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Washington’s Ardmore Elementary School, 2011 Grand Prize Winner

Smart Spaces

Award-winning schools where students love to learn

 20th Anniversary Awards of Excellence and Outstanding Projects  Building Collaboration Through Design  10 Ways to Create Schools Where Students Thrive


Attention, everyone.

Open your books for today’s GREEN SCHOOLS

pop quiz:

WORD PROBLEMS

Green schools save an average of $100,000 each year. A typical school facility lasts 42 years. Over the lifetime of the building, how much will one green school save?

Hint: enough money to hire two new teachers, purchase 200 new computers, or buy 5,000 new textbooks after the first year of operation. 162

THE CENTER FOR GREEN SCHOOLS

Meet us at the center of dialogue, policy development and innovation that will bring green schools to everyone within this generation.

centerforgreenschools.org


CRYSTAL M. LANGE COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES University Center, MI

The Power of Thoughtful Design In the 20 years LEARNING BY DESIGN has been covering the best in educational design, we’ve seen architects, planners, and school leaders continually raise the bar. Materials that would have been used without a second thought in 1990 are now scrutinized for their environmental impact; while achieving LEED recognition is always a challenge, it is increasingly common. Technology that was groundbreaking is now commonplace (and today’s cutting-edge tech will surely be replaced in turn). With so much progress being made, distinguishing between an excellent school design and a truly outstanding one can be a challenge. But the jurors for the Fall 2011 LEARNING BY DESIGN competition returned over and over again to one simple question: Does this building create an environment that makes you want to learn? For the schools you’ll discover in these pages, the answer is “yes.” Where Learning Happens This year, we showcase outstanding projects from California to Massachusetts, Washington to Texas, and recognize 13 award winners: three Grand Prize Awards and 10 Citations, Honorable Mentions, and Publisher’s Commendations. Our Publisher’s Commendation Award, new this year, has given us great opportunities to recognize notable design solutions. Our Fall 2011 Publisher’s Commendation Award honorees include an environmental science magnet school where the built environment creates powerful learning opportunities and a collegiate fine arts center retrofitted to enhance campus design while adding much-needed community spaces. Both projects reflect creativity and dedication to design that enhances learning. Also be sure to read our special feature on “10 Ways to Create Schools Where Students Thrive.” Using past LEARNING BY DESIGN Grand Prize Award winners as illustrations, architects John Weekes and Isaac Williams share their vision for a 21st century American schoolhouse that fully integrates with its community and the surrounding urban environment while connecting students to the world. A second special feature focuses on creating collaborative learning environments. Architect Amy Bell discusses techniques that can turn a cafeteria, library, or atrium into a space that fosters interaction while also offering flexibility. Looking Ahead to Spring In 2012, we’re looking forward to a new development in the digital edition of LEARNING BY DESIGN: videos spotlighting our winning projects. Be sure to visit www.learningbydesign.biz in April 2012, when the Spring issue goes live online. Don’t miss the opportunity to take a closer look at our winners’ innovative designs. It’s not too early to plan for the Spring issue, which will feature the same caliber of award-winning designs and projects that you’ve seen in LEARNING BY DESIGN in years past. To ensure you’re on that distribution list, send your mailing information to LBD@strattonpublishing.com. n

GO SURFING! Join us on Facebook facebook/LBDmagazine Follow us on Twitter twitter.com/LBDmagazine Access the digital edition at www.learningbydesign.biz. Send comments to LBD@strattonpublishing.com.

Debra J. Stratton

Anne L. Bryant

 ublisher, LEARNING BY DESIGN P President, Stratton Publishing & Marketing Inc.

 xecutive Publisher, LEARNING BY DESIGN E Executive Director, National School Boards Association

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2011 LEARNING

2011 judges bestowed top honBY DESIGN ors on three projects that promote transparency, connectivity, and community and exemplify educational design excellence. Although the three differ in approach, their designs embrace collaborative learning experiences and provide a variety of innovative spaces for teaching and learning. By Sally Zakariya

Features 14 10 Ways to Create Schools Where Students Thrive

The 21st century schoolhouse provides architects and school leaders with opportunities to design spaces that leverage connections with the community and the world to provide rich and meaningful learning opportunities. By John Weekes, AIA, and Isaac Williams, LEED AP

Citation of Excellence: Second Chance at Excellence

From a revamped school that was once ravaged by fire to a modern addition that united an original 1930s structure with two adjacent buildings, thoughtful renovations and creative restorations make these schools shine. By Sally Zakariya

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Mention: Designing What Works 9  Honorable 

These five Honorable Mention Award-winning projects deliver environments tailored to educational programming and the student population while seamlessly blending into their communities. By Sally Zakariya

Commendation: 12 Publisher’s 

Elevating Student Engagement

Both of these notable projects achieve design excellence and foster student engagement with rich, stimulating learning environments. By Teresa Tobat

On the cover Washington's Ardmore Elementary School, 2011 Grand Prize Winner. Photography: Benjamin Benschneider

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N  ew School of Thought

Architects are increasingly designing innovative, multifunctional spaces that cater to a variety of student needs and stay on budget. From all-day lunchrooms to grand atriums, discover some of the latest collaborative spaces architects are designing to cut costs and encourage learning. By Amy Bell, Assoc. AIA

EDY RIDGE ELEMENTARY/LAUREL RIDGE MIDDLE SCHOOLS Sherwood, OR


learning by design Volume 20/FALL 2011

CALVIN COLLEGE COVENANT FINE ARTS CENTER

www.learningbydesign.biz

Grand Rapids, MI

Debra J. Stratton, President, Stratton Publishing & Marketing Inc. 703.914.9200

Publisher

Executive Publisher Anne L. Bryant, Executive Director, National School Boards Association 703.838.6772

Editor Lisa Junker ljunker@strattonpublishing.com

Contributing Editors Josephine Rossi Sally Zakariya

Editorial/Production Assistant Teresa Tobat

Project Entry Managers Anna Lee Ney Arlene Jenkinson

Design Janelle Welch Renita Wade

DRUID HILLS HIGH SCHOOL Atlanta, GA

Architectural Project Liaison

Projects 23 E  arly Childhood & Elementary Schools 37 M  iddle/Intermediate Schools 39 H  igh Schools

Call for Entries

SPRINGFIELD COLLEGE Springfield, MA

2012

See page 53 for details!

54 C  ombined-Level Schools 57 C  olleges/Universities 64 S pecialized Educational Facilities

Resources 1 From the Publishers 65 Index to Projects by State 67 Index to Architects 67 Index to Advertisers

Anna Lee Ney 703.914.9200 ext. 25 alney@strattonpublishing.com

Advertising Sales Alison Bashian 800.335.7500 ext. 21 alisonb@strattonpublishing.com Published twice annually by Stratton Publishing & Marketing Inc. in cooperation with the National School Boards Association and American School Board Journal, 1680 Duke Street, Alexandria, VA 22314-1680. Copyright Š2011, National School Boards Association. ISSN:1538-019X. Send address

corrections to Stratton Publishing & Marketing Inc., 5285 Shawnee Road., Suite 510, Alexandria, VA 22312. Email: LBD@ strattonpublishing.com. For reprints, to order additional copies, or to view the digital edition visit www.learningbydesign.biz. LEARNING BY DESIGN is grateful to the American Institute of Architects, the Association of Higher Education Facility Officers, the Council of Educational Facility Planners, and the National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities for their support.

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Happens Here Three Grand Prize winners shape innovative learning environments that support educational programming and foster a culture of collaboration. By Sally Zakariya

Above: Nex+Gen Academy’s glass-walled, studiostyle classrooms overlook public gathering space, providing both natural light for the interior of the building and visual connectivity between inside and outside. At right: Ardmore Elementary School’s design creates numerous “found spaces” for students to gather for small-group interaction.

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ransparency, connectivity, community—these are the hallmarks of the Grand Prize winners in this fall’s LEARNING BY DESIGN. Though the three winning projects differ in function and context, all three embody a design approach that values collaborative learning experiences and provides a rich array of formal and informal spaces for teaching and learning. The judges also praised these projects for their sophisticated color palettes and use of materials, their thoughtful circulation flow, and their seamless integration of public and private spaces. These are spaces you’d want to be in, the judges agreed—spaces to curl up alone with a book, carry on small-group projects, or meet with entire classes in a commons area to listen to a presentation or watch a performance. These are spaces that say, “Learning happens here.”

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ARDMORE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Bellevue, WA

NEX+GEN ACADEMY Dekker/Perich/Sabatini “Fun, friendly, and flexible,” the judges said of nex+Gen Academy, an autonomous magnet school on the campus of Del Norte High School in Albuquerque, NM. The school, which focuses on project-based, cooperative, high-tech learning, was cited for what the judges called its “interesting flow of learning spaces throughout the building.” The design features glass-walled studio-style classrooms that surround and overlook a large public gathering space. The transparent walls not only fill the spaces with natural light but also provide visual connectivity between them. What’s more, the judges noted, this transparency allows students to successfully work unsupervised. An impressive array of collaborative spaces range in scale from small breakout areas that accommodate six to eight students to a spacious lobby with café-style seating. These spaces provide “a continuous learning environment where everyone is engaged across the space,” the judges said. “As a result, the building

GRAND PRIZE AWARDS, FALL 2011 Early Childhood/Elementary School

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• Dekker/Perich/Sabatini for nex+Gen Academy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

College/University

• EwingCole for Zankel Music Center— Skidmore College . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62

becomes almost 100 percent efficient” in terms of space for educational programming. “Kids will go find the spaces,” they added. “These look like places where you would learn in the real world, places where you would get together and talk.” www.learningbydesign.biz | L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n F A L L 2 0 1 1

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A glass atrium allows passersby to be drawn into musical performances taking place at Skidmore College’s Zankel Music Center.

The judges also praised the richness of nex+Gen’s façade and noted that the school exemplifies a trend in the GrandPrize-winning projects: a move away from stereotypical primary colors to a more mature and subdued color palette. “The colors strike the right balance,” the judges said. The interior uses plenty of colors, “but does so in a mature, adult way.” ARDMORE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL NAC|Architecture Nestled into a hillside in Bellevue, WA, Ardmore Elementary School takes full advantage of its siting and design to deliver intimate classroom neighborhoods, energy efficiency, sustainability, and interaction with the natural environment. Commenting on the school’s compact footprint, the judges said, “We like that it shows that things don’t have to be overly large or spacious to be successful.” The design features six classroom pods wrapped around interior courtyards and a central, two-story library space. Doors between the classrooms encourage teachers to collaborate, and “found” spaces within the neighborhood clusters encourage small-group interaction. These small places between the learning areas also allow for individual and contemplative study, the judges pointed out. Connectivity and transparency between the classrooms are enhanced by the courtyards, which bring the outside in and create visual flow throughout the building. “One interior courtyard is extremely intimate, yet helps stitch together the various spaces,” the judges observed, noting the airy feel of the building and the way nature pervades the learning environment. Of special note is the energy-efficient design of this daylightfilled building. Not only does its heat-pump system save on ener6

ZANKEL MUSIC CENTER, SKIDMORE COLLEGE

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gy costs, but a large proportion of the waste created in demolition of an older school and construction of Ardmore was recycled. “One LEARNING BY DESIGN criterion was sustainability that supports learning,” the judges said, “and this school nails that.” ZANKEL MUSIC CENTER—SKIDMORE COLLEGE EwingCole Outdoor spaces are as important as indoor spaces on college campuses, the judges observed, and the Zankel Music Center clearly demonstrates that principle. The building complements Skidmore’s Saratoga Springs, NY, campus plan by providing the fourth side of a quadrangle and creating an amphitheater in the center. “This is a nice use of public space,” the judges said. “You can imagine bringing the program outside into the landscape on nice days so that you end up with indoor and outdoor theaters complementing one another.” A dramatic, three-story-high glass wall at the back of the stage in the main concert hall brings the surrounding woodlands into the performing arts space—“a great integration of indoors and out,” according to the judges, “marking the most important performing space on campus.” The theme of transparency is repeated in the practice rooms, where the challenge of combining glass walls and good acoustics is met with heavy, retractable draperies that transform the rooms both acoustically and perceptually. A wide glass atrium at the center of the building divides the performance areas from the instructional spaces and provides a brightly lit window onto the music inside. “It’s great for passersby during a performance to see into the theater and see what’s going on there,” the judges observed. “This project gets the big things right,” they said. “It gets the campus feel, achieving a collegiate look with a little pizzazz that complements the campus architecture.” n


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HACKLEY SCHOOL— GOODHUE MEMORIAL HALL Tarrytown, NY

Second Chance at Excellence Thoughtful renovations and restorations earn three projects Citations of Excellence. By Sally Zakariya

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reat school design doesn’t always have to start from scratch. The winners of this fall’s LEARNING BY DESIGN Citation of Excellence Awards demonstrate how creative renovation, restoration, and repurposing can turn damaged, aged, or inadequate educational facilities into outstanding places for learning. Not only are the renewed facilities given a second chance at excellence, but—as these Citation of Excellence winners demonstrate—they also achieve new levels of energy efficiency and meet new needs in educational programming. Two of these projects preserve handsome traditional buildings that had great nostalgic as well as architectural importance, and all three create a significant new public face for the facilities. Like the Grand Prize winners, these notable projects provide an array of collaborative spaces that extend learning opportunities throughout the school and bring in daylight and transparency. The result for these Citation of Excellence winners is nothing short of a welcome new lease on life.

HACKLEY SCHOOL—GOODHUE MEMORIAL HALL Peter Gisolfi Associates When lightning struck Goodhue Memorial Hall, the resulting fire gutted an iconic 1903 structure, one of the earliest buildings at this independent K-12 school in Tarrytown, NY. Just three years later, Goodhue reopened, its original façade renewed and strengthened and its capacity almost doubled by the addition of a new second floor. Goodhue was “a notable building to begin with before the fire,” the judges said. With the restoration, the architects have “managed to honor the architecture of the original building but bring it forward into a very contemporary, almost collegiate, learning environment through a set of skillful renovations and additions that almost look as though they were there to begin with.” The judges praised the variety of learning spaces in the plan, including “seating opportunities and corridors animated so they become learning environments themselves.” They also commended the incorporation of energy-efficient systems and the graceful addition of a second floor, with its qualities of transparency. www.learningbydesign.biz | L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n F A L L 2 0 1 1

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Especially notable is the new library, whose spectacular vault and group study spaces echo traditional architecture but provide acoustic privacy. The newly restored building, the judges concluded, complements the quad and the eclectic architecture around it. DRUID HILLS HIGH SCHOOL Perkins+Will How do you unify disparate parts of a building complex into a coherent whole? For Atlanta, GA, Druid Hills High School, the answer was a smart new addition that joins a classic 1930s school and two adjacent buildings into a harmonious campus. The judges praised the new addition for “creating a centerpiece from the existing historic building but doing so in a modern language that complements the historical architecture but doesn’t replicate or mimic it.” To meet new enrollment and programming demands, the original school had grown by accretion, adding a freestanding cafeteria and incorporating an elementary school. “This project has done something very complicated in terms of knitting these buildings together” and resolving the interior circulation, the judges said. The new addition, which includes classrooms, science labs, and administrative support space, echoes the original school in its brick construction but introduces a soaring glass façade. It is clearly a modern building existing comfortably alongside a historic one, “collaborating to create something that looks like a campus,” the judges said. The result is a new public face for the school.

Previous page: After a fire gutted Goodhue Memorial Hall (originally built in 1903), the Hackley School renewed its original façade while adding a second floor. Below: A new building created greater architectural harmony and a campus-like feel at Druid Hills High School.

DRUID HILLS HIGH SCHOOL

DEER PARK HIGH SCHOOL Deer Park, WA

LEARNING BY DESIGN judges praised Deer Park High School’s tall, daylight-filled spaces.

DEER PARK HIGH SCHOOL NAC|Architecture Architects faced a not-uncommon challenge with Deer Park High School, Deer Park, WA, which had grown over the years with a combination of add-ons and stand-alone buildings. The modernization project, which includes an addition, was notable for “stitching together” the various parts, the judges said. Instead of tearing down existing structures, the architects built around them “in a way that is quite delightful, giving the building new life and sustainable renovation.” The result reorganizes the facility into an academic wing and a public wing. A welcoming outdoor courtyard in the center connects the indoors and outdoors. “The addition is very logical with the architecture of the original building and improves that logic,” the judges said. “It creates a civic presence for a building that had almost no presence at all.” In addition to the “nice vocabulary of quiet and refined materials,” the judges also praised the streamlined circulation patterns and the tall, daylight-filled spaces. “These are places you’d want to be.” In short, they said, “When you think of the word ‘transformation,’ this project is real evidence of the idea of transforming something [unsuccessful] into something that is very successful.” n

Atlanta, GA

CITATION OF EXCELLENCE AWARDS, FALL 2011 High Schools

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• NAC|Architecture for Deer Park High School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 • Perkins+Will for Druid Hills High School . . . . . . . . . 42

Combined-Level School

• Peter Gisolfi Associates for Hackley School—Goodhue Memorial Hall . . . . . . . . 54


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2011 Two separate schools with a joint commons area, Edy Ridge Elementary and Laurel Ridge Middle Schools are distinguished by skillful use of wood, masonry, and glass.

EDY RIDGE ELEMENTARY/LAUREL RIDGE MIDDLE SCHOOLS Sherwood, OR

Designing What Works Five diverse projects that share an inventive sensibility earn Honorable Mention Awards. By Sally Zakariya

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rom a stately, historic East Coast high school to a canyon-style elementary school out West, these varied projects have one important characteristic in common: inviting, flexible, thoughtful spaces that work for learning. Despite their different approaches, all five deliver learning environments well suited to the institution’s educational programming and student population as well as its physical setting within the wider community. And all five, the judges agreed, deserve Honorable Mention Awards in this fall’s LEARNING BY DESIGN.

EDY RIDGE ELEMENTARY/LAUREL RIDGE MIDDLE SCHOOLS Dull Olson Weekes Architects By designing two separate schools joined by a connective commons area and a shared community building, the architects have created a welcoming campus in Sherwood, OR. The judges were struck by the degree of openness in the environment and the skillful use of wood, masonry, and glass—including etched glass panels that identify different areas. The transparency of the media center walls “draws you straight www.learningbydesign.biz | L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n F A L L 2 0 1 1

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2011 OWATONNA HIGH SCHOOL Owatonna, MN

EASTERN HIGH SCHOOL Washington, DC

Above: Renovations to Eastern High School honored its status as a beloved Washington, DC, landmark while moving the school library to a more prominent position. Above right: A renovated classroom pod at Owatonna High School creates opportunities for small- and large-group learning as well as informal meetings. Below right: Designed to fit cohesively in its surrounding landscape, Helen M. Knight Elementary features scuppers to collect scarce rainwater and rock gardens hosting local plant life.

into the room,” they said, noting that the glazed glass used in the media center is also used for a portion of the classroom walls, creating a sense of connectivity between spaces. As one judge commented, “A little bit of the classroom gets to psychologically bleed out into the common space.” In short, the judges said, the architects have established a hierarchy of spaces and building scale. The result is a good example of breaking space down into small learning environments. EASTERN HIGH SCHOOL Fanning Howey Built in the 1920s, Washington, DC’s Eastern High School is a beloved landmark but was sorely in need of renovation to bring it into the 21st century. In this restoration project, the judges said, the architects “honored the great architecture of the early 20th century building but took advantage of opportunities to do new things.” Chief among the innovations is the transformation of interior courtyards that were little more than light wells into skylighted, landscaped atriums that have become the heart of the building. “A very clever way of finding space within the plan of the existing building,” the judges commented. The judges also commended the architects for moving the 10

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library to what had been administrative space, at the top of a beautifully restored grand stairway at the building’s entrance. (The administrative offices have been resituated in different parts of the building.) The library’s new location “puts learning front and center,” they said. OWATONNA HIGH SCHOOL ATS&R Planners/Architects/Engineers To accommodate a special program, architects renovated an existing classroom pod in the only high school in Owatonna, MN, rethinking the space to allow for more flexibility. “They created out of an obsolete environment a very contemporary idea of learning spaces that provide a variety of settings for activity,” said the judges. “This is thinking differently about space rather than carving everything up into classrooms.” The project creates a 21st century idea of learning based on different opportunities for small group, large group, and informal meeting spaces, all in a neighborhood setting within the footprint of the existing building.

HELEN M. KNIGHT ELEMENTARY Moab, UT


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Crystal M. Lange College of Health & Human Services offers numerous comfortable spots for informal, team-based learning to take place.

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CRYSTAL M. LANGE COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES University Center, MI

The judges had special praise for the use of comfortable, moveable seating that allows students to arrange conversational groupings or move the seats so they can see outside. “Who wouldn’t want to sit on furniture like that?” asked one judge. “Comfort is important to learning. Why do we try to instill a love of reading by making kids sit on hard plastic chairs?” HELEN M. KNIGHT ELEMENTARY MHTN Architects, Inc. Designed for the harsh Utah desert, this Moab, UT, school is clearly comfortable in the landscape, the judges said: “It resembles a contemporary cliff dwelling and has a nice visual connection to the environment.” But the connection goes beyond regionally appropriate aesthetics: Scuppers, or downspouts, collect scarce rainwater, and interior rock gardens allow students to study local plant life. “The entire building is a landscape for learning,” the judges said. The school replaces two older buildings but uses a schoolwithin-a-school approach to avoid appearing too large. Various seating opportunities encourage active use of the public areas, and the use of extended learning spaces and community spaces acts to break down the scale. “With just the right moves,” the judges said, “what could easily be a simple double-loaded corridor creates little found spaces that make all the difference.” In its design and use of sustainable local materials, the judges noted, the building celebrates place—an important part of being a green school. CRYSTAL M. LANGE COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES TMP Architecture, Inc. Formerly spread across the campus of Michigan’s Saginaw Valley State University in University City, MI, five health-related departments now share a home in a new building that epitomizes the concept of collaborative learning. Front and center is a casual gathering space filled with a variety of comfortable furniture— “the right mix of things that we know succeed for learning,” as one judge observed. The way nurses are trained sets the standard for project-based, team-based learning, the judges said, noting that in this building, students can come out of the surrounding classrooms and labs and continue discussing their work in an informal setting. “These professions are important to us,” the judges said, and the architects have created a building that recognizes that importance. In addition, the energy-efficient facility “takes the idea of sustainability to a different level that suggests the integration of health and human services,” the judges said. “The idea of wellness is powerful.” n

HONORABLE MENTION AWARDS, FALL 2011 Elementary School

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• MHTN Architects, Inc. for Helen M. Knight Elementary School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

High Schools

• ATS&R Planners/Architects/Engineers for Owatonna High School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 • Fanning Howey for Eastern High School . . . . . . . . . 43

Combined-Level School

• Dull Olson Weekes Architects for Edy Ridge Elementary/Laurel Ridge Middle Schools . . . . . . . . . 56

College/University

• TMP Architecture, Inc. for Crystal M. Lange College of Health & Human Services . . . . . . . . . . . . 59

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Elevating Student Engagement By Teresa Tobat

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anging from an environmental science magnet school with a museum-like atmosphere to an addition to a historical fine arts center, the two projects recognized with Publisher’s Commendation Awards overcame challenges to achieve design excellence and engage students with rich, stimulating environments. The entire design of Mary M. Hooker Environmental Sciences Magnet School, located in Hartford, CT, a project by BL Companies, Inc., reinforces the school’s environmental science curriculum. From the learning center’s spacious lobby outfitted with a 3,500-gallon eco-pond, plants, trees, and a waterfall to a butterfly vivarium and a planetarium, every inch of the building emphasizes environmental awareness. Judges said this rich, museum-like atmosphere increased pre-K through eighthgrade student engagement. “This building embraced the environmental curriculum and provided several spaces that reinforced that program and made it quite exciting for the children to experience every day,” judges noted. In addition to a design that emphasizes the outdoors, the MARY M. HOOKER ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES MAGNET SCHOOL Hartford, CT

CALVIN COLLEGE COVENANT FINE ARTS CENTER Grand Rapids, MI

building itself is a lesson in environmental sustainability, as it was designed to LEED Platinum standard. Hailed as a performance venue landmark 40 years ago, the Calvin College Covenant Fine Arts Center was in need of an enhancement and GMB Architecture + Engineering delivered. The center, located in Grand Rapids, MI, is a fixture in the community, and the design team did not want the building to lose its sense of history. The brick and limestone exterior was designed to respect the campus’s prairie school design and add 40,000 square feet of space to the original structure. The west-side entrance of the building was enlarged to serve as an anchor for the center’s three main public spaces: a new 240-seat recital hall, a new 3,800-square-foot gallery, and a renovated 1,100-seat auditorium complete with new HVAC with humidification, as well as theatrical lighting, fabrics, and woodwork. Judges praised the architects for preserving the building’s core through the expansion. They also commended the renovated auditorium as the “real strength” of the building. “The addition to the Calvin College Covenant Fine Arts Center gives the building a modern touch and complements the historical roots of the center while providing students with a stimulating learning atmosphere,” said LEARNING BY DESIGN Publisher Debra Stratton. “The project showcases education design innovation and excellence in an exceptional way—furthering LEARNING BY DESIGN’s mission.” n

Left: A 3,500-gallon eco-pond is just one of the hands-on learning opportunities built into the design of Mary M. Hooker Environmental Sciences Magnet School. Above: A renovation added two new public spaces to the Calvin College Covenant Fine Arts Center while respecting the campus’s prairie school design.

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Expanded Digital Edition Feature

10 Ways to Create

Schools Where Students

Thrive By John Weekes, AIA, and Isaac Williams, LEED AP

Recent LEARNING BY DESIGN award winners illustrate innovative strategies for education design.

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eclining budgets and enrollment, aging facilities, and lack of land for new schools have created new opportunities to rethink the American schoolhouse. In many places, the 21st century schoolhouse is smaller and located in town rather than on the outskirts. It may be an addition to an older building or even an adaptation of another type of building altogether. It leverages connections with other community resources, such as public libraries, and nearby colleges or universities, while also connecting students to the globe through distance learning and online resources. It facilitates rich and meaningful learning experiences for students beyond the classroom and creates an environment in which they can thrive academically and socially. This vision of the 21st century school is embodied in three recent LEARNING BY DESIGN award winners: Rosa Parks School in Portland, Oregon; The School Without Walls in Washington, DC; and BioScience High School in Phoenix, Arizona. Together, these three schools illustrate 10 of the most innovative strategies from recent award winners for creating 21st century schools where students thrive.

1. Engage all stakeholders in the design process. The foundation for creating a schoolhouse where students will thrive is the early engagement of all with a stake in the success of the school. This includes teachers, administrators, community members, nearby community organizations, and most importantly students. When all are invited, all share in the vision and become invested in the school’s success. The result is often a different definition of “school” than anyone had imagined at the outset. For Portland Public Schools, it was very important to involve all the relevant stockholders in the development of the design for Rosa Parks School. Community, teachers, students, and administrators, as well as representatives of the Boys & Girls Club, Housing Authority of Portland, and Portland Parks & Recreation, combined their talent and created not just a school but the Community Campus at New Columbia dedicated to supporting the whole child and students’ families. 2. Seek education partnerships and joint use. In a time of diminishing resources, partnerships can be a great way to augment school programs and provide educational continuity before and after school. A growing number of projects are 14

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also creatively financed through partnerships with public and private organizations. Rosa Parks School is just such an example. Portland Schools, Boys & Girls Club of Portland, the Housing Authority, and Portland Parks & Recreation partnered to create a joint campus where programs were aligned and facilities and operations shared for the benefit of the North Portland Neighborhood of Portsmith. Providing programs that support the neighborhood from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. daily, the Community Campus and Rosa Parks School were funded with a combination of public and private financing, donations, and new market tax credits. The overall project cost was 40 to 50 percent less than typical projects of similar size and scope.

3. Maximizing sites well connected to the community. A great school need not be on a large site. Many school siting guidelines around the country suggest a minimum of 1 acre per 100 students, plus an additional 10 acres for elementary schools and 30 acres for high schools. The results are elementary school sites of 13 or more acres and high school sites of more than 40 acres located outside of walking distance for students and away from other community resources. Interestingly, the average size of the sites for the three schools showcased in this article is 1.6 acres or about 0.35 acres for every 100 students. All are located in the heart of a community and leverage connections to other community institutions as a result. Partnerships with nearby parks and recreation centers can provide the larger athletic facilities that often take up much of the site, freeing land on the site to be used for outdoor learning opportunities. The School Without Walls sits on a very compact site in an urban neighborhood in Washington, D.C. A small school in size, it benefits from the opportunity to share facilities with adjacent George Washington University.

Technology-Rich Learning The School Without Walls, Washington, DC; EE&K Architects, a Perkins Eastman Company The School Without Walls is a small, urban, public high school in the heart of George Washington University, Washington, DC, that offers an innovative early college curriculum and has created a student-centered campus, blurring the boundaries between high school and higher education. The noninstitutional character and daylit interior of the historic 19th century Grant School building are echoed in the 21st century addition. By creating a collegiate ambiance, providing technology-rich learning environments, encouraging formal and informal interaction, and fostering a subtle sense of security, The School Without Walls’ facilities encourage a strong learning community and enable a seamless transition to college.

Through joint operating agreements, students from The School Without Walls use the university’s gym, auditorium, food service, and library. The university uses School Without Walls Classrooms in the evening to satisfy their peak demand.

4. Adapt and reuse existing facilities. Another way to do more with less is to reuse what is already there. In recent years there has been a growing trend among submissions to LEARNING BY DESIGN toward additions and renovations of existing schools and adaptations of other types of buildings into schools, particularly in cities. In fact, adaptive reuse of existing buildings is one way to keep schools in

town. Many older schools, particularly in cities, are located in well-established neighborhoods, and with creative adaptation, they can support the needs of the 21st century student quite well. There are also many buildings that have qualities that can create great schools— warehouses, office buildings, and even shopping malls have all been creatively transformed into schools. For example, The School Without Walls was the modernization and expansion of an early century school building. Partnering with adjacent George Washington University, this older school building benefited by transferring air rights to the university, allowing the original school building to

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Whether a Skype call to China or drama classes held at the local theater, the boundaries of school are expanding.

remain intact while the interior areas were transformed into contemporary learning environments.

5. Utilize the neighborhood and the world as campus. Advances in information technology have made it possible to connect students to knowledge sources around the world. More and more schools are also finding new ways to connect to resources in the neighborhood. Whether a Skype call to China or drama classes held at the local theater, the boundaries of school are expanding. From a learning environment standpoint, the most successful schools provide an environment where virtual connections to the world can be social, collaborative, and meaningful and connections to the neighborhood are real, empowering, and relevant.

6. Sustainable design for a high-performance learning environment. For teachers and students to perform at their best, the building must

perform well. It must create a comfortable environment, free of irritants, while also minimizing energy and resource use. The very best sustainable school buildings go beyond sustainability in terms of energy use and employ the building as a teacher of stewardship of the environment and a laboratory for learning about natural processes. BioScience High School in Phoenix, Arizona, goes beyond energy conservation and sustainability. The building is a living learning laboratory and expands the notion of school as a teaching tool.

7. Integrate technology throughout. The 2010 Department of Education National Education Technology Plan suggests that schools have to change to provide students the time and space to use technology in rigorous ways that support learning. Technology in school is no longer only about computer literacy, but must be in the service of students gaining 21st century literacies and skills such as collaboration, visual literacy, and

Space for Collaboration BioScience High School, Phoenix, AZ; Orcutt|Winslow A small, 400-student high school focused on science in general and bioscience in particular, BioScience High School was designed around creating independent learners. Every student has his or her own desk in a series of common areas to utilize as a base. Collaboration and exploration were primary elements in the initial program, developed in an open interactive brainstorming process, looking specifically at how students learn in today’s world. Sited in the middle of a biotech campus in downtown Phoenix, the school offers students the opportunity to work directly with researchers in their field of expertise. With students coming from all regions of the district, the openness into the large commons area, as well as smaller social breakout spaces, encourages interaction.

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storytelling that will allow them to thrive in the future. The school learning environment can be designed to facilitate learning opportunities for students to practice these skills.

8. Facilitate learning everywhere. The entire school can be designed as a place of learning. Even the corridors and outdoor spaces should be designed to support learning in multiple ways. Outdoor spaces can provide a great setting for presentations big and small, and corridors properly designed can serve as breakout spaces for small group collaboration, when designed with strong visual connections to adjacent learning spaces. At BioScience High School, the commons is more than just a place to eat. It is a learning space, active space, and presentation space. Multiple educational and functional capabilities expand the usefulness of a traditional cafeteria for the benefit of the school across the entire school day.

9. Break down the scale of the school. As economic pressures require schools to consolidate into larger schools in many districts, finding ways to break down the scale of the school becomes critical so that students can form meaningful relationships with peers and teachers and feel known and valued. At Rosa Parks School, a large student population was physically divided into four smaller neighborhoods of 125 students each. Each neighborhood is selfcontained with teacher support, student support, learning centers, and community gathering spaces, creating a family atmosphere in which students and teachers know and support each other.

10. Design in support of learning. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, every design decision should be made in support of learning. A wider variety of learning settings in terms of size and qualities offers teachers and students the flexibility to choose the right space for the right activity. BioScience High School, Rosa Parks School, and The School Without Walls all embrace the notion that the entire school should support learning. Variety of space, utilizing the entire campus, and reaching out to the surrounding

Partners With the Community Rosa Parks School, Portland, OR; Dull Olson Weekes Architects Rosa Parks School and the Community Campus at New Columbia is a partnership between Portland Public Schools, the Housing Authority of Portland, Portland Parks and Recreation, and the Boys and Girls Club of Portland. Only the second new school built by Portland Public Schools in the last 30 years, Rosa Parks provided an opportunity to envision one option for 21st century learning. By aligning all of the partners’ services and programs, using design to support learning, focusing on the whole child, and pursuing sustainable design strategies (including earning LEED Gold designation), Rosa Parks now supports a student population that is 100 percent at or below the poverty level.

neighborhood to support student learning needs are key characteristics of these schools. Schoolhouse design is evolving and changing to meet the needs of the 21st century. n John Weekes, AIA, is a principal with Dull Olson Weekes Architects. Reach him at jmw@dowa.com. Isaac Williams, LEED AP, is a senior designer and planner with Fielding Nair International and an assistant professor at the University of

Maryland School of Architecture. Reach him at isaac@fieldingnair.com. This article is based on “10 Ways to Create Schools Where Students Thrive,” a presentation given by Weekes; Williams; Sean O’Donnell, principal, EE&K Architects, a Perkins Eastman Company; Paul Winslow, founding partner, Orcutt|Winslow; and Debra Stratton, publisher, LEARNING BY DESIGN, at the 2011 National School Boards Association Annual Conference.

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New School of

THOUGHT Collaborative spaces are critical in today’s school designs. By Amy Bell, Assoc. AIA

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s budgets tighten, school districts across the country are looking to the architectural community to design more creative, collaborative spaces that can accommodate a variety of activities and help them get better bang for their buck. Think of functional spaces in terms of marketing. How can we get students excited about learning and the school environment? At the same time, as funding and space are at a premium, we have to imagine spaces that can serve a variety of needs for students, staff, and the community at large. Imagine corridors that are more than just travel paths, but also include a food service kitchen or study nook. Visualize a pie-shaped space created using moveable walls around

Photos by Edward Badham, courtesy Goodwyn Mills Cawood

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a central teaching station that would allow a 30-student classroom, or smaller, multitask stations, to be converted into a 90-student auditorium space. We need to think outside our preconceptions and present more options to clients. Common multiuse spaces include cafetoriums, libraries, and general communal areas such as corridors and atriums. With some creative thinking, any of these spaces can serve many masters well. All-Day Lunchrooms The dual-use cafetoriums of yesteryear were a move in the right direction, but today’s spaces are called upon to do much more than host lunch and pep rallies. They require more electrical outlets for the rapidly changing, technology-based learning environment. They must also be designed with whimsy and color to compete with today’s hippest eateries and attract this savvy generation of students. Cafeterias of the past were utilitarian, with cinderblock walls and acoustic tile ceilings. Kitchens commonly opened onto rooms with linear tables and a corralling system to shuffle students through a single cafeteria line. That’s not fun at all. When the Auburn (AL) School District wanted to upgrade its 40-year-old junior high school cafeteria and 30+-year-old high school cafeteria, Todd Freeman knew the renovations

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At Auburn High School, bar seating added in a cafeteria renovation provides a comfortable area where students can eat lunch, work on computers, or socialize. Left: Today’s libraries need to evolve into media centers that can readily adapt to new technologies as they are adopted by schools. www.learningbydesign.biz | L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n F A L L 2 0 1 1

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At the Burrow Center for Fine and Performing Arts at Wallace State Community College, a central atrium serves as a mingling area for students between classes as well as a reception space for art openings and other events. 6970 KW Learning by Design

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would require more than new HVAC, windows, and flooring. “Our district has been growing about 5 percent per year for the last eight years,” said Freeman, former director of school operations for the district and current principal of Auburn High School. “The major thing we needed was more space and a better way to take care of the growing population at the schools. We had a limited amount of space, so we needed to use it for multiple purposes, not just a cafeteria.” One of the district’s goals was to entice more students to eat in the cafeterias since the schools are reimbursed for a portion of meal sales. The renovated cafeterias were built around a grab-and-go food court concept, with multiple points of entry and sales. The schools can host several different lunch waves, and the students can get in and out quickly. The junior high added 68 seats by installing bar seating and 42-inch-high countertops by a bay of windows. Those seats give the space the appeal of a Starbucks, which is stiff competition for today’s school cafeterias. Bar seating offers not only more places to eat, but

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a comfortable, fun area where students can work on computers or simply hang out and socialize. The drab, rectangular table configuration was replaced with mixed seating groups of different-shaped tables that can be organized for study groups and other functions. A coiling door separates the kitchen from the cafeteria whenever lunch period is not in session, opening up possibilities for the remaining space. At the high school, bar seating provides a visual buffer between the kitchen and cafeteria areas, creating the feel of a multipurpose space. Whimsical ceiling features, bright colors, and decorative neon lighting add visual interest. Within a week of opening, lunches at Auburn High School’s renovated cafeteria increased by 150 meals per day. At Auburn Junior High, lunch participation has increased from 475 meals per day to 625 meals per day since the renovation was completed. The school has also been using the cafeterias for classroom instruction, banquets for extracurricular activities, and staff professional development. Libraries That Reach Out Much like lunchrooms, libraries compete for student attention. A drab library won’t engage them for long. These days, students want options. As technology advances, modern libraries become media centers that need to be flexible enough to provide for future technology. That requires placing additional conduits within the walls with pull strings or providing many more outlets than seem necessary. Bookshelves are almost a relic of the past, but some small, simple moves can enhance old, dull racks. Comfortable seating, strategically placed among the aisles, can “speak” to students and draw them closer to the books. Placing instructional teaching areas within or adjacent to libraries makes it possible for teachers to create lesson plans that include assignments that can only be achieved through library investigation. These areas also may be used for study groups where noise is a concern. Don’t think of this space as another cinderblock-walled room; consider glass wall dividers instead to allow for a cohesive connection to the library. One goal of the renovation of the Trinity Presbyterian School in Montgomery, AL, was to increase attendance at the private school as well as

add space to the library. If you’re going to get parents to pay tuition, you have to create an environment that will get kids excited about going to the school. A new mezzanine within the almosttwo-story library added square footage but also created a special space for students. Lounge chairs even feature built-in arm tablets like you see at coffee shops. Librarian Linda Hastey enjoys serving students lemonade in the summer and hot chocolate or apple cider in winter. A singled-out, carpet-free space with flexible seating lets her offer refreshments in a hospitable café environment, further piquing interest in the library. A Grand Atrium Collaborative use of space on the postsecondary level means creating environments that are conducive to multiple activities and appeal to people of every age. Atriums not only create visual appeal due to their grand height but can also be clever areas to introduce study and social activities. The space can be creatively divided with interesting placement of stairwells or elevators. Simpler, more portable elements like flexible

seating, moveable partitions, planters, and art sculptures can also add to the versatility. Remember your electrical needs; as technology advances, this will be a must. The Burrow Center for Fine and Performing Arts at Wallace State Community College in Hanceville, AL, is a fine arts center with a central atrium that connects the recital hall and two or three classrooms. Comfortable furnishings in the atrium make it inviting as a rendezvous spot for students between classes, and also for art openings and receptions, said Gary L. Owen Jr., vice president of architecture with Goodwyn Mills Cawood’s Birmingham, AL, office. The art gallery for which the center is named feeds into the atrium’s common area. “The school has even had little jazz combos and cocktail parties in the atrium when there are art openings or other gallery events,” Owen said. The area also acts as a pre-function area for the recital hall. n Amy Bell, Assoc. AIA, is a project designer with Goodwyn Mills Cawood, Montgomery, AL. Reach her at amy.bell@gmcnetwork.com.

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Copies of LEARNING BY DESIGN 2011 Spring are $35 each. Copies of LEARNING BY DESIGN 2011 Fall are $35 each. To order issues prior to 2011, please contact Anna Lee Ney at alney@ strattonpublishing.com High-resolution, print ready PDFs of projects are $350 per PDF.

FOR QUESTIONS contact Anna Lee Ney, LEARNING BY DESIGN, Stratton Publishing & Marketing Inc., 5285 Shawnee Road, Suite 510 Alexandria, VA 22312-2334 • Fax: 703.914.6777 • Call: 703.914.9200 ext. 25

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Design team Kenny Stanfield, AIA, LEED AP, Principal-in-Charge Justin McElfresh, LEED AP, Project Manager Ben Sorrell, ASLA, LEED AP, Site Design Bill Grigsby, PE, SE, Structural Engineer Brantley Adams, LEED AP, Production Manager Owner/Client Warren County Schools Bowling Green, KY Tim Murley, Superintendent 270/781-5150 KEY stats Grades Served: Pre-K-5 Capacity: 700 students Size of Site: 12 acres Building Area: 79,817 sq. ft. Building Volume: 1.4 million cu. ft. Space per Student: 114 sq. ft. Cost per Student: $18,175 Square Foot Cost: $159 Construction Cost: $12.7 million Total Project Cost: $15.1 million Contract Date: April 2009 Completed: Aug. 2010 Sustainability Rating System/ Applied/Status/Level: LEED/Registered/Gold Photography: Phebus PhotographY

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ristow Elementary is Kentucky’s first “net zero ready” school. It is designed to consume 19 kBtu of energy per square foot annually, which is 73 percent more efficient than the average school. The project includes a plan for the infrastructure to add a 360-kW solar panel package in the future, at which time it can affordably achieve net zero energy, generating as much energy as it consumes. The energy-reducing strategies developed by the design team echo the school district’s goals of sustainability. Natural daylight, controlled by light shelves and sunshades, dramatically reduces the artificial light needed in the classrooms and provides a healthier learning environment. Polished concrete and bamboo floors significantly reduce long-term maintenance and are readily renewable materials. The elimination of deep fryers and tilting skillets not only saves energy in the kitchen but also supports the district-wide initiative to provide healthier lunches for the students. Energy savings and sustainability are part of the school’s daily curriculum. Geothermal

piping is left exposed and equipped with temperature gauges, as students track the building’s performance through the seasons-themed hallways.

A sundial in the rotunda is oriented true north and allows students to monitor the sun’s daily path as it bathes the school in natural daylight. n

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Kevin Flanagan, AIA, LEED AP, Principal-in-Charge Malcolm Jollie, AIA, LEED AP, Project Manager Boris Srdar, AIA, LEED AP, Designer David Shaffer, AIA, Project Architect Coughlin Porter Lundeen, Civil and Structural Engineers Engineering Economics, Inc., Mechanical Engineer Coffman Engineers, Electrical Engineer Owner/Client Bellevue School District Bellevue, WA Dr. Amalia Cudeiro, Superintendent 425/456-4172 KEY stats Grades Served: Pre-K-5 Capacity: 480 students Size of Site: 10 acres Building Area: 70,330 sq. ft. Building Volume: 1 million cu. ft. Space per Student: 147 sq. ft. Cost per Student: $29,273 Square Foot Cost: $200 Construction Cost: $17 million Total Project Cost: $24.4 million Contract Date: June 2009 Completed: Aug. 2010 Sustainability Rating System/ Applied/Status/Level: *WSSP/LEED Silver Equivalent Photography: Benjamin Benschneider

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he pursuit of highly energy-efficient buildG B Y to increasings I N leads D E N R ingly compact solutions. Ardmore Elementary School is both aHonorable compact and energyMention efficient design while also creating an experientially rich 2011 educational environment. The school reveals itself in layers, offering users an engaging slowness of discovery. In collaboration with the users’ steering committee, the team identified three key planning goals. The goals of the new design were to create a sense of community, facilitate collaboration, and link the school to nature and to its site. Sense of community and ease of collaboration are achieved by encouraging learning at all scales: cultural, communal, and individual. Learning does not happen only in the classrooms. Core spaces and small classroom neighborhoods featuring flexible shared space also support a variety of learning opportunities. Informal “found” study areas provide additional personal accommodation for small groups and individuals. Employing a highly efficient earth-coupled heat pump system, the school exceeds Washington Sustainable Schools Protocol guidelines while achieving the equivalent of a LEED Silver design. With a superinsulated building envelope and well-distributed daylighting, the building is achieving a designed annual energy utilization index of less than 20 kBtu. The project recycled more than 80 percent of demolition and construction waste and preserved sensitive wetland areas on the site. n LE

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Deephaven Elementary School Media Center Deephaven, MN

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Tammy S. Magney, AIA, REFP, LEED AP 2011 763/545-3731 DESIGN TEAM Tammy S. Magney, AIA, REFP, LEED AP, Project Manager Jennifer Manning, LEED AP, Mechanical Engineer Diana Swensson, Interior Designer Gaylen D. Melby, PE, Electrical Engineer Peter Lacey, LEED AP, Project Designer Clark Engineering Corporation, Structural Engineer OWNER/CLIENT Minnetonka Public Schools Minnetonka, MN Dr. Dennis Peterson, Superintendent 952/401-5004 KEY STATS Grades Served: K-5 Capacity: 560 students Size of Site: 10 acres Building Area: 3,545 sq. ft. Building Volume: 47,800 cu. ft. Space per Student: 56 sq. ft. Cost per Student: $535 Square Foot Cost: $85 Construction Cost: $300,000 Construction Started: June 2010 Completed: Winter 2010 Photography: Kara Kopp, ATS&R

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he Deephaven media center renovation reinvents the elementary school by creating a “gateway to the world.� Students and community bring the world in through artwork, books, wireless technology, video broadcasts, and multiplescreen videoconferencing and presentations. The design takes a fresh approach for high-tech components in an artistic, whimsical, and playful way. A nature theme visually expands the small space through transparent connections to an outdoor courtyard and outdoor nature area. Stone walls, wood finishes, pergolas, benches, and trees create an inviting place for users of many ages. n


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Dr. Don R. Roberts Elementary School Little Rock, AR

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Bradley Chilcote, AIA, LEED AP 501/376-6681

2011

Design team Jack F. See, FAIA, Principal Bradley Chilcote, AIA, LEED AP, Principal Bryan Adams, AIA, LEED AP, Designer David Dyer, AIA, Architect Jay Clark, AIA, LEED AP, Architect Courtney Burton, ASID, Interior Designer Owner/Client Little Rock School District Little Rock, AR Sadie Mitchell, Ed.D., Associate Superintendent 501/447-1131 KEY stats Grades Served: Pre-K-5 Capacity: 895 students Size of Site: 20 acres Building Area: 158,380 sq. ft. Building Volume: 2.7 million cu. ft. Space per Student: 165 sq. ft. Cost per Student: $29,272 Square Foot Cost: $164 Construction Cost: $26.2 million Contract Date: June 2008 Completed: Aug. 2010 Construction Manager: Nabholz Construction Company Photography: Dero Sanford

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nhanced learning environments and increased energy efficiency were Little Rock School District’s main goals for the 158,380-square-foot Roberts Elementary School. Serving 895 students from pre-kindergarten through fifth grade, the school is organized in grade-level learning neighborhoods arranged around a flexible learning area with varied learning settings for individual or team learning in small, medium, and large groups. Architects helped lead community meetings in adjacent attendance zones to gather parent and local leader input on location as well as programmatic and academic issues. Work sessions with district staff and school board members ensured the physical spaces were designed based on educational priorities, curriculum trends, functional patterns, and the integration of technology into learning environments. The site is located adjacent to a highway and residential neighborhood. The two-story L-shaped building shelters playgrounds from vehicular and service areas, and a protected grove of trees preserves the wooded

character of the site. Insulated glazing with sunshaded devices, clerestory windows, and rooftop monitors that have photometric and occupancy sensors create a daylighting strategy that reduces heat gain and overall energy consump-

tion. Regionally milled wood paneling, rubber-tile floors, and low-VOC, scuff-resistant paint further the district’s initiative to provide intimate learning opportunities for students in a user- and environmentallyfriendly atmosphere. n

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2011

Fowler Drive Elementary School Athens, GA

GENERAL EXCELLENCE Entire School/Campus Building

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CDH Partners, Inc. G BY D IN E N R 675 Tower Road Marietta, GA 30060 www.cdhpartners.com

Honorable Melissa Cantrell Mention 678/784-3481

2011 DESIGN TEAM RW Allen & Associates, Construction Manager at Risk Southview, Landscape Architect OWNER/CLIENT Clarke County School District Athens, GA Philip D. Lanoue, Ph.D. 706/546-7721 KEY STATS Grades Served: K-5 Capacity: 575 students Size of Site: 15.3 acres Building Area: 67,755 sq. ft. Building Volume: 726,512 cu. ft. Space per Student: 118 sq. ft. Cost per Student: $13,268 Square Foot Cost: $113 Construction Cost: $7.6 million Contract Date: Feb. 2009 Completed: Jan. 2011 Photography: CDH Partners

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owler Drive Elementary School serves as a canvas for the extension of learning from the classroom to the built environment. Each classroom wing integrates a commons area to provide an emphasis on learning with small breakout groups. Large windows allow for natural daylighting and views to the exterior courtyards, in which a rainwater harvesting system and series of rain gardens and collection

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L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n F A L L 2 0 1 1 | www.learningbydesign.biz

pools define the landscape. The interior corridors are transformed into a series of embedded murals within the floor patterns, each with a different vignette. The main street corridor showcases a theme of “A Walk Through Georgia,� in which the children are educated about the major cities within the state and the connectivity of each independently and to each other. From the ports of the Georgia coast to the streets

of Athens and Atlanta, the children are given the opportunity to explore the state in their own home. The classroom wings offer different views of our world, beginning with sea turtles and dolphins of the Atlantic Ocean to the animals from around the globe, each centered about the solar system. The students that come through Fowler Elementary are offered a unique perspective in learning. n


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2011

George W. Gibbs Jr. Elementary School Rochester, MN

GENERAL EXCELLENCE

Wold Architects G BY D IN E N and Engineers

305 Saint Peter Street Saint Paul, MN 55102 Honorable www.woldae.com IG

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Mention

Vaughn Dierks 651/227-7773

2011

Design team Vaughn Dierks, Partner-in-Charge Nick Marcucci, Project Manager Lynae Schoen, Interiors and Programming Kevin Marshall, Lead Mechanical Engineer Jodi Nelson, Job Captain Owner/Client Rochester Public Schools Rochester, MN Dr. Jacquelyn Silver 507/328-3000 KEY stats Grades Served: Pre-K-6 Capacity: 650 students Size of Site: 13.2 acres Building Area: 82,714 sq. ft. Building Volume: 1.5 million cu. ft. Space per Student: 127 sq. ft. Cost per Student: $22,314 Square Foot Cost: $175 Construction Cost: $14.5 million Total Project Cost: $17.3 million Contract Date: July 2008 Completed: Aug. 2009 Sustainability Rating System/ Applied/Status/Level: LEED/Certified/Silver Photography: Joel Koyama

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opulation growth in Rochester Public Schools allowed for a collaborative design process involving both staff and community to create a dynamic new school. The school organizes five independent clusters around a centrally located media center. Each cluster arranges classrooms around extended learning areas (ELAs) designed to facilitate learning beyond the classroom. ELAs contain conference areas, soft seating, small-group interaction spaces, additional storage and casework, toilets, and integrated pull-out special education areas. Early childhood rooms are located adjacent to the entry. In an effort to minimize distances to the classroom areas, the main corridor, which includes art, music, gym, and cafeteria, is at a split level between floors flooded by natural daylight through clerestory windows the length of the space. Sustainable strategies guided the selection of efficient engineering systems, including geothermal ground-source heat and cooling, ice storage energy transfer for off-peak demand, low-velocity displacement ventilation for improved indoor

air quality, CO2 monitoring, and daylight and occupancy sensors. The two-story building is built into a steep hillside, orienting classroom windows to the north for passive daylight

strategies. Site features include vehicular separation, minimized hard surfaces, minimized irrigation and natural plantings, and shared community amenities. The building is LEED Silver certified. n

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BY D Gignac &G Associates, LLP IN E N R 416 Starr Street Corpus Christi, TX 78401 www.gignacarchitects.com

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Gloria Hicks Elementary School Corpus Christi, TX

GENERAL EXCELLENCE

Honorable Raymond MentionGignac 361/884-2661

2011 DESIGN TEAM Raymond Gignac, AIA Rolando Garza, AIA, LEED AP Carolyn James, AIA Paul Rybalka John Silva OWNER/CLIENT Corpus Christi Independent School District Corpus Christi, TX D. Scott Eliff, Superintendent 361/695-7200 KEY STATS Grades Served: Pre-K-5 Capacity: 806 students Size of Site: 11 acres Building Area: 77,192 sq. ft. Space per Student: 96 sq. ft. Cost per Student: $14,764 Square Foot Cost: $154 Construction Cost: $11.9 million Contract Date: Mar. 2009 Completed: Sept. 2010 Photography: Richard Payne, FAIA

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hen charged with replacing aging, undersized elementary schools, the Corpus Christi Independent School District chose to utilize a prototype design that has been previously implemented effectively in the district. Gloria Hicks Elementary, named after a well-known local supporter of education, was the result, combining the student population of two smaller area elementary schools. The school is designed to provide complete educational facilities for pre-kindergarten through fifth-grade students and also serves as a meeting place for the community. With a variety of specialized classrooms and labs, the facility also contains a library, administration area, food service spaces, and support areas. The 77,000-square-foot school accommodates about 800 students. A serpentine corridor, which is the main circulation artery, is lined with continuous clerestory windows to introduce natural light into the building. The site plan provides convenient, covered drop-off areas for parents and buses. The plan also encourages bicycles as a means of transportation by including bicycle storage racks and wide sidewalks and paths. A grand entrance with a clear canopy provides building occupants with a strong sense of entry. And while it may be a prototype design, custom masonry and tilework make Gloria Hicks stand out as a unique place to learn. n

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School


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Helen M. Knight Elementary Moab, UT

GENERAL EXCELLENCE Entire School/Campus Building

MHTN Architects, Inc. 420 E. South Temple, Suite 100 Salt Lake City, UT 84111 www.mhtn.com Bruce Barnes, AIA, LEED AP 801/595-6700 James T. Dresslar Architect LLC Design team Reaveley and Associates, Structural Engineer Van Boerum & Frank Associates, Inc., Mechanical Engineer Electrical Consulting Engineers (ECE), Electrical Engineer Stantec, Civil Engineer Hogan and Associates Construction, Construction Management, General Contractor Jedrziewski Designs, Kitchen Consultant Owner/Client Grand County School District Moab, UT Margaret Hopkin, Superintendent 435/259-5317 KEY stats Grades Served: K-6 Capacity: 900 students Size of Site: 12.6 acres Building Area: 117,744 sq. ft. Space per Student: 130 sq. ft. Cost per Student: $2,193 Square Foot Cost: $168 Construction Cost: $19.7 million Total Project Cost: $21.7 million Contract Date: April 2009 Completed: Oct. 2010 Photography: Scott Zimmerman Photography

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elen M. Knight Elementary School in Moab, Utah, was built to replace two outdated schools and was constructed on open space adjacent to one of the existing schools. In changing the paradigm from two small schools to one large school, staff and community members wanted to provide a smalllearning-community feel with safe, comfortable environments for the lower-grade students. To reduce the large-school feeling, grade-level classrooms

were organized around community learning centers, which are large enough for 125 students in each grade to meet together to work on projects, play, sing, and fill many needs for teachers and students. The school was also organized into two smaller schools (kindergarten through grade 3 and grades 4 through 6). This school-within-a-school design grouped age levels together, allowing students to feel a sense of belonging and maintaining the small-school feeling while

conserving resources. This project reflects the best in elementary learning environments in a regionally appropriate aesthetic, utilizing local materials and color palette without literally copying any style or geologic feature. The new school employed integrated design to implement sustainable standards for the harsh desert of Moab. Students and faculty, along with the district and community, have an outstanding learning environment that they truly adore. n

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Lachin Oubre G BY D IN E APC &NAssociates, R 3000 W. Esplanade Ave., Suite 302 Metairie, LA 70002 Honorable www.lachinoubrearchitects.com N

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Langston Hughes Elementary School New Orleans, LA

GENERAL EXCELLENCE

Mention

PBK Inc. 2011 11 Greenway Plaza, 22nd Floor Houston, TX 77046 www.pbk.com DESIGN TEAM Michael Lachin, AIA, Principal Architect, Lachin Oubre & Associates Rick Blan, AIA, Partner-in-Charge, PBK Richard Chi, Designer, PBK Peter Fortier, Designer, Lachin Oubre & Associates Mark Madorsky, PE, President, PBK Mechanical, Electrical, & Plumbing Division Edmund Schrenk, PE, Civil, Structural Engineer, Schrenk & Peterson OWNER/CLIENT Recovery School District New Orleans, LA Paul Vallas, Superintendent KEY STATS

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orking with the Recovery School District, the consulting firms were selected to provide consulting services in the accelerated delivery of construction documents for what was to become the first completed of several replacement schools constructed for the Recovery School District. Among the unique considerations was a neighborhood site that was very shallow but more than three blocks wide. The buildings were arranged in staggered fashion to preserve existing trees and to define the children’s play areas; there are 33 classrooms, a resource center, administration areas, and a gymnasium, totaling 98,642 square feet. Building construction was designed to exceed applicable requirements for construction in hurricane zones and includes disaster mitigation features such as water-impervious construction and elevated critical building systems. All building controls are fully automated. Designed to achieve

Grades Served: K-8 Capacity: 440 students Size of Site: 7.2 acres Building Area: 98,642 sq. ft. Building Volume: 1.5 million cu. ft. Space per Student: 224 sq. ft. Cost per Student: $59,090 Square Foot Cost: $264 Construction Cost: $26 million Total Project Cost: $27.3 million Contract Date: Sept. 2007 Completed: Feb. 2011 Sustainability Rating System/ Applied/Status/Level: LEED/Certified/Silver Photography: Lachin Oubre & Associates, APC

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compliance with advanced educational standards, and to surpass requirements for energy efficiency and sustainability, Langston Hughes Elementary was completed with LEED Silver certification. Langston Hughes Elementary School is the first new school within the Recovery School District to have been occupied. It is regarded as the standard for new schools being developed for New Orleans as the entire educational system experiences rebirth following the devastation of Hurricane Katrina. n


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Lorenzo de Zavala Special Emphasis School Corpus Christi, TX

GENERAL EXCELLENCE Entire School/Campus Building

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BY D Gignac & Associates, LLP G IN E N R 416 Starr Street Corpus Christi, TX 78401 www.gignacarchitects.com Honorable

Raymond Gignac Mention 361/884-2661

2011

Design team Raymond Gignac, AIA Rolando Garza, AIA, LEED AP Carolyn James, AIA Paul Rybalka John Silva Owner/Client Corpus Christi Independent School District Corpus Christi, TX D. Scott Eliff, Superintendent 361/695-7200 KEY stats Grades Served: Pre-K-5 Capacity: 1,002 students Building Area: 83,500 sq. ft. Space per Student: 83 sq. ft. Cost per Student: $12,475 Square Foot Cost: $150 Construction Cost: $12.5 million Contract Date: Mar. 2009 Completed: Aug. 2010 Photography: Richard Payne, FAIA, Nick Gignac

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uilt to modernize and combine two smaller area schools, Lorenzo de Zavala Elementary School has become a standout educational facility in Corpus Christi, Texas. The new school is an iteration of a prototype design created for Corpus Christi Independent School District, which was modified and adapted to its new site. The school is designed to provide complete educational facilities for pre-kindergarten through fifth-grade students and also serves as a meeting place for the community.

The program includes standard and specialized classrooms and labs, library, administration, food service, and support areas. The 83,500-square-foot school accommodates 1,002 students. The design has been recognized for its efficiency and utilizes a large, serpentine corridor as its main circulation artery. This main corridor uses continuous clerestory windows to introduce natural light into the building while other tributary hallways use traditional sky-

lights. The site plan makes effective use of available space and provides separate, covered drop-off areas for buses and parents. The site also encourages the use of alternative transportation, such as bicycles, by providing wide walkways and bicycle racks. The grand, canopied entrance at Lorenzo de Zavala Elementary provides a strong sense of entry. Its distinct color palette and use of tile and masonry ensure that the school remains a one-ofa-kind place for learning. n

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2011

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2011

GENERAL EXCELLENCE

Hartford, CT

BL ICompanies, Inc. NG BY D N Research EParkway 355 R Meriden, CT 06450 www.blcompanies.com IG

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Mary M. Hooker Environmental Sciences Magnet School

Green Design/Building/ Sustainability

Honorable Scott Pellman, AIA, Mention 203/630-1406

2011 DESIGN TEAM Scott Pellman, AIA, Principal-in-Charge/Project Designer Christopher Roof, AIA, LEED AP, Project Manager/Architect Nicholas Semyanko, AIA, Project Architect John Schmitz, Civil Engineer James Fielding, ASLA, Landscape Architecture BVH Integrated Services, Mechanical & Electrical Engineer Viridian Energy & Environmental, LLC, LEED Consultant OWNER/CLIENT Hartford Public Schools Hartford, CT Dr. Christina M. Kishimoto, Superintendent 860/695-8000 KEY STATS Grades Served: Pre-K-8 Capacity: 660 students Size of Site: 17 acres Building Area: 106,694 sq. ft. Building Volume: 1.5 million cu. ft. Space per Student: 162 sq. ft. Cost per Student: $34,212 Square Foot Cost: $212 Construction Cost: $22.6 million Total Project Cost: $42 million Contract Date: Mar. 2009 Completed: Aug. 2010 Sustainability Rating System/ Applied/Status/Level: LEED for Schools/Registered/ Platinum Photography: Robert Benson Photography

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he Mary M. Hooker Environmental Sciences Magnet School is one of the first schools in New England and the first in the City of Hartford to be designed to the LEED Platinum standard. The existing 75,000-squarefoot building was renovated as new, while 31,000 square feet of additional space were added. The theme of the school is Education in Energy Efficiency and Environmental Responsibility. The entrance lobby presented a unique opportunity to develop what is essentially an environmentally focused children’s museum for the students. Natural materials such as stone, reclaimed wood, and water were utilized to surround students with nature, as well as create an innovative and inviting learning environment. Large windows were strategically placed to infuse spaces with natural light and to provide a visual connection to forested portions of the 15-acre site. Six acres of the site are designated as an outdoor

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PUBLISHER’S COMMENDATION AWARD


nature center and trail system used for environmental instruction. The ecologically and environmentally inspired spaces include a greenhouse, a vivarium for raising and studying live butterflies, an interactive science theater with a 28-foot dome for the digital projection of astronomical and meteorological educational programs, and an aquatics laboratory with more than 60 tanks for the study of both fresh and saltwater species, as well as aquaculture techniques. Natural lighting floods the lobby, which contains plants, trees, a waterfall, and a 3,500-gallon eco-pond as components of a complete ecological system to highlight the school’s mission. The entire school is used as a teaching tool, including mechanical and electrical spaces, where observation windows are provided for the students to learn about the school’s systems. State-of-theart mechanical and electrical systems are integrated into this facility. To reduce water usage, flushless urinals and low-usage flushometers are provided and there is no irrigation system on the site. Among the high-performance systems is a digital energy management system with extensive levels of monitoring and control, along with CO2 sensors, which control the introduction of outdoor air to reduce energy consumption during periods of reduced occupancy. Photovoltaic panels and a 60-kW cogeneration plant provide electrical generation and the re-use of combustion exhaust to heat domestic hot water and provide supplemental heat. High-efficiency lighting systems were designed to less than 1 watt per square foot with occupancy, time-ofday, and daylighting controls to reduce artificial illumination when there is sufficient daylight. Energy savings for the project achieved 10 out of 10 LEED points for Energy Performance and the maximum points for Innovation in Design. n www.learningbydesign.biz | L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n F A L L 2 0 1 1

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2011

Post Road School White Plains, NY

GENERAL EXCELLENCE Green Design/Building/ Sustainability

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KG&D Architects G BY D IN E PC & N Engineers, 285 Main Street Mount Kisco, NY 10549 Honorable www.kgdarchitects.com R

Mention

Russell A. Davidson, AIA 914/666-5900

2011

DESIGN TEAM Russell A. Davidson, AIA, Principal-in-Charge Erik A. Kaeyer, AIA, LEED AP, Principal for Design Calvin L. Black, PE, Principal for Construction Administration Patrick Meaney, Associate, Project Architect Susan Davidson, Associate, Interior Designer Sean Stadler, Intern Architect OWNER/CLIENT White Plains City School District White Plains, NY Dr. Christopher Clouet, Superintendent 914/422-2019 KEY STATS Grades Served: K-5 Capacity: 600 students Size of Site: 7 acres Building Area: 90,000 sq. ft. Space per Student: 150 sq. ft. Square Foot Cost: $312 Construction Cost: $28.1 million Total Project Cost: $38 million Completed: Sept. 2009 Sustainability Rating System/ Applied/Status/Level: LEED and *NY-CHPS Photography: David Lamb Photography 2010 *New York-Collaborative for HighPerformance Schools

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esidents concerned with the cost for replacement of their community’s 1914 school building engaged architects in public dialog about sustainable elements, including alternative energy systems such as geothermal heating/cooling and solar power. Discussions led the community to commit to building an environmentally conscious campus. This new school comprises a two-story classroom building and lower-level public access spaces, including cafeteria, auditorium, and gymnasium, built into the sloping site. Classroom-level plans evenly divide lower and upper grades and utilize three groupings of five classrooms each to delineate grade clusters. Special subjects integrated into each level overlook a circular courtyard. Natural light is a major design element, from the courtyard that brings light into the core and corridors to classroom daylighting techniques. Interior-mounted light shelves reduce sunlight glare and “bounce” light to the ceiling, reducing the need for artificial light. Corridors and stairwells incorporate daylight through wayfinding skylights and expansive window walls. Sustainable solutions were designed into all facets, from site to building systems to interior finishes. Features include a closed-loop geothermal system and heat-recovery ventilating units; solar thermal heating

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panels; extensive green roof; low-flow plumbing fixtures; efficient light fixtures; regional building materials and building materials with low or no volatile organic compounds; and a

highly insulated building envelope design. Energy analysis confirmed the building operates 65 percent more efficiently than buildings of similar construction. n


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2011

Bluffs Middle School Scottsbluff, NE

GENERAL EXCELLENCE Renovations and Adaptive Reuse

The BY D G Schemmer IN E Inc. NAssociates S

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1044 N. 115th Street, Suite 300 Omaha, NE 68154 Honorable www.schemmer.com

Mention

R. William Cramer, AIA 402/493-4800

2011

Baker & Associates, INC. www.baker-eng.com Design team R. William Cramer, AIA, Principal and Project Manager Terry Wood, AIA, LEED AP, Design Architect Robert Whitmore, Project Architect Jason Heinze, PE, LEED AP, Structural Engineer Jamie VanRoy, PE, Mechanical Engineer Brad Farmer, Electrical Design Owner/Client Scottsbluff Public Schools Scottsbluff, NE Richard A. Myles, Superintendent 308/635-6200 KEY stats Grades Served: 6-8 Capacity: 600 students Size of Site: 8.4 acres Building Area: 135,000 sq. ft. Building Volume: 2.2 million cu. ft. Space per Student: 225 sq. ft. Cost per Student: $25,833 Square Foot Cost: $115 Construction Cost: $15.5 million Total Project Cost: $16.9 million Contract Date: Dec. 2008 Completed: Aug. 2010 Sustainability Rating System/ Applied/Status/Level: Energy Star/Pending

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his three-story, 1920s era school underwent a complete transformation, thanks to the successful prereferendum services, programming, and design of a 95,000-square-foot renovation and a 40,000-square-foot new addition. The school serves 600 students in grades 6 through 8. Each grade level includes classroom and support space for two teaching teams. Educational program features include a new 750-seat spectator gymnasium with an overlook mezzanine; health classroom; locker rooms and weights/aerobics space; and a kitchen/cafetorium. Renovated spaces include administration, counseling, academic and specialty classrooms, and media center. A new geothermal heat pump HVAC system employs the earth’s heat energy to heat and cool the entire facility, ensuring occupancy comfort, reducing maintenance/repairs, and lowering energy costs while also minimizing environmental impact. Designed with energysaving technologies following LEED principles, the school is slated to receive Energy Star certification. Two new elevators provide all levels with ADA accessibility.

Replacement of the electrical system involved technology wiring, providing card access doors for added security. New parking and a front student drop-off drive provide safe, convenient access.

High-performance design, plus on-time construction completion, plus below-budget delivery, plus the latest energysaving innovations, equal an enhanced learning environment for all. n

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Schmidt Y D G B Associates IN E Street N E. Vermont 320 R Indianapolis, IN 46204 www.schmidt-arch.com N

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George Rogers Clark Middle School Vincennes, IN

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2011

Donovan & Donovan Associates Architects DESIGN TEAM Anna Marie Burrell, AIA, Principal-in-Charge Kyle E. Miller, PE, LEED AP, Project Manager Steven A. Savoie, AIA, LEED AP, Project Architect

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he new Clark Middle School in Vincennes is the first LEED for Schools certified educational facility in Indiana. The 148,650-square-foot facility was developed as an educational tool to demonstrate sustainability through multiple engaging examples in the course of daily operation. Monitoring stations throughout the building highlight energy usage and savings. These features have been incorporated into the middle school curriculum, making physical science and the integration of mathematics and social responsibility

Craig M. Flandermeyer, RLA, LEED AP, Sustainability Andrea M. Graves, RID, IIDA, LEED GA, Interior Designer Donovan & Donovan Associates, Consulting Architect OWNER/CLIENT Vincennes Community School Corporation Vincennes, IN Thomas Nonte, Superintendent 812/882-4844 KEY STATS Grades Served: 6-8 Capacity: 700 students Size of Site: 21.7 acres Building Area: 148,650 sq. ft. Building Volume: 2.7 million cu. ft. Space per Student: 212 sq. ft. Cost per Student: $31,382 Square Foot Cost: $148 Construction Cost: $22 million Total Project Cost: $28 million Contract Date: Oct. 2007 Completed: July 2010 Sustainability Rating System/ Applied/Status/Level: LEED/Certified/LEED for Schools 2.0 Photography: Duane Dart/ Schmidt Associates

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a reality to students and the entire school community. Native plantings in waterconserving beds combine with dual-flush plumbing fixtures, energy-recovery wheels, and high-efficiency lighting to create the most environmentally responsible facility conditions.

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Students and staff are actively engaged in recycling programs that extend the responsibility and accountability of maintaining a sustainable environment. Many recycled materials, such as carpet and structural components, have been incorporated into the construction.

The interior spaces maximize daylighting through transparencies achieved in fenestration combined with colors and materials. Special attention was paid to the design of classroom acoustics to provide a quiet environment conducive to learning. n


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2011

Benito Juarez-Abraham Lincoln High School La Joya, TX

GENERAL EXCELLENCE Entire School/Campus Building

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G BY D Gignac LLP I N & Associates, E N R 416 Starr Street Corpus Christi, TX 78401 www.gignacarchitects.com Honorable

Mention Raymond Gignac 361/884-2661

2011

Design team Raymond Gignac, AIA Rolando Garza, AIA, LEED AP Carolyn James, AIA David Monreal Ana Salas-Luska Owner/Client La Joya Independent School District La Joya, TX Dr. Alda T. Benavides 956/580-5000 KEY stats Grades Served: 9-12 Capacity: 2,000 students Size of Site: 110.7 acres Building Area: 335,125 sq. ft. Space per Student: 168 sq. ft. Cost per Student: $28,707 Square Foot Cost: $171 Construction Cost: $57.4 million Contract Date: Oct. 2008

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s the communities from the La Joya Independent School District (ISD) in South Texas have flourished, a need to accommodate a growing number of high school students has arisen. Named after two iconic presidents, Benito Juarez of Mexico and Abraham Lincoln of the United States, Juarez-Lincoln High School was designed to replace the sole high school within 226 square miles. The new high school serves

the students of the central and north sides of La Joya ISD. The 335,125-square-foot facility accommodates up to 2,000 students from grades 9 to 12. The problem of circulation across such a large area was solved by introducing a major main street corridor to bisect the campus and allow for quick access to different parts of the facility. The high school uses clerestory daylighting in corridors and entries to

maximize energy efficiency. Light-colored local masonry materials are included in the building envelope, with metal panel accents for aesthetics. The grand entrances of the high school provide a sense of entry and direction for the large campus. The high school was carefully master-planned to be flexible and to ensure the flourishing La Joya ISD will be satisfied with its investment for the long term. n

Completed: Dec. 2010 Photography: Richard Payne, FAIA

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LAN Associates, G B Y DEngineering, IN E N Planning, Architecture, R Surveying, Inc. 445 Godwin Ave. Honorable Midland Park, NJ 07432 Mention www.lan-nj.com N

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Cresskill High School Cresskill, NJ

RENOVATIONS & ADAPTIVE REUSE

Kim Vierheilig 2011 201/447-6400 DESIGN TEAM Kenneth H. Karle, PP, PE, LEED AP Stephen J. Secora, AIA, PP, PE, LEED AP James L. Sanders Kim V. Vierheilig, AIA, LEED AP BD+C OWNER/CLIENT Cresskill Board of Education Cresskill, NJ Dr. Loretta Bellina, Superintendent 201/567-5919 KEY STATS Grades Served: 6-12 Capacity: 986 students Size of Site: 33.8 acres Building Area: 141,769 sq. ft. Building Volume: 1.8 million cu. ft. Space per Student: 30 sq. ft. (new) Cost per Student: $23,478 Square Foot Cost: $265 (new) Construction Cost: $20.7 million Total Project Cost: $23.8 million Contract Date: June 2004 Completion: Sept. 2007 Photography: Thomas H. Kieren/Custom Corporate Photography

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resskill is a community that has a combined middle and high school. The school required a master plan that would provide two separate entrances and a separate wing for middle school classrooms. Additionally, the existing science classrooms needed to be renovated and provided with a new greenhouse. Along with the requirements driven by the school’s high academic program, the scope of work focused on improving the athletic program areas as well as expanding the cafeteria. Due to wetlands on the property, all additions were required to be raised 18 inches above the existing finished floor. Energy efficiency was implemented in numerous HVAC design methods, including evaporative condenser chillers, variable-frequency drives on water distribution pumps, and units with CO2 demandbased controls. The athletic addition was programmed to operate as a stand-alone building at night. It is equipped with a state-of-the-art fitness center, a 10,000-square-foot gymnasium, and an auxiliary gym that serves as the wrestling and dance studio. By moving the athletic program, the old gymnasium was freed up to become a spacious media center. The media center reading area took advantage of the volume of the space by vaulting up to a cone-shaped skylight to bring light deep into the space. n

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2011

GENERAL EXCELLENCE Entire School/Campus Building

NAC|Architecture 1203 W. Riverside Spokane, WA 99201 www.nacarchitecture.com Keith Comes, AIA 509/838-8240 Design team Meulink Engineering, Inc., Mechanical Engineer NAC|Engineering, Electrical Engineer Structural Design Northwest, Structural Engineer Taylor Engineering, Inc., Civil Engineer Gavin Associates, Landscape Architect Ward Design Group, Theater Design Owner/Client Deer Park School District Deer Park, WA Dr. Becky Cooke, Superintendent 509/464-5507 KEY stats Grades Served: 9-12 Capacity: 1,000 students Size of Site: 54 acres Building Area: 146,236 sq. ft. Building Volume: 3.3 million cu. ft. Space per Student: 146 sq. ft. Cost per Student: $33,755 Square Foot Cost: $231 Construction Cost: $33.8 million Total Project Cost: $38.8 million Contract Date: Sept. 2006 Completed: Sept. 2010

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Deer Park High School 2011

Deer Park, WA

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he modernization of Deer Park High School completely redefines the existing facility. The original school was an odd combination of low classroom wings at various angles crashing into warehouse-like concrete-block boxes. Hipped roofs that compressed the classroom wings have been raised at the ends and at feature locations, creating dynamic daylight-filled interior spaces. Existing freestanding buildings and new additions have been interconnected with glass tube corridors that surround new outdoor courtyards utilized for academic activities. Sleek metal panels and ground-face masonry have been layered with the existing concrete block, creating a refined modern character. The result is a unified single structure that has a campus-like aesthetic with varied rooflines and volumes nestled within the landscape. The fundamental organization of the new plan creates an academic zone (with the general and specialized classroom spaces) and a public zone (with the gymnasiums and performing arts spaces) that have been joined by the new commons. Internal circulation has been redesigned to eliminate the congestion for students that had plagued the school for years. The building masses form two new exterior plazas that serve as the main academic entry and the primary events entry, both leading directly to the new commons. n

Sustainability Rating System/ Applied/Status/Level: *WSSP/Energy Star/Registered Photography: Benjamin Benschneider *Washington Sustainable Schools Protocol

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Druid Hills High School 2011

Atlanta, GA

RENOVATIONS & ADAPTIVE REUSE Entire School/Campus Building

Perkins+Will 1315 Peachtree Street, NE Atlanta, GA 30309 www.perkinswill.com Barbara Crum 404/443-7613 DESIGN TEAM Barbara Crum, Managing Principal Shawn Hamlin, Project Manager Marc Nunes, Project Architect Barbara Crum, Project Designer OWNER/CLIENT Dekalb County School System Tucker, GA Barbara Colman, Interim CIP Operations Officer 678/676-1453 KEY STATS Grades Served: 9-12 Capacity: 1,200 students Size of Site: 11.7 acres Building Area: 175,000 sq. ft. Space per Student: 170 sq. ft. Cost per Student: $12,917 Square Foot Cost: $89 Construction Cost: $15.5 million Total Project Cost: $21 million Contract Date: Aug. 2008 Completed: Aug. 2010 Photography: Jonathan Hillyer Photography, Inc.

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riginally housed in a 1930s historic building, Druid Hills High School grew to occupy three disconnected structures on its confined site in a primarily residential neighborhood in Atlanta. Over the years, the 140,000-square-foot school expanded to include a freestanding cafeteria building and what was previously an adjacent elementary school. The new 35,000-squarefoot addition links the cafeteria and the old elementary school building, creating a new façade for the campus. In deference to the original historic building, the new addition pulls away from the existing building and sets it off with a glass corner and setback entry way. With its window pattern that is a modern recall of the original building’s fenestration, the brick façade of the addition curves away, further emphasizing the historic structure. The addition includes eight new science labs, four classrooms, and administrative support space. n

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Eastern High School Washington, DC

GENERAL EXCELLENCE Entire School/Campus Building

Fanning Howey 210 N. Lee Street, Suite 208 Alexandria, VA 22314 www.fhai.com Edwin R. Schmidt, AIA 703/519-9822 cox, graae + spack architects www.cgsarchitects.com Design team Edwin R. Schmidt, AIA, Project Executive Bruce J. Hobby, Associate AIA, Project Manager Robin O’Hara, Educational Planner Robin McGrew, AIA, LEED AP, Project Designer Julia R. Devine, EIT, LEED AP BD+C, Structural Designer Katie L. Stone, NCIDQ, Interior Designer Owner/Client District of Columbia Public Schools Washington, DC Kaya Henderson, Chancellor 202/442-5885 KEY stats Grades Served: 9-12 Capacity: 1,100 students Size of Site: 12.8 acres Building Area: 284,000 sq. ft. Building Volume: 5.5 million cu. ft. Space per Student: 258 sq. ft. Cost per Student: $60,909 Square Foot Cost: $236 Construction Cost: $67 million Total Project Cost: $71 million Contract Date: Jan. 2009 Completed: June 2010 Sustainability Rating System/ Applied/Status/Level: LEED/Registered/Gold Photography: Maguire Photo

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astern High School was built in 1923 and is one of the oldest continuously operating high schools in Washington, D.C. In 2008, the District of Columbia Public Schools determined that renovations were necessary to restore “The Pride of Capitol Hill,” with the following goals: develop small learning academies for project-based learning; improve technology; preserve historic materials and restore original spaces; improve energy efficiency and achieve a minimum of LEED Silver certification; and main-

tain the quality of the learning environment throughout construction.  The design team was challenged to achieve those goals while working within the existing building footprint. Renovations reconfigured classrooms and labs to resemble college-level learning environments. A robust technology infrastructure supports selfdirected learning and programs such as Project Lead the Way. While a 21st century learning environment was taking shape, a parallel effort was underway to preserve Eastern’s rich his-

tory, including restoration of leaded portico windows at the exterior, woodwork throughout the building, marble in the main stairway, terra cotta flooring in corridors, interior brick walls, and interior plaster detailing. All building systems were replaced, and new interior finishes and automated lighting controls were added throughout the building. Other sustainable features include a renovated greenhouse with a supporting rainwater cistern. Eastern is projected to earn LEED Gold certification. n

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Jurupa Hills High School Fontana, CA

GENERAL EXCELLENCE Entire School/Campus Building

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G BY D WLCI NArchitects, Inc. E N 8163RRochester Ave., Suite 100 Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91730 www.wlcarchitects.com Honorable

Mention Mike Henry

909/987-0909

2011

DESIGN TEAM James P. DiCamillo, Principal Architect, Designer Robert Uribe, Senior Project Manager Marlis Harang, Project Architect OWNER/CLIENT Fontana Unified School District Fontana, CA Cali Olsen-Binks, Superintendent 909/357-5000 KEY STATS Grades Served: 9-12 Capacity: 2,100 students Size of Site: 45 acres Building Area: 275,000 sq. ft. Building Volume: 4.1 million cu. ft. Space per Student: 131 sq. ft. Cost per Student: $35,714 Square Foot Cost: $272 Construction Cost: $75 million Total Project Cost: $100 million Contract Date: Sept. 2005 Completed: Sept. 2010 Photography: Genevieve Wolff

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urupa Hills High School is the fifth comprehensive campus for this suburban, Southern California school district. This unique campus marks a decidedly different approach to design, curriculum delivery, and sustainability. The 275,000-square-foot complex has been built entirely under one roof, which is rare for the region. This approach allowed the district to acquire less land while building a facility that shields the students and faculty from the 100-degree heat and 70-mph winds that impact the site. The campus’s heart is the 400-foot-long, two-story mall that connects the academic and public spaces. The plan allows the gymnasium, theater, and cafeteria to be used independently without opening the main campus. Academic classrooms and labs are distributed into four focused wings, each with its own office, student center, and conference spaces. The fourth wing houses the district’s informational technology magnet program. This wing can also be secured from the rest of the campus. Instructional spaces include a television studio and video-

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conferencing center. The masonry and steel structure provides excellent thermal mass, and the twostory compact plan reduces

the building’s exposure to the harsh, inland sun. Southfacing windows include sun shades while the north façades feature flush glazing. n


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Lacoste Campus of Chalmette High School Chalmette, LA

GENERAL EXCELLENCE Education Building & Field House

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Lachin Oubre NG BY DE &N IAssociates, APC 3000 W. Esplanade Ave., Suite 302 Metairie, LA 70002 Honorable www.lachinoubrearchitects.com R

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Michael Lachin, AIA 504/835-8013

2011

Design team Lachin Oubre & Associates, APC, Architect Landis Construction Co., General Contractor Albert Carey, Project Manager for Owner Schrenk & Peterson, Inc., Civil/Structural Engineer Schantz Engineering LLC, Mechanical Engineer Creative Electrical Group, Electrical Engineer Owner/Client St. Bernard Parish School Board Chalmette, LA Doris Voitier, Superintendent 504/301-2000 KEY stats Grades Served: 9-12 Capacity: 450 students Size of Site: 6.5 acres Building Area: 111,424 sq. ft. Building Volume: 1.8 million cu. ft. Space per Student: 25 sq. ft. Cost per Student: $65,333 Square Foot Cost: $264 Construction Cost: $29.4 million Total Project Cost: $33.8 million Contract Date: June 2007 Completed: Dec. 2010 Photography: Lachin Oubre & Associates, APC

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he Lacoste Campus was the first new school complex designed and built for the St. Bernard Parish School Board after Hurricane Katrina. Designed to withstand future floods and hurricaneforce winds, the campus was built with all major mechanical, electrical, and communications systems raised to avoid future disaster. Glazed concrete-block walls, terrazzo floors, and fiberglass doors and frames with stainless steel hardware were used throughout. The educational building is a 63,000-square-foot concreteframed structure that serves ninth-grade students. This building includes classrooms to accommodate 450 students on three floors, state-of-theart computer and science labs, a commercial-size kitchen, and an administrative wing. The building also features a three-story circulation rotunda. The field house is a 48,000-square-foot facility that houses a full gymnasium, a wrestling and fitness center, and a natatorium with an Olympic-sized competition

swimming pool. An enclosed pedestrian bridge was designed to connect to the existing Chalmette High School Campus. The bridge design, curved to allow

the preservation of historic oak trees, complements the curved form of the educational building, inspired by the hurricane forces that it is designed to resist. n

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Los Angeles, CA

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LAUSD Central Region High School No. 13

Mention Alex Parslow

213/542-8300

2011

DESIGN TEAM Gary Gidcumb, Principal-in-Charge John Nichols, Educational Programmer Michael Tome, Design Principal Andrea Cabalo, Project Manager Danielle Martin, Construction Administration Jessica Liu, Interior Design OWNER/CLIENT Los Angeles Unified School District Los Angeles, CA Shannon Haber, Director of Communications 213/241-4575 KEY STATS Grades Served: 9-12 Capacity: 2,295 students Size of Site: 23 acres Building Area: 220,223 sq. ft.

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pening fall 2011, Los Angeles Unified School District’s Central Region High School No. 13 is the result of a communityfocused redevelopment initiative alongside the historic Pacific Railway line and the Los Angeles River. The school will reinvigorate the former industrial park, transforming this East Los Angeles neighborhood and alleviating overcrowding at three area schools within the district. The 23-acre campus will accommodate up to 2,295 students with 85 classrooms and multiple educational buildings. Spaces to be shared with the community—such as the gymnasium, library, and performing arts center—are located along the campus perimeter to ensure ease of use. With the instructional facilities positioned away from the streets, the facility provides students with a quiet and secure learning environment while maintaining openness to the community for the shared amenities. Sustainability is a key emphasis of the campus design. Taking advantage of the temperate climate, the design reduces the amount of conditioned space by utilizing outdoor circulation. Native and adaptive plants, chosen based on their suitability for the Los

Building Volume: 3.3 million cu. ft. Space per Student: 95 sq. ft. Cost per Student: $58,320 Square Foot Cost: $606 Construction Cost: $133.8 million Total Project Cost: $230.8 million Contract Date: May 2008 Completed: Feb. 2011 Sustainability Rating System/ Applied/Status/Level: *CHPS/LEED/Registered/Silver Photography: Ryan Beck *Collaborative for High-Performance Schools

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L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n F A L L 2 0 1 1 | www.learningbydesign.biz

Angeles River Plant Palette, are used along the bioswale and create demonstration gardens for the students. Central Region

High School No. 13 will garner 41 points for Collaborative for High-Performance Schools and is registered as LEED Silver. n


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nex+Gen Academy

2011

Albuquerque, NM

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Dale R. Dekker, AIA, AICP, Senior Principal Benjamin H. Gardner III, AIA, LEED AP, Principal Architect Sanjay S. Kadu, Project Designer Adrienne Lewis, AIA, LEED AP, Project Manager Karen Alarid, AIA, APS Director, Facilities, Design, & Construction Richard Miller, PE, APS Staff Engineer, Facilities, Design, & Construction Owner/Client Albuquerque Public Schools Albuquerque, NM Winston Brooks, Superintendent 505/880-3713 KEY stats Grades Served: 9-12 Capacity: 400 students Size of Site: 3.5 acres Building Area: 46,894 sq. ft. Building Volume: 695,124 cu. ft. Space per Student: 117 sq. ft. Cost per Student: $16,250 Square Foot Cost: $139 Construction Cost: $6.5 million Total Project Cost: $10.6 million Contract Date: Sept. 2009 Completed: Sept. 2010 Sustainability Rating System/ Applied/Status/Level: LEED/Registered/Gold Photography: Kirk Gittings

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Benjamin H. Gardner III, AIA, LEED AP 505/761-9700 Design team

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ex+Gen Academy is an autonomous public high school built on the existing Del Norte High School campus. Its educational program is based on the New Tech Foundation’s learning model, which combines small school principles with collaborative, project-based learning and an emphasis on technology as an essential tool for learning. The design response to support this curriculum is an open studio environment that fosters transparency in the education process, facilitating collaborative opportunities for both teaching and learning. Educational studios seamlessly branch out from the main circulation spine without the barrier of doors. Smaller breakout spaces and a large commons area provide casual workspace for group activities, and a centrally located stage allows for large group assembly and formal presentations. Technology is integrated throughout, with wireless connection to provide access to the web-based curriculum and support distance learning and digital media. Furnishings were selected for mobility and ease of reconfiguration, including interactive whiteboards and vertical elements that act as dividers and pin-up space. The building’s design and material palette of masonry, stucco, and metal panel present a dynamic and contem-

porary image that reflects the forward-thinking, technologybased curriculum of the

school. nex+Gen Academy is designed to achieve LEED for Schools Gold certification. n

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GENERAL EXCELLENCE Learning Center

ATS&R Planners/Architects/ Engineers 8501 Golden Valley Road, Suite 300 Minneapolis, MN 55427 www.atsr.com David M. Maroney, AIA, NCARB 763/545-3731 DESIGN TEAM David M. Maroney, AIA, NCARB, Project Architect James T. Lange, PE, Mechanical Engineer Kim Sorenson, IIDA, CID, Interior Designer Gaylen D. Melby, PE, Electrical Engineer Clark Engineering Corporation, Structural Engineer OWNER/CLIENT Owatonna Public Schools Owatonna, MN Dr. Tom Tapper, Superintendent 507/444-8600 KEY STATS Grades Served: 9-12 Capacity: 1,600 students Size of Site: 19 acres Building Area: 11,500 sq. ft. Space per Student: 64 sq. ft. Cost per Student: $1,778 Square Foot Cost: $47 Construction Cost: $320,000 Total Project Cost: $539,000 Contract Date: Jan. 2010 Completed: Sept. 2010 Photography: Kara Kopp, ATS&R

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Owatonna High School Owatonna, MN

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he Owatonna High School Options Program offers a fresh approach to education for students who want more accountability and ownership over their learning. Students, together with their parents and a guide, create a personalized plan based on their individual interests and goals. This program fosters creativity, increases critical thinking, enriches technology, and creates a greater sense of purpose. By rethinking an existing pod of classrooms, minor alterations provide a variety of flexible learning environments. Removing walls between staff planning and break areas improves student/staff interaction. Re-proportioning classrooms allows for large groups, smaller collaboration, and a broadcast studio. Fullheight glass panels create a welcoming open entry. Contemporary upgraded finishes, color tackable surfaces, and inspiring graphics provide high impact in the space. Technology upgrades support learner-centered education and collaboration using laptops, interactive display boards, wireless connections, projectors, cameras, and printers. Technology and furniture create inviting flexible learning spaces for teamwork, large/small groups, lecture/ presentation, and socialization. A variety of mobile and adjustable furniture quickly transforms rooms. Modular and ergonomic furniture, along with lounge pieces, supports technology and encourages flexibility. n

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Saint Jean Baptiste High School New York, NY

GENERAL EXCELLENCE Renovation/Addition/Restoration

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GeddisBArchitects Y D G I N Road, EP.O. Box 1020 71 OldNPost R Fairfield, CT 06890 www.geddisarchitect.com Barbara L. Geddis, FAIA Mention 203/256-8700

2011

Design team

Barbara L. Geddis, FAIA, Design Director Maria Baptista, AIA, Project Architect Sabrina Nunes, Architectural Intern Dominick Fortuna, PE, Mechanical Engineer, C&F Consulting Engineering, P.C. Michael Conners, PE, Electrical Engineer, C&F Consulting Engineering, P.C. John Baranello, Structural Engineer, Severud Associates Owner/Client Saint Jean Baptiste High School New York, NY Sister Rosemary Cianciolo, CND 212/288-1645 KEY stats Grades Served: 9-12 Capacity: 400 students Size of Site: 0.4 acres Building Area: 18,880 sq. ft. Space per Student: 47 sq. ft. Cost per Student: $15,000 Square Foot Cost: $318 Construction Cost: $6 million Total Project Cost: $8.2 million Contract Date: Aug. 2008 Completed: Sept. 2010 Photography: Geddis Architects

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his girls’ high school on the Upper East Side in New York City, housed in a 1929 four-story structure of light brick with limestone details, had only a narrow slot of land to the east for expansion. With program needs in several areas, a small attached addition needed to be accompanied by a carefully phased renovation and reconstruction of adjacent areas. The new addition features an on-grade entrance lobby, elevator, new library/media center, classrooms, college counseling office, meditation room, and administrative office suite. The narrow, four-story façade of the addition is inspired by Upper East Side townhouses of the late 1920s. As part of the renovation process, two existing classrooms were combined and transformed into biology and chemistry lab classrooms and an art studio. The existing dimly lit gymnasium in the basement has been replaced by a bright and welcoming dining area, study hall, and aerobics studio. With the addition, the school continues to be in harmony with the scale and materials of other buildings (mostly townhouses) of the narrow street. n www.learningbydesign.biz | L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n F A L L 2 0 1 1

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Van Buren High School Van Buren, AR

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G B YAssociates, Hight-Jackson P.A. DE IN N 5201RVillage Parkway, Suite 300 Rogers, AR 72758 www.hjarch.com Honorable

Mention Liz Cox

479/464-4965

2011

DESIGN TEAM Ron Shelby, AIA, Project Architect Mark Haguewood, AIA Liz Cox, Interior Design OWNER/CLIENT Van Buren School District Van Buren, AR Dr. Merle Dickerson, Superintendent 479/474-7942 KEY STATS Grades Served: 10-12 Building Area: 262,500 sq. ft. Square Foot Cost: $96 Construction Cost: $25.4 million Completed: Dec. 2008 Photography: Janet Warlick - Camera Work, Inc.

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major addition and renovation created a new identity for the high school campus. The existing school was built in the early 1960s, with outside covered corridors. These corridors and interior courtyard were enclosed in the late 1980s, followed by multiple additions to the building in the 1990s. Construction was carried out in two phases, allowing for continuous school operation. The project consisted of 212,500 square feet of new construction with 50,000 square feet of remodel of the existing building. The building is steel frame and masonry construction. Completed in 2007, Phase I included a new gymnasium, commons, administration offices, and extensive remodel to classroom corridors. The site drops drastically to the east, providing an opportunity to create a dramatic elevated entrance porch for the new front door of the high school and walk-out basement level for the competition gymnasium. During Phase II, the center portion—and oldest area—of the building was demolished to make room for the new Van Buren School District Fine Arts

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Center. The 1,500-seat auditorium is used for school productions as well as community concerts and special events.

Gallery space on the first and second floors is used to display student artwork. Phase II was completed in 2008. n


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Ventura, CA

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Ventura High School Field House

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Brian Paul Dougherty, FAIA, LEED AP 2011 714/427-0277 Design team Brian Dougherty, FAIA, LEED AP, Partner-in-Charge Seung Paek, AIA, LEED AP, Project Manager Joe Breidenbach, LEED AP, Project Designer Viola Inc., Contractor

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erched above the campus overlooking the Pacific Ocean, this high school stadium field house is a source of great pride. The project evolved from modernizing a nondescript 1960s field house to replacing it after crisscrossing seismic faults were identified beneath the existing facility. The new 2,900-square-foot structure is located on a small, prominent, buildable sloped site. It establishes an iconic entry to the recreational center of campus while maintaining a low profile to surrounding homeowners. Created to meet LEED and CHPS criteria, the design incorporates numerous sustainable strategies. The facility is a billboard for athletics, with metal panels that reflect the colors of the

Owner/Client Ventura Unified School District Ventura, CA Dr. Trudy Arriaga 805/641-5000 KEY stats Grades Served: 9-12 Capacity: 206 students Size of Site: 0.3 acres Building Area: 2,900 sq. ft. Building Volume: 29,000 cu. ft. Space per Student: 14 sq. ft. Cost per Student: $11,165 Square Foot Cost: $790 Construction Cost: $2.3 million Total Project Cost: N/A Contract Date: Aug. 2006 Completed: May 2010 Sustainability Rating System/ Applied/Status/Level: *CHPS/Self-Certified/CHPS Photography: RMA Photography *Collaborative for High-Performance Schools

ever-changing coastal climate. The building houses two locker rooms with showers and toilets, appropriate for men and women, or home and visiting teams. Offices, therapy space, computer room, decks, and gathering space make this a facility that embodies the campus tradition of athletic excellence. Areas in the building can be locked to accommodate events at all hours, making it an asset that benefits the entire community. The field house celebrates the bonds between school and community, athletics and scholarship, and the memories that bring together generations of athletes. n www.learningbydesign.biz | L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n F A L L 2 0 1 1

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Veterans Memorial High School Brownsville, TX

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GomezI Mendez Inc. N G B Y D Saenz, E N 1150 Paredes Line Road R Brownsville, TX 78521

Honorable Rudy V. Gomez, AIA Mention 956/546-0110

2011

DESIGN TEAM D. Wilson Construction, General Contractor ACR Engineering, Inc., Mechanical, Electrical, & Plumbing Engineers Green Rubiano & Associates, Structural Engineers SSP Design, LLC, Landscape Designer OWNER/CLIENT Brownsville Independent School District Brownsville, TX Brett Springston, Superintendent 956/548-8000 KEY STATS Grades Served: 9-12 Capacity: 2,400 students Size of Site: 80 acres Building Area: 361,017 sq. ft. Building Volume: 10.1 million cu. ft. Space per Student: 150 sq. ft. Cost per Student: $25,667 Square Foot Cost: $171 Construction Cost: $61.6 million Total Project Cost: $69.6 million Contract Date: April 2008 Completed: Jan. 2010 Photography: Prelim, Inc., Dan Hatzenbuehler

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he vision for Veterans Memorial High School was to create a state-ofthe-art learning environment with a mature college feel and a clean, modern look. The client wanted a setting to inspire students and faculty alike while remaining functional to supervise. The design is anchored by the main courtyard, located between two classroom wings, the cafeteria, and the performing arts building. The courtyard

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serves as the entry point for students and as a commons area between classes. The performing arts center includes a 650-seat auditorium with full theatrical rigging and instructional labs for marching band, symphonic band, color guard, and dance teams. The ninebuilding complex includes special-use facilities, such as a three-court gymnasium, technical building trades, and ROTC, in addition to traditional classrooms and labs.

With a footprint of 360,000 square feet, pedestrian travel from one side of the campus to the other can be achieved in seven minutes or less. The Spanish-themed architecture is apparent throughout the multistory campus, with the use of multitoned brick bands set above smooth-faced masonry units. At the higher elevations, the buff-toned plaster veneer receives ornament in the form of tile metal roofing, crown molding, and terra cotta. n


2012 Call for

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Showcase Your Firm’s

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No other publication showcases your firm’s outstanding design projects as well as LEARNING BY DESIGN. This award-winning magazine reaches 65,000+ school & university decision makers who refer to LEARNING BY DESIGN throughout the year to tap education design innovation and best practices—and to learn which firms are leading the pack. Be seen in LEARNING BY DESIGN 2012 n Spring & Fall editions showcase the best in education design, from pre-K to 12 schools to universities. n Earn additional discounts—submit multiple projects to one or both editions in 2012 and receive discounted entry fees. Reserve your space by September 30. n Go to LEARNINGBYDESIGN.BIZ to learn more. Contact: Anna Lee Ney at 703.914.9200, ext. 25 alney@strattonpublishing.com

LEARNING BY DESIGN

The premier source for education design innovation and excellence

Presented by Stratton Publishing & Marketing Inc. and the National School Boards Association/ American School Board Journal


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Hackley School—Goodhue Memorial Hall 2011

Tarrytown, NY

RENOVATIONS & ADAPTIVE REUSE Entire School/Campus Building

Peter Gisolfi Associates 566 Warburton Ave. Hastings-on-Hudson, NY 10706 www.petergisolfiassociates.com Sandra Mintzes, AIA, LEED AP 914/478-3677, ext. 316 DESIGN TEAM Peter Gisolfi, AIA, ASLA, LEED AP, Partner-in-Charge Ken Pojman, AIA, Associate Partner, Project Manager Klaus Kalmbach, RA, RLA, Associate, Project Architect Crosby Scott, Project Coordinator Ronen Wilk, RLA, Project Landscape Architect Joori Suh, CID, LEED AP, Interior Designer OWNER/CLIENT Hackley School Tarrytown, NY Walter Johnson, Headmaster 914/631-0128 KEY STATS

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n August 4, 2007, Goodhue Memorial Hall at Hackley School was struck by lightning and ravaged by fire. Built in 1903, this neo-Classical building defined the main quadrangle, surrounded by Tudor-style buildings. Within its central double-height space, it housed the school’s main library, flanked by one-story wings containing the library office,

Grades Served: 5-12 Capacity: 300 students Building Area: 16,200 sq. ft. Building Volume: 210,600 cu. ft. Space per Student: 54 sq. ft. Contract Date: Nov. 2007 Completed: Aug. 2010 Photography: Robert Mintzes

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computer support space, small offices, and classrooms. The fire destroyed the entire interior of the building, but Goodhue’s stone exterior was left standing. After stabilizing these walls, a plan was developed to expand Goodhue without altering its footprint significantly. The plan called for: • Taking advantage of the central double-height space

• •

to create a second floor, and extending that second floor over the one- story flanking wings; Excavating the basement to create a new foundation, space for infrastructure, and space for school archives use —storage, seminar room, and office; and Constructing the first LEED-certified building on the Hackley campus.


A steel structure was inserted within the original stone walls. Curved steel trusses were used to recreate the vaulted central space. The southeast-facing Palladian window in the main façade was restored, and the larger northwestern window was extended to bring light to both floors. Goodhue Memorial Hall reopened in September 2010 with its exterior completely

restored. Its transformed interior still evokes the spirit of its classical beginnings. Entering the building from the main quadrangle, the lobby is furnished with soft seating as a gathering space for students. Just beyond the lobby a central multimedia room is used for lectures and conferences.The flanking wings on the first floor house history department offices and classrooms.

An open stair leads to the new library, which occupies the entire second floor. The main reading room of the library features the barrel-vaulted ceiling created by the steel trusses; it is flooded with natural light from the two classical windows and new dormers in the roof. The flanking wings contain computer stations, computer labs, group study spaces, reading alcoves, staff offices, and workspace.

The building has also been transformed in terms of energy efficiency. By adding a new geothermal heating and cooling system, insulating the walls and roof, and installing efficient new windows, the energy loss through the building’s skin has been reduced by approximately 70 percent. Goodhue is now a model of sustainable design and adaptive reuse, and will receive LEED Gold certification. n

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Edy Ridge Elementary/Laurel Ridge Middle Schools Sherwood, OR

SUSTAINABILITY & LEARNING Entire School/Campus Building

Dull Olson Weekes Architects 907 SW Stark Street Portland, OR 97205 www.dowa.com Tami Fuller 503/226-6950 DESIGN TEAM Norm Dull, AIA, Principal John Weekes, AIA, Educational Planner Keith Johnson, AIA, Project Manager Beth Cantrell, AIA, Designer Ki Hyun Kim Skanska USA, Contractor OWNER/CLIENT Sherwood School District Sherwood, OR Dan Jameson, Superintendent 503/625-8100 KEY STATS Grades Served: K-8 Capacity: 1,100 students Size of Site: 29 acres Building Area: 141,575 sq. ft. Building Volume: 3.1 million cu. ft. Space per Student: 130 sq. ft. Cost per Student: $32,806 Square Foot Cost: $255 Construction Cost: $36.1 million Total Project Cost: $38.9 million Contract Date: June 2006 Completed: June 2009 Sustainability Rating System/ Applied/Status/Level: LEED/Certified/Gold Photography: Gary Wilson Photo/ Graphic

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wo distinct school environments for students, teachers, staff, parents, and visitors were created to house 1,100 students in kindergarten through eighth grade. Planned as stand-alone facilities with an intentional separation and identity for each school, they come together through shared design goals, learning opportunities, and community building. Designed to connect to the natural environment and to

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the community, the building reflects the district’s commitment to implementing sustainable design features. As an educational facility, it became apparent that the sustainable design features should be visible to the students and the community as teaching/learning tools and should encourage interaction with the built and natural environments. With classroom houses configured as mirror images of one another, each two-story class-

room wing is connected to the main building by a media center which acts as a “knuckle,” using an abundance of glass to visually connect the spaces. A primary design objective to provide community use of the building was achieved with a designated community meeting room, along with music rooms, cafeterias, and gym spaces physically located to make them easily available for community use during off-school hours. n


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Calvin College Covenant Fine Arts Center Grand Rapids, MI

GENERAL EXCELLENCE Performing Arts Center

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GMBGArchitecture BY D IN E N + Engineering 85 E. 8th Street, Suite 200 Holland, MI 49423 Honorable www.gmb.com R

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Tom Van De Griend, AIA, LEED AP 616/796-0200

2011

Design team Tom Van De Griend, AIA, LEED AP, Principal-in-Charge Rob Den Besten, AIA, LEED AP, Project Architect Brad Heeres, PE, LEED AP, Electrical Engineer Jim Merlino, PE, Mechanical Engineer Owner/Client Calvin College Grand Rapids, MI Dr. Gaylen Byker 616/526-6000 KEY stats Grades Served: Post-secondary Capacity: 2,807 students Size of Site: 4.9 acres Building Area: 124,000 sq. ft. Building Volume: 5.2 million cu. ft. Space per Student: 44 sq. ft. Cost per Student: $4,809 Square Foot Cost: $109 Construction Cost: $13.5 million Total Project Cost: $15 million Contract Date: Mar. 2008 Completed: Oct. 2010 Photography: JRP Studio, LLC

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ailed as a superlative performance venue and an acoustic marvel 40 years ago, the Calvin College Covenant Fine Arts Center was feeling its age. The Covenant Fine Arts Center (CFAC) is the front door of the Calvin College campus for many in the broader community. It was important to maintain that connection as well as serve the college’s students by creating additional practice, rehearsal, teaching, and performance space. The solution was to modernize the CFAC but respect its heritage and nostalgic appeal to the community. The brick and limestone exterior was designed to respect the campus’s prairie school design language and add 40,000 square feet of space to the original 72,000-square-foot steel-framed structure. The west side entrance of the building was enlarged to serve as an anchor for its three main public spaces: the new 240-seat recital hall, the new 3,800-square-foot gallery, and the renovated 1,100-seat auditorium. The expanded east side added a student lounge surrounded by classrooms, practice and teaching suites, instrument storage, a musical library, and the English and music department offices. The entire facility is anchored by the renovated CFAC auditorium, complete with new HVAC with humidification, theatrical lighting, fabrics, and woodwork. n

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Chattahoochee Technical College—Canton Campus Canton, GA

GENERAL EXCELLENCE Science and Technology Center

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BY D G BRPH IN E N 2727 Paces Ferry Road, Suite 1800 R Atlanta, GA 30339 www.brph.com Honorable

Mention Mark Levine, AIA 678/784-5805

2011

DESIGN TEAM Matthew Walsh, AIA, Project Manager Timothy Pulver, AIA, Project Designer OWNER/CLIENT Chattahoochee Technical College Marietta, GA Dr. Sanford Chandler 770/528-4545 KEY STATS Grades Served: Post-secondary Capacity: 1,000 students Size of Site: 12.5 acres Building Area: 62,500 sq. ft. Square Foot Cost: $200 Construction Cost: $12.5 million Contract Date: Sept. 2008 Completed: Dec. 2010 Sustainability Rating System/ Applied/Status/Level: LEED/Pending/Silver Photography: Tony Clark Photography

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ocated on a 12.5-acre site in Canton, Georgia, the newly established Canton Campus for Chattahoochee Technical College melds modern and technically centered design with traditional North Georgia/Adirondack elements. The Canton Campus is the eighth for the college, and the newly built 62,500-square-foot academic facility establishes the architectural style for future campus facilities. BRPH provided professional design services for this 58

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state-of-the-art facility, which houses multiple programs of study throughout traditional classrooms and also features a library, computer and technical labs, medical labs, science labs, a bookstore, a student center, and a 68-seat tiered lecture hall. BRPH designers programmed the interior space and selected building materials to complement the building’s surroundings To address the Technical College System of Georgia’s commitment to environmentally sustainable campuses,

the new Canton Campus features sustainable elements designed to achieve LEED Silver certification, including innovative stormwater management strategies and a highly efficient building envelope. The proposed undeveloped site was heavily wooded and included steep topography, which called for creative building siting. The design team worked closely with the college throughout the design process, leading them in developing a vision for the campus. n


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Crystal M. Lange College of Health & Human Services University Center, MI

Science Building

TMP Architecture, Inc. 1191 W. Square Lake Road Bloomfield Hills, MI 48302 www.tmp-architecture.com William A. Frederick, AIA 248/338-4561 Design team William A. Frederick, AIA, Project Manager and Programming Robert Powell, AIA, Designer and Programming Carol Frederick, AIA, Interior Design and Programming Edward B. Jakmauh, FAIA, ACHA, LEED AP, Programming, Ballinger Wayne Kerbelis, Mechanical Engineer, PBA Terry Cleis, PE, LEED AP, Electrical Engineer, PBA Owner/Client Saginaw Valley State University University Center, MI Eric R. Gilbertson 989/964-4000 KEY stats Grades Served: Post-secondary Capacity: 700 students Size of Site: 18 acres Building Area: 95,975 sq. ft. Building Volume: 1.5 million cu. ft. Space per Student: 138 sq. ft. Cost per Student: $30,666 Square Foot Cost: $224 Construction Cost: $21.5 million Total Project Cost: $28 million Contract Started: April 2009 Completed: July 2010 Sustainability Rating System/ Applied/Status/Level: LEED/Registered/Silver Photography: Christopher Lark

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he new two-level, 95,975-square-foot health sciences building at Saginaw Valley State University houses the Crystal M. Lange College of Health and Human Services, which includes the departments of nursing, kinesiology, occupational therapy, health sciences, and social work. Formerly, these departments were scattered about the campus. The building provides new facilities for student instruction, collaboration, presentations, and training in health and

human services. With integrated technology throughout, the building features instructional laboratory spaces and classrooms for nursing, kinesiology, and occupational therapy skills. Special laboratories and meeting rooms provide spaces for the development of health sciences and social work interview and analysis skills. Additionally, student gathering spaces with comfortable furniture and informational monitors—announcing university special events, class changes, and student achieve-

ments—are provided, as well as faculty offices, conference rooms, and computer classrooms. The university committed to a LEED-certified facility from the earliest programming phases for this new building, and the design team worked closely with university personnel to identify unique energyefficient and sustainable project elements. Registered with the United States Green Building Council, the facility is on track with points necessary to achieve LEED Silver certification. n

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Richard B. Flynn Campus Union—Springfield College Springfield, MA

GENERAL EXCELLENCE Student Center/Union

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Symmes B Y D & McKee G Maini IN E N Associates/SMMA R 1000 Massachusetts Ave. Cambridge, MA 01238 Honorable www.smma.com

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Joie Watson 617/547-5400

2011

DESIGN TEAM Alex C. Pitkin, AIA, Principal-in-Charge Robert C. Hicks, AIA, Project Manager David Fanuele, LEED AP, Project Architect Mark J. Zarrillo, FASLA, AICP, Landscape Architect Renee Dean, LEED AP, Interior Designer Paul Livernois, PE, Structural Engineer OWNER/CLIENT Springfield College Springfield, MA Dr. Richard B. Flynn, President 413/748-3000 KEY STATS Grades Served: Post-secondary Building Area: 58,000 sq. ft. Square Foot Cost: $334 Construction Cost: $15 million Total Project Cost: $16.7 million Contract Date: 2007 Completed: Aug. 2009 Photography: SMMA, David Lamb

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erched on a hillside above Lake Massasoit, Springfield College’s new campus union represents the seamless integration of 36,000 square feet of new construction with the completely redesigned 22,000-square-foot Beveridge Center. The new union transforms the way students access services and activities, using formal and informal gathering spaces to support the college’s mission to enhance each student’s mind, body, and spirit through social interaction and participation in campus

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life. The union unites offices for student organizations, the dean of students, residence life, career services, campus ministries, volunteer programs, 3,000 student mailboxes, servery, convenience store, bookstore, and a multipurpose function hall. The design embraces the prominent site between the main campus thoroughfare and the lake by defining distinct external spaces linked to corresponding building functions. The union’s primary façade reinforces the historic quadrangle, and

the entrance tower balances the historic Judd Hall tower, forming a gateway to the quadrangle. A new covered arcade defines the Alden Street façade and embraces the Beveridge Center’s existing structure. In contrast to the formal gestures of these rusticated brick and stone façades— reflecting the Victorian campus character—the lakeside façade of the building in steel and glass opens the dining and ballroom spaces to dramatic vistas and a terraced court. n


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Y D G B Little IN E N R 5815 Westpark

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University of Arkansas at Fort Smith Residence Hall Fort Smith, AR

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Mention Phil Kuttner

704/525-6350

2011

Allison Architects www.allisonarchitects.com Design team Beth Buffington, Principal-in-Charge, Little Richard Naab, Project Manager, Little John Allison, Principal-in-Charge, Allison Architects Chris Hartzfield, Project Manager, Allison Architects Shannon Rydell, Design Principal, Former Little Employee Kelly Schlenker, Project Designer, Former Little Employee Owner/Client University of Arkansas Fort Smith, AR R. Mark Horn, Vice Chancellor for Finance 479/788-7000 KEY stats Grades Served: Post-secondary Capacity: 454 students Building Area: 114,760 sq. ft. Space per Student: 237 sq. ft. Cost per Student: $46,447 Square Foot Cost: $197 Construction Cost: $21.1 million Contract Date: Dec. 2008 Completed: July 2010 Sustainability Rating System/ Applied/Status/Level: LEED/Pending/Silver

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he University of Arkansas needed assistance in developing a long-range campus plan that would holistically consider the role student life plays in overall campus development. Historically a small commuter-based college, the University of Arkansas intends to grow its student population to approximately 8,000 students, and on-campus student housing will be an integral part of that aggressive growth plan. The design team worked with university stakeholders to formulate a 2020 Campus Plan that allows for a balance of initiatives in residence life, athletics, and academic/curriculum expansion programs. From this plan, an immediate need of 454 beds of traditional residence hall living was determined, along with a 230-seat dining facility. In designing the new facilities, it was important to all of the stakeholders that a vibrant center for campus life be created, along with a dining facility that would attract the entire campus population, including residents, staff, and day students. Location of the dining facility on the main quad provides a perfect focal point for campus interest and activity while maintaining an ideal relationship with the new housing, providing both interior and exterior seating. In this way, the design looks toward the future while respecting the strong, established roots of this important community-based learning institution. n

Photography: Stacy Gough, Ken West

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Zankel Music Center—Skidmore College

2011

Saratoga Springs, NY

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EwingCole of 100Citation N. 6th Street Excellence Philadelphia, PA 19106 www.ewingcole.com

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Performing Arts Center

2011

Joseph Donahue 215/625-4119 Belson Design Architects www.belsondesign.com DESIGN TEAM Tom Applequist, Lead Designer Charles Belson, Managing Principal Ryan McNutt, Project Manager Steve Bishop, Construction Manager, MLB Construction RoLand LaFond, Site Superintendent, MLB Construction Paul Lundberg, Project Manager, Skidmore College OWNER/CLIENT Skidmore College Saratoga Springs, NY Mike West, Vice President for Finance & Administration, Treasurer 518/580-5810 KEY STATS Grades Served: Post-secondary Capacity: 2,400 students Size of Site: 27 acres Building Area: 66,700 sq. ft. Space per Student: 28 sq. ft. Cost per Student: $1,135 Square Foot Cost: $408 Construction Cost: $27.3 million Total Project Cost: $29 million Contract Date: Nov. 2007 Completed: Jan. 2010 Photography: Eduard Hueber/ archphoto.com; Korlarp Suwacharangkul

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he design team performed a study to help Skidmore College determine whether its nearly 40-year-old music facility should be renovated or replaced. The study concluded that even extensive, costly renovation would still not bring the acoustics of the existing recital hall up to par. With nearly 40 full- and part-time faculty, Skidmore’s music department offers more than 50 courses in such diverse areas as the Western classical tradition; electronic- and computer-based musical composition; non-Western musical forms and traditions; jazz, pop, and rock; and West African drumming, as well as individual instruction in a wide variety of instruments and vocal genres. Students may pursue their musical passions at a level typically seen at a music conservatory, engaging in close interaction with faculty who are accomplished performers, scholars, and composers. Aligned along a north-south axis, the building is divided into two separate spheres of activity,

L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n F A L L 2 0 1 1 | www.learningbydesign.biz

with a wide, brightly lit glass atrium in the center that serves as a crossroads and a gathering space. South is the performance sphere, featuring the 600-seat Helen Filene Ladd Concert Hall, an acoustically tuned space that can be scaled up or down for any size audience. Designed to accommodate a full orchestra and chorus, its stage is backed by a dramatic threestory-high glass wall overlooking nearby Haupt Pond. North is the instructional

sphere, which includes faculty offices, 14 practice rooms, the 90-seat Elisabeth Luce Moore Hall for lectures and recitals, electronic music laboratory, piano lab, and several classrooms. This wing is used virtually around the clock to accommodate the practice schedules and creative needs of students during evening and night hours, and teaching during the day. Located on the main drive near the college’s entrance, the Zankel Center serves as a gateway to the campus. Its


traditional brick, copper, and glass faรงade harkens back to the style and palette of the original campus buildings while its bold structure works in tandem with the similarly powerful shape of the nearby Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery. Together with the Janet Kinghorn Bernhard Theater, the Marjorie Saisselin Art Building, and the original Therese W. Filene Music Building, it creates a true arts quadrangle. A new outdoor amphitheater and landscaping visually connect the new building to the quadrangle. This project received a 2003 Honor Award for Unbuilt Work and a 2010 Merit Award for Built Work from the Cleveland Chapter of the American Institute of Architects. n www.learningbydesign.biz | L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n F A L L 2 0 1 1

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Stanton Independent School District Auditorium Stanton, TX

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G BY D BGRI NArchitects Inc. E N R 2118 34th Street Lubbock, TX 79411 www.bgrarchitects.com Honorable

Mention Steven C. Aufill

806/747-3881

2011

DESIGN TEAM Steven C. Aufill, Principal-in-Charge, Project Manager, Project Designer Tonda K. Elliott, IIDA Associate, Interior Designer BSA Consulting Engineers, PLLC, Mechanical, Electrical, & Plumbing Engineers Smith Engineering Co., Civil Engineers Lee Lewis Construction Inc., Contractors OWNER/CLIENT Stanton Independent School District Stanton, TX David Carr, Superintendent 432/756-2244 KEY STATS Grades Served: K-12 Capacity: 1,100 students Size of Site: 2.3 acres Building Area: 23,500 sq. ft. Building Volume: 657,500 cu. ft. Space per Student: 21 sq. ft. Cost per Student: $4,856 Square Foot Cost: $227 Construction Cost: $5.3 million Total Project Cost: $5.7 million Contract Date: Mar. 2009 Completed: May 2010 Photography: BGR Architects Inc.

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aving outgrown the existing 400-seat auditorium, Stanton Independent School District needed a new facility. A restrictive site and a desire to utilize existing parking helped shape the form of the 23,500-squarefoot, 1,100-seat auditorium. Two entries, located to take advantage of existing west parking and new east parking, lead to separate two-story lobbies connected by a centrally located core of restrooms, housekeeping, ticket sales, and administrative areas. Divided equally into a lower sloped-floor portion and a rear stepped section, the design creates a variety of audience seat options, all with superb sight lines. Wide, fanshaped seating helps the facility fit the small site and ensures that all viewers feel close to the stage. Designed acoustically for multiple-sized viewer groups, the lower section can be utilized un-amplified. Interior materials, which were chosen for economy, acoustical performance, and durability, include stained or sealed concrete and carpet flooring as well as combinations of painted smooth, textured, and acoustical masonry

L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n F A L L 2 0 1 1 | www.learningbydesign.biz

walls. Clear anodized aluminum railings, rich stained wood trim, and a mature color scheme provide a sophisticated accent to the interiors. Exterior colors and brick materials,

decorative masonry, exterior insulated finish system, and metal match the existing campus but are combined in ways to set the auditorium apart as a new facility. n


Index to Projects By State Arkansas

Louisiana

New York

Dr. Don R. Roberts Elementary School................... 27

Lacoste Campus of Chalmette High School........... 45

University of Arkansas at Fort Smith Residence Hall....................................................... 61

Langston Hughes Elementary School..................... 32

Hackley School—Goodhue Memorial Hall...........................................7-8, 54-55

Van Buren High School......................................... 50

Massachusetts

Saint Jean Baptiste High School............................. 49

California

Richard B. Flynn Campus Union— Springfield College................................................ 60

Zankel Music Center— Skidmore College......................................... 6, 62-63

Michigan

Oregon

Calvin College Covenant Fine Arts Center....... 12, 57

Edy Ridge Elementary/ Laurel Ridge Middle Schools......................... 9-10, 56

Jurupa Hills High School........................................ 44 LAUSD Central Region High School No.13............ 46 Ventura High School Field House........................... 51 Connecticut Mary M. Hooker Environmental Sciences Magnet School.......................................... 12, 34-35

Post Road School.................................................. 36

Crystal M. Lange College of Health & Human Services................................ 11, 59

Texas Minnesota

Benito Juarez-Abraham Lincoln High School.......... 39

Deephaven Elementary School Media Center........ 26

Gloria Hicks Elementary School............................. 30

District of Columbia

George W. Gibbs Jr. Elementary School................. 29

Lorenzo de Zavala Special Emphasis School........... 33

Eastern High School........................................ 10, 43

Owatonna High School.............................. 10-11, 48

Stanton ISD Auditorium........................................ 64

Georgia

Nebraska

Veterans Memorial High School............................ 52

Chattahoochee Technical College— Canton Campus.................................................... 58

Bluffs Middle School............................................. 37

Utah

Druid Hills High School...................................... 8, 42

New Jersey

Helen M. Knight Elementary........................... 11, 31

Fowler Drive Elementary School............................ 28

Cresskill High School............................................. 40

Washington

Indiana

New Mexico

Ardmore Elementary School......................... 6, 24-25

George Rogers Clark Middle School...................... 38

nex+Gen Academy........................................ 5-6, 47

Deer Park High School...................................... 8, 41

Kentucky Bristow Elementary............................................... 23

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Photo by Architecture Week Photography

2011 Citation of Excellence Winner: Endeavour Elementary School Kaysville, UT VCBO Architecture

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Index to Advertisers Index to Architects Big Ass Fan Company......................................65 www.bigassfans.com 877/BIG-FANS

ATS&R Planners/Architects/Engineers.....10-11, 26, 48

Lachin Oubre & Associates, APC......................32, 45

BGR Architects Inc.................................................64

LAN Associates, Engineering, Planning, Architecture, Surveying, Inc....................................40

Creteseal............................................................67 www.creteseal.com 800/278-4278

BL Companies, Inc......................................12, 34-35

Guardian Industries Corp...............................13 www.sunguardglass.com 866/GuardSB (866/482-7374)

CDH Partners, Inc...................................................28

Little......................................................................61 BRPH.....................................................................58 MHTN Architects, Inc.......................................11, 31

Kalwall Corporation........................................20 www.kalwall.com Bruce Keller 800/258-9777

NAC|Architecture................................6, 8, 24-25, 41 Dekker/Perich/Sabatini....................................5-6, 47 Perkins+Will.......................................................8, 42 Dougherty + Dougherty Architects LLP...................51 Peter Gisolfi Associates............................. 7-8, 54-55 Dull Olson Weekes Architects........................9-10, 56 Schmidt Associates................................................38

Nana Wall Systems......................................... C4 www.nanawall 888/868-6643

EwingCole....................................................6, 62-63

Tandus Flooring............................................... C3 www.tandus.comJ John Sumlin, VP Sales Education Market 800/655-1075

Geddis Architects...................................................49

U.S. Green Building Counci........................... C2 www.centerforgreenschools.org 202/828-7422 Waste Management, Inc.................................22 www.wm.com/campus Paul Pistono, VP Public Sector Solutions 888/558-6390

Sherman Carter Barnhart Architects.......................23 Fanning Howey................................................10, 43 Symmes Maini & McKee Associates/SMMA............60 The Schemmer Associates Inc.................................37 Gignac & Associates, LLP............................30, 33, 39 TMP Architecture, Inc.......................................11, 59 GMB Architecture + Engineering......................12, 57 Wittenberg, Delony & Davidson, Inc. Architects......27 Gomez Mendez Saenz, Inc.....................................52 WLC Architects, Inc................................................44 Hight-Jackson Associates, P.A.................................50 Wold Architects and Engineers...............................29 HMC Architects.....................................................46 KG&D Architects & Engineers, PC..........................36

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(800) 278-4273 www.learningbydesign.biz

| Learning By Design FALL 2011

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Learning By Design Fall 2011