the Philadelphia Athletics in 1912, then hit the big leagues for good with the Cleveland in 1916, winning 15 games in his first full big league season. The following year, he led the league with nine shutouts, while winning 19 games and posting an earned run average of 1.81. He won 22 games the following season, the first of four consecutive 20-plus victory seasons.

His high water mark in the big leagues was 1920, when he went 24-14, leading the league in strikeouts and leading the Indians to the AL pennant. In the World Series, Coveleski shone like few others ever have, winning games One, Four and Seven. Each game was a complete game five-hitter, and game seven was a shutout. As he gave up just one earned run in each of the other games, his World Series earned run average was a sparkling 0.67. He held a career record of 215-142, a .602 winning percentage, 38 shutouts and a career earned run average of 2.89.

2x era title

CLEVELAND STATISTICS

17

W

L

ERA

G

GS

CG

SHO

SV

IP

172

123

2.80

360

305

193

31

20

2502

.1

H

R

ER

BB

SO

2450

972

779

616

856


( Tris)

tristram speaker CLEVELAND CAREER

1916- 1926

center fielder

History

By the time Speaker turned 21, he was already one of the best center fielders in the game, a player highly regarded for both his work at the plate and in the field. He began his career with the Red Sox, where he had the best season of his career in 1912. Speaker earned American League MVP honors that year, leading the AL in on-base percentage and carrying Boston to a World Series championship.

A tremendous contact hitter who could drive the ball into the gaps and down the line, Speaker led the American League in doubles eight times. In Speaker’s first season with the Indians, he led the AL in average, onbase percentage and slugging. Speaker took over as a player/manager during the 1919 season—a position he held until his final season in Cleveland in 1926—leading the Indians to a 40-21 finish down the stretch. In his first full season as player/ manager in 1920, Speaker reached his third and final World Series, helping the Indians capture the championship in seven games over Brooklyn.

MVP

batting avg. title

3x

CLEVELAND STATISTICS G

AB

R

H

HR

RBI

BB

SO

SB

AVG

OBP

SLG

1519

5546

1079

1965

73

886

857

146

155

.354

.444

.520

18


World

1920

Series


I

n one of few nine-game series, the Cleveland Indians beat the Brooklyn Robins for their first World Series Championship by virtue of winning five games to two. The final game was won at home in shutout fashion by a score of 3-0. Stan Coveleski was the starting pitcher and, with the final win, finished with a win-loss record of 3-0 throughout the World Series.


( joe )

joseph sewell CLEVELAND CAREER

1920-1930

shortstop

History

After Indians shortstop Ray Chapman was killed by a pitch from the Yankees’ Carl Mays in August 1920, Sewell was called up. The 21-year-old Sewell had played in just 92 minor league games before his big league debut, yet he settled in immediately and helped lead the Tribe to the 1920 World Series title. Where Sewell really carved out his identity was his ability to get the bat on the ball more consistently than anyone else ever has. Sewell struck out 20 times in 558 at-bats during the 1922 season, and that would be his career high. He never even reached double-digits in strikeouts in any of his last nine seasons. He ended his career with a rate of 62.6 at-bats per strikeout. Sewell played in 1,103 consecutive games, the second-longest such streak in history at the time. Sewell was also known for using only a single bat through his entire career, a 40-ouncer he dubbed “Black Betsy.” Sewell also led American League shortstops in fielding percentage three times and finished in the top five six times.

2x

CLEVELAND STATISTICS

21

G

AB

R

H

HR

RBI

BB

SO

SB

AVG

OBP

SLG

1513

5621

857

1800

30

868

654

99

71

.320

.398

.425


( charlie )

charles jamieson CLEVELAND CAREER

1919-1932

left fielder

History

After being traded to Cleveland in 1919, Jamieson helped the team win the 1920 World Series. His production at the plate in the coming years led to his early success in Cleveland, but his reputation as a defender became his identity as a player. With his speed and arm, he covered the expansive left field in League Park for 14 seasons. Jamieson's range factor led the league three times and he also led the league in double plays three times. He is the only outfielder who initiated triple plays twice in the same year—both coming within weeks of each other. He played a total of 1,242 games in left field in his career, the most in Cleveland history. He finished his career with a .303 batting average and 1,062 runs scored over 18 major league seasons. Jamieson topped the .300 mark eight times.

CLEVELAND STATISTICS G

AB

R

H

HR

RBI

BB

SO

SB

AVG

OBP

SLG

1483

5551

942

1753

18

490

627

247

107

.316

.388

.406

22


( wes )

wesley ferrell CLEVELAND CAREER

1927-1933

pitcher

History

Ferrell signed a contract with Cleveland in 1927 and made his Major League Baseball debut September 9, 1927, pitching a single inning against the Boston Red Sox, and gave up three earned runs. After a stint in the minors, he joined the Indians for good in 1929, though only a spot-starter at first; he established himself as one of the best pitchers in the American League by season's end. He posted a 21-10 record, with 100 strikeouts and a 3.60 earned run average. Ferrell had eight seasons of 200-plus innings, topping the 300 plateau twice and leading the league three times. He also had six seasons of 20 or more wins including each of his first four full seasons, the only 20th century pitcher to accomplish the feat. He led his teams in wins seven times and averaged 19 wins per season over 10 full seasons in the majors. As a hitter, Ferrell batted .280 lifetime and set pitcher records for home runs in a season (9) and a career (38). Ferrell collected 329 hits, 57 doubles, 13 triples, 208 runs batted in, 175 runs and a .446 slugging percentage. He even drew in 129 walks, resulting in a .351 career on-base percentage.

2x

CLEVELAND STATISTICS

23

W

L

ERA

G

GS

CG

SHO

SV

IP

102

62

3.67

195

157

113

8

12

1321

.1

H

R

ER

BB

SO

1373

644

539

526

516


( earl )

howard averill CLEVELAND CAREER

1929-1939

center fielder

History

Averill broke into the majors in 1929 at the relatively late age of 26. He quickly made up for lost time during his rookie year, starting the season as the center fielder and number three batter for the Cleveland Indians. Averill quickly proved to be a line-drive machine, pounding out 198 hits that season en route to a .332 batting average, 18 homers, 96 runs batted in and 110 runs scored. During his first 10 big league seasons, he averaged 22 home runs, 107 runs batted in and 114 runs scored a season and hit .319. For his 13-year career, Averill hit .318 with 238 home runs (his career total of 226 homers was a Cleveland Indians record for 55 years), 2,019 hits and 1,224 runs scored. He hit over .300 in eight of his 12 full big league seasons, topping out at .378 in 1936 when he led the American League with 232 hits and 15 triples. Averill finished in the top four of the American League Most Valuable Player voting in three seasons and was named to six All-Star teams.

3

6x

CLEVELAND STATISTICS G

AB

R

H

HR

RBI

BB

SO

SB

AVG

OBP

SLG

1510

5909

1154

1903

226

1084

725

470

66

.322

.399

.542

24


Down, but not out.

The Great Depression took its toll on the American society, but it wouldn't suppress the spirit of Cleveland baseball.

The first Indians game played at Cleveland Stadium (above) was on July 31, 1932, just over a year after it opened. They would continue to play at the new stadium until the start of the 1934 season where they decided to go back to League Park. The return was due to a decrease in attendance and complaints from players and fans about the huge outfield, which reduced the number

of homeruns. The Indians made the permanent switch to Cleveland Stadium at the start of the 1940 season with a reduced outfield size to address the previous issues. They would continue to play there until 1994. Amid the economic decline, Cleveland hosted the 1935 MLB All-Star game, proving the steadfast baseball spirit.


( hal )

harold trosky CLEVELAND CAREER

1933-1941

first baseman

History

Trosky was hailed as the next Babe Ruth his rookie season after tallying a combined 200 home runs and RBI. His 216 HR's with the Indians ranks him fifth on the team's all-time list, behind Earl Averill, Manny Ramirez, Albert Belle, and Jim Thome. The 1936 brought him great success where he led the American League in runs batted in (162), extra-base hits (96), and total bases (405). Trosky is also widely considered one of the best players to never make an All-Star team. This was due to the fact that he was an American League first baseman at the same time as Hall of Fame first basemen Lou Gehrig, Jimmie Foxx and Hank Greenberg. Unfortunately, Trosky had a short-lived career due to constant migraine headaches that affected his vision.

CLEVELAND STATISTICS G

AB

R

H

HR

RBI

BB

SO

SB

AVG

OBP

SLG

1124

4365

758

1365

216

911

449

373

21

.313

.379

.551

26


( mel )

melvin harder CLEVELAND CAREER

1928-1947

pitcher

History

Harder strated his career with the Indians in 1928 as a relief pitcher. He was then moved to the starting rotation in 1930 and pitched the first game ever at the new Cleveland Stadium in 1932. He also appeared in all four All-Star games from 1934 to 1937 and set a record with 13 consecutive innings without an earned run. Harder's 223 wins and 186 losses remain a club record. Ironically, after a 20-year career, the Indians won the World Series the year after he retired.

After retiring as a player, Harder stayed with Cleveland as a pitching coach the following season. He guided what became known as the Indians' "Big Four" pitching rotation, featuring Bob Feller, Bob Lemon, Early Wynn and Mike Garcia. Harder would continue to develop great pitching talent with Cleveland until the 1964 season, having spent the first 36 years of his adult life in Cleveland.

18

4x

CLEVELAND STATISTICS

27

W

L

ERA

G

GS

CG

SHO

SV

IP

223

186

3.80

582

433

181

25

24

3426

.1

H

R

ER

BB

SO

3706

1714

1447

1118

1161


( al )

alfonso lopez manager

1951-1956

manager

History

Lopez found great success as a dependable backstop and built a strong reputation doing so. He played 1,918 games behind the plate during 19 seasons with Brooklyn, Boston, Pittsburgh and Cleveland, setting a major league record for games caught that stood for 40 years. After his playing days were over, Lopez came back to Cleveland now as manager of the club and averaged 95 wins per season—including 111 wins during the 1954 campaign. Lopez and the Indians claimed the American League pennant that season—one of only two instances in the 1950's when the pennant was not won by the New York Yankees.

2x

CLEVELAND STATISTICS W

L

W-L%

G

Finish

1954

570

354

.617

930

1.8

AL Pennant

28


( ken)

kenneth keltner CLEVELAND CAREER

1937-1944, 1946-1949

third baseman

History

Keltner made a rapid ascent through the minor leagues, and in 1938, Cleveland invited him to spring training camp. The 21-year-old Keltner made the team and played in 149 games that season, posting a .276 batting average with 26 home runs and 113 runs batted in. Keltner had a career-season in 1948, placing third in the AL with 31 home runs and posting careerhighs with 119 runs batted in, 91 runs, and 89 walks, and placed fifth in the league with a .522 slugging percentage on his way to a World Series Championship. He led American League third basemen four times in assists, five times in double plays, twice in fielding percentage and twice in range factor, ending his career with a .965 fielding percentage. When he left Cleveland, he was in the top five in many of the all-time Indians hitting records.

7x

CLEVELAND STATISTICS

29

G

AB

R

H

HR

RBI

BB

SO

SB

AVG

OBP

SLG

1513

5655

735

1561

163

850

511

474

39

.276

.337

.441t


( satchel )

Leroy paige CLEVELAND CAREER

1948-1949

pitcher

History

Paige began his professional career in the Negro leagues in the 1920's after being discharged from reform school in Alabama.

At the age of 42, Paige made his big league debut when Cleveland owner Bill Veeck signed him to a contract on July 7, 1948. Two days later, Paige made his debut for the Indians and quickly got involved in one of the tightest pennant races in American League history. The club went on to win the AL pennant in a one-game playoff against Boston, then captured the World Series title in six games against the Braves. Paige became the first AfricanAmerican pitcher to pitch in the World Series when he worked two-thirds of an inning in Game 5. The numbers—at least the big league ones—do not do justice to his legend. The stories, however, keep alive the memory of a man who became bigger than the game. Satchel Paige was bigger than mere numbers.

2x

CLEVELAND STATISTICS W

L

ERA

G

GS

CG

SHO

SV

IP

10

8

2.78

52

12

4

2

6

155

.2

H

R

ER

BB

SO

131

50

48

55

97

30


cleveland stadium Est. 1931


World

1948

Series


( lou)

louis boudreau CLEVELAND CAREER

1938-1950

shortstop

History

After one game in 1938 and 53 games in 1939, Boudreau became the Indians regular shortstop in 1940, hitting .295, driving in 101 runs, and leading the AL in fielding percentage for the first of 10 consecutive seasons. In 1942, the Indians shocked the baseball world by hiring their 24-year-old shortstop as a player-manager. Boudreau would continue in that role through 1950. In 1946, he devised the “Williams Shift,” sometimes known as the “Boudreau Shift,” placing all of the infielders on the right side of second base and leaving only the left fielder across the diamond, in an attempt to stop the pull-hitting Ted Williams. Few players (or managers) ever had a better season than Boudreau did in 1948. The Indians went 97-58, while Boudreau hit .355 with 106 runs batted in, a career-high 18 home runs, and struck out only nine times in 560 at-bats.

5

MVP batting avg. title

8x

Player of the year

CLEVELAND STATISTICS

33

G

AB

R

H

HR

RBI

BB

SO

SB

AVG

OBP

SLG

1560

5754

823

1706

63

740

766

297

50

.296

.382

.416


( joe )

joseph gordon CLEVELAND CAREER

1947-1950

manager

1958-1960

second baseman / manager

History

Gordon started out with the New York Yankees and then was traded to Cleveland following the 1946 season. One word has always defined Joe Gordon: winner. He appeared in the postseason in six of his 11 big league seasons. Gordon won five World Series rings (four with the Yankees) despite losing two years while he served World War II in the Army Air Corps. Overall, Gordon was selected to play in the All-Star Game in nine of his 11 seasons. Of the Hall of Famers who played their entire career in the All-Star Game era, only nine appeared in a higher percentage of Mid-Summer Classics during their career than Gordon. Gordon was the first AL second baseman to hit 20 home runs in a season, which he did seven times in his 11-year career, and holds the league mark for career home runs at second base (246). Defensively, he led the AL in assists four times and double plays three times. Gordon also managed the Cleveland Indians starting in 1958, and led Cleveland to a second-place finish in 1959.

MVP

9x

5x

CLEVELAND STATISTICS G

AB

R

H

HR

RBI

BB

SO

SB

AVG

OBP

SLG

W

L

W-L%

G

Finish

566

2021

318

530

100

358

278

194

21

.262

.354

.463

184

151

.549

335

3.3

34


( bob)

robert feller CLEVELAND CAREER

1936-1941, 1945-1956

pitcher

History

Feller began his Major League journey in 1936, at age 17, fresh off his family’s farm in Van Meter, IA. It was during his rookie season that Feller earned the nickname “Rapid” Robert because of his devastating fastball and high strikeout totals. He made his first major league start in August, striking out 15 St. Louis Browns. A month later, he set an American League rookie record fanning 17 Philadelphia Athletics in a game. Upon completion of his rookie campaign, Feller returned home to Iowa to finish his senior year of high school. Feller really began to hit his stride after his 19th birthday, rattling off a string of three straight twenty win seasons. But in 1941 he enlisted in the US Navy after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. He became the first Major League Baseball player to enlist in World War II, and in the process, gave up nearly four seasons of baseball in the prime of his career. At the conclusion of the war, Feller returned to the game and picked up right where he left off averaging more than 19 wins a season over the next six years.

19

8x era title

Player of the year

CLEVELAND STATISTICS

35

W

L

ERA

G

GS

CG

SHO

SV

IP

H

R

ER

BB

SO

266

162

3.25

570

484

279

44

22

3827

3271

1557

1384

1764

2581


( al )

albert rosen CLEVELAND CAREER

1947-1956

third baseman

History

Rosen joined the Indians in September of the 1948 season. Despite only playing five games during the season with Cleveland, he was included on the World Series roster behind Ken Keltner. When Keltner was traded in 1950, Rosen took over as the Indians' third baseman, leading the AL in home runs with 37, hitting more than any previous American League rookie. It stood as the AL rookie record until Mark McGwire surpassed it in 1987. Rosen averaged a league-best homer every 15 at bats, and led the league in hit by pitches (10). In 1953, Rosen led the AL in home runs (43), runs batted in (145), runs (115), slugging percentage (.613), and total bases (367). He also came in second in on base percentage, and third in hits (201), and tied for eighth in stolen bases. He also had a 20-game hitting streak. Defensively, he had the best range factor of all third basemen in the league (3.32), and led it in assists (338) and double plays (38). His runs batted in total is still the most for an Indians third baseman and is fourth most for any Indian in a season.

MVP

player of the year

4x

CLEVELAND STATISTICS G

AB

R

H

HR

RBI

BB

SO

SB

AVG

OBP

SLG

1044

3725

603

1063

192

717

587

385

39

.285

.384

.495

36


( jim)

james hegan CLEVELAND CAREER

1941-1942, 1946-1957

catcher

History

Hegan signed a contract with Cleveland in 1938 and played in the minor leagues for four seasons before his major league debut on September 7, 1941 at the age of 20. He appeared in 68 games for the Indians in 1942, before joining the United States Coast Guard for the remainder of the Second World War. When Hegan returned in 1946 he became the regular starting catcher, replacing Frankie Hayes. In his second season back after the war, Hegan was recognized as one of the top catchers in the American League when he was selected as a reserve in the 1947 All-Star Game. As a testament to Hegan's pitch-calling skills, during this period, the Indians pitching staff was the best in baseball, leading the American League six times in earned run average. During his career, he led American League catchers three times in putouts, assists, double plays, total chances per game and fielding percentage and, had a career fielding percentage of .990. Hegan caught 121 shutouts in his career, ranking him ninth all-time among major league catchers. He is the Indians' all-time leader in games played as a catcher with 1,491.

5x

CLEVELAND STATISTICS

37

G

AB

R

H

HR

RBI

BB

SO

SB

AVG

OBP

SLG

1526

4459

526

1026

90

499

437

664

15

.230

.299

.349


( larry)

lawrence doby CLEVELAND CAREER

1947-1955, 1958

center fielder

History

Doby began his baseball career as a star infielder for the Newark Eagles of the Negro National League and was also the first African-American player to play professional basketball in the ABL, the precursor to the NBA. After taking time out from professional sports to serve in the United States Navy during WWII, Doby returned to the NNL and led the Eagles to the Negro league championship in 1946.

In 1947, only a few months after Jackie Robinson’s major league debut, Cleveland signed Doby and he became the first African-American player in the American League. In 1948, his sophomore campaign in the big leagues, Doby became the first African-American to hit a home run in World Series play. And in 1952 the slugging centerfielder became the first African-American to lead either league in home runs. During his time in the Major Leagues, Doby was a seven time All-Star and put together five-100 RBI and eight-20 home run seasons.

14

7x

CLEVELAND STATISTICS G

AB

R

H

HR

RBI

BB

SO

SB

AVG

OBP

SLG

1235

4315

808

1234

215

776

703

805

44

.286

.389

.500

38


( bob )

robert lemon CLEVELAND CAREER

1946-1958

pitcher

History

He led American League third basemen in fielding four times, setting a league record of seven putouts in one game in both 1901 and 1909. Bill Bradley was the first Cleveland baseball player to hit for the cycle on September 24, 1903. In 1902 he hit home runs in four straight games and finished the year with a .340 batting average. Bradley made his professional debut on August 26, 1899 with the Chicago Orphans. After playing for two seasons in Chicago, Bradley moved to Cleveland to play for the newly formed American League. He spent the next decade with the Cleveland franchise, his best season coming in 1902 when he had a batting average of .340, 12 triples, and 11 home runs. After the 1910 season, Bradley spent three seasons with the Toronto Maple Leafs of the International League before returning to the Federal League in 1914, playing for the Brooklyn Tip-Tops that year and the Kansas City Packers the following year.

21

Perfect game – 1908

7x

CLEVELAND STATISTICS

39

W

L

ERA

G

GS

CG

SHO

SV

207

128

3.23

460

350

188

31

22

IP

H

2850 2559

R

ER

BB

SO

1185

1024

1251

1277


( mike )

edward garcia CLEVELAND CAREER

1948-1959

pitcher

History

Garcia debuted with the Indians on October 8, 1948, just before the Indians played in the 1948 World Series. He allowed three hits and no runs in two innings, and he struck out one batter. Unfortunately, he did not make a World Series appearance during their championship run. Garcia joined Bob Lemon, Early Wynn, and Bob Feller on the Indians' "Big Four" pitching staff. Historians consider the "Big Four" to be one of the greatest starting pitching rotations in baseball history. During those six seasons with the "Big Four," Garcia compiled a record of 104 wins against 57 losses. He had two 20-win seasons and led the American League in earned run average and shutouts twice each. From 1955 to 1959, Garcia finished with losing records in three of five seasons. The 1955 season represented Garcia's first losing record (11–13) and his first season earned run average over 4.00.

4x

era title

CLEVELAND STATISTICS W

L

ERA

G

GS

CG

SHO

SV

IP

H

R

ER

BB

SO

142

96

3.24

397

281

111

27

22

2138

2102

865

770

696

1095

40


( herb)

herbert score CLEVELAND CAREER

1955-1959

pitcher

History

In 1955, Score came up to the Major Leagues as a rookie at the age of 21. He quickly became one of the top power pitchers in the American League joining a staff that still included Bob Feller and Bob Lemon. Score struck out 245 batters in 1955, a Major League rookie record that stood until 1984, when it was topped by Dwight Gooden. It was the first time in MLB history a regular starting pitcher averaged over one strikeout per inning. Score retired from playing baseball in 1962. Beginning in 1964, he was employed as a television and radio play-by-play announcer with the Cleveland Indians for the next 34 years, first on television from 1964 to 1967, and then on radio from 1968 to 1997, the longest career for an Indians play-by-play announcer. Score's final Major League Baseball game as an announcer was Game 7 of the 1997 World Series.

roy

CLEVELAND STATISTICS

41

W

L

ERA

G

GS

CG

SHO

SV

IP

49

34

3.17

115

100

41

10

3

714

.1

H

R

ER

BB

SO

490

288

252

458

742

2x


T

he 1954 season was one to remember when Cleveland won an American League record 111 games. The mark would stand another 44 years until the New York Yankees won 114 games in 1998. But Cleveland's .721 winning percentage during that year is still an American League record today.

Behind a powerhouse pitching staff consisting of Bob Lemon (22 wins), Bob Feller (13 wins), Mike Garcia (19 wins), and Early Wynn (23 wins), the Indians found themselves in the World Series. Unfortunately, the season quickly became one to forget after getting swept by the New York Giants.


early wynn CLEVELAND CAREER

1949-1957, 1963

pitcher

History

Wynn's move to Cleveland teamed him up with Bob Feller, Bob Lemon and Mike Garcia to give the team one of baseball’s great pitching rotations, proving fortuitous for Wynn. But after compiling a 163-100 record for the Indians from 1949-57, he was traded to the White Sox.

After signing back with the Indians, the 43-year-old posted his 300th win on July 13, 1963, becoming the 14th hurler in major league history to achieve the milestone. Wynn, who pitched in four different decades, finished his big league pitching career with a record of 300-244, struck out 2,334 batters in 4,564 innings, and had an earned run average of 3.54. He won at least 20 games in a season five times, was named an All-Star every season from 1955-60, and when he finally retired in 1963 he had pitched longer than anyone else in baseball history.

9x

CLEVELAND STATISTICS

43

W

L

ERA

G

GS

CG

SHO

SV

IP

164

102

3.24

343

296

144

24

11

2286

.2

H

R

ER

BB

SO

2037

923

824

877

1277

era title

Player of the year


( rocky )

rocco colavito CLEVELAND CAREER

1955-1959, 1965-1967

right fielder

History

After breaking in with the Indians briefly in 1955, he started 1956 in the Pacific Coast League. He returned to the Indians in July of 1956, and after batting .276 with 21 home runs he earned one vote in the AL Rookie of the Year voting. After slipping to a .252 average in 1957, in 1958 he batted .303 with 41 home runs (one behind Mickey Mantle's league lead) and 113 runs batted in, and finished third in the MVP balloting. He also led the AL in slugging with a .620 average, the highest by a right-handed Indians hitter until Albert Belle in 1994. One year later Colavito became the first Indian to have two 40-home-run seasons Colavito would hit 30-plus homers seven times, establishing himself as a major power hitter and as an excellent fielder with a strong arm. Colavito was easily the Cleveland fans' favorite, with his handsome appearance and approachability. But just days before the Opening Day of the 1960 season, Indians general manager Frank Lane traded him to the Detroit Tigers for Harvey Kuenn, who had won the 1959 batting title.

9x

CLEVELAND STATISTICS G

AB

R

H

HR

RBI

BB

SO

SB

AVG

OBP

SLG

913

3185

464

851

190

574

355

478

9

.267

.361

.495

44


The trade of fan favorite Rocky Colavito to the Detroit Tigers for Harvey Kuenn in 1960 is said to have put a 33 year curse on the Cleveland Indians through 1993. During this stretch the team did not finish a season within

11 games of first place and were continually towards the bottom of the AL East Division. Colavito was brought back to Cleveland in 1965, but previous GM, Frank Lane, had already caused too much trading damage.


( Sam )

samuel mcdowell CLEVELAND CAREER

1961-1971

pitcher

History

Prior to the 1960 season, McDowell signed with the Indians for a $75,000 bonus. After spending the year in the minor leagues, he earned a promotion to the majors and made his debut one week before his 19th birthday. Starting against the Minnesota Twins, McDowell pitched 6.2 scoreless innings, giving up just three hits, but handed out five walks. Plagued by control issues, McDowell had multiple stints in the minors, but would be a mainstay on the major league roster after his breakout season in 1964. He finished with a record of 11-6 with an earned run average of 2.70, seventh-best in the American League. He also led the league in strikeouts per nine innings with 9.2, striking out 177 in 173.1 innings. The 1965 season proved McDowell was among elite pitchers in the league after eclipsing several AL leader lists, including earned run average (2.18), strikeouts (325), strikeouts per nine innings (10.7), hits per nine innings (5.9) and home runs per nine innings (0.3). 1970 brought good success as well and his performance landed him the Pitcher of the Year Award.

6x

era title

CLEVELAND STATISTICS W

L

ERA

G

GS

CG

SHO

SV

IP

122

109

2.99

336

295

97

22

11

2109

.2

H

R

ER

BB

SO

1603

805

702

1072

2159

46


gaylord perry CLEVELAND CAREER

1972-1975

pitcher

History

Perry debuted in 1962 with the San Francisco Giants, and had his breakout season in 1966, when he carried a 20-2 record into August, before cooling off to finish 21-8. He pitched a no-hitter at Candlestick Park in 1968, shutting out Bob Gibson 1-0. Perry was traded from San Francisco to the Indians prior to the 1972 season, and won his first Cy Young Award, leading the AL in wins (24) and complete games (29). He was joined there in 1974 by his brother Jim, who won 215 games to his brother’s 314—they trail only the Niekro brothers in total wins, 539 to 529. During their one full season together, they recorded 38 of the team’s 77 wins. Gaylord went on a stretch that same season where he won 15 straight games. Perry, a five-time All-Star and five-time 20-game winner, won 314 games and notched 3,534 strikeouts.

5x

2x

CLEVELAND STATISTICS

47

W

L

ERA

G

GS

CG

SHO

SV

IP

70

57

2.71

134

133

96

17

1

1130

.2

H

R

ER

BB

SO

918

377

340

330

773


frank robinson CLEVELAND CAREER

1974-1976

manager

1975-1977

outfielder / first baseman / manager

History

Robinson broke into the National League as a 20-year-old in 1956 and tied a rookie record with 38 home runs en route to NL Rookie of the Year honors. Over the next decade and a half, Robinson was one of the most feared hitters in the game. He won the Triple Crown in 1966 and was the first player in major league history to win the MVP Award in both leagues. A 12-time AllStar, he also took home World Series MVP honors in 1966 and the All-Star Game MVP Award in 1971. In 1975, as his playing days wound down with the Cleveland Indians, he was named the club’s player-manager. He was the first African-American to manage a major league club. He also managed the Giants, Orioles, Expos and Nationals and was named American League Manager of the Year in 1989.

20

roy 5x

MVP2x

batting avg. title

14x

Player of the year

Manager of the year

CLEVELAND STATISTICS G

AB

R

H

HR

RBI

BB

SO

SB

AVG

OBP

SLG

W

L

W-L%

G

Finish

100

235

30

53

14

39

50

37

0

.226

.358

.438

186

189

.496

375

4.3

48


T

en Cent Beer Night in Cleveland on June 4, 1974 was a promotional event held to draw more fans to the game against the Texas Rangers. They offered 12 fluid ounce cups of beer at 3.2% for 10¢ each, which was a substantial discount on the regular price of 65¢. There was a limit of six beers per purchase but with no limit on the number of purchases made during the game.

During the game, fans became increasingly intoxicated and, ultimately, the game had to be forfeited to Texas due to a riot in the ninth inning.


( mike )

dudley hargrove CLEVELAND CAREER

1979-1985

manager

1991-1999

first baseman / manager

History

During his 12-year playing career, Hargrove batted .290 with 80 home runs and 686 runs batted in. He won both the AL Rookie of the Year and The Sporting News Rookie of the Year awards in 1974, after hitting a career-high .323 with the Rangers (he was the first Ranger ever to be so honored). Afterwards, he made the AL All-Star squad in 1975 and led the league first basemen in assists twice. He was most effective in getting on base, moving runners, and not giving up an easy out—unusual for a first baseman which is usually considered a power position. Hargrove became known as "The Human Rain Delay" due to his deliberate routine before each at-bat and before each pitch. As a rookie with the Rangers, Hargrove was one of the early targets of Cleveland fans during the infamous Ten Cent Beer Night incident on June 4, 1974. He would find a home in Cleveland, however, where he finished his playing career and started managing the Indians in 1991. He led his team to five consecutive AL Central Division titles in 1995–99, and World Series appearances in 1995 and 1997.

roy

CLEVELAND STATISTICS

51

G

AB

R

H

HR

RBI

BB

SO

SB

AVG

OBP

SLG

W

L

W-L%

G

Finish

1995, 1997

888

2945

388

860

33

383

505

257

14

.292

.396

.382

721

591

.550

1312

2.8

AL Pennant


andre thornton CLEVELAND CAREER

1977-1987

first baseman

History

After short stints with the Philadelphia Phillies, Atlanta Braves, Chicago Cubs, and the Montreal Expos, the Expos traded Thornton to Cleveland for pitcher Jackie Brown. The trade would prove to be one of the most lopsided deals of the 1970's; Brown would only pitch one more year in the majors. After hitting 28 home runs in his debut season in Cleveland, Thornton hit a career-high 33 home runs in 1978 (a total he would match in 1984). In 1979, he was honored with the Roberto Clemente Award. In 1982, Thornton hit 32 home runs and batted in 116 runs, a career high. He also had 109 walks. From 1981 to 1984, he played primarily as a designated hitter; he won a Silver Slugger Award as a designated hitter in 1984. Thornton played exclusively as a DH from 1985 to 1987. He is a two-time American League All-Star. He finished his career with 244 doubles, 253 home runs, a batting average of .254, an on-base percentage of .360, and a slugging percentage of .452. For three seasons, he was in the top five in home runs in his league, and he was in his league's top five in walks four times.

2x

CLEVELAND STATISTICS G

AB

R

H

HR

RBI

BB

SO

SB

AVG

OBP

SLG

1225

4313

650

1095

214

749

685

683

39

.254

.355

.453

52


Cleveland was nostalgic, longing for a season like it had in 1954 when the Indians won a record-setting number of games in the American League. Years of mediocrity wasn't going to cut it for a city so proud of its baseball heritage. Then came Ricky "Wild Thing" Vaughn.

"Major League" was released in 1989 as an immediate satire of Cleveland baseball, drawing its inspiration from the start of the 1960 curse. The movie personified the long struggle to become a winning team again. Wild Thing certainly wasn't making Cleveland's heart sing...


albert belle CLEVELAND CAREER

1989-1996

left fielder

History

Cleveland drafted Belle out of Louisiana State University. Belle was an intimidating presence at the plate and was well known for wearing an intense glare. He became the fourth player to have eight straight seasons of 30 home runs and 100 runs batten in, joining Babe Ruth, Jimmie Foxx and Lou Gehrig (a feat since matched by Albert Pujols and Alex Rodriguez). He led the league three times in runs batted in, three times in total bases, three times in extra-base hits and twice in slugging. He was a five-time All-Star between 1993 and 1997. As a fielder he had a powerful throwing arm and his range factor by games played was consistently higher than the major league average at that position. In 1995, he became the first player in major league history to hit 50 home runs and 50 doubles in the same season; the last player before him to reach as many as 40 in both categories had been Willie Stargell in 1973.

5x

player of the year

5x

CLEVELAND STATISTICS G

AB

R

H

HR

RBI

BB

SO

SB

AVG

OBP

SLG

913

3441

592

1014

242

751

396

622

61

.295

.369

.580

54


CARLOS BAERGA CLEVELAND CAREER

1990- 1996, 1999

second baseman

History

On November 4, 1985, at the age of sixteen, Baerga was signed by the San Diego Padres. On December 6, 1989, San Diego traded him to the Cleveland Indians along with Sandy Alomar, Jr. and Chris James in exchange for established power-hitter Joe Carter. Baerga debuted as a major league baseball player with the Indians, on April 14, 1990. That year, he played mostly as a third baseman and shortstop and would hit 17 doubles and seven home runs, while averaging .260 at the plate. Baerga became the first second baseman since Rogers Hornsby in 1922 to have back-to-back 200+ hit, 20+ home run, 100+ runs batted in, and .300+ average seasons when he accomplished the feat in 1992–93. The switch-hitting Baerga was the first of three players to have ever hit one home run from both sides of the plate in the same inning. He was a three-time All-Star in the 1992, 1993, and 1994 seasons.

3x

2x

CLEVELAND STATISTICS

55

G

AB

R

H

HR

RBI

BB

SO

SB

AVG

OBP

SLG

941

3666

549

1097

104

565

198

386

49

.299

.339

.444


Est.

JACOB’S FIELD

1994


( sandy)

santos alomar, jr. CLEVELAND CAREER

1990-2000

catcher

History

After two short call-ups with the Padres, Alomar finally got his chance at an everyday job after being traded to Cleveland following the 1989 season along with Carlos Baerga and Chris James, in exchange for power-hitter Joe Carter. Once in Cleveland, he established himself immediately, becoming the first rookie catcher to start an All-Star game and winning both Rookie of the Year honors and a Gold Glove Award. In 1997, everything came together for Alomar. He batted .324, was the MVP of the All-Star game in his home ballpark, put together a 30-game hitting streak (one short of Nap Lajoie's Indians record and four short of his former teammate Benito Santiago's record for catchers), and helped lead Cleveland to their third straight postseason appearance.

roy

6x

CLEVELAND STATISTICS

57

G

AB

R

H

HR

RBI

BB

SO

SB

AVG

OBP

SLG

985

3409

416

944

92

453

165

386

24

.277

.315

.419


charles nagy CLEVELAND CAREER

1990-2002

pitcher

History

Nagy was taken in the first round as 17th overall pick by Cleveland during the 1988 Major League Baseball draft amateur draft. He was second of three first round picks selected, sandwiched between shortstop Mark Lewis and pitcher Jeff Mutis. During the 1995 season, Nagy led the staff with a 16-6 and a 4.55 earned run average, as the Indians returned to the World Series for the first time since 1954. The next year, 1996, was arguably his best season, sitting on a 17-5 record and a 3.41 earned run average, and he finished fourth in the Cy Young Award voting. Nagy finished sixth on Cleveland's all-time strikeout leader list (1,235),10th in wins (129), and 11th in innings pitched (1,942.1).

3x

CLEVELAND STATISTICS W

L

ERA

G

GS

CG

SHO

SV

IP

129

103

4.51

313

297

31

6

0

1942

.1

H

R

ER

BB

SO

2173

1054

974

583

1235

58


omar vizquel CLEVELAND CAREER

1994-2004

shortstop

History

Vizquel made his Major League debut on April 3, 1989. At the end of the 1993 season, Vizquel was traded by the Mariners to the Indians for Félix Fermín, Reggie Jefferson, and cash. Widely considered one of baseball's all-time best fielding shortstops, Vizquel won 11 Gold Glove Awards, including nine consecutive from 1993–2001. Among shortstops, his .985 fielding percentage is tied for highest all-time, he is the all-time leader in games played, and the all-time leader in double plays turned. Vizquel tied Cal Ripken, Jr.'s American League record for most consecutive games at shortstop without an error (95), since surpassed. Vizquel is the all-time hits leader among players from Venezuela (2,877; 40th all-time), and the shortstop with the third-most hits all time, behind Derek Jeter and Honus Wagner. Vizquel is the sacrifice hit leader of the live-ball era. At the time of his retirement, Vizquel was the oldest player in the Major Leagues, and the only active player with service time in the 1980s. He is one of only 29 players in baseball history to play in Major League games in four decades, and the only one who played shortstop.

3x

CLEVELAND STATISTICS

59

G

AB

R

H

HR

RBI

BB

SO

SB

AVG

OBP

SLG

1478

5708

906

1616

60

584

612

586

279

.283

.352

.379

11x


( kenny)

kenneth lofton CLEVELAND CAREER

1992-1996, 1998-2001, 2007

outfielder

History

Lofton was traded to Cleveland in 1992 for catcher Eddie Taubensee and right-handed pitcher Willie Blair. During his first season with the Indians, in 1992, Lofton hit .285. His 66 stolen bases broke the all-time record for an American League rookie and was the most by a Major League rookie since Vince Coleman stole 110 in 1985. His season's stolen base count, which led the AL, also broke a franchise record. Lofton finished second (to the Milwaukee Brewers' Pat Listach) in AL Rookie of the Year balloting. The following season, Lofton broke his own Cleveland single-season stolen bases record, recording 70 (which led the MLB). Lofton appeared in three consecutive All-Star Games (1994–1996) and won four straight Gold Glove Awards (1993–1996) with the Indians. He led the AL in stolen bases for five straight seasons (1992–1996) and set the single-season Indians' franchise stolen base record (75). His 622 stolen bases rank him fifteenth all-time. He holds the Indians' record for stolen bases with 452.

6x

4x

CLEVELAND STATISTICS G

AB

R

H

HR

RBI

BB

SO

SB

AVG

OBP

SLG

1276

5045

975

1512

87

518

611

652

452

.300

.375

.426

60


Est.

progressive field

2007


( jim )

james thome CLEVELAND CAREER

1991-2002, 2011

third baseman / first baseman / designated hitter

History

Thome was drafted by the Indians as an "afterthought" in the 13th round in the 1989 MLB draft. Thome made his MLB debut on September 4, 1991, as a third baseman against the Minnesota Twins. In the game, he recorded two hits in four at-bats. Early in his career, he played third base before eventually becoming a first baseman at the beginning of the 1997 season. Thome's strength was power hitting. In six different seasons, he hit more than 40 home runs. During the 1996 season, he once hit a 511-foot homer at Jacobs Field, the longest home run ever at a Cleveland ballpark. His best season came in 2002, leading the AL in walks (122), slugging percentage (.677) and on-base plus slugging (1.122), while batting .304 with a .445 onbase percentage. He also hit a career-high 52 home runs (2nd in AL) and collected 118 runs batted in. The 52 home runs set a new Indians single-season record and made Thome the 21st major league player to join the 50 home run club. In 2011, he became the eighth MLB player to hit 600 home runs. As of 2017 Thome is the career leader in walk-off home runs with 13.

5x

CLEVELAND STATISTICS G

AB

R

H

HR

RBI

BB

SO

SB

AVG

OBP

SLG

1399

4711

928

1353

337

937

1008

1400

18

.287

.414

.566

62


H

eritage Park – Home of the Cleveland Indians Hall of Fame, opened on Opening Day 2007. The fully outdoor exhibit is located directly beyond center field at Progressive Field.


Player Index Santos Alomar, Jr. howard Averill carlos baerga

page 24

page 55

james bagby, sr. albert belle

page 57

page 15

page 54

louis boudreau

page 33

william bradley

page 7

raymond chapman rocco colavito

page 44

stanley coveleski lawrence doby

page 14

page 17

page 38

Robert Feller

page 35

wesley ferrell elmer flick

page 23

kenneth keltner Napoleon lajoie robert lemon

page 8

page 29

page 11

page 39

edward garcia

page 40

kenneth lofton

joseph gordon

page 34

alfonso lopez

melvin harder

page 27

samuel mcdowell

dudley hargrove james hegan joe jackson

page 37

page 9

Charles Nagy

page 22

page 28

page 46

page 58

stephen o'neill leroy paige

page 12

charles jamieson adrian joss

page 51

page 60

page 16

page 30

gaylord perry frank robinson

page 47

page 48

albert rosen

page 36

herbert score

page 41

joseph sewell

page 21

louis sockalexis

page 5

tristram speaker james thome

page 62

andre thornton harold trosky omar vizquel early wynn

page 18

page 52

page 26

page 59

page 43

denton young

page 10


“

Every day is a new opportunity. You can build on yesterday's success or put its failures behind and start over again. That's the way life is, with a new game every day, and that's the

�

way baseball is.

Bob Feller


Profile for Logan Strauss

Franchise Greats: Cleveland Indians Hall of Fame  

Collector's Edition commemorative book of the 44 players inducted into the Indians Hall of Fame, as well as a look at some of the franchise'...

Franchise Greats: Cleveland Indians Hall of Fame  

Collector's Edition commemorative book of the 44 players inducted into the Indians Hall of Fame, as well as a look at some of the franchise'...

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