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American School Board Journal

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LEARNING BY DESIGN The premier source for education design innovation and excellence

California’s Malibu High School–Citation of Excellence Award Winner

New Heights of Excellence Learning environments make the most of green design

 AWARDS OF EXCELLENCE  TRUE COST OF GOING GREEN  RETROFITS FOR SUSTAINABILITY  GREEN TIPS AND STRATEGIES


Attention, everyone.

Open your books for today’s GREEN SCHOOLS

pop quiz:

WORD PROBLEMS

Green schools save an average of $100,000 each year. A typical school facility lasts 42 years. Over the lifetime of the building, how much will one green school save?

Hint: enough money to hire two new teachers, purchase 200 new computers, or buy 5,000 new textbooks after the first year of operation. 162

THE CENTER FOR GREEN SCHOOLS

Meet us at the center of dialogue, policy development and innovation that will bring green schools to everyone within this generation.

centerforgreenschools.org


LEARNING BY DESIGN F a ll 2 0 1 0

Green Is the New Black Education design and construction is getting greener by the minute, and LEARNING BY DESIGN is pleased to put the latest sustainable innovations and best practices at your fingertips. This debut Fall Edition—with a special focus on green design—is a direct response to reader feedback. The architects, designers, engineers, superintendents, school board members, facility planners, and others who read LEARNING BY DESIGN told us they wanted more information about green design strategies, and we’re pleased to have responded to that need. Sustainable Learning Classrooms flooded with natural light, buildings powered by solar energy, improved air quality, and using the building as an environmental teaching tool—these are just a few of the strategies that quickly are establishing a new, higher standard of education design and construction excellence. It’s an exciting time in education design and construction, especially as students—from pre-K to college—reap the benefits of enhanced learning environments. The architects and facility planners who serve on the LEARNING BY DESIGN jury agree—buildings are getting greener, the learning experience is getting richer, and the awards competition is getting more and more competitive. Congratulations to the three Grand Prize and four Citation of Excellence award recipients recognized in this issue. It’s the first time in the magazine’s nearly 20-year history that three projects have received the top award in one competition. Read more about all of the Fall 2010 award recipients, starting on page 4, as well as the can’t-miss features that immediately follow. These articles are written by experts in the education design and construction field and they answer valuable questions for LEARNING BY DESIGN readers. • What is the true cost—now and over time—of designing and building a green or LEED certified education facility? • What are the best strategies for retrofitting older schools to meet sustainability goals and improve the learning environment for students and faculty? • What resources, programs, and other guidance is available to help school districts plan and execute green building plans? Remember that you can also tap LEARNING BY DESIGN content online, and easily share, tweet, and post links. Celebration Time We’re also pleased to announce that the Spring 2011 Edition of LEARNING BY DESIGN marks the magazine’s 20th anniversary, and we’re reaching out to the nation’s leading organizations and firms in the education design and construction market to participate in a commemorative initiative. This 20th anniversary issue, published in April 2011, will feature special editorial coverage of the most innovative concepts in education design during the past 20 years and forecast what’s in store for the coming decade. Make sure your firm is a part of this one-of-a-kind issue, which among other features will include special Publisher’s Commendation and Readers’ Choice awards. Please e-mail LBD20@strattonpublishing.com to be included. We look forward to hearing from you. n

GO SURFING! Join us on Facebook facebook/LBDmagazine Follow us on Twitter twitter.com/LBDmagazine You also can access this issue as a digital edition at www.learningbydesign.biz, the magazine’s relaunched Web site. Send comments to LBD@strattonpublishing.com.

Debra J. Stratton Publisher, LEARNING BY DESIGN President, Stratton Publishing & Marketing Inc.

Anne L. Bryant Executive Publisher, LEARNING BY DESIGN Executive Director, National School Boards Association

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For the first time in LEARNING BY DESIGN’s nearly Excellence Mention 20-year history, judges have bestowed three Grand 2010 Prize awards in2010 a single design competition. These distinctively different projects each showcase innovative and sustainable strategies.

8 Citations of Excellence:

Design Innovations for Every Need

Four outstanding design projects feature cutting-edge green strategies that are having an immediate impact on the learning environment.

Features 11 The True Value of Green

Here’s the data behind the green design strategies in this issue. Take a look at how all the outstanding projects featured in this issue compare, including LEED certification plans, cost per student, and other constructed-related costs. By John C. Chadwick, AIA, RIBA

14 Energy Smart Schools Teach Everyone Lessons

The U.S. Department of Energy offers a wide range of resources, tips, and strategies to help educational facilities achieve “high-performance” status. See how your school can achieve maximum results. By Margo Appel

16 Transforming Older Schools for Sustainability

Here’s a comprehensive look at the “intelligent transformation” of existing education buildings, which includes energy conservation, smart renovations, and other sustainable strategies. By Peter Gisolfi, AIA, ASLA, LEED AP

On the cover A project of HMC Architects, Malibu High School features a new 35,000-square-foot classroom, library, and administration building strategically nestled into a coastal habitat near Zuma Beach, California. See page 36 for details.

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learning by design Volume 19/FALL 2010 Published twice annually by Stratton Publishing & Marketing Inc. in cooperation with the National School Boards Association and American School Board Journal, 1680 Duke Street, Alexandria, VA 22314-1680. Copyright Š2010, National School Boards Association. ISSN:1538-019X.

www.learningbydesign.biz For reprints or to order additional copies, visit www.learningbydesign.biz.

Publisher Debra J. Stratton, President, Stratton Publishing & Marketing Inc. 703.914.9200

Executive Publisher Anne L. Bryant, Executive Director, National School Boards Association 703.838.6772

Managing Editor Marlene L. Hendrickson mhendrickson@strattonpublishing.com

Contributing Editor Josephine Rossi

Projects 20 E  arly Childhood & Elementary Schools 31 M  iddle/Intermediate Schools 33 High Schools

Resources 1 From the Publishers 64 Index to Projects

Editorial/Production Assistant Teresa Tobat

Project Entry Manager Carrie Wood

Design Janelle Welch Renita Wade

Architectural Project Liaisons

64 Index to Architects 64 Index to Advertisers

49 Combined-Level Schools 54 Colleges/Universities 61 S pecialized Educational Facilities

Phyllis Hurdleston 717.560.6706 phyllis@strattonpublishing.com Judy Dubler 703.914.9200 ext. 32 jdubler@strattonpublishing.com Jessica Whalen 703.914.9200 ext. 32 jwhalen@strattonpublishing.com

Advertising Sales Eastern Territory: Alison Bashian 800.335.7500, ext. 21 alisonb@strattonpublishing.com Western Territory, Canada, New York: Steve Schwanz 800.440.0232 adinfo.lbd.foxrep.com

You can also read and share this issue of LEARNING BY DESIGN in its interactive, digital format! Go to www.learningbydesign.biz.

LEARNING BY DESIGN is grateful to the American Institute of Architects, the Association of Higher Education Facility Officers, the Council of Educational Facility Planners, and the National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities for their support.

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Uniquely Exceptional Design For the first time, three outstanding projects earn LEARNING BY DESIGN Grand Prize Awards—proving that sustainable strategies can work anywhere

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hree singularly unique design projects earned Grand Prize awards in this edition of LEARNING BY DESIGN. The learning environment each winning project creates in its own way defines the edges of what constitutes a truly exceptional approach to green design. The three projects—a public elementary school in Virginia, a private combined-level school in Hawaii, and a college in Michigan—are vastly different in terms of context, challenge, and end users. But if there was a single winning trait that caught the judges’ attention, it was each project’s clear commitment to advancing both green design and learning environment creation through innovations that seamlessly and authentically integrate the two. As a result, the overall impact of each winning project exceeds the sum of its parts in distinctive and thought-provoking ways. “These three projects really stand out. It would be inappropriate to judge between them because they’re addressing such different issues, different contexts,” LEARNING BY DESIGN judges commented. “They’re exceptional buildings that should be called out and can’t really be compared to one another.” MANASSAS PARK ELEMENTARY SCHOOL AND PRE-KINDERGARTEN VMDO Architects, P.C. Judging by all the project entries in this issue of LEARNING BY DESIGN, the threshold for what qualifies as cutting-edge

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Manassas Park Elementary School and Pre-Kindergarten (left and above), a project of VMDO Architects, P.C., takes full advantage of the neighboring forest to make the learning environment an “educational ecosystem,” said LEARNING BY DESIGN judges. “It’s a beautiful building.”

green design is rising. For example, most projects sought or will seek LEED Silver certification or higher. (See “The True Value of Green” on page 11.) But one project clearly melded green technology and educational goals so well that it rose to the top even without seeking third-party validation. It also shows how creatively the principles of green design can be integrated even in a public school funded through a tiny tax base. The design for Manassas Park Elementary School & Pre-K by VMDO Architects, P.C. was based on the notion that “We can’t expect people to protect and conserve something that they don’t understand.” With that in mind, the team designed a 140,463-square-foot school building for grades 3-5 and pre-K as an “educational ecosystem” that takes full advantage of the neighboring forest and a moderate local climate to integrate children with their environment practically, aesthetically, and educationally. While many projects purport to use a building as a teaching tool for environmental goals, some only manage to do that in a limited or superficial way. Not so with the Manassas Park project. “There are lots of interesting examples, but this one does it the best, even though LEED is not in the picture here,” the judges said. “It has got environmental sustainability and environmental education embedded in the design from the top to the bottom, and also in a very clear way where the students are involved with it and understand it.” The three-level school in the city of Manassas Park, VA, has

a capacity of 900 students. The learning spaces are horizontally defined as the summer house, the autumn house, the winter commons, and the spring house, with appropriate corresponding colors and way-finding schemes. The judges acknowledged the importance of the design’s breakdown into small learning communities as important for such a large and diverse student population. Vertically, the learning spaces conjure associations with the tall trees that form a fourth wall to the learning courtyards just outside the generous windows, from the “understory” to the “canopy.” Details such as a sophisticated color scheme and thoughtful placement of wood and full-length mirrors enhance the notion of being in a forest. The judges were impressed by how the project team made the forest theme work in a way that has a lot of credibility and appeals to children’s natural curiosity. “Even the tree analogy; we’re not seeing a literal tree somewhere, which would be kind of the pedantic way to do it. It’s really more of an organizing principle,” said the judges. “It’s making something that is appropriate and attuned to children without doing it in a literal or unsophisticated way.” The school’s geothermal ventilation system is programmed to allow natural ventilation whenever possible. When the building is in natural ventilation mode, green lights signal the students to open the windows, making them active participants in conservation efforts. The judges also were impressed by the beauty and functionality of outdoor instructional space, including courtyards, an amphitheater, and a stormwater retention pond. The pond is designed in such a way that it never fills entirely, thus reducing hazards and the need for safety barriers. Intensive signage includes maps and educational diagrams, rather than simply labels, and the pond remains accessible after school and on weekends. “It has the best stormwater management system we’ve ever seen,” they said. HAWAII PREPARATORY ACADEMY ENERGY LABORATORY Flansburgh Architects The new Energy Laboratory designed by Flansburgh Architects www.learningbydesign.biz | L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n F A L L 2 0 1 0

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A project of Flansburgh Architects, Hawaii Preparatory Academy Energy Laboratory (left and above) is a zero-net-energy, fully sustainable building powered by alternative means. The project seeks LEED Platinum certification.

for Hawaii Preparatory Academy in Kamuela, HI, is a freestanding high school science building that also is a living laboratory for environmentally conscious, sustainable living systems. The product of an unusual partnership that included the science faculty and a forward-thinking donor who founded a German alternative energy corporation, the Energy Lab functions as a zero-net-energy, fully sustainable building powered principally by alternative means. The project includes a number of building systems that employ sun, water, and wind, and is in the process of applying both for LEED Platinum certification and the even more demanding Living Building Challenge designation. Despite its high cost of $445 per square foot—and, no doubt, partly because of it—the slight 9,000-square-foot building manages to break new ground in ways that future designers likely will want to study, the judges said. Students are surrounded by the very systems they are studying. “The building itself is a lab for learning how to do buildings with zero impact. The program of the building is an energy-learning program, so it is about what it is. Everything is embedded together,” the judges noted. The standalone lab also features architecture that the judges deemed “extraordinarily beautiful,” with natural materials brought together in a way that is elegant and which complements the program it embodies. The judges commented on the detailing, such as the warmth of the wood, and the fact that the building is scaled appropriately for students. Despite being “high-tech,” the building does not seem out of place in its natu6

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ral environment. “It’s sculptural, really. It grows from the site. It looks like it belongs in Hawaii,” they commented. That the Energy Lab was constructed to accommodate a variety of instructional needs also is noteworthy. It was developed as a reflection of the science curriculum it houses, progressing from smaller project rooms to a large research center to a laboratory. The spaces are designed to encourage student discovery, and experimentation, both indoors and out. “It’s hands-on learning, it’s project-based learning, it’s interdisciplinary, and it’s teaching what the building is about at the same time, so it’s really nicely integrated and beautiful,” judges said. The building’s donor reportedly believes that generational education is the key to establishing and improving patterns of sustainability. In this innovative design, the project team has managed to set a powerful example of that principle at work. “It’s exquisite. Every piece of it is beautifully handled. It goes together beautifully,” said the judges. “It’s not replicable quite yet, but it’s a jewel. It’s showing us an interesting direction for the future educationally as well as in terms of design.” CENTRAL MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND HUMAN SERVICES SHW Group Central Michigan University’s new College of Education takes an overall integrated approach to sustainable design in a landmark building that combines the teaching of young children with the training of teachers. The four-story building, seeking LEED Gold certification, accommodates an education program, early childhood development center, human development clinic, reading clinic, classrooms, and laboratory space. The judges were impressed by how SHW Group combined an array of sustainable materials and elements for the 136,255-square-foot building in ways that are striking as well as functional. “I really like it as a collage of building elements. The colors, the finishes, the contrast between the different pieces of it, and the changes in scale,” said one of the judges. Exterior walls consist of terra-cotta pressure-equalized rain-screen cladding, glass curtain wall, and metal panels. Accents of slate


CENTRAL MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND HUMAN SERVICES Mt. Pleasant, MI

walls echo the tradition of chalk boards in education. Insulated low-E coated and other high-performance glazing is used in all punched windows and curtain walls. Clerestory windows are used above primary circulation spaces to optimize natural light. The judges took notice of how well the building meets the needs of college-age students as well as pre-kindergartners. In the pre-K classrooms, for example, the project team managed to bring the scale closer to the ground for the sake of small children while preserving the benefits of high lighting. “They managed quite successfully to integrate the low scale of the pre-K with the overall massing of the building,” one judge said. “I’m sure the pre-K students don’t really understand they’re in a much larger building, because they’re in their own piece of it.” Meanwhile, the college part of the building has many features the judges said they look for in college buildings. The classrooms are technology-rich and versatile to allow different types of layout. The building offers wired and wireless network access, visual presentation, distance learning, collaboration, media capture, streaming, and digital archiving of many class activities. Architecturally, there’s a great deal of transparency throughout the building, making the spaces seem open and inviting. The design includes narrow atriums that allow diagonal views from floor to floor. A large atrium connects the building’s three main sections, serving as an overall orientation space for the building. The judges also liked the building’s large lecture hall. The judges acknowledged the presence of many informal meeting spaces throughout the college portion of the building, which they called “delightful.” Such non-classroom meeting places continue to gain importance in school design with the advent of wireless technology. “You can sit down, you can study, you can meet with friends and have a group study,” they said. “This building is all about the people that use it,” the judges said. “The students are integrated and it’s all in one building and it matches the scale of both” age groups. n

The College of Education and Human Services at Central Michigan University (top and above), a project of SHW Group, features technology-rich and versatile classrooms that meet the needs of college-age students as well as pre-kindergartners.

GRAND PRIZE AWARDS FALL 2010 Early Childhood/Elementary Schools

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• VMDO Architects, P.C. for Manassas Park Elementary School and Pre-Kindergarten . . . . . . . . .24

Combined-Level Schools

• Flansburgh Architects for Hawaii Preparatory Academy Energy Laboratory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52

Colleges & Universities

• SHW Group for Central Michigan University College of Education and Human Services . . . . . . . . 54

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Design Innovations for Every Need From circulation details to skillful use of natural light, four exemplary projects maximize sustainable strategies and earn Citations of Excellence

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he diversity of this year’s LEARNING BY DESIGN Citation of Excellence winners speaks to the adaptability of design innovation and best practices. An elementary school in Washington state can now set the standard in educational facility construction for using recycled building materials. A college classroom building in Iowa not only supports a strategically integrated curriculum, it also features a rainwater harvest system, semi-intensive vegetative roof, photovoltaic panels, and a smart building energy management system. And while the outstanding projects featured in this new Fall edition of LEARNING BY DESIGN help set a new standard for green design excellence, four projects rose to the top and earned Citations of Excellence.

EASTGATE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL NAC|Architecture “This is a really beautiful building.” So said the LEARNING BY DESIGN judges after reviewing the project submission for Eastgate Elementary School in Bellevue, WA. To walk through the school is to have an indoor-outdoor experience. Organized as a series of small pavilions around a series of courtyards, the building is connected to nature through views and landscaped courts, allowing a gradual revelation of the shifting relationship between interior and exterior learnEASTGATE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Bellevue, WA

ing spaces. “There are really great views inside and out into the natural environment, and the courtyard isn’t just one open area that’s called an outdoor classroom. It’s actually broken down into smaller areas that are much more convincing,” said judges. “They spent a lot of time with how you circulate between the different pavilions and making sure that the space between the buildings is really positive and usable.” The new school, which serves 500 students in kindergarten through fifth grade, is a pioneer in its district for emphasizing sustainability. Ground-source heat exchange wells connected with heat pumps, a highly insulated envelope, and extensive daylighting combine to create a very efficient building that does not burn fossil fuels onsite. Recycled-content exterior siding and natural interior materials permeate the 63,500-square-foot building. The judges were impressed by how NAC|Architecture combined the recycled and natural materials. “It’s a sort of a novel assembly of materials that is intriguing and inviting and warm and scaled right for kids,” they said. The judges also commented on the obvious care with which the core learning areas were designed, an aspect of school building design that often gets too little attention. “The classrooms themselves are really remarkable. They’re good, large, multifunctional classrooms with space for books and sinks and storage and everything, but they also have beautiful windows, including a corner window right where the teacher’s desk is,” said judges. “You almost never see that, but it is really thoughtful in terms of the environment that’s created for teaching and learning.” Thoughtful, too, is the way in which the interiors have been tailored to appeal to kids without overdoing it. Primary colors are used judiciously, such as a single red wall in one classroom and a blue wall in another. The furniture is child-sized without being too funky. Overall, the building’s interior “appeals to the children, but with a very sophisticated vocabulary,” the judges commented. “It’s not talking down to the kids.” MALIBU HIGH SCHOOL EXPANSION HMC Architects Malibu High School, situated on a hillside one-quarter mile from Zuma Beach and the Pacific Coast Highway, offers sweeping views of the Pacific Ocean and the Santa Monica Mountains. HMC Architects is seeking to make the school’s new 35,000-square-foot classroom, library, and administration

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CITATION OF EXCELLENCE AWARDS FALL 2010 Early Childhood/Elementary Schools

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• NAC|Architecture for Eastgate Elementary School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

High Schools

• Van H. Gilbert Architect PC and Fanning Howey Associates Inc. for V. Sue Cleveland High School . . 45 • HMC Architects for Malibu High School Expansion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

Colleges & Universities MALIBU HIGH SCHOOL EXPANSION Malibu, CA

building into an “iconic gateway” to the campus that is worthy of those surroundings, both aesthetically and in terms of its environmental impact. Judges agreed: The building/renovation, currently underway, is up to the challenge. “It has got some really innovative things in terms of sustainability,” commented the judges. “But it’s also taking a campus of older buildings and giving it a new face.” The existing school is located in an environmentally sensitive area. Protecting the fragile coastal habitat has been a guiding factor in designing the new building, which is scheduled for completion in 2012. To that end, vegetative green roofs will provide outdoor learning spaces while improving building performance. Strategically placed skylights and floor-to-ceiling glazing will provide an abundance of natural daylight and minimize energy consumption. Recycled aluminum panels will shield the building from the western sun, preserve views, and invite daylight into classrooms. The primary mechanical system will encompass radi-

• RDG Planning & Design for The Roe Center at Central College . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58

ant heating and natural ventilation for cooling. The design also involves wind turbines, cool roofs, cisterns, and biofiltration. The judges liked the way the project connects students and faculty with their environment visually and physically. “It’s all green roofs cascading down with the topography,” they said. While many LEARNING BY DESIGN award entries included green roofs that students can view through a window, the Malibu High School project goes a step further, with access to the verdant roof via an upper-story science lab as well as an outside stair. “It’s taking green roofs, which started out as just a little sort of gesture, maybe, and now we’re seeing them cover more area, more integrated into the design, not an afterthought, and actually more integrated into the educational program,” judges said. By placing the new building close to the street rather than in larger open areas, the architects have chosen an intelligent urban solution to the site’s environmental limitations while making a dramatic statement. “It essentially reinvents the school because it gives a completely new image,” judges added.

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V. SUE CLEVELAND HIGH SCHOOL Van H. Gilbert Architect PC and Fanning Howey Associates Inc. The Rio Rancho Public Schools, together with Van H. Gilbert Architect PC and Fanning Howey Associates Inc., set out to design a new building for V. Sue Cleveland High School that would allow each of the high school’s six learning academies to sustain its own identity while promoting overall unity and a sense of community. After a highly interactive planning process that culminated in a twoday intensive visioning session, the result was a high school campus that manages to strike that balance through a very interesting site plan, while also taking advantage of the latest trends in sustainability and technology. Cleveland High School can accommodate up to 2,350 students and has a combined footprint of 419,000 square feet. The layout consists of a series of connected “schools within a school,” which include academies for liberal arts, design, arts, science and health, environmental studies, and international studies. Each academy is self-contained with its own administrative and guidance areas, restrooms, teacher planning areas, common areas, lockers, and computer labs. An expansive, secured outdoor plaza, or “main street,” runs alongside the academies and links them to shared-use areas, including a media center, blackbox theater, and stunning professional-quality concert hall. The judges commended the project team on the innovative plan, which manages to scale down the sizable high THE ROE CENTER AT CENTRAL COLLEGE school. “It’s a very large school, but Pella, IA unlike some other ones we’ve seen, it really breaks it down,” said judges. “This doesn’t look like that big a school when you actually look at the plan. Then it has this wonderful outside main street that connects them all together.” Architecturally, the external elevations are fairly simple, but nicely done, while the entire hilltop campus is oriented to take advantage of the views of a nearby mountain range. “It really integrates the natural landscape,” said the judges. Inside the high school, the judges commented on the abundance of windows; the mix of casual learning environments as well as versatile, tech10

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nology-rich classrooms; and a regionally appropriate vocabulary of neutral colors. “There’s a lot of transparency between spaces,” they added. “We don’t usually see this much glass.” Among the school’s environmentally friendly features are its use of ground-source heat pumps, natural lighting, low-maintenance materials, and heat-reflecting roof materials. The judges also were impressed that students helped out with the submittal process for LEED Gold certification. “One of the things you can do to get LEED points for the school is use the building as a teaching tool, and to have the students actually help to get the certification is really carrying that to the next step,” said judges. “Overall, this project is pretty exemplary,” judges added. “An interesting high school.” THE ROE CENTER AT CENTRAL COLLEGE RDG Planning & Design The project challenge for Central College and RDG Planning & Design was to create a dynamic learning environment for three college departments sharing the same space for the first time. The goal was to optimize opportunities for collaboration among the education, psychology, and community-based learning students, faculty, and community partners. At the same time, the project team set a high bar for green building design by seeking LEED Platinum certification The result is the naturally lit, highly transparent Education/ Psychology Classroom Building, which offers flexible, technologyrich classrooms designed around a multistory central space that is as unusual as it is inviting. The central area includes a light-filled, ground-floor seating area surrounded by a screen of narrowly spaced, floor-to-ceiling carved wood slats. The eye-catching lobby “cone” is visible to students on all floors as they climb stairs or cross through on their way to class. “The main staircase is in it, so it’s designed to bring people together at one point. You can sit casually inside the cone or outside it, but it is a focal point,” judges commented. The 57,000-square-foot Education/Psychology building is the first to break the traditional western boundary of the Central College campus. It incorporates many cutting-edge sustainable strategies, including a rainwater harvest system, semi-intensive vegetative roof, native landscape site design, photovoltaic panels, and a smart building energy management system. More than 40 percent of the materials used for construction were regional and more than 30 percent were of recycled content. Eighty percent of construction and demolition debris was diverted from the landfill. “This project is just very nicely done,” judges said. “The classrooms were exceptional, the idea of bringing these different departments together and expressing that with the architecture by having this nexus space, and the nexus space is actually really different from what we’d typically see, and very nice.” n


thetruevalueof

green

The data behind LEARNING BY DESIGN’s outstanding design projects confirms— sustainable strategies are the way of the future By John C. Chadwick, AIA, RIBA

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here’s never been a time quite like this in the education design and construction field, and the outstanding projects showcased in this issue of LEARNING BY DESIGN are a testament to that. For the first time in the magazine’s nearly 20-year history, judges have awarded three Grand Prizes in a single competition, and each of those projects—ranging from pre-K to university—are sustainability standouts. The education design and construction tide is

turning, it seems. Not only are green design strategies setting new and higher benchmarks for excellence, they’re becoming the norm. Imagine the benefits reaped by the nation’s students, educators, and communities when schools, colleges, and universities reach new heights of excellence—by default. But this high tide of excellence in education design and construction is not without a steep learning curve. Architects, engineers, facility planners, educators—all who participate in the design and construction of the nation’s

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Green Data and Analysis Three basic metrics for each LEARNING BY DESIGN project in this issue were calculated from the information provided in the submissions: cost per square foot, per student, and square feet per student. To allow for fair comparisons between projects, dollar costs were normalized for time to April 1, 2010, and for location to Washington, DC, using the Marshall and Swift quarterly Current and Comparative Cost Multipliers. KEY: Non-LEED LEED Silver LEED Gold LEED Platinum

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ever, that the analysis presented here is a debut installment, and that data from these 37 projects by itself is a start to what can become a more meaningful analysis over time. The data, however, does generally support findings from previous studies on the cost of sustainability. See the charts on these pages, and note that the data has been normalized to allow for fair comparisons.

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learning environments—need the latest best practices, strategies, and resources to continue on this path of excellence. To meet the increasing need in the education design and construction field for green design information and data, LEARNING BY DESIGN presents this exclusive analysis of all the outstanding 12

projects in this Fall 2010 Edition. The goal of this number-crunching exercise is twofold: To compare and analyze the data submitted with each project to assess the cost of sustainable design; and to launch a valuable database for comparison and analysis of the cost, area, and sustainability of future submissions. It is important to note, how-

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Strategies at Work The Leadership in Enery and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating System managed by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) currently is the most widely recognized and adopted third-party certification program for sustainable building performance in the United States. Sixteen of the 37 projects showcased in this issue of LEARNING BY DESIGN already are LEED certified or are seeking LEED certification at the Silver, Gold, or Platinum level. No projects have received or are seeking certification at the minimum Certified level, and of those projects not pursuing certification it’s likely that many would score points under the LEED rating system. It should be noted that LEED is not the only rating system for sustainable building performance used in the United States. Others include Green Globes Design and the Collaborative for High Performance Schools (CHPS), under which schools can self-certify or seek third-party verification. One notable project submitted for this issue, the Hawaii Preparatory Academy Energy Laboratory, is not only targeting LEED Platinum but is also expected to be certified as one of the first projects to meet the even more rigorous standards of the Living Building Challenge, which requires a minimum of 12 months’ occupancy before the certification process can start. The International Building Institute’s (ILBI) Living Building Challenge program poses the question: “What if every single act of design and construction made the world a better place?” The program was initially launched and is still operated in the United States and Canada by the Cascadia Region Green Building Council, which is a chapter of both the U.S. Green Building Council and the Canada Green Building Council. The Living Building Challenge is a cohesive standard that draws upon the most progressive thinking on sustainability in the fields of architecture, engineering, planning, landscape design, and policy. It comprises seven areas of performance: site, water, energy, health, materials, equity, and beauty. Projects meeting the Living Building


Challenge must have net-zero impact on and actually improve the environment. Building the Data Though it can be challenging to produce meaningful analysis from a small and varied sample of projects, as the database builds with future issues of LEARNING BY DESIGN the analysis will become more meaningful. It is, however, possible to make some useful observations from this sample: • Though the Advanced Energy Laboratory at the private combined-level school in Hawaii seeking to meet the Living Building Challenge has the highest construction cost of all the projects submitted, the donor and the entire owner/design/construction team have clearly raised the bar for sustainability and integrated the design with the curriculum to an exceptional degree. • While the Advanced Energy Laboratory has both the highest cost per square foot and the highest cost per student, the area per student is quite reasonable compared to some of the other projects, perhaps reflecting a sustainable goal not yet covered by the LEED rating system: building less, and using what is built more efficiently. • That there are no LEED Platinum K-12 projects in this sample may imply a perception that Platinum is too costly and challenging for K-12 facilities, although the two

LEARNING BY DESIGN Fall 2010 Outstanding Projects Projects by Category Pre-K: 1 Elementary, Middle: 1 Middle: 1 Pre-K: 1 Elementary, Middle,Middle: High: 12 Middle: 1 College/University: 4 Middle, High: 2 Pre-K, Elementary: 3 College/University: 4 Pre-K, Elementary: 36 Elementary: Elementary: 6 Other: 8 Other: 8 High: High: 10 10

Projects by LEED Category LEED Certified: 0 LEED Platinum + Challenge: 1 Certified: LEED LEED Platinum: 20 Platinum + Challenge: 1 LEED LEED Silver: 4 LEED Platinum: 2 LEED LEED Gold:Silver: 9 4 Non-LEED: 20 9 LEED Gold: Non-LEED: 20

Square Feet Per Student Here is a look at all the LEARNING BY DESIGN projects in this issue as they pertain to square feet per student. 0

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Platinum college and university projects appear to have been constructed for quite reasonable costs. • Excluding the schools with highest and lowest costs, the per square foot construction costs for the pre-K to elementary schools in this sample range from $137 to $292 with a median of $210; the three LEED Gold pre-K and elementary projects are at the low, middle, and top. • Excluding the schools with highest and lowest costs, the per-square-foot construction costs for the middle and high schools range from $122 to $274 with a median of $185; the two LEED Silver middle and high schools are at the low and middle of this range, while the three LEED Gold projects are at the middle and top. • That the above construction costs are higher for the pre-K to elementary schools than the middle and high schools indicates the limitations of this sample since costs are normally higher for high schools than elementary schools. • Excluding the schools with highest and lowest costs, the per student construction costs for the pre-K to elementary schools in this sample range from $19,287 to $37,074 with a median of $30,575. • Excluding the schools with highest and lowest costs, the per student construction costs for the middle and high schools in this sample range from $20,155 to $58,392 with a median of $29,498. • Excluding the schools with highest and lowest costs, the area per student for the

pre-K to elementary schools in this sample ranges from 100 to 156 square feet with a median of 127 square feet. • Excluding the schools with highest and lowest costs, the area per student for the high schools ranges from 120 to 260 square feet with a median of 187 square feet. Reading the Results Previous studies indicate that there is no statistically significant difference between average construction costs for LEED-seeking and non-LEED projects of similar program types, and that most owners are able to achieve LEED certification at their desired level within available funds. The studies also suggest that the following factors are essential in controlling the costs of projects with sustainable design goals: • Sustainability must not be considered an optional add-on to projects. • The client must be committed to a sustainable solution from the outset. • The program and brief must include goals for sustainability. • There must be an integrated design process in which all members of the client, design, and construction teams are thoroughly committed to sustainable goals. n John C. Chadwick, AIA, RIBA, is sector leader for K-12 and higher education at Davis Langdon, Washington, DC. Reach him at jchadwick@davislangdon.us. Jennifer Crawford, research associate with Davis Langdon, contributed to this article.

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energy smart schools

By Margo Appel

teach everyone lessons

“W

e shape our buildings,” Winston Churchill once said. “Thereafter, they shape us.” Every day, environmentally focused, energy-efficient school buildings are shaping students into wise stewards of our resources.

Some of the lessons the buildings impart are “in your face.” Every time students at Desert Edge High School in Goodyear, AZ, walk by the school’s interactive “green touchscreen,” they can’t miss the showcase of the building’s green features. Some of the lessons are more subtle: Students at Northern Guilford Middle School in Greensboro, NC, read their assignments under optimal lighting, courtesy of a daylighting design that uses south-facing clerestories with revolutionary curved, interior, translucent light shelves. Schools and universities that do more than just talk about geothermal ground-source heat pumps, photovoltaics, and wetland ecosystems—schools that actually incorporate these features—enable students to connect the dots between science class and real life.

Everyone Can Start Somewhere Creating these sorts of living laboratories may seem far beyond the reach of many school districts. While a small percentage of the country’s 13,900 public K–12 school districts are planning right now to construct high-performance schools, for example, others are having trouble just keeping up with rising utility bills. And that’s not surprising because energy costs represent a school district’s second-largest expense. 14

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Interestingly, however, energy costs are one of the few areas where schools can save money without sacrificing quality. Nearly one-third of the energy consumed in the average U.S. school is wasted. The country’s least efficient schools use four times more energy per square foot than its most efficient schools. An energy-efficient school district with 4,000 students can save as much as $160,000 a year in energy costs. Over 10 years, those savings can reach $1.6 million. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Building Technology Program aims to help schools become, or get closer to becoming, high-performance schools—those that improve the learning environment as they achieve maximum energy performance. The program promotes a 30 percent reduction of energy use in existing buildings and a 50 percent reduction over the ASHRAE 90.1-1999 energy code for new buildings and major renovations. Enough Green To Go Green While energy efficiency can mean long-term savings for schools, financial concerns frequently stand in the way of high-performance upgrades. With improved technologies and practices, however, a well-planned high-performance building may cost little more than a traditional building. And sometimes it may not cost any more. Many of today’s schools enjoy fast paybacks—in the range of


A Wealth of Help

The Building Technologies Program has created tools and training materials for school planning, financing, designing, operations and maintenance, and energy education. They are consolidated on the EnergySmart Schools Solutions CD, available free of charge. The CD includes everything a school district needs to get started on energy savings. Information also can be downloaded at www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/energysmartschools/index.html.

five to eight years—as well as ongoing life-cycle returns on their energy-efficiency investments. All school construction projects—high-performance or otherwise—have to clear a few hurdles to obtain financing. Securing the best financial arrangement is critical. Here are several creative ways to finance high-performance school construction or energyefficiency improvements to existing schools. • Internal financing. Schools use their own operating or capital funds to finance smaller, short-term projects with short payback periods. This method enables projects to get under way quickly; schools retain all energy cost savings. • Revolving investment funds. Schools use their own money to finance energy-efficiency projects and put savings from decreased energy costs into a revolving fund. This money can be used to finance other energy-saving projects. • Debt financing. Bank loans generally finance small, shorterterm energy-efficiency improvements. For bigger projects, many districts issue a general obligation bond. These bonds often are tax-exempt, which lowers their cost. • Lease or lease-purchase agreements. Schools secure equipment or energy-efficiency improvements from private vendors, who are repaid over the term of the lease from the resultant savings. Schools pay no upfront costs, and equipment can be purchased at the end of the lease for a prenegotiated price. • Energy-saving performance contracts. Schools use these contracts to upgrade equipment and to improve the energy performance of existing facilities. School districts and energy services companies contractually agree on a payback period and annual savings. Energy savings above the contractual figure go to the district. Most contracts result in a positive cash flow for the school district annually. • State programs. State grants and low-interest loans are available

for schools interested in making energy-efficiency upgrades. The Database of State Incentives for Renewables & Efficiency (www.dsireusa.org) provides information about these initiatives on a state-by-state basis. • Utilities. Local utilities may offer reduced-interest loans or rebates for energy-efficient projects or features. Utilities also may offer technical assistance to help schools identify and evaluate potential projects. • Supplemental environmental projects. Companies that are not in compliance with federal environmental regulations fund these energy-efficient projects in lieu of paying fines. • Public benefit funds. In states where electric utility customers must pay a public benefit fund fee with their monthly bill, utilities or state-administered programs use the funds for energyefficient projects, including school construction. Results Versus Investment Many schools conduct a life-cycle cost analysis to determine whether a specific project—from a boiler to a building—is worth the initial investment. This accounting method determines the total costs associated with an upgrade over its lifetime, including: purchase or construction costs; fuel costs; operation, maintenance, and repair costs; replacement costs; resale or disposal costs; loan interest payments; and nonmonetary benefits. Life-cycle cost can be calculated by a number of software programs, including free Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Programs from the Federal Energy Management Program (www.eere. energy.gov/femp). Documenting expected life-cycle cost savings can strengthen a district’s case to taxpayers, state officials, and financial institutions. n Margo Appel is with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building Technologies Program. Reach her at margo.appel@hq.doe.gov.

Technology Trendsetters These schools have created healthy and comfortable environments by combining the best of today’s design strategies and building technologies. Alder Creek Middle School—Located in a rural area that experiences extreme temperatures, this Truckee, CA, school is built on a sloped site to maximize the earth’s thermal insulation properties. Geothermal ground-source

heat pumps use 58 percent less energy than a typical boiler/ chiller system. Construction was funded with a $31 million bond, but the school system received other financing, including a $250,000 demonstration grant from the California Energy Commission, a $60,000 public utility grant for the geothermal system, and a $10,000 A-Plus for Energy grant from BP. Local residents and busi-

nesses chipped in $9,000 for a photovoltaic system. Whitman-Hanson Regional High School—This Whitman, MA, school saves $100,000 in energy costs annually. An HVAC system that adjusts automatically to changes in occupancy level is among the many energy-efficient features that were incorporated. A solar array on the gymnasium roof provides supplemental energy during peak

demand. Designers also incorporated a “cool roof” with a white PVC membrane that reduces energy needed for cooling. The Massachusetts Technology Collaborative provided $650,000 in design and technology grants, and a utility company provided design assistance and energy delivery technology and comprehensive design assistance incentives totaling more than $370,000.

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Older Schools Transforming

By Peter Gisolfi, AIA, ASLA, LEED AP

for Sustainability

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In a discussion of transformation and sustainability, the first question is this: How is sustainable design different from energy conservation? We already know what needs to be done to save energy in our older school buildings, but how is this different from what we now mean by sustainable practice?

nergy conservation was an important topic of conversation in the late 1970s, during the Carter administration, when the price of oil rose precipitously. Typically, schools would replace old, single-glazed windows with new ones that were double-glazed, or they would replace roofs, adding significant amounts of insulation. Some schools replaced older boiler plants with new, more efficient boilers or dual-fuel boilers, which burned both gas and oil. Basically, public schools picked “the low-hanging fruit.” In so doing, they probably succeeded in reducing energy consumption by 15 to 30 percent. Sustainable practice addresses larger issues. It is based on the premise that the designed environment (buildings and landscapes) should have the least possible negative impact on the natural environment while taking the greatest advantage of what nature—that is, the local environment—offers. Sustainable practice applies to outdoor space as well. Do the building and its other impervious surfaces overload the storm sewers? Is there too much runoff? Is there adequate shade on the sunny side of the building or in other places that need it? Do the building and its asphalt parking lots create a heat island that adversely affects the neighborhood? Energy conservation has advanced substantially beyond the practices of the 1970s and 1980s. Employing appropriate sustainable strategies—even in older, existing buildings—can reduce energy consumption by as much as 50 percent.

Intelligent Transformation Existing education buildings change con16

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stantly. They change when additions are made, and they change when renovations become necessary. Whenever a change of either type is imminent, it is common practice to determine the functional needs and space requirements for the future based on demographic information and pedagogical intentions. Sustainable objectives might include intentions such as reducing energy consumption by 50 percent, generating 30 percent of the energy used by the building from green sources, and improving indoor air quality. Intelligent transformation creates something new and different from what was there previously. At the same time, it can preserve and enhance the most valuable aspects of an older building. Essential Strategies It is easy to embrace a sustainable, holistic approach in the design of a new building. But how can an existing building reduce its negative impact on the natural environment? The most obvious answer is that the building can use significantly less energy. But that’s just the beginning. Our purpose is to understand the basic strategies that can be employed to achieve significant sustainable results. The site of an existing building is a given, but it can be significantly improved. Simply coming up to current code practice with regard to stormwater runoff would be a major improvement for the surrounding environment. Biofiltration (the use of planting material to filter and purify runoff) is not required in all municipalities but would be a significant contribution to overall environmental quality.


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School buildings are commonly surrounded by vast heat islands of asphalt parking lots. These areas can be shaded by trees, which can increase comfort on the site and produce oxygen. Vegetation can be used intelligently for wind breaks and shading, where appropriate. The vegetation selected for all of these purposes should be native species that do not require irrigation and are self-sustaining. If the building and its site increase the production of oxygen and reduce the production of carbon dioxide, the result is a substantial reduction in the negative impact on the natural environment. Water is a precious resource, especially in some parts of the country, and it can be used much more intelligently than in the past. Rainwater can be harvested for building and site use. The profligate use of irrigation on the site can be addressed with environmentally appropriate plant material and by using greywater (wastewater generated from domestic activities, such as laundry, dishwashing, and bathing that can be recycled on site), rainwater, or even groundwater instead of municipal drinking water for necessary irrigation. The exterior building envelope, or building shell, is the assembly of systems and materials through which the building interacts with the exterior environment.

Today, there are techniques for improving the performance of the building envelope. In a poorly insulated building, heat is transferred in from sunshine and hot air in warmer seasons, and heat is transferred out in colder seasons. A significant portion of the building’s energy is lost through leaky window systems. At the same time, it is common to find older buildings constructed of heavy masonry with high thermal mass, which means they change temperatures very slowly. This is a valuable asset in conserving energy, especially during the warm season. Indoor Environmental Quality Indoor environmental quality depends on intelligent use of the benefits offered by the natural environment. These benefits include fresh air, daylight and sunshine, and temperature control. Fresh air depends on adequate ventilation and operable windows. Contrary to the practices of the 1970s, sustainable design provides the maximum amount of fresh air possible to the building and its users. Oddly enough, most school buildings are used only 40 or 50 hours in a week, which contains 168 hours. Obviously, ventilation systems have to be controlled in a way to maximize ventila-

tion in each occupied space and allow the building to hibernate at other times. Unfortunately, many ventilation systems do not operate effectively, or they may have been eliminated as part of past energy conservation strategies. These systems should be upgraded with mechanical system improvements, and they should be controlled effectively. Many older buildings feature large window openings, which provide ample daylight and sunshine. These openings should be preserved and not covered with insulating panels, as was the habit in the 1970s and 1980s. Fortunately, the quality of fenestration and glazing has changed dramatically. Today, buildings do not have to lose as much energy through the windows; instead, double- or even triple-glazed windows, thermally broken windows, and coated glazing can be used. There are other techniques, such as insulating blinds, for further reducing heat transfer through these openings. Effective temperature control is essential for indoor environmental quality and is often lacking. The new, digital generation of temperature control devices offers intriguing possibilities for the future, but often these devices and systems are complicated and unreliable.

It’s simple addition and subtraction. Add Big Ass Fans to your school and . . .  Subtract high energy bills from the equation by improving the yearround efficiency of HVAC systems  Reduce missed school days by improving indoor air quality  Lower standard effective temperature by 10-20 degrees in the summer  Decrease stratification in the winter by pushing warm air to the floor How many problems can you solve by adding a Big Ass Fan to your school? Visit www.BigAssFans.com or call 877-BIG FANS (244-3267) to learn more.

May be covered by one or more of the following U.S. Patents: 6,244,821; 6,589,016; 6,817,835; 6,939,108; 7,252,478; 7,284,960; D587,799; D607,988 and other patents pending. © 2010 Delta T Corporation dba The Big Ass Fan Company. All rights reserved.

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Material Choices and Reuse Most older buildings were constructed with nontoxic materials, especially if the asbestos has already been eliminated. It has been common practice to add toxic materials on a regular basis, such as vinyl flooring, nylon carpeting, and a variety of paints. These more recently added materials can be eliminated, and green substitutes can be installed. A major advantage of renovation, expansion, and transformation is that older buildings and all of their materials continue to be used. We can save all of the energy that might be used to demolish an existing building, dispose of all of its materials, and construct a new building using new materials. Many older buildings can be sufficiently upgraded to be equal in all ways to newly constructed buildings. In fact, many institutions, particularly schools, can appreciate the historical continuity of using and reusing buildings from generation to generation. Basically, transforming and expanding existing buildings is an inherently sustainable approach. Mechanical Systems and Controls Mechanical systems typically include heating, ventilating, and cooling a building. The most complicated aspects of these systems are the control mechanisms that run them. The control systems must operate a large building in a manner that saves energy and ensures that the building hibernates effectively or “sleeps” when it is not occupied. Many school buildings are occupied only about 50 percent of the days of the year (180 out of 365). On the days they are open, they may be used only about 42 percent of the time (10 hours per day). If you combine those calculations, a typical school building might be occupied only about 21 percent of the time in any given year. The challenge is to understand how these buildings operate when they are not occupied, and to understand how we might occupy them more efficiently. Daylight and Electric Lighting Ideally, if there is sufficient daylight, we should leave the lights off. However, many teachers will turn on the lights when they enter the classroom, and will leave them on all day. Two strategies to minimize this energy waste are possible. The first is to switch the lights so two or three levels of lighting can be achieved and, at the same time, to switch the lights so the fixtures closer to the windows are controlled separately from those that are farther away. Teachers and students would then have to embrace using only the necessary lights. The second strategy is an automatic

The 1903 Goodhue Hall at the Hackley School in Tarrytown, NY, has been transformed after a devastating fire. The building, which has doubled in size, contains the upper/middle school library as well as classrooms, laboratories, and faculty offices. Most of the historic exterior has been restored. It is well insulated, the windows are double-glazed, and the early 20th-century heating system has been replaced with a geothermal heating and cooling system, which uses less than half the energy of a new code-compliant building. The building will be LEED Gold certified.

switching or dimming system, controlled by light sensors responsive to sunlight. The advantage of such a system is obvious, but the disadvantage is that these systems are costly to install and are likely to cease working once the building’s occupants have tampered with them. A simple switch that turns the lights off when the room is unoccupied can be applied to either option. This application has become standard practice. Onsite Energy Sources Green energy sources, such as geothermal heating and cooling systems, windmills, and photovoltaic panels that convert solar radiation to electricity, are now readily available. In many localities, these energy sources are subsidized by government agencies and are quite affordable. These green energy sources are part of an emerging industry that will provide us with extraordinary opportunities for sustainable practice in the future. Even now, it is becoming common practice to install geothermal heating and cooling systems in renovated buildings that require cooling all summer. These systems, which are actually ground-coupled heat pumps or groundwater-coupled heat pumps, tap into the constant temperatures below the earth’s surface, making it possible to transfer the earth’s heat to the building in winter, and transfer the building’s heat to the ground in summer. Another strategy is to take advantage of vast areas of flat roofs that are common on school buildings. These can be covered with an array of photovoltaic panels to capture the sun’s energy and simultaneously shade the roof. Similarly, parking lots can be covered with trellises made of photovoltaic panels to provide shade for parked cars and, simultaneously, generate electricity.

Final Thoughts As school buildings are modified and evolve, the sustainable aspects of the buildings and sites require upgrades as well. The techniques for heating and cooling buildings will change and become more efficient. The strategies for onsite energy generation will also improve. In this environment, we have to be ambitious and flexible to constantly update our objectives. A school building and its site are moving targets. The people who use them change. The pedagogy changes. Our culture changes. Buildings and sites have to change over and again to keep up. When sustainable objectives are embraced, the buildings will turn out even better than anticipated. If we act intelligently, the people who use the buildings will be more comfortable and healthier. Students, faculty and staff will work more effectively. Energy and money will be saved. And the overall health of the environment will be improved. The more general idea is this: Buildings consume approximately 40 percent of the energy we use in the United States. We should aim to cut that energy consumption in half. It would be impossible to reach this goal simply by constructing new, sustainable, and energy-conserving buildings. Our most important task is to transform older buildings so they become more energy efficient. n Peter Gisolfi, AIA, ASLA, LEED AP, is senior partner of Peter Gisolfi Associates, a firm of architects and landscape architects in Hastings-On-Hudson, NY. He is chairman of the Spitzer School of Architecture at the City College of New York and author of the book, Finding the Place of Architecture in the Landscape. Reach him at pgisolfi@peter gisolfiassociates.com.

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DESIGN TEAM Gregory Hartman, Principal-in-Charge Jorge Gonzales, Project Manager Richard Deutsch, Project Manager Ronnie DiCappo, Interior Designer Ray Trujillo, Quality Assurance Dave Aube, Civil Engineer OWNER/CLIENT Albuquerque Public Schools Albuquerque, NM Gael Keyes, Principal 505/888-1647 KEY STATS Grades Served: K-8 Capacity: 300 students Size of Site: 3.53 acres Building Area: 27,000 square feet Building Volume: 250,000 cubic feet Space per Student: 70 square feet Cost per Student: $20,000 Square Foot Cost: $174 Construction Cost: $6 million Total Project Cost: $7.7 million Contract Date: June 2008 Completed: June 2009 Completion: 100% Photography: Patrick Coulie

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lbuquerque Public Schools’ Desert Willow Family School is a unique new public school campus, providing a hybrid home school and on-site alternative educational program for an established successful community of learners. The school is the first LEED Silver certified public school in the Albuquerque Public School District. Sustainable design features include a demonstrative geothermal ground-source heat

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pump system and numerous daylighting strategies, resulting in a reduction of more than 30 percent in traditional energy costs. Green material selections, low-water native plants, and active recycling programs are major features that have been integrated into the core education curriculum. The new campus is composed of three buildings that open to a central multipurpose courtyard. The first building is a community and performance

space used as the primary learning space for all curricula. The other buildings house classrooms and administrative spaces. The residentially scaled construction consists of wood trusses and framing, individual room heat pumps, and operable insulated windows. Each classroom has its own library, art supplies, kitchen, and printer, and is daylit with clerestories and skylights, eliminating the need for artificial lights on most days. n


IN

G BY D E

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Childhood

&

Elementary

School

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A

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OUTSTANDING PROJECT

2010

Wimberley, TX

Entire School/Campus Building NEW CONSTRUCTION

IG

A

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N

N

O’Connell Robertson G BY D IN E 811 Road, N Barton Springs R Suite 900 Austin, TX 78704 Honorable www.oconnellrobertson.com

LE

Jacob’s Well Elementary School

Mention

Cathy Brandewie 2010 512/478-7286 Design team Richard Burnight, AIA, Principal-in-Charge Jarrod Sterzinger, AIA, LEED AP, Project Manager/Architect Nick Patterson, PE, LEED AP, Mechanical Engineering Louis Cornoyer, PE, Fire Protection and Plumbing Dennis Clauson, Electrical Design Jennifer Hoskins, IIDA, LEED AP, Interior Design Owner/Client Wimberley Independent School District Wimberley, TX Dwain York, Superintendent 512/847-2414 KEY stats Grades Served: 2-5 Capacity: 700 students Size of Site: 19.2 acres Building Area: 83,963 square feet Space per Student: 105 square feet Cost per Student: $21,071 Square Foot Cost: $175 Construction Cost: $14.8 million Total Project Cost: $17.3 million Contract Date: Mar. 2008 Completed: Aug. 2009 Completion: 100% Photography: Thomas McConnell

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ompleted in August 2009, Jacob’s Well Elementary School was the first new primary school in Wimberley Independent School District in more than 20 years. O’Connell Robertson provided comprehensive architecture and engineering services after assisting the district with planning and communications for its successful bond election. The new school, serving second through fifth grades, blends traditional educational design with contemporary architecture, supporting today’s curriculum. Breakout spaces facilitate art, science, and multiclass settings, imparting transparency and connectivity without losing functionality or security. Sustainable features are found throughout the school, reflecting and incorporating the beauty of the surrounding Texas hill country. The interior has natural light in every classroom and common area, and strategically placed skylights provide shared lighting. Four percent of the materials used were regional, and 15 percent were recycled materials. The mechanical systems are energy efficient and individually controlled, and the lighting is adjustable by room according to educational need. The site design responds to existing site contours, minimizes offsite light trespass, allows joint use of facilities, and includes on-site stormwater management. A rainwater harvesting system offsets irrigation needs that have been limited through the use of native landscaping. The school design meets the district’s goal of providing a facility “designed with student learning in mind,” offering sustainable educational environments both inside and outside the classroom. n www.learningbydesign.biz | L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n F A L L 2 0 1 0

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2010

N

IN

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A

Early

G BY D E

Childhood

Honorable Mention

&

Elementary

School

N

N

Citation of Excellence

R

IG

A

G BY D E

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N

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Eastgate Elementary School 2010

Bellevue, WA

Entire School/Campus Building NEW CONSTRUCTION NAC|Architecture 2201 6th Ave., Suite 1405 Seattle, WA 98121 www.nacarchitecture.com Kevin Flanagan, AIA, LEED AP 206/441-4522 Design team Kevin Flanagan, AIA, LEED AP, Principal-in-Charge Steve Galey, AIA, LEED AP, Project Manager Boris Srdar, AIA, LEED AP, Project Designer David Shaffer, AIA, Project Architect Coughlin Porter Lundeen Structural/Civil Engineers Coffman Engineers Electrical Engineers Engineering Economics Inc. Mechnical Engineers Owner/Client Bellevue School District Bellevue, WA Dr. Amalia Cudeiro 425/456-4000 KEY stats Grades Served: K-5 Capacity: 500 students Size of Site: 8.1 acres Building Area: 63,500 square feet Space per Student: 127 square feet Cost per Student: $39,200 Square Foot Cost: $309 Construction Cost: $19.6 million Total Project Cost: $25 million Contract Date: June 2007 Completed: Aug. 2009 Completion: 100% Photography: NAC|Architecture, Ben Benschneider, Walmsley Photography

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esigned to connect the building to nature through views and landscaped courts, Eastgate Elementary School invites the use of the whole site as a teaching tool. The school’s organization in small pavilions and a series of courtyards enriches the curriculum through increased opportunity for stimulating indoor/ outdoor learning. Designed to reveal itself through a gradual revelation of the shifting relationship of

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interior to exterior learning spaces, the building encourages a “slowness” of experience and understanding that makes learning palpable. The building and landscape are peers and partners in this slow dance. The heightened attention to landscape design supports relevant learning of arts and science and encourages the students’ life-long affection for the natural environment and sustainability. Eastgate achieved a vigorous sustainable agenda

that continues to mark this building as a district pioneer. Ground-source heat exchange wells connected with heat pumps, a highly insulated envelope, and extensive daylighting combine to create a very efficient building that does not burn fossil fuels onsite. Recycled-content exterior siding and natural interior materials permeate the building, reinforcing the educational value of a sustainable approach. n


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A A

G BY D E N

G BY D E

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Early

OUTSTANDING CPROJECT hildh

ood

&

Elementary

School

N

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IN

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IN

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Grand Prize

2010

Manassas Park Elementary School and Pre-K

2010

City of Manassas Park, VA

Entire School/Campus Building G BY D E

LE

A

N

IN

G BY D E

Honorable Mention

N

N

2010 Robert Moje, AIA, LEED AP 434/296-5684

R

IG

VMDO Architects, P.C. Citation of 200 E. Market Street Excellence Charlottesville, VA 22902 www.vmdo.com

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IN

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A

NEW CONSTRUCTION

2010

DESIGN TEAM 2rw Consultants, Inc., Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing Engineers Fox & Associates, Structural Engineer Bowman Consulting, Civil Engineer EIS, Food Service Siteworks Studio, Landscape Architecture Hess Construction, Construction Manager OWNER/CLIENT Manassas Park City Schools City of Manassas Park, VA Dr. Thomas H. DeBolt, Division Superintendent 703/335-8858 KEY STATS Grades Served: Pre-K & 3-5 Capacity: 900 students Size of Site: 10.6 acres Building Area: 140,463 square feet Building Volume: 1.4 million cubic feet Space per Student: 156 square feet Cost per Student: $31,141 Square Foot Cost: $199 Construction Cost: $28 million Total Project Cost: $33 million Contract Date: Mar. 2007 Completed: Apr. 2009 Completion: 100% Photography: Prakash Patel

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he design for the Manassas Park Elementary School and Pre-K project is based on two fundamental ideas: First, just as every moment can be a teachable moment, there is no such thing as a nonteachable place. Second, we can’t expect people to protect and conserve something they don’t understand. A rare public school building designed specifically for 4- and 5-year-olds, the pre-K portion of the facility contains right-sized elements, including cave-like reading nooks and a 4-foot entrance door. Conversely, the upper elementary school has specialty rooms typically found in high schools: science labs, art and music rooms, a full-size gym, and professional office space for teachers. Extensive use of glass and mirrors creates visual openness; each corridor even has a direct view to the outside. Breakout spaces for individual or small group study are everywhere. There’s a pervasive sense of passive supervision, and students assume the responsibility that is expected of them.

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More than a teaching tool, the building is an educational ecosystem. Wayfinding and finishes echo the adjacent forest. Classroom signs double as informational displays on com-

monly found local flora and fauna. When in natural ventilation mode, green lights tell students to open the windows, making them active participants in conservation. n


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Childhood

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Elementary

School

N

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IG

A

N

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OUTSTANDING PROJECT

2010

Mittie A. Pullam Elementary School Brownsville, TX

Entire School/Campus Building NEW CONSTRUCTION

N

LE

IG

A

S

N

Gignac G& Associates, LLP BY D IN N 416 Starr EStreet R Corpus Christi, TX 78401 www.gignacarchitects.com

Honorable Raymond Gignac Mention 361/884-2661

2010

Design team

Raymond Gignac, AIA, Principal-in-Charge Rolando Garza, AIA, LEED AP Carolyn James, AIA David Monreal, AIA Lizbeth Elizondo John Silva & Ana Salas-Luksa Owner/Client Brownsville Independent School District Brownsville, TX Brett Springston 956/698-0014 KEY stats Grades Served: Pre-K-5 Capacity: 850 students Size of Site: 16.8 acres Building Area: 91,965 square feet Building Volume: 1.4 million cubic feet Space per Student: 108 square feet Cost per Student: $14,063 Square Foot Cost: $130 Construction Cost: $12 million Contract Date: May 2008 Completed: Aug. 2009 Completion: 100% Photography: Gregory James Phelps

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he new Mittie A. Pullam Elementary School has been designed for grades pre-K through 5. The school has been designed so the building exterior reflects the area’s culture and architecture. The building is constructed to maximize energy efficiency, improve indoor air quality, and minimize the impact on the environment. The school’s orientation on the site and the building’s exterior envelope were both carefully considered to provide optimum energy efficiency. Each grade is self-contained within a building wing to allow for team teaching. Common facilities such as the library and art classrooms are centrally located for easy access from all classroom wings. The building incorporates sustainable design principles such as energy-efficient systems and natural daylighting. State-of-the-art technology infrastructure has been incorporated in the entire campus. The project also includes a 4,500-square-foot multipurpose room for physical education and assemblies. n www.learningbydesign.biz | L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n F A L L 2 0 1 0

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OUTSTANDING PROJECT

2010

Childhood

NEW CONSTRUCTION

IG

A

S

WRNS Studio G BY D IN E Suite 402 501 Second Street, N R San Francisco, CA 94107 www.wrnsstudio.com N

Honorable Adam Woltag Mention

415/489-2232

2010

DESIGN TEAM Guttmann & Blaevoet, Mechanical Engineering Bluestone Engineering, Inc., Structural Engineering Integrated Design Associates, Inc., Electrical Engineering Davis Langdon, Cost Consulting BKF, Civil Engineering Bellinger Foster Steinmetz, Landscape Architecture OWNER/CLIENT Hillsborough City School District Hillsborough, CA Larry Raffo, Assistant Superintendent of Schools 650/342-5193 KEY STATS Grades Served: K-5 Capacity: 300 students Size of Site: 0.3 acres Building Area: 6,500 square feet Building Volume: 143,000 cubic feet Space per Student: 21.6 square feet Cost per Student: $11,000

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esigned for flexibility, the new 6,500-squarefoot multipurpose building at North Elementary School accommodates athletic activities, theatrical performances, student dining, and parent/teacher meeting space. The new building sits at the top of the elementary school campus overlooking the southern drop-off area and lower athletic playing fields. The main court is 40 by 68 feet long with two retractable basketball backboards, sports flooring, and volleyball stanchions. This space will accommodate 300 seats for theatrical performances as well as provide lunch-period seating for 192 students. High clerestory windows on three sides of the main court space will provide ample daylighting and views to the surrounding wooded hillsides. Landscaped patio spaces for students and faculty allow for small gatherings outdoors, adjacent to the existing campus buildings. The building was designed to meet City of Hillsborough Public School criteria. Early in the design process, WRNS conducted several meetings to address the concerns of the school’s parent community throughout the planning and design process. Issues of particular significance included limiting the disturbance to the adjacent residential neighborhood, which was addressed by material and color selections and landscaping. n

Square Foot Cost: $508 Construction Cost: $3.3 million Total Project Cost: $3.6 million Contract Date: July 2006 Completed: July 2009 Completion: 100% Photography: Bruce Damonte

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&

Elementary

School

North Elementary Multipurpose Building Hillsborough, CA

Multipurpose Building

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Early

N

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IG

A

N

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L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n F A L L 2 0 1 0 | www.learningbydesign.biz


IN

G BY D E

Early

Childhood

&

Elementary

School

N

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IG

A

N

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OUTSTANDING PROJECT

2010

Prairie Ridge Elementary School Kalamazoo, MI

Green School Building Interior Design NEW CONSTRUCTION

N

LE

IG

A

S

N

TowerPinkster G BY D IN E 242 E.NKalamazoo Ave., Suite 200 R Kalamazoo, MI 49007 www.towerpinkster.com

Honorable Steven H. Hoekzema Mention 616/456-9944

2010

Design team

Steven H. Hoekzema, AIA, NCARB, Principal-in-Charge Shawn Parshall, AAIA, CDT, LEED AP, Architectural Designer Jim Ross, Project Manager Rebecca Meggs, IIDA, CSI, NCIDQCertified, LEED AP, Interior Design Ron Masek, ASLA, LEED AP, Landscape Architect Perry Hausman, PE, LEED AP, Mechanical Engineer Owner/Client Prairie Ridge Elementary/Kalamazoo Public Schools Kalamazoo, MI Dr. Michael Rice, Superintendent 269/337-0100 KEY stats Grades Served: Pre-K-5 Capacity: 600 students Size of Site: 30 acres Building Area: 84,532 square feet Building Volume: 2.1 million cubic feet Space per Student: 140 square feet Cost per Student: $18,283 Square Foot Cost: $130 Construction Cost: $11 million Total Project Cost: $14.2 million Contract Date: Apr. 2007 Completed: Aug. 2008 Completion: 100% Photography: Hedrich Blessing - Craig Dugan

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s a result of the Kalamazoo Promise, offering graduates college tuition scholarships of up to 100 percent, Kalamazoo Public Schools invested in its growing population with a new, sustainable elementary, the first LEED Gold certified school building in Michigan. To minimize site impact, the two-story structure is nestled into the hillside of its 30-acre site, creating upper- and lowerlevel walk-outs to maximize daylight and the earth’s insulating properties. A superior building envelope and careful orientation, combined with high-performance lighting systems, reduced lighting power, and cooling requirements, result in a 40-percent energy reduction. A green roof cools Prairie Ridge and is located between the art and flex-use classrooms to accommodate a sculpture garden and science exploration. A two-story media center opens onto an outdoor amphitheatre, taking learning outside the traditional classroom. The school is designed in two wings that can be separated during evening use. Community spaces feature a gymnasium; media center; cafeteria; and music, art, and computer rooms. The education wing houses a central learning commons, flex-classrooms with shared technology rooms, and secure

mudroom access from the bus loop. The building also utilizes exposed construction and green signage throughout to educate students.

Prairie Ridge, a blend of the indoors and the outdoors, is a flagship school as it strives to create facilities that fulfill the Kalamazoo Promise. n

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Early

Childhood

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Elementary

School

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A

N

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OUTSTANDING PROJECT

2010

Pine Crest Lower School Boca Raton, FL

Entire School/Campus Building NEW CONSTRUCTION

N

LE

IG

A

S

Zyscovich Architects G BY D IN E 27th Floor 100 N. NBiscayne Blvd., R Miami, FL 33132 www.zyscovich.com

Honorable Cheryl Jacobs Mention

305/372-5222

2010

DESIGN TEAM Jose Murguido, AIA, REFP, Principal-in-Charge Michael McGuinn, RA, Project Manager Michael Ehrling, RA, Project Designer Carlos Flores, RA, Project Architect Elaine Rodriguez, ID, Interior Design Thorn Grafton, AIA, LEED AP OWNER/CLIENT Pine Crest School Boca Raton, FL Dr. Lourdes M. Cowgill, President 954/776-214 KEY STATS Grades Served: Pre-K–5 Capacity: 616 students Size of Site: 22 acres Building Area: 59,873 square feet Space per Student: 98 square feet Cost per Student: $37,329 Square Foot Cost: $384 Construction Cost: $12.9 million Total Project Cost: $23 million Contract Date: Oct. 2007 Completed: Summer 2009 Completion: 100% Photography: Moris Moreno Photography

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ine Crest School is pioneering a new nationwide direction for schools as one of the first entities to facilitate a project-based learning methodology within the development of a LEED certified facility. The Boca Raton campus has been formed anew with the replacement of the school’s main administration building, a new Lower School (grades pre-K through 5) building, and a redefined campus. In developing the master plan for the 22-acre site, Zyscovich determined that the Lower School should be relocated to a central position within the campus to enhance the protection of the youngest students and to place them in direct proximity to all of the school’s supporting program areas. The master plan called for a new overall campus organization and the alteration of circulation patterns, such as the removal of a rear loop road and the creation of new drop-off areas, resulting in a more pedestrianfriendly campus. This school’s program objectives are innovative for two reasons. First, the campus was re-created in an innovative

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way: New exterior learning spaces have been created, and the students’ ability to interact with natural areas and the environment has been enhanced. The existing school’s 22-acre site maintains native species and enhances a conservation buffer at the north and east sides of the site. Second, Pine Crest’s administration has shown extreme commitment to protecting the environment. For the first time, a policy to pursue LEED certification has been adopted, and LEED Gold certification has been achieved

for the Lower School. Some of the specific green components of the project include cisterns, photovoltaic panels, solar hot water, and exterior shading of the windows. There are touchscreen monitors throughout the campus that allow students to check building metrics such as energy and water usage. Learning opportunities abound in the new Lower School, with innovative classroom-like spaces in breezeway porches, outdoor courtyards, and stairway teaching galleries.


In addition, there are exterior areas dedicated to the exploration of science, art, and media. These new exterior classrooms are only steps from the students’ indoor desks—right outside the western-facing windows and the walkway. To facilitate the project-based learning objectives, classrooms were created as pods: four classrooms joined together and separated by glass folding walls.

“Zyscovich is proud to be a part of the transformation of Pine Crest to a LEED facility,” says Jose Murguido, AIA, REFP, vice president and principal-incharge of the project. “Our firm is committed to creating highperformance schools with design and construction practices that significantly reduce or eliminate the negative impact of buildings on the environment as well as its occupants.” n www.learningbydesign.biz | L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n F A L L 2 0 1 0

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IN

G BY D E

Early

Childhood

&

Elementary

School

N

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IG

A

N

S

R

OUTSTANDING PROJECT

2010

T.C. Cherry Elementary School Bowling Green, KY

Entire School/Campus Building NEW CONSTRUCTION

Honorable

N

LE

IG

A

S

RossTarrant Architects, Inc. G BY D IN E 101 Ave. N Old Lafayette R Lexington, KY 40502 www.rosstarrant.com Martha R. Tarrant, AIA, LEED AP BD+C Mention 859/254-4018

2010

DESIGN TEAM Martha R. Tarrant, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, President RossTarrant Architects Leonard Bowers, AIA, Principal-in-Charge RossTarrant Architects Dan Colvin, IIDA, CID, Senior Interior Designer RossTarrant Architects Laith M. Ross, PE, LEED AP BD+C, Senior Civil Engineer RossTarrant Architects David R. Higgins II, RCDD, LEED AP, CMTA, Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing Consultant Curtis D. Byers, Ph.D., PE, Structural Design Group Structural Consultant OWNER/CLIENT Bowling Green Independent Schools Bowling Green, KY Joe Tinius, Superintendent 270/746-2200 KEY STATS Grades Served: K-5 Capacity: 400 students Size of Site: 8.2 acres Building Area: 54,664 square feet Space per Student: 137 square feet Cost per Student: $27,121 Square Foot Cost: $199 Construction Cost: $10.8 million Total Project Cost: $13.3 million Contract Date: May 2008 Completed: Sept. 2009 Completion: 100% Photography: Phebus Photography

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he Bowling Green Independent Schools sought to create a new high-performance, energyefficient school to enhance the learning environment for its students. Its newest elementary school is a cutting-edge facility that features the largest volume use of solar tube devices of any school in the state. The tubes provide controllable, natural daylight to interior spaces throughout the building. Daylight sensors automatically adjust artificial lighting based on the available daylight. Classroom wings were oriented to optimize daylighting, and custom sunshades were designed for south-facing windows to control light and mitigate glare. The sun’s energy is also harnessed to heat the majority of the building’s hot water. The school’s exterior walls are constructed of insulated concrete forms, which provide superior insulation and minimize the burden on the highly efficient climate-control system. A white roof minimizes solar heat gain. In the lobby, a Vital Signs graphic monitor displays the building’s water, electricity,

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and natural gas consumption, illustrating the energy savings enabled by the energy-efficient design. The new school was designed to be a teaching tool in other

ways as well. In a mathematics classroom, grid patterns on the ceiling and floor depict a graph with plotted points while geometric shapes and large rulers adorn the walls. n


IN

G BY D E

Middle

school/intermediate

school

N

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A

N

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GN

OUTSTANDING PROJECT

2010

Kennedy Middle School Pharr, TX

Entire School/Campus Building NEW CONSTRUCTION

N

LE

IG

A

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N

Gignac G& Associates, LLP BY D IN N 416 Starr EStreet R Corpus Christi, TX 78401 www.gignacarchitects.com

Honorable Raymond Gignac Mention 361/884-2661

2010 Design team Raymond Gignac, AIA, Principal-in-Charge Rolando Garza, AIA, LEED AP Carolyn James, AIA John Silva Juan Mujica and Ana Salas-Luksa Owner/Client Pharr-San Juan-Alamo Independent School District Pharr, TX Dr. Daniel P. King 956/702-5600 KEY stats Grades Served: 6-8 Capacity: 1,200 students Size of Site: 40 acres Building Area: 144,514 square feet Space per Student: 120 square feet Cost per Student: $17,556 Square Foot Cost: $146 Construction Cost: $21.1 million Contract Date: Oct. 2008 Completed: March 2010 Completion: 100% Photography: Gregory James Phelps, Howard E. Doughty

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he new Kennedy Middle School, designed for grades 6 through 8, provides a complete educational facility that incorporates green design concepts, including daylighting to interior spaces with insulated skylight systems, high-efficiency lighting, the use of local and regional materials, and native landscaping features. The school’s orientation on the site and the building’s exterior envelope were both carefully considered to provide optimum energy efficiency. The design of this school uses a prototype layout to assist the school district with providing a cost-effective building. Each grade is self-contained within a building wing and shares common facilities such as the library, art classrooms, computer labs, and resource and special education areas, which are centrally located for easy access. State-of-theart technology infrastructure has been incorporated in the entire campus. n

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IN

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Middle

school/intermediate

school

N

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IG

A

N

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OUTSTANDING PROJECT

2010

Oakwood Intermediate School Allendale, MI

Entire School/Campus Building NEW CONSTRUCTION

N

LE

IG

A

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GMB Y D G B IN E N Architecture + Engineering R 85 E. Eighth Street, Suite 200 Holland, MI 49423 Honorable www.gmb.com

Mention

David Wilkins 616/796-0200

2010

DESIGN TEAM David Wilkins, AIA, NCI, Principal-in-Charge Rob DenBesten, AIA, LEED AP, Project Architect Jeff Hoag, AIA, LEED AP, Architect Trent DeBoer, PE, LEED AP, CGD, CBST, Mechanical Engineer Brad Heeres, PE, LEED AP, Electrical Engineer Tim Gerrits, LLA, LEED AP, Landscape Architect OWNER/CLIENT Allendale Public Schools Allendale, MI Dan Jonker, Superintendent 616/892-5570 KEY STATS Grades Served: 4-5 Capacity: 350 students Size of Site: 160 acres Building Area: 93,000 square feet Building Volume: 1.4 million cubic feet Space per Student: 265 square feet Cost per Student: $44,000 Square Foot Cost: $165 Construction Cost: $15.4 million Total Project Cost: $18.6 million Contract Date: Aug. 2007 Completed: Aug. 2009 Completion: 100% Photography: Bill Lindhout Photography

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ritical in the design of the new Oakwood Intermediate School was the response to both its campus context as well as the surrounding natural wetlands. Serving fourthand fifth-grade students, Oakwood represents the latest development of the district’s 160-acre Pierce Street campus. Key elements of the building and site design include separation of the bus loop and visitor drop-off, secure

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entry vestibules, and finishes that embody the natural context of the site. Continued development of the adjacent Jaarsma Outdoor Learning and Research Center reinforces the connection to the site ecology through the provision of walking paths, an outdoor classroom, and pavilions that can be used by students, staff, and the community. This theme of multiuse space is carried to the building’s interior, where various environments have been

provided to accommodate educational needs while also functioning as community resources. As is consistent with the other schools on this campus, sustainable technologies have been incorporated throughout. These features include a geothermal heat pump mechanical system, daylight harvesting, solar shading, radiant floors, and vegetated stormwater infiltration swales integrated into parking areas and drives. n


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High

School

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A

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OUTSTANDING PROJECT

2010

Arabia Mountain High School Lithonia, GA

Entire School/Campus Building NEW CONSTRUCTION

N

LE

IG

A

S

N

Perkins+Will G BY D IN N PeachtreeE Street NE 1315 R Atlanta, GA 30309 www.perkinswill.com

Honorable Barbara Crum Mention

404/443-7613

2010 Design team Barbara Crum, Principal-in-Charge Shawn Hamlin, Project Manager Marco Nicotera, Project Architect Turner Construction Company, Contractor Owner/Client DeKalb County School System Tucker, GA Barbara Colman, Interim CIP Operations Officer 678/676-1453 KEY stats Grades Served: 9-12 Capacity: 1,600 students Size of Site: 80 acres Building Area: 232,000 square feet Building Volume: 4.2 million cubic feet Space per Student: 144 square feet Cost per Student: $23,563 Square Foot Cost: $163 Construction Cost: $37.7 million Total Project Cost: $43.3 million Contract Date: June 2006 Completed: Aug. 2009 Completion: 100% Photography: Jonathan Hillyer Photography, Inc.

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ompleted in 2009, DeKalb County School System’s newest high school, Arabia Mountain, will be the first LEED certified public school in the state of Georgia. Arabia Mountain High School is also the first school dedicated to DeKalb’s recent “Going Green” initiative, which focuses on a cleaner and healthier learning environment. The school adjoins the Davidson-Arabia Mountain Nature Preserve, a DeKalb County park comprised of 2,000 acres of granite outcrop,

wetlands, pine and oak forests, streams, and a lake. Focused on environmental studies, the school’s curriculum embraces its location. In creating a curriculum that incorporates the school’s setting and sustainability features, the faculty worked with the State Education and Environment Roundtable to develop an EIC Model™ Program. This program focuses on using local, natural, and community surroundings as a context for interconnecting all educational practices into a comprehensive school

improvement strategy, as well as establishing a context for standards-based instruction. The building is oriented with the classrooms facing north and south, with large expanses of glass to capture the view of the nature preserve. This orientation allows natural light deep into the classrooms and maximizes energy efficiency. Bioretention gardens surrounding the building help with water quality management and serve as an outdoor learning environment for the science classes. n

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IN

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High

School

N

LE

IG

A

N

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OUTSTANDING PROJECT

2010

Cannon Falls High School/Middle School Cannon Falls, MN

Entire School/Campus Building RENOVATION/ADDITION/ RESTORATION

Honorable Gary Nyberg Mention

N

LE

IG

A

S

Smiley G Glotter B Y D Nyberg IN E N Architects R 111 Washington Ave. N., Suite 300 Minneapolis, MN 55401 612/332-1401

2010

DESIGN TEAM Gary Nyberg, Project Principal Jim Wilson, Project Architect Jill Bills, Project Job Captain Dolejs Associates, Mechanical and Electrical Engineers LS Engineers, Structural Engineer Larson Engineering, Civil Engineer OWNER/CLIENT Cannon Falls Public Schools Cannon Falls, MN Todd Sesker, Superintendent 507/263-680

A

s part of an expansion of the existing Cannon Falls High School/ Middle School, SGN planned a joint-use community center. It features a 600-seat auditorium with support spaces, an event lobby for gatherings, and a much-needed school commons with an expanded kitchen and concession area, created to serve the school as well as for public use at breaks in performances or sporting events. The new front entry and lobby give the building a light,

KEY STATS Grades Served: 6-12 Capacity: 750 students Size of Site: 71 acres Building Area: 211,430 square feet Building Volume: 4.1 million cubic feet Space per Student: 282 square feet Cost per Student: $21,565 Square Foot Cost: $77 Construction Cost: $16.2 million Total Project Cost: $18.6 million Contract Date: Oct. 2007 Completed: Sept. 2009 Completion: 100% Photography: SGN Staff Photo

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open feel, which was missing from the original 1960s construction. Horizontal elements are emphasized on the addition, and a warm color palette helps “the old” merge seamlessly with “the new.” The exception is the bold red brick introduced at the entry wall, which draws both students and visitors into the building and focuses on the new student dining commons.

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The new commons area was created by removing two walls of a small auxiliary gymnasium and replacing them with a colorful colonnade. A complete wellness and fitness center is included in the community center, featuring a 30,800-square-foot multipurpose fieldhouse (with three basketball courts, three volleyball courts, three tennis courts, a track, and

seating for 580 spectators), a weight room, lockers, and an expanded wrestling area. The fieldhouse is designed for community events and, along with the auditorium and commons, can be separated from the rest of the school for after-hours use. In the words of Superintendent Todd Sesker, “We have now become a cool school.” n


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RDG Planning G B Y D & Design IN N 301 GrandE Ave. R Des Moines, IA 50309 www.rdgusa.com

Honorable Mention Eliz Erbes

Dowling Catholic High School West Des Moines, IA

Entire School/Campus Building

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515/268-5155

2010

Design team RDG Planning & Design, Architects RDG Planning & Design, Landscape Architects RDG Planning & Design, Mechanical Engineers RDG Planning & Design, Electrical Engineers

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fter serving students for more than 50 years, Dowling Catholic High School was in need of a “sensible but inspiring� upgrade. At the time of its construction, emphasis was placed on efficiency; this was accomplished by minimizing exterior walls, thus creating classrooms without windows. It was time to improve the educational environment at the classroom level. Staying within the constraints of the existing exterior walls while providing daylight into teaching spaces became the challenge. The solution involved a series of corridor skylights aligned with borrowed

Shuck Britson, Structural Engineers Graham Construction Owner/Client Dowling Catholic High School West Des Moines, IA Jerry Deegan, President 515/222-1040 KEY stats Grades Served: 9-12 Capacity: 1,200 students Size of Site: 60 acres Building Area: 115,000 square feet Building Volume: 1.6 million cubic feet Space per Student: 96 square feet Cost per Student: $11,126 Square Foot Cost: $116 Construction Cost: $13.4 million Total Project Cost: $17 million Contract Date: Jan. 2008 Completed: Dec. 2009 Completion: 100% Photography: Brian Frank

light windows for each interior classroom. The classrooms were also designed to provide better acoustics, technology enhancements, flexible lighting, and appropriate furniture. As a result of the renovations, interior walls are now insulated for sound. Interactive whiteboards are permanently installed at the teaching walls, and wireless technology allows

for at-desk laptop use. Direct/ indirect pendant lighting with flexible switching provides appropriate lighting in all teaching conditions. To ensure the new furnishings would be appropriate, a demonstration classroom was designated for one semester and equipped with several types of student/teacher desks, chairs, and IT podiums. Students and

faculty were able to test the furnishings, thereby acquiring first-hand knowledge of what would be most appropriate before the rest of the furniture was purchased. A variable air volume mechanical system provides the appropriate heating, ventilation, and air conditioning while maintaining superior indoor air quality for all classrooms. n

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2010

Entire School/Campus Building RENOVATION/ADDITION/ RESTORATION HMC Architects 633 W. Fifth Street, Third Floor Los Angeles, CA, 90071 www.hmcarchitects.com Alex Parslow 213/542-8300 DESIGN TEAM Gary Gidcumb, RA, LEED AP, Principal-in-Charge Andrea Cabalo, RA, LEED AP, Senior Project Manager James Woolum, AIA, IIDA, Design Principal TMAD Taylor & Gaines, Structural Engineering Breen Engineering, Inc., Civil, Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing Engineers OWNER/CLIENT Santa Monica-Malibu Unified School District Santa Monica, CA Tim Cuneo, Superintendent 310/450-8338 Parsons Corporation Program Manager Los Angeles, CA Hunter Gaines Senior Project Manager 310/443-7895

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Malibu High School 2010

Malibu, CA

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ith sweeping views of the Pacific Ocean and the Santa Monica Mountains, Malibu High School sits on a hillside one-quarter mile from Zuma Beach and the Pacific Coast Highway. The school’s new 35,000-square-foot classroom, library, and administration building will serve as an iconic gateway to the campus. The existing school’s location in an environmentally sensitive area was of critical concern to the district and the design team. The community’s heightened awareness of the fragility of the coastal habitat was a guiding factor in creating a new facility that would be a sustainable laboratory for students and neighbors. Reinforcing this sustainable philosophy, the design connects students and faculty with their environment at every turn. The new building echoes the contours of the native hillside. Planted green roofs provide outdoor learning spaces while improving building performance. Strategically placed skylights and floor-to-ceiling glazing provide an abundance of natural daylight and minimize energy consumption. Recycled aluminum panels shield the building from the western sun, preserve views,

KEY STATS Grades Served: 6-12 Capacity: 1,201 students Size of Site: 37.8 acres Building Area: 35,315 square feet Building Volume: 404,868 cubic feet Space per Student: 117 square feet Contract Date: Sept. 2008 Completed: Sept. 2012 Completion: 50% Renderings: HMC Architects

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and invite daylight into classrooms. In addition, the primary mechanical system relies on radiant heating and natural ventilation for cooling.

This passive system—along with wind turbines, cool roofs, cisterns, and biofiltration— exemplifies functional sustainable design. n


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2010

Metea Valley High School Aurora, IL

Entire School/Campus Building NEW CONSTRUCTIOn

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DLR B YGroup G DE IN 222 S.R NRiverside Plaza, Suite 2220 Chicago, IL 60606 www.dlrgroup.com

Honorable Dennis Bane Mention

312/382-9980

2010 Design team DLR Group, Architect and Engineer Turner Construction, Contractor Owner/Client Indian Prairie School District 204 Aurora, IL Kathy Birkett, Superintendent 630/375-3000 KEY stats Grades Served: 9-12 Capacity: 3,000 students Size of Site: 84.1 acres Building Area: 464,200 square feet Building Volume: 8.9 million cubic feet Space per Student: 156 square feet Cost per Student: $28,603 Square Foot Cost: $185 Construction Cost: $85.8 million Total Project Cost: $124.6 million Contract Date: Dec. 2005 Completed: Feb. 2010 Completion: 100% Photography: James Steinkamp

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ature is inherent at the new 3,000-student Metea Valley High School in suburban Chicago. Designers incorporated two functional, low-maintenance courtyards to boost daylighting within the facility. A combination of floor-to-ceiling translucent fiberglass panels and glass draws natural light deep into the school where it is harvested and, on many days, allows the majority of lighting to be powered off. Each courtyard gives students the freedom to catch a breath of fresh air, observe student sculptures created by the art department, study and collaborate with access to the media center, or enjoy a snack. A rooftop garden and a greenhouse provide enhanced learning opportunities outside classroom walls and are operated and maintained by the earth science department. The site is connected to adjacent neighborhoods through a series of bike paths and protects the bordering community by providing its own water infiltration system. Rainwater from parking areas drains into a series of rain gardens and bioswales to filter contaminants. Energy modeling demonstrates the design will be approximately 20 percent more efficient than required by ASHRAE 90.1. n www.learningbydesign.biz | L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n F A L L 2 0 1 0

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Montgomery High School San Diego, CA

Entire School/Campus Building RENOVATION/ADDITION/ RESTORATION

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RuhnauGRuhnau ClarkE BY D IN E Suite C N Palmer Way, 5751 R Carlsbad, CA 92010 www.rrcarch.com

Honorable David Ruhnau, AIA Mention 760/438-5899

2010

DESIGN TEAM David Ruhnau, AIA, Principal-in-Charge Joseph Calderon, AIA, Project Designer Gustavo Bidart, Project Director Gilbane SGI, Construction Manager Kanda & Tso, Structural Engineers Nack & Associates, Mechanical Engineers OWNER/CLIENT Sweetwater Union High School District Chula Vista, CA Dr. Jesus Gandara, Superintendent 619/691-5555 KEY STATS Grades Served: 9-12 Capacity: 2,280 students Size of Site: 43.3 acres Building Area: 35,179 square feet Building Volume: 351,756 cubic feet Space per Student: 15 square feet Cost per Student: $3,859 Square Foot Cost: $250 Construction Cost: $11.4 million Total Project Cost: $14.1 million Contract Date: Aug. 2009 Completed: Dec. 2010 Completion: 90%

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ontgomery High School serves more than 2,000 students in southern San Diego County, requiring the facility to become a beacon of knowledge within the community. With a campus that has been serving the community for more than 50 years, the challenge was to make the project cohesive within the different modernization phases to integrate the history and heighten school spirit and pride.

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The school district’s commitment to the LEED process enabled this project to incorporate innovative measures and provide mutually agreed upon sustainable features to target Gold and possibly Platinum LEED certification. Site work includes brownfield redevelopment, parking for low-emitting vehicles, maximization of open space, heat island reduction, and irrigation water use reduction. The build-

ing envelope was designed to maximize acoustical separation for quiet learning spaces and thermal separation for energy efficiency and comfort. The project provides natural daylighting to 95 percent of the regularly occupied spaces with thermally isolated dual-glazed windows. Operable windows provide natural ventilation. Every effort was made to use low-emitting, high-recycledcontent materials and finishes.


The building siting maximizes north daylight by placing the new building in a longitudinal east-west orientation. Exterior horizontal aluminum shade louvers control daylighting and glare. Powered roller shades provide additional daylighting and glare control within the library. Rooftop-mounted solar

photovoltaics are designed to provide 12.5 percent of the building’s energy requirements. Solar tubular light monitors provide daylighting to the interior classrooms at the first floor. Daylight controls include photo sensors for energy efficiency and light pollution control. n www.learningbydesign.biz | L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n F A L L 2 0 1 0

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Drummey Rosane G BY D IN E Inc. NAnderson, 141 Herrick Road Newton Centre, MA 02459 Honorable www.draarchitects.com S

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Needham High School Needham, MA

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James A. Barrett, AIA 617/964-1700

2010

DESIGN TEAM James A. Barrett, AIA, Principal-in-Charge R. Judd Christopher, Project Manager

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fter several years of modernizing the district’s schools, the time came to evaluate Needham High School. With HVAC systems beyond useful life, undersized classrooms, and outdated technology, the school needed a makeover. Sited on a hill in a historic district, the original 1929 building had been added onto in 1955 and 1967, creating a sprawling, multilevel, non-ADA-compliant facility. The priority was to preserve the 1929 building and create a state-of-the-art educational

Leo Parker, Project Architect Ed Hartranft, Landscape Architect Engineers Design Group, Inc., Structural Engineer Griffith & Vary, Inc., Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing Engineers OWNER/CLIENT Needham Public Schools Needham, MA Daniel F. Gutekanst, Superintendent 781/455-0400 KEY STATS Grades Served: 9-12 Capacity: 1,450 students Size of Site: 14.9 acres Building Area: 287,810 square feet Space per Student: 199 square feet Cost per Student: $33,400 Square Foot Cost: $168 Construction Cost: $48.4 million Total Project Cost: $70 million Contract Date: Dec. 2004 Completed: Apr. 2009 Completion: 100% Photography: Greg Premru PhotographY

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campus with a consolidated entrance. The existing and new come together at the new entrance, connecting the east and west sides of the site. The four-story structure was built into the hill on existing playfields to allow the school to remain in operation during construction. The new complements the existing with similar geometry but uses metal elements for a modern feel. Although the new building is four stories, it sits one story lower in deference to the existing building. The fine and performing arts department volunteered to be relocated into the renovated existing building because

L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n F A L L 2 0 1 0 | www.learningbydesign.biz

of the abundant natural light. Undersized classrooms were combined to create larger spaces for specialized program areas like photography, graphic arts, and ceramics. Each renovated or new

school in the district incorporated some form of public art into the facility. This priority is reflected in the custom sculptures that inhabit the entrance lobby of the high school. n


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Moser B Y D Nelson, G Pilon IN E LLC NArchitects, R 30 Jordan Lane Wethersfield, CT 06109 Honorable www.mpn-arch.com

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Norwich Technical High School Norwich, CT

Entire School/Campus Building

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Mention

Richard B. Brown 860/563-6164

2010

Design team Richard B. Brown, AIA Principal Kenneth F. Pilon, AIA Principal Richter & Cegan, Landscape Architects Macchi Engineers, Structural and Civil Engineers URS Corporation, Mechanical and Electrical Engineers Mark Loeffler, IALD Lighting Consultant Owner/Client Norwich Technical High School Norwich, CT Dr. Ceferino Lugo Assistant Superintendent 860/807-2206 KEY stats Grades Served: 9-12 Capacity: 800 students Size of Site: 41 acres Building Area: 208,000 square feet Building Volume: 2.9 million cubic feet Space per Student: 260 square feet Cost per Student: $52,500 Square Foot Cost: $202 Construction Cost: $44 million Total Project Cost: $66 million Contract Date: 2006 Completed: 2009 Completion: 100%

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state-of-the-art technical high school facility, the Norwich Technical High School project entailed major additions and renovations to a circa 1968 community college facility that had previously occupied the site. Additions are organized around newly created courtyards at both the academic and trade wings, effectively wrapping the perimeter of the existing building and creating an entirely new image for the facility. Technical instruction labs located in the new trade wing addition make extensive use of daylighting, utilizing an innovative clerestory structure with daylight-responsive dimming controls integrated into the direct-indirect fluorescent fixtures. The educational program for the school requires that the students rotate between technical and academic instructional cycles. Technical instruction labs function as selfcontained learning modules and include lockers, toilet facilities, and a technologyenabled theory room as well as core instructional spaces and faculty areas. Several of the programs, including culinary arts, cosmetology, and auto repair, also serve the needs of the surrounding community. Academic facilities throughout the building are fully technology-enabled with Internet/intranet access, networked LCD projectors, interactive whiteboard technologies, media storage and retrieval, and cable television, to make distance learning available in all instructional spaces. n

Photography: Woodruff/Brown Architectural Photography

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Owasso Public Schools—Wellness Center Owasso, OK

Sports Facility/ Gymnasium/Fitness Center NEW CONSTRUCTION

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The GStacy B Y DGroup IN N 10229 E. 96th EStreet N., R Suite 101 Owasso, OK 74055 Honorable www.stacy-group.com

Mention

Michael D. Stacy 918/272-2622

2010

DESIGN TEAM Michael D. Stacy, President Jason West, Project Coordinator Allison Curran, Interiors Director Amanda Sanderson, Interior Designer OWNER/CLIENT Owasso Public Schools Owasso, OK Dr. Clark Ogilvie, Superintendent 913/272-5367 KEY STATS Capacity: District Wide Building Area: 38,562 square feet Square Foot Cost: $178 Construction Cost: $6.9 million Contract Date: July 2008 Completed: Sept. 2009 Completion: 100%

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he Owasso Wellness Center was developed to promote fitness and healthy lifestyles for both the students and faculty of Owasso Public Schools as well as to provide a home base for the district’s football program. The three-story facility, radiating with school pride through the use of school colors, mascot, and inspiring quotes, houses a variety of functions, including locker rooms, team rooms, and training areas, as well as faculty offices and a Hall of Fame area. The heart of this facility brings together a state-of-theart weight room and cardiovascular fitness area through an open atrium filled with natural light. The open plan encourages interaction among the student athletes, the general student body, and the faculty. Additional spaces supporting such interaction include training and clinical areas for students to work with professional trainers and physicians. Expansive balconies on the third floor provide a prime view of the football field and also visually connect the coaches’ offices and athletic gallery space to a centrally located Hall of Fame area. This multifunctional

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room, flanked by custom trophy cases, exudes higherend finishes and is used to house such events as banquets, fundraising charities, and team meetings for the district and

the community. Though the primary function of this facility is to support athletics, it is a building that will bring the community of Owasso together for many years. n


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NEW CONSTRUCTION

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VCBOGArchitecture BY D IN E East N524 South 600 Salt Lake City, UT 84102 www.vcbo.com

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School

Park City High School Park City, UT

Green School Building Interior Design

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Honorable Steve Crane Mention

801/575-8800

2010 Design team Steve Crane, FAIA, REFP, Principal-in-Charge Vern Latham, AIA, Project Manager Pablo Gotay, AIA, Project Coordinator Herm Hughes Construction, General Contractor Owner/Client Park City School District Park City, UT Dr. Ray Timothy, Superintendent 435/645-5600 KEY stats Grades Served: 10-12 Capacity: 1,500 students Size of Site: 28 acres Building Area: 260,000 square feet Building Volume: 4.2 million cubic feet Space per Student: 187 square feet

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he design of Park City High School reinforces collaborative learning and teaching by dividing the large facility into smaller education communities—informal, intimate gathering centers surrounded by science labs and classrooms that bring students and teachers together. A responsive design process that included many work sessions was informed by input from a committee comprised of staff, students, and local stakeholders, resulting in optimal space configurations. The architect developed the concept and schematic design, incorporating historical sections of the old school. Responsive building materials, textures, and scale, with elements such as sloped, corrugated metal roofs, gables, and metal panels, suggest the rich, historical mining tradition. Wide flange beams and splitfaced, honed masonry units emulate the local area’s mountain and stone architecture. The exterior’s rhythmic variety of facades expresses the function of the interior’s smaller education communities. Park City High School has achieved LEED Silver certification, and energy savings are projected at 50 percent per year. The school will be 100 percent green-powered. Credits

were earned utilizing efficient task and daylighting, conserving one million gallons of culinary water annually, recycling existing building materials, and using locally

produced materials. The community is proud of the school’s reflection of its commitment to the environment and delighted with its functionality and beauty. n

Cost per Student: $15,667 Square Foot Cost: $155 Construction Cost: $23.9 million Total Project Cost: $28 million Contract Date: Sept. 2004 Completed: Aug. 2008 Completion: 100% Photography: Dana Sohm, Sohm Photographx

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DLA Architects, Ltd. G BY D IN E Lutzow N (Dahlquist and R Architects) 15 Salt Creek Lane, Suite 400 Honorable Hinsdale, IL 60521 Mention www.dla-ltd.com IG

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Ridgewood High School Gymnasium Norridge, IL

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Carrie L. Matlock 2010 630/230-0024 DESIGN TEAM Dwain A. Lutzow, AIA, Principal-in-Charge

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his addition is the crescendo of a multiphased, multiyear renovation for the entire building. Each addition and renovation project has been designed and built to meet the sustainable design standards ingrained within the culture and curriculum of School District 234, but the district chose to seek a LEED registration with a certification goal of Gold for the gymnasium addition. Located on a tight urban site, the addition was

Carrie L. Matlock, AIA, LEED AP, Project Manager OWNER/CLIENT Ridgewood High School District 234 Norridge, IL Robert Lupo, Ed.D., Superintendent 708/456-424 KEY STATS Grades Served: 9-12 Capacity: 1,800 students Size of Site: 23.5 acres Building Area: 66,826 square feet Building Volume: 1.2 million cubic feet Space per Student: 572 square feet Cost per Student: $9,011 Square Foot Cost: $242 Construction Cost: $16.2 million Total Project Cost: $16.4 million Contract Date: Feb. 2005 Completed: Mar. 2010 Completion: 100% Photography: Alexander Romanovsky/ DLA Architects, Ltd.

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L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n F A L L 2 0 1 0 | www.learningbydesign.biz

constructed on a remediated brownfield. The school is bordered by residential and commercial areas, providing the opportunity for alternative transportation methods. Its convenient location allows students to walk or ride bicycles to school. The gymnasium’s vegetated green roof will reduce noise and vibration from the large, nearby airport; absorb rainfall, which will reduce detention requirements; lessen the heat island effect; and diminish

deflection and vibration from the running track, which is suspended from the roof structure. Building commissioning, the design of an energy-efficient building envelope and mechanical/electrical systems, the use of carbon dioxide monitors, and the reduction of CFCs in the equipment specified support a primary concern for indoor air quality. Daylighting, as well as the selection of light fixtures, controls, and occupancy sensors, reduces electrical consumption. n


2010

Entire School/Campus Building NEW CONSTRUCTION

Van H. Gilbert Architect PC 2428 Baylor Drive SE Albuquerque, NM 87106 www.vhgarchitect.com Jode Nyboer 505/247-9955 Fanning Howey www.fhai.com Design team Joe Muhlberger, LEED AP, Architect Jim Graf, Design Architect John Willi, AIA, REFP, LEED AP, Project Designer Owner/Client Rio Rancho Public Schools Rio Rancho, NM Dr. V. Sue Cleveland, Superintendent 505/896-0667 KEY stats Grades Served: 9-12 Capacity: 2,350 students Size of Site: 140 acres Building Area: 419,000 square feet Building Volume: 5.8 million cubic feet Space per Student: 174 square feet Cost per Student: $60,849 Square Foot Cost: $296 Construction Cost: $113.4 million Total Project Cost: $143 million Contract Date: June 2007 Completed: July 2009 Completion: 100% Photography: Chas McGrath

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V. Sue Cleveland High School 2010

Rio Rancho, NM

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Sue Cleveland High School is a showcase for how to positively affect teaching and learning outcomes. Designed as a series of six schools-within-a-school, the building supports learning academies for liberal arts, design, arts, science and health, environmental studies, and international studies. Each academy is self-contained with its own administrative and guidance areas, restrooms, teacher planning areas, commons areas, lockers, and computer labs. Academies are linked through an expansive “main street” plaza. This unique, secured outdoor space creates a unifying sense of place for students, faculty, and the community to enjoy. Main Street also links each academy to shared-use areas such as the media center, blackbox theater, and a professional quality concert hall. Classrooms are extremely flexible and include movable furniture to support unlimited teaching configurations. The building explores the latest trends in technology and sustainability, including a wireless network, interactive whiteboards, and audio enhancement systems. Pending LEED Gold certification, the high school employs ground-source heat pumps, natural lighting, lowmaintenance materials, and heat-reflecting roof materials. “As students use this facility, we are certain that they take away more than what they came with…. The environment we have provided will have a positive impact on their education for years to come,” says Alfred Sena, executive director of facilities for the district. n

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OUTSTANDING PROJECT

2010

Spring Grove Area High School Spring Grove, PA

Entire School/Campus Building NEW CONSTRUCTION

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Crabtree, & Y D G BRohrbaugh IN E N Associates - Architects R 401 E. Winding Hill Road Mechanicsburg, PA 17055 Honorable www.cra-architects.com

Mention

G. Douglas Rohrbaugh 717/458-0272

2010

DESIGN TEAM Christopher Barnett, Project Manager M.E. Rowe, Interior Designer Scott Cousin, Project Designer Paul Taylor, Director of Educational Design Jeff Daniels, Project Architect OWNER/CLIENT Spring Grove Area School District/ Spring Grove Area High School Spring Grove, PA Dr. Robert Lombardo, Superintendent 717/225-4731 KEY STATS Grades Served: 9-12 Capacity: 1,400 students Size of Site: 200 acres Building Area: 333,810 square feet Building Volume: 10 million cubic feet Space per Student: 238 square feet Cost per Student: $32,062 Square Foot Cost: $134 Construction Cost: $49.8 million Total Project Cost: $54.9 million Contract Date: Mar. 2006 Completed: June 2008 Completion: 100% Photography: Alan Wycheck

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fter a series of public discussions about renovating and expanding the existing high school on a very limited site versus constructing a new high school facility on districtowned land, it was decided by the Board of School Directors to design and build a new high school on the 200-acre campus. Using the well-established principles of open communication and parent engagement prevalent in the district, a student learning center that is a source of pride to the entire community was achieved. The main focus was to create a learning environment with a career-based focus, encouraging high interest and collaborative experiences and motivating students to experience educational success on a

L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n F A L L 2 0 1 0 | www.learningbydesign.biz


daily basis. A career center located at the intersection of the academic wings and the commons area provides an anchor for student learning, with the student store designed space across the hallway to emphasize school/ community partnerships. The flexible design of the school allows students to become connected with the community through internships, job shadowing, and community projects. New technology systems incorporated in the building allow students, staff, and parents to freely exchange information through various multimedia formats over hard-wired and wireless systems. The educational program was transformed to provide responsive and flexible curriculum delivery. The facility has many

smart design features, including large, insulated skylights and full-height dual-glazed window walls that provide substantial daylighting. The masonry and concrete construction provides significant solar mass to mediate the wide swings in exterior temperatures and reduce the need for mechanical conditioning. The design creates a seamless integration between the academic spaces and areas for public use. The commons area not only achieves this integration through relationships with adjacent spaces and use of materials and finishes, but also provides students and staff with an area to exchange information and ideas. Centrally located, the commons area provides access to many key components of the building, including the

administration/guidance area, natatorium, gymnasium, school store, auditorium, cafeteria, and access to the outdoor amphitheater on the first floor. A pair of open stairways with integrated benches provides access to

the second-floor bridge above, where the library, gymnasium, track, TV studio, and pool mezzanine are all easily accessible. A practice softball field and a competitive soccer field are also located onsite. n

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Washington-Lee High School Arlington, VA

School Community Center/Joint Use Facilities NEW CONSTRUCTION

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Grimm + Parker Architects 1355 Beverly Road, Suite 105 Honorable McLean, VA 22101 Mention www.grimmandparker.com John M. Hill, Principal 2010 703/903-9100 DESIGN TEAM ADTEK Engineers, Civil Engineers Mendoza, Ribas & Farinas, Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing Engineers Wolfman & Associates, Structural Engineers Nyikos Associates, Kitchen MBP/Aecom, Construction Manager Hess Construction, Builder OWNER/CLIENT Arlington Public Schools Arlington, VA William O’Connor, Director of Design and Construction 703/228-6609 KEY STATS Grades Served: 9-12 Capacity: 1,600 students Size of Site: 19.5 acres Building Area: 378,068 square feet Building Volume: 6.4 million cubic feet Space per Student: 236 square feet Cost per Student: $45,412 Square Foot Cost: $192 Construction Cost: $72.7 million Total Project Cost: $81.8 million Contract Date: Oct. 2002 Completed: July 2009 Completion: 100% Photography: Ken Wyner Photography

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ashington-Lee High School, a LEED Gold certified high school in Arlington County, Virginia, is a stellar example of community planning and a model for sustainable building. It is poised to serve as an important civic center and cultural asset for the new century. Its location relative to mass transit makes Washington-Lee an educational hub for the community. In addition to the running track and aquatics facility,

L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n F A L L 2 0 1 0 | www.learningbydesign.biz

which are used by the community during school hours, the school is zoned so that other spaces can be used off-hours by the community. The school serves as one of four primary sites for the Arlington Adult Education Program year round. Spaces for informal gathering and discussion are provided to generate the free flow of academic and social energy. These spaces throughout the school include a large library balcony, a plaza/amphitheater outside

the dining room, a courtyard, and a cyber cafĂŠ. The entire school is outfitted for wireless Internet to make all spaces active learning zones. Washington-Lee has many sustainable features, including 8,000 square feet of vegetated roof as well as fixtures and equipment that reduce water usage by more than 40 percent and energy usage by more than 25 percent. A green education plan was developed for students and the community. n


IN

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Combined-Level

School

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OUTSTANDING PROJECT

2010

Entire School/Campus Building

Elgin Academy—Harold D. Rider Family Media, Science, and Fine Arts Center Elgin, IL

NEW CONSTRUCTION

N

LE

IG

A

S

N

DLA Architects, Ltd. G BY D IN E Lutzow N (Dahlquist and R Architects) 462 N. McLean Blvd. Honorable Elgin, IL 60123 Mention www.dla-ltd.com Carrie Matlock

2010 630/230-0024 Design team Bruce R. Dahlquist, AIA, LEED AP, Principal-in-Charge Tracy Biederstadt, LEED AP, Project Manager Owner/Client Elgin Academy Elgin, IL Dr. John Cooper, Head of School 847/695-0300 KEY stats Grades Served: K-12 Capacity: 600 students Size of Site: 0.7 acres Building Area: 41,380 square feet Building Volume: 1.7 million cubic feet Space per Student: 69 square feet Cost per Student: $15,600 Square Foot Cost: $226 Construction Cost: $9.4 million Total Project Cost: $9.6 million Contract Date: July 2007 Completed: Oct. 2008 Completion: 100% Photography: Alexander Romanovsky/ DLA Architects, Ltd.

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he Harold D. Rider Family Media, Science, and Fine Arts Center is a four-story, 41,380-squarefoot building that provides a contemporary counterpoint to Elgin Academy’s historic campus, which features buildings dating back to 1856. Constructed on a remediated brownfield, the hillside site provides an enclosure to the campus. Facing the quad, the facility respects the height and massing of the existing traditional campus architecture, while its outwardly facing

façade reacts to the vitality of the adjacent urban corridor. Reflecting green/sustainable design principles, the building is LEED Gold certified. Integral to the design was the creation of a high-performance, energy-efficient, and environmentally responsible educational facility, providing students with a healthy, innovative educational experience. The consolidation and proximity of the high school math and science programs as well as the visual/performing arts programs within have

encouraged interdepartmental student and faculty planning/ interaction, with the new student commons serving as the catalyst. Furthermore, the design’s green and sustainable principles are also being incorporated into Elgin Academy’s educational curriculum. Joint community use complements the educational component of the building’s program. The Media, Science, and Fine Arts Center is home to the Elgin OPERA, Elgin Theater Company, and other community groups. n

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IN

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Combined-Level

School

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IG

A

N

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OUTSTANDING PROJECT

2010

Hancock Early Childhood and Administrative Center St. Louis, MO

School Community Center/Joint Use Facilities

Honorable

N

LE

IG

A

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RENOVATION/ADDITION/ G BY D IN E N R RESTORATION

Wm. B. Ittner, Inc. Mention 611 N. Tenth Street, Suite 200 St. Louis, MO 63101 2010 www.ittnerarchitects.com Dennis M. Young 314/421-3542 DESIGN TEAM C. Rallo Contracting, Construction Manager Land Development Consultants, Inc., Civil Engineers KPFF, Structural Engineers Wm. Tao & Associates, Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing Engineers OWNER/CLIENT Hancock Place School District St. Louis, MO Dr. Greg Clark, Superintendent 314/544-1300 KEY STATS Grades Served: Pre-K Capacity: 100 students, 20 administrators, and staff Size of Site: 2.3 acres Building Area: 17,800 square feet Building Volume: 258,000 cubic feet Space per Student: 100 square feet Cost per Student: $9,950 Square Foot Cost: $112 Construction Cost: $2 million Total Project Cost: $3.5 million Contract Date: May 2009 Completed: Nov. 2009 Completion: 100% Photography: Debbie Franke Photography, Wm. B. Ittner, Inc.

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he Hancock Early Childhood and Administrative Center concept redeveloped an existing industrial building into a combined early childhood center with central administrative offices. It was important that the design process engage the faculty and the community. The public engagement process was vital in obtaining useful input from the faculty

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and creating a sense of ownership by the parents and grandparents. An exciting educational environment was created that also serves the needs of the community, while revitalizing the industrial part of the district. The Early Childhood and Administrative Center incorporates all of the necessary educational components to provide the children of Hancock Place School

District with a solid foundation for learning. The reception area accommodates technology and storage areas as well as a large waiting room, complete with an interactive play area. Tactile surfaces were designed in the common spaces, stimulating the children’s senses of sight and touch. The tactile surfaces encourage the children to touch and feel the differences


in surfaces, and the surfaces are painted in primary colors. The classrooms were designed large enough to accommodate individual learning spaces as well as group activities. Each classroom has a skylight, which introduces soft, natural light into the room. The multipurpose area allows children to play indoors during inclement weather and serves as a gathering space for performing activities. The multipurpose room is equipped with garage-type doors, opening up and down, allowing the

children to physically drive in their riding toys in for storage. The building also has spaces for parents as teachers, special education, and training and testing rooms. The bright colors and scaled design allow the children to learn and grow in an environment suited to their needs. The facility provides a fun, safe place for children and parents to partner with the district for success. The administrative center portion of the building houses the Board of Education room, which was designed with movable partitions, allowing for separate meeting areas for small groups or a large space to accommodate a big group. Each administrative office was designed with soft tones and windows, allowing for maximum natural light. The reception area is spacious and includes space for storage, features up-to-date technology, and is highly visible to all visitors. The dual-functioning building is divided by a long hallway, which transitions from the soft, subtle office tones into the bright, primary-colored early childhood facility. The 17,800-square-foot facility was completed in November of 2009 with a cost of $2 million. n

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G BY D E

OUTSTANDING

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C o m b i n PROJECT ed-Level

School

N

LE

IN

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IN

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Grand Prize

2010

Hawaii Preparatory Academy Energy Lab

2010

Kamuela, HI

Science Laboratory G BY D E

LE

A

IN

G BY D E

Honorable Mention

N

N

2010 Joanna Callas 617/367-3970

N

IG

Flansburgh Architects 77 N. Washington Street Citation of Boston, MA 02114 Excellence www.faiarchitects.com

R

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IN

S

N

IG

R

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A

NEW CONSTRUCTION

2010

Buro Happold Consulting Engineers www.burohappold.com DESIGN TEAM David Croteau, AIA, Project Architect Christopher Brown, AIA, Project Manager Quality Builders, Inc., General Contractor Pa’ahana Enterprises, LLC, Project Management OWNER/CLIENT Hawaii Preparatory Academy Kamuela, HI Lindsay Barnes Jr., Headmaster 808/885-7321 KEY STATS Grades Served: K-12 Building Area: 9,000 square feet Square Foot Cost: $445 Total Project Cost: $4 million Completed: Jan. 2010 Completion: 100%

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onceived as a high school science building dedicated to the study of alternative energy, the new energy lab at Hawaii Preparatory Academy functions as a zero-net-energy, fully sustainable building. The project’s fundamental goal is to educate the next generation of students in environmentally conscious, sustainable living systems. The building’s donor, the founder of a German alternative energy corporation, believes that only through generational education will we truly achieve improved patterns of sustainability. It was his initiative that

Photography: Matthew Millman

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L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n F A L L 2 0 1 0 | www.learningbydesign.biz

challenged the design team to develop a green science building, insisting that it be powered principally by alternative means. The design team and the head of Hawaii Prep’s science department have furthered these goals, expanding the mission to include a great number of building systems that employ sun, water, and wind. The project targets LEED Platinum and Living Building Challenge certification. Completed in January 2010, the energy lab shines as a living laboratory, furthering its educational goals as a functioning

example of sustainability. The energy lab was developed as a reflection of the science curriculum it houses. Progressing from smaller project rooms, to a large research center, to a laboratory, spaces were designed to encourage student discovery, exploration, and experimentation. The building’s configuration facilitates scientific study both indoors and out, linking interior spaces with the surrounding landscape. Students are constantly surrounded by the systems they study, where Hawaii Prep’s energy lab offers a continuous sustainable teaching moment. n


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School

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A

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OUTSTANDING PROJECT

2010

Pine Crest School Central Chilled Water Plant Fort Lauderdale, FL

Campus Master Planning NEW CONSTRUCTION

N

LE

IG

A

S

N

RMF Engineering, Inc. G BY I N Park D E 474 Wando Blvd., Suite 100 N R Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464 www.rmf.com

Honorable Mention Dave Crutchfield 843/971-9639

2010

Design team Dave Crutchfield, PE, LEED AP, Principal Don Zimmerman III, CEM, Project Manager Todd Smith, PE, Mechanical Engineer Dennis Sepavich, PE, Electrical Engineer Owner/Client Pine Crest School Fort Lauderdale, FL 954/492-4100 KEY stats Grades Served: K-12 Size of Site: 50 acres Building Area: 4,149 square feet Square Foot Cost: $1,656 Construction Cost: $6.9 million Total Project Cost: $8.3 million Contract Date: Jan. 2009 Completed: Jan. 2010 Completion: 100% Photography: Moris Moreno

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he new Pine Crest Central Chilled Water Plant is the school’s first LEED Gold certified building and the City of Fort Lauderdale’s first LEED certified new construction project. At the start of the project, the need for the 4,000-squarefoot building was extensively analyzed to determine if combining various campus cooling systems into a central chilled water system was economically prudent. Various types of systems were analyzed, includ-

ing ice storage and thermal storage systems. At the end of the analysis stage, a central chilled water system utilizing three 750ton centrifugal chillers was chosen to replace the various equipment located thought the campus. The new campus chilled water system is sized to accommodate future growth of the campus and accommodate all campus buildings. The chilled water is distributed to the entire campus via 7,000

feet of underground chilled water piping. The architecture uses building elements found in the architecture of the surrounding campus buildings. The location of the new central energy facility was also studied extensively as the campus is surrounded by residential areas that have strict noise migration standards. Postconstruction testing indicated that all noise levels were well under the limits. n

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G BY D E N

G BY D E

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PROJECT C o l l ege / U n i ve r s i t y

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Grand Prize

2010

Central Michigan University—College of Education and Human Services

2010

Professional School

Mt. Pleasant, MI

G BY D E

LE

A

IN

G BY D E

Honorable Mention

N

N

2010 LEED AP Marjorie K. Simmons, Managing Principal/Chairman 248/336-4700

N

IG

SHW Group Citation of 2338 Coolidge Excellence Berkley, MI 48072 www.shwgroup.com

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IN

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NEW CONSTRUCTION

2010

Design team Janice Suchan, AIA, LEED AP, Principal-in-Charge Tod R. Stevens, AIA, LEED AP, Principal Designer Nathaniel M. Walsh, AIA, LEED AP, Project Architect Richard A. Corona, PE, LEED AP, Principal Engineer Jeffrey M. Walenciak, PE, LEED AP, Lead Electrical Engineer Thomas A. Baier, PE, Lead Structural Engineer Owner/Client Central Michigan University Mt. Pleasant, MI Stephen Lawrence, Associate Vice President, Facilities Management 989/774-4000 KEY stats Grades Served: Post-secondary Capacity: 884 students Size of Site: 5.2 acres Building Area: 136,255 square feet Building Volume: 2.4 million cubic feet Space per Student: 154 square feet Cost per Student: $39,140 Square Foot Cost: $254 Construction Cost: $34.6 million Total Project Cost: $50 million Contract Date: Jan. 2006 Completed: June 2009 Completion: 100% Photography: Justin Maconochi

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entral Michigan University’s new College of Education, seeking LEED Gold certification, possesses an overall integrated approach to sustainable design and is devoted to the creation of modern student learning environments. The facility houses a nationally renowned education program, early childhood development center, human development clinic, reading clinic, and classroom and laboratory space. Exterior walls consist of terra-cotta pressure-equalized rain-screen cladding, glass curtain wall, and metal panels.

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Accents of slate walls echo the tradition of chalkboards in education. Insulated low-E coated and other high-performance glazing is used in all punched windows and curtain walls. Clerestory windows are used above primary circulation spaces to provide natural daylighting. Overhangs and extended metal frames on southernfacing windows project to shield from the summer sun. All low roofs and the southern high roof are designed with sedum green roofs. Roof construction includes Energy Star compliant roof membrane

installed over rigid insulation, creating a “cool” roof structure. The building is technology rich, offering state-of-the-art technology capabilities, including wired and wireless network access, visual presentation, distance learning, collaboration, media capture, streaming, and digital archiving of many class activities. This cohesive, integrative, technologically enriched, and learner-centered environment will significantly benefit students, faculty, and the wider community for generations to come. n


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College/University

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OUTSTANDING PROJECT

2010

Green School Building Interior Design

Iowa State University—College of Design: King Pavilion Ames, IA

RENOVATION/ADDITION/ RESTORATION DE

IN

IG

N

LE

N

301 Grand Ave. Des Moines, IA 50309 www.rdgusa.com Honorable R

S

A

RDG Planning & Design G BY

Mention Brian Lindgren

515/288-3141

2010

DESIGN TEAM Charles Saul Engineering, Structural Engineer RDG Planning & Design, Interior Design Conservation Design Forum, Landscape Architecture RDG Planning & Design Lighting Design Weidt Group, Energy and Daylighting OWNER/CLIENT Iowa State University Ames, IA Kerry Dixon-Fox, Facilities Planning & Management 515/294-8028 KEY STATS Grades Served: First- and secondyear design students Capacity: 210 students Size of Site: 0.9 acres Building Area: 22,000 square feet Building Volume: 280,000 cubic feet Space per Student: 1,333 square feet Cost per Student: $31,428 Square Foot Cost: $216 Construction Cost: $4.75 million Total Project Cost: $6.6 million Contract Date: Feb. 2008 Completed: Aug. 2009 Completion: 100% Photography: Cameron Campbell

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he project challenge was to create a relatively small addition to the rear of the existing six-story College of Design facility. The building program includes housing Iowa State University’s freshman core design program and secondyear architecture, landscape architecture, and interior design studio classrooms. The goal was to build a facility that would facilitate student interaction and exploration of ideas.

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The project is sustainably designed and has achieved a LEED Platinum certification. One of the project’s main goals is to create a living laboratory that will demonstrate sustainability to the students learning in the facility. The design solution is a pavilion design, pulled slightly away from the main building and organized as a two-story form. Open studio classroom environments are efficiently organized around a central core space that functions as

flexible experimentation space. The center volume allows natural daylight to penetrate deep into the center of the building to the lower level. Clerestory and full-height corner perimeter windows capture daylight into each studio classroom. The building will essentially require no electric lighting during daytime hours. The use of a vegetated roof on the facility reduces heat island effect and stormwater management needs on the property. n


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GN

OUTSTANDING PROJECT

2010

NEW CONSTRUCTION

S

IG

N

N

The Collaborative Inc. G BY D IN E Ave. N 500 Madison R Toledo, OH 43604 www.thecollaborativeinc.com

A

Lourdes College—McAlear and Delp Halls Sylvania, OH

Entire School/Campus Building

LE

College/University

N

LE

IG

A

N

S

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Honorable Michael A. Muse Mention 419/242-7405

2010 Design team Paul Hollenbeck, AIA, Partner-in-Charge Michael A. Muse, AIA, Project Manager Matt Clarkson, Assoc. AIA, Design Team Anne Yager, ASLA, LEED AP, Landscape Architect Dorey Fox, IIDA, Interior Designer Dave Serra, Construction Documents Owner/Client Lourdes College Sylvania, OH Dr. Robert Helmer, President 419/824-3809 KEY stats Grades Served: Post-secondary Capacity: 2,131 students Size of Site: 1.5 acres Building Area: 38,000 square feet Building Volume: 184,164 cubic feet Space per Student: 17 square feet Cost per Student: $2,903 Square Foot Cost: $163 Construction Cost: $6.2 million Total Project Cost: $6.8 million Contract Date: Nov. 2005 Completed: Sept. 2007 Completion: 100% Photography: Maconochie Photography (top), Photo Works, Inc. (middle, bottom)

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s the first new building in 40 years, this project provides more classroom space and sets the tone for future campus expansions. The building includes a welcome center, eight classrooms, faculty offices, a student center, and the WIN Center, a tutoring and educational outreach program. The major goals for the project suggested that the design solution respect the existing Spanish mission campus architecture and that it be rooted in Franciscan traditions. McAlear Hall, the classroom wing, maintains the tradition of the campus’ Spanish mission style through its scale and building materials. Simultaneously, the design solution is also rooted in this time period. Delp Hall houses the WIN Center, and with its need for daylighting, transparency, and monitoring, this portion of the building became a more contemporary architectural element. Sponsored by the Sisters of St. Francis, Lourdes College celebrates St. Francis, the patron saint of animals and the environment. Delp Hall draws on the winged inspiration of St. Francis’ portraits to create an uplifting space with abundant but controlled daylight and views. The winged roof system gathers rainwater and directs it back to the groundwater system. Additional sustainable design initiatives include a geothermal HVAC system and recycled and recyclable materials integration. n

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2010

N

IN

G BY D E

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College/University

Honorable Mention

N

N

Citation of Excellence

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IG

A

G BY D E

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The Roe Center at Central College 2010

Pella, IA

Green School Building Interior Design NEW CONSTRUCTION

RDG Planning & Design 301 Grand Ave. Des Moines, IA 50309 www.rdgusa.com Jeff Blosser 515/288-3141 Design team Weitz Construction, Primary Contractor MEP Associates, Mechanical, Electrical, and Civil Engineers Charles Saul Engineering, Structural Engineer RDG Planning & Design, Landscape Architect Owner/Client Central College Pella, IA Mike Lubberden, Director of Facilities Planning & Management 641/628-5346 KEY stats Grades Served: Post-secondary Capacity: 612 students Size of Site: 2.1 acres Building Area: 57,000 square feet Building Volume: 665,373 cubic feet Space per Student: 93 square feet Cost per Student: $20,915 Square Foot Cost: $225 Construction Cost: $12.8 million Total Project Cost: $15.4 million Contract Date: Mar. 2008 Completed: Aug. 2009 Completion: 100% Photography: Cameron Campbell

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he project challenge at Central College was to create a dynamic learning environment for three college departments sharing the same space for the first time. The main project goal was a collaboration catalyst for students, faculty, and community partners in the areas of education, psychology, and community-based learning. This multipurpose classroom and instruction building was crafted to be highly sustainable, technology rich, and campus friendly. The building was designed to serve others—the campus, community, environment, students, and faculty—from its very inception. Designed as a flexible learning environment, this highly transparent and naturally lit building facilitates new pedagogical techniques for effective instruction and accomplishment of beneficial life‑long learning objectives. The first building to break the traditional western boundary of campus, this exciting structure sets a high bar by achieving a LEED Platinum certification,

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reinforcing Central College’s specific sustainable strategies. The specific sustainable strategies incorporated in this project include a rainwater harvest system, a semi-intensive vegetative roof, a native landscape site design, photovoltaic panels, and a smart building energy management system. More than 40 percent of the materials used for construction came from regional sources, with more than 30 percent of the materials being comprised of recycled content. A construction waste management plan was incorporated, diverting 80 percent of the construction and demolition debris from the landfill. n www.learningbydesign.biz | L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n F A L L 2 0 1 0

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College/University

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A

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OUTSTANDING PROJECT

2010

University of Indianapolis East Hall Indianapolis, IN

Dormitories/ Residence Halls NEW CONSTRUCTION

Honorable

N

LE

IG

A

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Design Collaborative, Inc. G BY D IN E Suite 600 N Main Street, 200RE. Fort Wayne, IN 46802 www.designcollaborative.com Kevin J. Scully, NCARB Mention 260/422-4241

2010

DESIGN TEAM Kevin J. Scully, NCARB, Project Architect Timothy N. Terman, NCARB, Project Manager Jason B. Baker, PE, LEED AP, Mechanical Engineer Eric W. Sank, PE, LEED AP, RCDD, Electrical Engineer Shiel Sexton Company, Construction Manager Structural Engineering Services, Structural Engineer Fore Sight Consulting, LLC Civil Engineer OWNER/CLIENT University of Indianapolis Indianapolis, IN Ken Piepenbrink, Director of Physical Plant 317/788-3231 KEY STATS Grades Served: Post-secondary Capacity: 153 students Size of Site: 3.8 acres Building Area: 62,200 square feet Building Volume: 715,300 cubic feet Space per Student: 420 square feet Cost per Student: $56,128 Square Foot Cost: $134 Construction Cost: $8.3 million Total Project Cost: $9.8 million Contract Date: Sept. 2008 Completed: Aug. 2009 Completion: 100% Photography: Doran Wilson, M. Photog. MEI Cr. CPP AS - P

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ompleted in August 2009, East Hall at the University of Indianapolis features modern design elements that fit beautifully within the traditional campus architecture. The facility was constructed with autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC). AAC is a highly sustainable precast building stone made of all-natural raw materials. It provides structure, insulation, and fire resistance in a single material. The four-story facility has 148 single-occupant suites with private access and a restroom shared with one other student room. The facility features two-story atriums on the first and third floors. The $9.8 million facility also has a central gathering area on the first floor with a lounge, bistro, conference room, offices, and a suite for the residential director. Laundry facilities are located on the second and fourth floors, and a fireplace lounge is located on the third floor. The building is primarily AAC with unified steel frame, joist, and deck construction. Brick veneer and stucco over the AAC make up the exterior

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façade. The building features four-story curtain wall at the lobby entry as well as at the west and east entries. The

HVAC system is primarily individual PTAC units in the suites with a split system in the common areas/lounges. n


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Specialized

Educational

Facility

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A

N

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OUTSTANDING PROJECT

2010

Centennial Hills Library Las Vegas, NV

Library/Media Center NEW CONSTRUCTION

Honorable

N

LE

IG

A

S

N

JMA Architecture StudioS G BY D IN N CovingtonE Cross Drive 10150 R Las Vegas, NV 89144 www.jmaarch.com Thomas J. Schoeman, AIA Mention 702/731-2033

2010 Design team JMA Architecture Studios, Architecture & Interior Design Rafael Construction, General Contractor Wright Engineers, Structural Engineer Harris Consulting Engineers, Electrical and Mechanical Engineer Nevada by Design, Civil Engineer J.W. Zunino & Associates, Landscape Architect Owner/Client Las Vegas–Clark County Library District Las Vegas, NV Jeanne Goodrich, Executive Director 702/507-6100 KEY stats Capacity: 689 students Size of Site: 7 acres Building Area: 45,555 square feet

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entennial Hills Library is built on a seven-acre site in the growing northwest area of Las Vegas. The library is sited on an east/west axis, allowing floorto-ceiling glass walls in a “Piet Mondrian” pattern to celebrate indirect daylight from the north and south. This glazing system frames views to the adjacent city park to the north. The landscape creates lush and cool areas while being sensitive to water use and the hot desert climate. Exterior materials include

glazing, stone, stucco, and metal shade structures. Interior materials include terrazzo flooring, recyclable carpet, eco-resin panels, and linoleum countertops. The library is designed to achieve LEED Gold certification. Natural daylighting via glazing with internal blinds reduces the need for electric lights, thereby reducing heat gain and cooling costs. The building envelope and an efficient mechanical system work with other systems to maximize energy perfor-

mance and efficiency. Other elements include an extensive recycling program, the use of exterior shading devices, and automatic photocell-based lighting controls. The library utilizes the most current technologies, including automated sorting equipment and a radio frequency identification system. These technologies increase the turnaround of the volume collection and the 500,000 items the district moves between the branches each month. n

Building Volume: 1.3 million cubic feet Space per Student: 66 square feet Cost per Student: $25,544 Square Foot Cost: $386 Construction Cost: $17.6 million Total Project Cost: $20.1 million Contract Date: July 2007 Completed: Jan. 2009 Completion: 100% Photography: JMA Architecture Studios

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Specialized

Educational

Facility

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A

N

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OUTSTANDING PROJECT

2010

Green School Building Interior Design

Hartford Central School District Alternative Energy Plant Hartford, New York

NEW CONSTRUCTION

N

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IG

A

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CSArchGArchitecture/ BY D IN E N Engineering/Construction R Management 40 Beaver Street Honorable Albany, NY 12207 Mention

www.csarchpc.com Daniel A. Langer 2010 518/463-8068 DESIGN TEAM

Daniel A. Langer, AIA, Principal-in-Charge Tina Mesiti-Ceas, AIA, Project Designer Donald Thomas, AIA, Project Architect Scott Wolfe, Director of Construction Management Robert MacHattie, Construction Site Representative OWNER/CLIENT Hartford Central School District Hartford, NY Thomas W. Abraham, Superintendent 518/632-5222 KEY STATS Size of Site: 20 acres Building Area: 2,132 square feet Building Volume: 40,508 cubic feet Square Foot Cost: $215 Construction Cost: $458,000 Total Project Cost: $1.5 million Contract Date: Apr. 2008 Completed: Dec. 2009 Completion: 100% Photography: Randall Perry Photography

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he Alternative Energy Plant at Hartford Central School District was developed to provide a long-term, energy-saving, and cost-effective solution to the district’s heating needs. Instead of burning oil, the plant utilizes wood chips from local tree farms as fuel. Delivered in bulk and stored within the building in a fuel bunker, the chips move by auger into a gasifier, where they are ignited, super-heated

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to 2,200°F by an induced air flow, and converted to a gas. This gas is then burned in a standard boiler to produce hot water for distribution throughout the heating system of the entire school complex. The district expects impressive long-term cost savings from the new system. Two years ago, the district used $110,000 worth of fuel oil; chips to provide an equivalent amount of heat will cost about $40,000, and that money will

be spent locally. An additional benefit is that the waste product from the combustion of the wood chips—called potash—can be used by local farmers as fertilizer. The Alternative Energy Plant features extensive glazing that allows the system to be observed in operation from the outside, and the district plans to create a hands-on environmental curriculum utilizing the plant as a teaching tool. n


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Specialized

Educational

Facility

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A

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OUTSTANDING PROJECT

2010

Lee’s Summit R-VII School District Aquatic Center Lee’s Summit, MO

Aquatic Center

ACI/Frangkiser G BY D IN E Inc. N Hutchens,

1421 E. 104th Street Kansas City, MO 64131 Honorable www.aci-frangkiser.com IG

N

N

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A

NEW CONSTRUCTION

Mention

Michael Kautz 816/761-8900

2010

Design team Michael Kautz, Principal-in-Charge Pat Sutliffe, Project Architect Christine Parisi, Interior Designer Owner/Client Lee’s Summit R-VII School District Lee’s Summit, MO Dr. David McGehee Superintendent 816/986-1000 KEY stats Capacity: 550 students Size of Site: 8.6 acres Building Area: 34,526 square feet Building Volume: 851,900 cubic feet Space per Student: 63 square feet Cost per Student: $19,157 Square Foot Cost: $305 Construction Cost: $10.5 million Total Project Cost: $11.9 million Contract Date: July 2008 Completed: Aug. 2009 Completion: 100% Photography: Michael Spillers Photography

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hen the Lee’s Summit R-VII School District decided to build an aquatic center, the three high schools were using rented pool facilities that had become too small to adequately support the education, training, and competition needs for the sport of swimming. Additionally, a future fourth high school was being planned. The aquatic center’s primary function is to provide a swimming and diving facility for high school competitive teams, with opportunities for middle school intramurals, physical education/health instruction, extracurricular elementary swim lessons, and community aquatics. To conserve school district funds, the aquatic center is located at a middle school campus, which eliminated the cost of land purchase and provided for shared existing parking. The site also offers a neutral site for all of the high schools. The pool measures 25 yards by 50 meters with a moveable bulkhead. This provides eight lanes for competition and 23 lanes that are 25 yards long for practice. There are two 1-meter and one 3-meter diving boards, provided for competition and training. The pool is designed with

various depths, ranging from 4 feet to 13 feet deep. With the varied zones, the design allows for competition, training, and fitness. Spectators enter the aquatic center at the main lobby,

with access to concessions, restrooms, and elevated seating for 400 people. A separate mechanical system is provided at the spectator seating area to provide comfort during the aquatic events. n

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Index to Projects By State California Malibu High School................................. 8, 36 Montgomery High School...................... 38-39 North Elementary Multipurpose Building...................................................... 26 Connecticut Norwich Technical High School.................... 41 Florida Pine Crest Lower School......................... 28-29 Pine Crest School Central Chilled Water Plant..................................... 53 Georgia Arabia Mountain High School..................... 33 Hawaii Hawaii Preparatory Academy Energy Lab............................ 5-6, 52 Illinois Elgin Academy—Harold D. Rider Family Media, Science, and Fine Arts Center.......................................... 49 Metea Valley High School............................ 37 Ridgewood High School Gymnasium........... 44 Indiana University of Indianapolis East Hall.............. 60 Iowa Dowling Catholic High School..................... 35 Iowa State University—College of Design: King Pavilion.............................. 56 The Roe Center at Central College................................ 10, 58-59

Kentucky T.C. Cherry Elementary School.................... 30 Massachusetts Needham High School................................ 40 Michigan Central Michigan University— College of Education and Human Services................................................ 6-7, 54 Oakwood Intermediate School.................... 32 Prairie Ridge Elementary School.................. 27 Minnesota Cannon Falls High School/Middle School..... 34 Missouri Hancock Early Childhood and Administrative Center............................ 50-51 Lee’s Summit R-VII School District Aquatic Center........................................... 63 Nevada Centennial Hills Library................................ 61 New Mexico Albuquerque Public Schools Desert Willow Family School....................... 20 V. Sue Cleveland High School................ 10, 45 New York Hartford Central School District Alternative Energy Plant.............................. 62 Ohio Lourdes College—McAlear and Delp Halls............................................. 57 Oklahoma Owasso Public Schools—

Index to Advertisers Big Ass Fan Company.................................................................... 18 www.bigassfans.com, 877/BIG-FANS

CRETESEAL........................................................................................ 9 www.creteseal.com, Jim Christie, 800/278-4273

KI.............................................................................................Cover 3 www.kieducation.com, 800/424-2432

NanaWall Systems, Inc...........................................................Cover 4 www.nanawall.com, Ebraham Nana, 800/873-5673 x 201

NICHIHA USA, Inc........................................................................... 55 www.nichiha.com, 866/424-4421

Tandus Flooring.............................................................................. 17 www.tandus.com, John Sumlin, 800/248-2878

U.S. Green Building Council..................................................Cover 2 www.usgbc.org, 202/828-7422

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Wellness Center.......................................... 42 Pennsylvania Spring Grove Area High School.............. 46-47 Texas Jacob’s Well Elementary School................... 21 Kennedy Middle School.............................. 31 Mittie A. Pullam Elementary School............. 25 Utah Park City High School.................................. 43 Virginia Manassas Park Elementary School and Pre-K................................................ 4, 24 Washington-Lee High School...................... 48 Washington Eastgate Elementary School............... 8, 22-23

Index to Architects ACI/Frangkiser Hutchens, Inc........................63 Buro Happold Consulting Engineers.............52 Crabtree, Rohrbaugh & Associates - Architects........................... 46-47 CSArch Architecture/Engineering/ Construction Management..........................62 Design Collaborative, Inc..............................60 DLA Architects, Ltd. (Dahlquist and Lutzow Architects)..........................44, 49 DLR Group...................................................37 Drummey Rosane Anderson, Inc..................40 Fanning Howey Associates, Inc...............10, 45 Flansburgh Architects........................... 5-6, 52 Gignac & Associates, LLP........................25, 31 GMB Architecture + Engineering..................32 Grimm + Parker Architects...........................48 HMC Architects.......................................9, 36 JMA Architecture Studios.............................61 Moser Pilon Nelson, Architects, LLC.............41 NAC|Architecture............................... 8, 22-23 O’Connell Robertson....................................21 Perkins+Will.................................................33 RDG Planning & Design........ 10, 35, 56, 58-59 RMF Engineering, Inc...................................53 RossTarrant Architects, Inc............................30 Ruhnau Ruhnau Clarke.......................... 38-39 SHW Group......................................... 6-7, 54 Smiley Glotter Nyberg Architects..................34 The Collaborative Inc...................................57 The Hartman + Majewski Design Group.......20 The Stacey Group........................................42 TowerPinkster..............................................27 Van H. Gilbert Architect PC....................10, 45 VCBO Architecture.......................................43 VMDO Architects, P.C.......................... 4-5, 24 Wm. B. Ittner, Inc................................... 50-51 WRNS Studio...............................................26 Zyscovich Architects............................... 28-29


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Learning By Design Fall 2010  

The Premier Source for Education Design Innovation and Excellence

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