Issuu on Google+

11 Exceptional Men of 2011 Pages 13–15

FREE COPY

October 7 – October 13, 2011

Volume 3, Issue 40

Are You Ready to Zumba! Page 12

FREE

From another world…Page 20

rs! o t s e c n a r u o y Dig up Page 11

A Valley Homecoming Page 4

Best Buddies Page 9

Bald Eagle Beauties Page 4

What’s Inside:

Schools.......................................4 Park’s View.................................6 Sports................................. 16–19 Entertainment..................... 20–21 What’s Happening....................22

Stirring & Stirring His Brew Page 11

Group Meetings........................23 Centre County Libraries...........24 Deed Transfers.........................25 Community Announcements....25 Classifieds................................26

Check Out Our Website at www.centrecountygazette.com

At Last... LOCAL NEWS!


PAGE 2

THE GAZETTE - SERVING CENTRE COUNTY

OCTOBER 7, 2011

On The Cover

Homemade Simmering Oil and

This photo of mums at a local farm stand was taken by Amy Debach Confer, professional photographer and The Fresh Life columnist for The Gazette.

Potpourri New Fall Scents Autumn Harvest and

Love Potion Purchase my homemade Potpourri and Simmering Oils at Knoebel’s Covered Bridge Craft Festival in Elysburg, PA October 7, 8 and 9th. shop online @ shopyellowhouse.com

800-511-6579

it’s a great rate, Sure but that’s not the

best part.

Local Decisions.

2.99 APR %

*

*Ho me Equity L oa n Fixe d For 2 Ye a rs $10, 000 Min imu m L o a n A m o u n t

Get Your Great Rate Today! (888) 412-5772 or jssb.com - Quick Code: Home

www.jssb.com

*To obtain this special rate a minimum loan amount of $10,000 not currently borrowed from Jersey Shore State Bank is required. Maximum Loan Amount $250,000. With a $10,000 loan and a 2 year term the monthly payment would be $430.27. Loan payment does not include amount for taxes and insurance premiums, so your total obligation will be greater. 85% maximum loan to value ratio on primary residence only. Purchase money loans and certain other loans over $100,000 may require borrower paid title insurance. Offers subject to credit approval. Rates and terms accurate as of publication date and subject to change. Cannot be combined with other promotional rates and account specials. Automatic payment form a Jersey Shore State Bank Account is required. Additional rates and terms available. Member FDIC

JA265-24-97731-4


OCTOBER 7, 2011

WWW.CENTRECOUNTYGAZETTE.COM

Editor’s Prologue

Letters To The Editor

By Sandie Biddle, managing editor Editor@CentreCountyGazette.com CCGazette@Hughes.net

Jag Owners’ Identity

There were many small victories to celebrate in Happy Valley this past week. Tiffany Woodall reported the Down Syndrome Buddy Walk, where $38,000 was raised for Down syndrome. Sam Stitzer attended a presentation at the Old Fort American Legion where an astounding $24,000 was donated to Penns Valley HOPE and EMT funds. A loyal friend of State College, Bill Welch, was memorialized by the dedication of Mayor Welch Plaza in front of the municipal building. Years of planning and grants came to fruition with the opening of a new trail through Spring Creek Canyon – a recreational treasure for all to enjoy. Residents of Aaronsburg opened their doors, and their hearts, to visitors to their Dutch Fall Festival, featuring yard sales and fabulous fresh-baked goodies, including the historical museum’s famous apple dumplings. (There are still 700 left, on sale tomorrow – Saturday, October 8, from 10 a.m. ’til noon.) All these events took place outdoors in the midst of drizzles, downpours, sprinkles, and gully washers. Nothing deters our neighbors from their appointed good deeds! Karen offers Part Two of her genealogy series in this issue, focusing on the PA Room at the Centre County Historical Museum in Bellefonte – a treasure trove of family history, events, and timelines. Karen also introduces us to a local artist who creates stunning paintings of the real and surreal – in vivid color and startling clarity. With a little help from my friends, literally, The Gazette is proud to present 11 Exceptional Men of 2011, plus three more who were nominated and deserved recognition. Thanks, Brian Bassett, Tammy Miller, and Sam Stitzer for helping me track down and chronicle the deeds of these humble, big-hearted neighbors. They care for abandoned pets, raise money for the hungry, volunteer for hurricane relief, inspire parishioners, host exchange students, coach kids’ teams, and comfort victims of crime. We will continue to feature more exceptional Centre County citizens in The Gazette, lauding them as Hometown Heroes and in other ways. When times are tough, and they are, we turn first to one another. Neighbor helping neighbor. Independent, interdependent – giving simply because we care. That’s the American way. Next week, it’s our Pink Ribbon issue, with fundraisers, medical news, charities, events, and inspiration for those with breast cancer and those who love them.

In the article about the 11th Annual Milesburg Apple Harvest Festival and Car, Truck, and Motorcycle Show, there was mention of a spectacular 1963 Jaguar (also featured on our front cover). Here’s what Dave Bagley, the owner wrote, us: “The story in this week’s Centre County Gazette about the 1963 JAG owned by Dave and Barb Bosley of Milesburg – the last name is Bagley. If it cannot be corrected, no big deal. Thank you for all of the coverage you folks do.” – Dave Bagley Well, Dave and Barb, it is a big deal to us! Thank you for reading The Gazette and for preserving a very fine bit of hot-rod history. “One was a 1963 Jaguar XKE roadster owned by Dave and Barb Bagley. This rare, black beauty featured Jag’s dual overhead cam, six-cylinder engine with triple carburetors, the “flipnose” front end, and a tan leather interior. The XKE, with its long nose and sweeping curves is considered to be one of the most beautiful cars ever made, and its design was way ahead of its time in the 1960s.”

Mark your preference: www.centrecountygazette.com

Canoeing or Kayaking?

October 14 – Breast Cancer Pink Ribbon issue October 21 & 28 – Halloween’s scariest, friendliest, most community-minded events November 4 – Hunters’ Guide Advertisers, choose the features that suit your business best Sales@centrecountygazette.com

azette

Serving Centre County

Last Week’s Results

Autumn 100% Spring 0%

Gazette Editorial Policy We invite comment, rebuttal, or the expression of your own thoughts about matters you deem of public importance. We invite stories and photos about our community and its people. All submissions must be of the writers own

azette The

PUBLISHER Arnie Stott GENERAL MANAGER Don Bedell MANAGING EDITOR Sandie Biddle BUSINESS MANAGER Susan Stott PENNS VALLEY BUREAU CHIEF Sam Stitzer PennsValley@CentreCountyGazette.com State College NEWS StateCollege@CentreCountyGazette.com SPORTS Les Barnhart, Editor Matt Masullo sports@centrecountygazette.com OFFICE MANAGER Patti Marshall PRODUCTION MANAGER Michael Malicki GRAPHIC DESIGN Ralph Boldin Brandy Ritchey Rose Ann Hoover Sharen Kuhn ADVERTISING CONSULTANTS Tom Orr Vicki Gillette SUBMIT YOUR NEWS: editor@centrecountygazette.com

The Gazette is a weekly newspaper seving Centre County and is published by Stott Publications, Inc., P.O. Box 129, Warriors Mark, PA 16877. Reproduction of any portion of any issue is not permitted without written permission from Stott Publications, Inc. Publisher reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement for any reason.

creation and include contact information (which may be withheld upon request) The Gazette reserves the right to reject or edit any submission. Att: Editor, The Gazette, P.O. Box 129, Warriors Mark, PA 16877

BUILDING FOR SALE

Serving Centre County FREE Every Friday at your favorite newsstand And online at www.centrecountygazette.com

• Built in 2003 • Former Car Lot Every Friday in October, 6:00pm Reservations recommended: 814-364-1664 or info@pennscave.com

Bring your own flashlights and shine a different perspective on our cave formations!

• 1/3 Acre Lot • Building has 3 Offices, Utility Room, Bathroom, and a 2 Bay Garage • Gravel Lot • Sewer/Water/Electric/Cable

across from Bald Eagle Area High School

$16.50

“CALL FOR MORE DETAILS”

age 13 and up

222 Penns Cave Road, Centre Hall

HIGH TRAFFIC LOCATION

$8.75

ages 2 to 12

www.pennscave.com

Serving Centre County

The Gazette P.O. Box 129 Warriors Mark, PA 16877 Tel.: 814-632-6700 Fax: 814-632-6699 www.CentreCountyGazette.com

ADVERTISING sales@centrecountygazette.com

Look for the ‘This or That’ logo in the bottom left of the Home Page to cast your vote online.

Upcoming Features IN The Gazette

The

PAGE 3

(814) 931 -8333


PAGE 4

THE GAZETTE - SERVING CENTRE COUNTY

OCTOBER 7, 2011

Centre Count y Schools Penns Valley Students Invited to Compete The Penns Valley Conservation Association invites the public to its Renewable Energy and Conservation Fair on October 22. The Penns Valley Area School District will host the fair in the Penns Valley Area High School cafeteria from noon to 4 p.m. The fair will start at noon with the presentation of the school district-wide renewable energy and conservation art exhibition winners. Prizes will be awarded for each of four grade divisions: K-2, 3-5, 6-8, and 9-12 and the entries will be on display. Any media, two or three-dimensional art entries are now being solicited by Kathleen Galligan, Environmental Educator in the Penns Valley School District. The exhibition is open to all students in the Penns Valley area. Contact Kathleen Galligan by e-mail: kgalligan@pennsvalley.org for details. The entries will showcase the artists’ perceptions of renewable energy – its forms, its values, and its social qualities.

Meet the Penns Valley Stock Market Game Team Recently, Allan Darr, ProAct, LTD’s President and CEO and Brian Griffith, Penns Valley School District Superintendent, met with the students who are participating in the Centre County Gazette Stock Market Game Challenge from EconomicsPennsylvania.  The students playing in this special competition are 12th grade students Austin Auman and Derek Dashem and 11th grade student, Scott Johnson. Each of these young men expects to major in business in college and currently play football for Penns Valley.    Teacher, Mrs. Jane Brooker, shared, “The Stock Market Game will help these students in their pursuit of business, and two of the students played the game previously in the Gifted Program under the leadership of Penns Valley teacher, Eric Weaver. This The Penns Valley team joins their superintendent is my 10th and a game sponsor in this picture, L to R: Brian year at PVHS Griffith, Superintendent of Penns Valley School District; Austin Auman, Scott Johnson and Derek and 15th year Dashem - Penns Valley High School students; and overall teaching. sponsor Allan Darr, president and CEO of ProAct LTD The SMG is an amazing experience for students. A few of my students are now trading on the stock market and doing well.” Mrs. Brooker has an MBA in Business from University of Findlay and the students are part of her Introduction to Business Class. Mr. Brian Griffith shared, “Penns Valley is one the highest-performing school districts in the state, when measured against student achievement. We have been recognized as one top 50 most improved school districts. In addition, one of our school buildings has been recognized as one of the top 25 performers for three consecutive years. Our district once again made AYP in all schools, subgroups and grade spans.”  The AYP is Adequate Yearly Progress on the PSSA testing required for all PA students. Mr. Allan Darr is the president and CEO of ProAct, LTD and his company develops and manufacturers unique medical devices for very specific procedures to improve successful outcomes. Their minimally invasive surgery products are distributed by large medical device companies globally. ProAct celebrates its 22nd year in this field.  The Gazette along with four local businesses joined to support five local schools in sponsorship of the Centre County Gazette Stock Market Game Challenge from EconomicsPennsylvania.  One team of three to five high school students will represent each school in local competition. They are Bald Eagle, Bellefonte, Penns Valley, and State College High Schools, along with Central Pennsylvania Institute for Science and Technology (CPI).  Each team is given $100,000 in hypothetical money and invests in the stocks, bonds, and mutual funds.  The team with the most money at the end wins. The top three teams will be listed in the newspaper each week during the game, which begins on October 19 and will finish on December 16.  A recognition event will be held at CPI on December 20.  This program is being provided by the Gazette and local businesses, Fulton Bank, ProAct LTD, Lion Country KIA, and Videon Central, Inc.   Tom Mertz, President of Lion Country KIA added, “What a great learning experience.” Find more information about EconomicsPennsylvania at economicspa.org or by calling Carolyn Shirk (570) 975-5149.

Penns Valley Celebrates Homecoming Article & photos by Sam Stitzer

parade. The Penns Valley Band warmed The citizens of Penns Valley honored a up the crowd with several numbers, then great tradition last week by celebrating the the parade float winners were announced. high school football team’s homecoming. The Next, the Homecoming Queen contestants Homecoming Parade was held on Thursday, September 29 at the Grange Fairgrounds Julia Dawson, Lilly Kline, Haley Zerby, in Centre Hall. It stepped off at 6:30 p.m. Hannah Kapinus, and Gabi Maylock, were introduced and applauded by the crowd. near the Homan Lane entrance, and traveled across the fairgrounds to the grandstand, Finally, Coach Martin Tobias took the stage Steve Foust and Ellie Coursen which was packed with spectators eagerly and thanked everyone for their support of prepared the Grace United Methodist awaiting its arrival. his team, then called the senior members of Church float. The parade’s theme was the team onstage to be recog“Superheroes,” and fittingly, the nized for their years of service Grand Marshals of the parade were to the Rams team. The whole members of the valley’s volunteer evening was a great show of fire companies and EMT ambusupport and recognition by the lance personnel. Although these community for Penns Valley’s people can’t leap tall buildings in young athletes. a single bound, they have been The homecoming Homecoming Queen candidate known to rush into burning buildfootball game was played Julia Dawson rode past the ings to perform heroic rescues, and Bob Booz topped a taco under the Friday night lights at grandstand. Julia was crowned at one of the many food they are all Penns Valley High the Penns Valley stadium. The Homecoming Queen on vendors at the H School graduates. They are Penns Penns Valley Band opened the Friday night. omecoming parade. Valley’s genuine heroes! festivities with their “Superhe The parade featured many floats representing local civic roes” field show, featuring music from the Superman movie. groups and churches, as well as classes and athletic teams in About halfway through the game, the Rams were probably the Penns Valley district. The Penns Valley High School band hoping Superman would show up wearing a blue jersey to marched into the grandstand looking good, and drawing help them in their struggle against the Mounties of Philipsgreat applause and cheers. There were even alumni major- burg-Osceola High School. But the Man of Steel must have ettes, showing the crowd that they can still twirl and strut been busy fighting crime in Metropolis, and couldn’t fly to after just a FEW years! Spring Mills fast enough to prevent the rams from taking a Parade announcer, Scott Geesey, introduced each parade 46-21 drubbing by the Mounties. unit, and offered some witty remarks, to the crowd’s delight. At halftime, the Homecoming Queen candidates were Prizes were awarded to floats in several classes. The winners, escorted past the home stands, and took their places in front as determined by the Grand Marshal judges, were: of the traditional arches of blue and white balloons. Tension built as the winners were announced. The second runner-up Elementary Division (grades K-4) –  is Hannah Kapinus. First runner-up is Gabi Maylock, and the Centre Hall-Potter Elementary School 2011 Penns Valley Homecoming queen is Julia Dawson. Julia Middle Level Division (grades 5-8) – was crowned by the 2010 Homecoming Queen, Tessa DearPenns Valley Intermediate School High School Division (grades 9-12) – dorff. Cheers, tears, and hugs accompanied the crowning. It was a proud moment for all these young ladies and 11th Grade – Penns Valley Class of 2013 their families and friends. But more then just pride, it was Community Organizations Division – Grace United Methodist Church of Centre Hall the culmination of a great tradition which is played out on High School Organization Division –  football fields all across the land on crisp autumn nights. We Lady Ram Soccer Team congratulate the new queen and her court, as well as all the The parade was enjoyed by a large crowd of onlookers, folks who worked so diligently to organize these great Homewho also packed the various food stands near the grandstand, coming events. snatching up hot food and drinks See all of Sam’s on a cool autumn night. photos from the Penns A pep rally was held in Valley Homecoming the grandstand following the the last weekend in September.

Penns Valley’s future heroes: the flag football team on their float

The Penns Valley Ram escorted the Penns Valley cheerleaders to the grandstand.

The Penns Valley Band drum The Lady Ram Soccer Team rode on line got the crowd excited at the a truck decorated like a soccer ball. Homecoming game.

Coach Tobias introduced the senior members of the football team at the pep rally.

Homecoming Queen candidates and escorts waited for the announcement of winners.

Tessa Deardorff, 2010 Homecoming Queen congratulated 2011 queen Julia Dawson, while Julia’s father, Michael Dawson looks on.

BEA Homecoming Scheduled for October 7

Bald Eagle Area will hold its Homecoming Activities at Alumni Field on Friday, October 7, beginning at 6:30 p.m. Calling BEA alumni! Alumni Marching Band members are invited to play their instrument or twirl their baton or flag during Homecoming ceremonies. BEA majorette, silk, and band alumni should email Band Director Kellie Long at klong@beasd.org. Band alumni should include their instrument and preferred part. There will be a run-through rehearsal at 6 p.m., near the Marching Band Trailer at the high school, prior to Homecoming candidates are pictured (from L to R) Alaina Warner the game. Band alumni will be playing the Star-Spangled (Tim Gleason), Samantha Murnyack (Jed Spicer), Chelsey Poorman Banner, Alma Mater, and Fight Song. Majorette and Silk (Tyler Howell), Tiffany Kolp (Nicholas Uncapher), Leigh Baney (Seth alumni will twirl during Homecoming ceremonies and Holt), Taylor Kresovich (Garren Kunes), Cherese Greene (Cody Ripka), the Fight Song. Alumni – remember to wear BLUE and Cassondra Ross (Matthew Dillon), Emily Butterworth (Joshua Koleno), GOLD! Keirsey Hackenberg (Clayton Gardner), and Sarah Miller (James Grieb).


OCTOBER 7, 2011

WWW.CENTRECOUNTYGAZETTE.COM

PAGE 5

going LOCAL! an Adventure Eaters Guide By Ken Hull

Greetings, Even though I have a second book now with 64 new places for you to explore and enjoy, sometimes it’s nice to revisit a place from the original book. Since this place has moved locations, taken on a new partner, put on a whole new look and vibe, and sports a new and improved menu, it just seemed like a great idea anyhow. It’s a wellknown fact that I’m a “self-proclaimed beer snob.” I wasn’t always that way as you can read in my first book, but with age comes wisdom, and wisdom will always order a small-batch craft brewed beer over a big-batch crap-brewed beer anytime (yeah, I wrote crap not craft). And now that we’re living in an age of amazingly well crafted and awesome tasting beers, why drink anything else. Not only that, but when you’re fortunate enough to have those types of beers brewed right here in Happy Valley, well, wisdom not only prevails, but moves to town! Actually since book one, there are now three breweries/ brewpubs here with a fourth looking to join. As if life weren’t sweet enough in central PA. But as stated, I’m going to revisit one of my originals, and the patriarch – the one that started it all – Otto’s Pub & Brewery. Otto’s is a fantastic place. Yeah, I try and divide my time between there, Elk Creek Café + Aleworks, and The Brewery at The Gamble Mill, but I have to admit, Otto’s is my first love. And now that they’ve transformed themselves from awesome to awesomer, I thought I’d let you know with an update. This past year, Otto’s moved into their new digs in the old Quaker Steak & Lube place just a stones-throw from the old location on North Atherton Street. Here Charlie Schnable, head brewer and co-owner, can expand his palette of brewing

Your New New Best Friend

?

Johnny is still looking for his forever home – friendly, young, well-trained, and healthy! He’s a one-yearold terrier, beagle, ?, mix. He’s neutered, vaccinated, and tested negative for lyme disease and heartworms. Johnny is now in a foster home and doing great. His foster dad has him cratetrained and walking nicely on a leash. Still a puppy, Johnny has been putting on weight since moving out of the kennel he was staying in. He loves playing with other dogs, gets along well with cats and kids. He’d make a great companion for kids! Johnny is a Pets Come First Dog. Contact Pets Come First (814) 359-7150 and please leave a message.

PAWS Purr-sonal

go in the future. He’s a very personable guy, and between him and a really great staff, you can’t help but feel at home there. When I wrote about Otto’s in my first going LOCAL! book, I had nothing but great things to write. Who would have thought four years later I’d be adding more great things. Well, that’s the way it goes when you’re not restricted by corporate rules; independent business owners and creative spirits can seek to bring you their best. At Otto’s Pub & Brewery, that is the main ingredient to a feast of drinking and eating goodness. Stop in, you’ll see and taste what I mean. Enjoy! Otto’s Pub & Brewery State College, Centre County Locally Owned By: Charlie Schnable and Roger Garthwaite Cuisine: American Bistro Price Range: $3 to $24 Hours: Mon. – Thurs. 11 a.m to midnight, Fri. & Sat. 11 a.m. to 1 a.m., Sun. 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Location: 2235 North Atherton Street Wi-Fi: Yes Contact Info: (814) 867-6886 Vegetarian Offerings: Yes Supports Local Farmers: Yes Locally Owned Accommodations Nearby: The Stevens Motel Ken Hull is a local artist, author, biker, and “adventure eater” living the life in historic Boalsburg Village.His books are available locally and at www.goingLOCALpa.com. His art is available at www.KenHull.com. E-mail him at ken@kenhull.com.

Beer Collectors Pour into State College By Don Bedell

$1 are going for donation, attendees were able $5 or more now. to tour the tables of beer colDickel also adds lectibles from collectors from that beer collectseveral states. ibles can be very Otto’s co-owner Roger Garthwaite hopes that State regional. Often, College will become an annual people have an allestop for the ECBA. “This is a giance to a brewery better, central location for because of where they are from or this club,” said Garthwaite. “I because a relative hope we can do more in the once worked for the future.” brewery. Because Some of the vendors provided some of the memoof that, items can bring more money rabilia that is on display inside Jim Dickel (right) of Mt. Savage, MD Otto’s. Garthwaite feels that talks to an attendee about his items. based on where this event was a good they are being sold. opportunity to celebrate this type of The local representative of the memorabilia adding, “There aren’t ECBA is Sam Komlenic of State College. many places that display breweriana Komlenic has been collecting breweriana like we do.” for almost 39 years. “I started collect Vendor Jim Dickel from Mt. ing at 16 and I can still remember the Savage, MD says that when it first place where I bought something,” comes to beer collectibles, the con- he said. Items ranged from bottle openers dition isn’t as important as it is with other collectibles like baseball with beer logos engraved in the handle cards. Dickel explains, “If a collec- going for $1 up to a Duquense Brewing tor doesn’t have something in their lighted clock with a $3,500 asking price. collection, the condition of the item Attendees also had the option to Sam Komlenic of State College (left), a local member doesn’t matter.” He says that prices bring their personal items to have them of beer related items have escalated. appraised. It was like the “Antiques of the ECBA discusses his collectibles with going Even small items that used to go for Roadshow” of beer collectibles! local author and Gazette contributor, Ken Hull

STATE COLLEGE – Ever wonder what those old beer cans in the attic or that beer sign in your garage are worth? Beer can collectors had the chance to find out if they were sitting on a gold mine when The Eastern Coast Breweriana Association held their Fall Fest in State College this year. On Saturday, October 1, Otto’s Pub & Brewery in State College was filled with beer collectibles from past and present. According to their Web site, the ECBA is a group of individuals dedicated to the preservation of the history of the American Brewing Industry through Breweriana Collectibles. For a small

BINGO BINGO O G N BI Snow Shoe EMS Plumbing • Heating • Air Conditioning • Heat Pumps Backflow Installation and Testing

216 S. Allegheny Street, Bellefonte, PA 814.355.4841 • FAX 814.355.2684

Your Exclusive York Dealer

Since 1927 #PA012698

Every Saturday Night 7PM | Doors open at 5PM 2 , $1 20 492 W. Sycamore St. (Rt. 144) Jack PoNt UMBERS 0ROGRESSIVE*ACKPOTs3MOKE&REEAND(ANDICAP!CCESSIBLE 

OM E JOIN

C

Gorgeous black female seeks new family to get lots of attention from and to give plenty of love to! Sweet Pea is very affectionate, bowing her head for kisses when someone puckers up, but is also a bit of a tease, laying belly-up pretending that she wants a rub but then giving a playful swat when a hand reaches in. No need for expensive toys for Sweet Pea, since she is content with jumping into boxes and laundry baskets. To read more about Sweet Pea, including her fascination with the bathroom, visit http://www.centrecountypaws. org/cats/ or meet her in person at PAWS (1401 Trout Rd., State College).

arts, his culinary cohorts can refine their menu offerings, live music can be enjoyed again, brewing memorabilia can be displayed, a new partner can take the place to new and exciting heights. Also more customers can be seated, and said customers have lots more places to park! As in book one, I refer to Charlie as much an artist as I do a genius scientist – a savant if you will. No one can bring such common ingredients together with such uncommon results. Brewing beer is pretty basic, but brewing like this is complex and requires creativity and a command of the process. Don’t believe me? Stop in at his place and order the Beer Sampler and you’ll find out just how different beers can be. And, in the hands of a master, simple and pure ingredients can become a work of art flowing from a glass. The new Otto’s has also sought to be creative with their menu by using more and more locally sourced ingredients as well as adding a really cool pizza oven. The cuisine is American Bistro and caters to the discerning adult palate as well as the even more discerning (fussy) kid’s palate. Because of the much larger building, things that were wanted, or needed at the old place can happen here. Live music now graces the pub and local performers, like my friend Scott Mangene, can sing and play in one section while in others, folks can sit and chat with just the din of conversation in the background. Pennsylvania has a rich history of brewing beer. At one time there were hundreds of independent breweries throughout the commonwealth. Otto’s takes much pride in featuring memorabilia from some of these breweries. Ads, beer trays, logos, etc, have been painstakingly reproduced in large format images and are hanging from the ceiling. It’s really fun to walk around and see all the different ones – and they’re even different from front to back. Glass cases house valuable pieces, with one case displaying a very rare ceramic beer service. A confession here, the aforementioned improvements (beer excluded) were not Charlie’s doing – he’s an artist – he’s most happy in his “studio” making beer. The “new” Otto’s is the result of Charlie’s new partner (who also happens to be his father-in-law) Roger Garthwaite. Roger is actually very creative too when it comes to marketing and business savvy, and has taken Otto’s to the place it is now and most likely will

N! U F F US FOR A NIGHT O 7ATCH4HE'AZETTE%VERY7EEKFOR/UR!DS


PAGE 6

THE GAZETTE - SERVING CENTRE COUNTY

If you only know Steve Martin from the late 1970s as that “wild and crazy” guy, you are missing much of his talent. Martin started his professional career as a writer for television shows, most notably The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour, and is now an award-winning author of magazine articles, movie scripts, and best-selling books. Born Standing Up—a comic’s life

tells of his early days in comedy, how it started and how and why it ended. By 1978, Steve Martin was the biggest concert draw in stand-up history. In 1981, he stopped doing stand-up completely. In Born Standing Up, Martin tells of starting his career at age 10 selling guidebooks at Disneyland, the newly opened theme park. His fascination with magic grew when he worked at the Disney Magic Shop and he gives credit to the pros who taught him the secrets of performing magic.

SPECIAL PRICING ON HIGH EFFICIENT TRIPLE PANE WINDOWS

“Still Serving Central PA Since 1963” - Ronald W. Johnson

2011 Tax Credit AVAILABLE

$199 WINDOWS INCLUDING INSTALLATION WHITE DOUBLE HUNG WINDOWS NO SET-UP FEE! SEE OFFICE FOR DETAILS PA CODE COMPLIANT! CALL NOW! FREE ESTIMATE DISPOSAL OF OLD WINDOWS INCLUDED DOUBLE PANE LOW E/ARGON

There is still time to take Advantage of Energy Savings!

From there he went to the Bird Cage Theatre at Knott’s Berry Farm where he performed his magic/ comedy act a dozen times a week. Working there he honed his act with a dedication to excellence. This early training has lasted him throughout his career. The work, sacrifice, discipline, and originality paid off and as his fame grew, the isolation and loneliness also grew. The traveling took its toll on his relationships with his family and friends until he finally decided, at the top of his fame, to stop.

Contractor Registration #002047

814.364.1436

Martin tells his story in an almost selfdeprecating way. Rarely do we get a look into his deepest emotions and for some reason that seems to work. The book never becomes a tell-all gossipy account of the people around him. It does take us backstage to learn more about the heavy irreverence of The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour and the new voice that was Saturday Night Live. As a result, not only do we get a glimpse of the rise of one of the most inventive of comics, but a glimpse into the time of free love and protests against the war in Vietnam – and all told by a talented author.

Centre County Gazette

Lose Weight Quit Smoking Solve Problems with Hypnosis! Safe Easy Natural Efffective

Hypnotherapy is often overlooked because it is completely misunderstood. Get help for: U Smoking U Weight Loss U Stress U Cancer Recovery U Pain U Hot Flashes U Allergies U Sleep U Surgery Prep U Memory U Fears U Blood Pressure U Achievement U Confidence U Success U Healing U Issues from Past U MUCH MORE

Hypnotherapy

www.ronaldjohnson.com

FREE ESTIMATES

OCTOBER 7, 2011

Lynn Ralston, R.N., CHt 814-422-8783

&ROXPEXV'D\ 0DWWUHVV6DOH

Locations Nearby Spring Mills State College Harrisburg New Cumberland

6DYHXSWR

 2)) RXUHYHU\GD\SULFH

7XEELHV%HGURRPV (&ROOHJH$YH •ZZZWXEELHVQHW

Listen to us ANYWHERE! Now Streaming LIVE on the Web www.1059qwikrock.com Thanks for making us your favorite radio station! 11

Arbitron Fall ’09 / Spring ’10

11


OCTOBER 7, 2011

WWW.CENTRECOUNTYGAZETTE.COM

PAGE 7

y r o t c e r Business Di

Check Out These LOCAL Businesses! Tell them you saw their ad in The Gazette. At Your Service Construction and Home Repair

LIVE ACOUSTIC MUSIC

(814) 933-9150

'VMM4FSWJDF4BMPO .FO 8PNFO $IJMESFO

Amy, Jenna Suzanne , "QQPJOUNFOUT"WBJMBCMF

ircuts $$10.00 Ha 8BML*OT8FMDPNF

.POEBZ  5VFTEBZ  8FEOFTEBZ  5IVSTEBZ  'SJEBZ  4BUVSEBZ 

BY JOHN AND CHAD Oct. 7th, 21st, and 28th 5pm-9pm

Chimney Repair, Repointing, Crowns, Flashing, Masonry, Gutters, RooďŹ ng, Decks, Porches, Drywall, Painting, Carpentry, Remodeling, Etc. Reliable, Quality Work

Fully insured

No Job Too Over 35 years Small experience

Call for a free estimate (814) 933-9150 Michael Matukonis

8FTU)JHI4USFFUÂ…#FMMFGPOUFÂ…

Requests Taken

Dining Room in Rear

FREE DELIVERY

50% OFF BOUTIQUE

to Centre Hall, Spring Mills, Potters Mills, Boalsburg and Pleasant Gapjewelry) (excluding

$.99

2782 SUMMER Earlystown Rd, Rte 45 SHOES | Centre Hall, PA 16828 | 814 364-2176

Pa Contractors License# PA 022363

AND SHORTS

FRI., SEPT. 30 THRU THU., OCT. 6

CONAWAY

Your Starter Kit is just the beginning. s%NJOYOPEN ENDEDINCOMEPOTENTIAL

FRIENDSHIPANDFUN s"UILDAFULFILLINGBUSINESSOFYOUROWN

AUTO SERVICE AND TOWING

Ask me how to get started today!

Brandy Ritchey

304 Moose Run Rd Bellefonte, PA 16823

Independent Beauty Consultant www.marykay.com/britchey2 717.250.6354

NEW LOCATION

814-353-4500

HANDYMAN SERVICE A FULL SERVICE CONSTRUCTION COMPANY SERVING CENTRE CO. FOR OVER 25 YRS. It’s Time to Winterize - Inside and Out!

s&ENCES)NSTALLED s-ULCHING s'UTTERS CLEANEDORREPLACED s(AULING s'ENERAL#ONTRACTOR s,ANDSCAPING s-OVING(ELPERS

s0RESSURE7ASHING s2OOlNG NEWORREPAIRS s#ONCRETE NEWORREPAIRS s0AINTING s(OUSE3IDING s$RIVEWAY3EALING s"ASEMENT#LEAN/UTS

s2EMODELING s$ECKS NEWORREFURBISHED s4REE4RIMMING s"RICK "LOCK3TONE s)NSURANCE*OBS s2OOF#LEANING s7INDOW2EPLACEMENT

Fall Clean-Up and Gutter Cleaning! 0!&ULLY)NSURED353-8759

Handymaid Housecleaning Service 20 years experience! Call Tami 441-2102

WE BUY GUNS!

sBrakes, Tires, Exhaust Specialist and General Maintenance, PA Inspection (including Campers & Trailers)

s23 7/8 Hours a Day Towing sLow Labor Rates - $40/hr sOver 15 Years Experience sWe Buy Junk Cars

USED 10 ga. 3 1/2 in. Mag Doublebarrel 12 ga. REM. 870 Camo 3 1/2 in. Mag 20 REM 870 Camo Mag (3) 12 ga. REM. Express REM. 12 ga. 870 Wingmaster 12 REM 1100 3 in. Mag Semi Savage 24 V 22 Over 20 ga.

phone: 814-548-0088 web: www.hunterswarehouse.net email: hunterswarehouse@comcast.net

JLJ LAWN CARE SERVICE 9!2$3!,%$!93

USED Savage 24 V 30/30 Over 20 ga. 410 Doublebarrel (5) 16 ga. Shotguns (4) Model 12, 12 ga. Winchesters Model 12, 20 ga. Winchester Winchester 1400 12 ga. recoilless Over 2,000 Guns in Stock

We Beat All Retail Prices Statewide!

PA 018650

814-422-0398

Yes We Do Mobile Homes Too!

SMarket HUEY’S (814) 237-4578

In Milesburg 814-355-4225 BUY ONE LUNCH OR DINNER GET ONE LUNCH OR DINNER AT 1/2 PRICE

avern

Sun., Mon., Tues., Wed. ONLY! Must Present Coupon, Dine in Only

814 359-2082

104 N. Main Street, Pleasant Gap PA 16823-5157 HOURS: Mon. - Thu. 11am - 11pm, Fri. - Sat. 11am - 12am, Sun. 12am - 9pm

1401 Benner Pike Bellefonte, PA 16823

Annual Apples Bin Sale Until Oct. 31st! HARDY FALL MUMS, INDIAN CORN, PUMPKINS, WINTER SQUASH AND GOURDS

OURS:

H ; Monday-Saturday 8-6 Sunday Noon-5

Owner

814.470.2838

135 W. Linn St., Bellefonte, PA 16823

New Horizons Real Estate Co.

orse

Mark A. Newman, DC 817 Willowbank St. Bellefonte, PA 16823 814-355-4889

Brian Johnstonbaugh

We can arrange a “Rent to Own� on any property for sale by any broker, owner, bank, or other.

Red Oak Lane, Spring Mills

For Your Free In Home Estimate

PA# 078036

RENT TO OWN

“LOW OVERHEAD MEANS REASONABLE RATES�

CALL 814-422-0398

Lawnmowing AT THE FAITH CENTRE!& Trimming Personalized Quality Assured

FOR3ELECT3UMMER)TEMS Fully Insured • FREE Estimates

KEN HAUPT CONSTRUCTION REPLACEMENT WINDOWS SIDING KITCHEN & BATH ADDITION

110 W. High St. Bellefonte, PA 355-2238

WE BUY MOST EVERYTHING

Small Game Season is Here!

All prices subject to availability.

100s of Items - 3/$1.00 in Rear of Store!

Proceeds benefit our food bank & community. — Thank you

HUNTER’S WAREHOUSE 7EST(IGH3TREETs"ELLEFONTE 0!

NEW Mossberg 20 ga. Pump ......... $199.99 REM. 870, Pump .................... $309.99 REM. 870, Super Mag ........... $339.99 NEF. 410 or 20 ga................... $129.99 Mossberg 930 Mag................ $469.99 TriStar 22 ga. Mag Over/Under.$439.99 REM. 12 ga. VERSA, MAX .. $1,079.99

GET YOUR HALLOWEEN COSTUME NEEDS HERE!

3&4*%&/5*"-t$0..&3$*"'3&&&45*."5&t'6--:*/463&%

814.355.0565

“You’ll smile when the job is done right the 1st time.�

STEVE COLE - Owner 1160 Old 220 Rd. Bellefonte, PA 16823

John Petuck

(814) 355-8500


PAGE 8

THE GAZETTE - SERVING CENTRE COUNTY

Realtors Donate to Local Clinic STATE COLLEGE – The Centre County Association of Realtors, through member donations, annually creates a Community Service Fund to benefit local organizations. Sally Lenker, left, Chair of the Community Services Committee, recently presented a donation from this fund to Cheryl White, right, executive director of Centre Volunteers in Medicine. 

How You Can Help Home Nursing Announces Foundation Grants Contributed by Home Nursing Agency

The Home Nursing Agency Foundation, a community benefit, nonprofit organization, recently awarded 27 Mission Grants totaling $120,000 to agency programs to support patient care and services provided in the home and in the community. Since 1968, the Home Nursing Agency Foundation’s mission is to provide financial support to create, improve, or enhance the programs and services of Home Nursing Agency. The foundation welcomes all private and public donations, and all donations are tax-deductible to the fullest extent of the law. These grants are going to such

essential services as hospice funding, volunteers, and bereavement programs; pediatric home nursing; adult day services; counseling; behavioral health; children’s grief center, drug and alcohol services; and many other vital services for those who cannot afford them. For more information about the Home Nursing Agency Foundation and how Mission Grants make an impact in the lives of individuals and families served by the Agency, visit www.homenursingagency.com or contact Pam Seasoltz, Director of Development, at ext. 2565 or pseasoltz@homenursingagency.com.

PennDOT Driver License, Photo Centers Closed for Columbus Day Holiday The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation announced that all driver license and photo centers, including its full-service center in Harrisburg, will be closed Saturday, October 8 through Monday, October 10 in observance of Columbus Day. Customers may still obtain a variety of driver and vehicle products and services online through PennDOT’s Driver and Vehicle Services website, www.dmv.state.pa.us. Driver and vehicle online services are available 24-hours-a-day, seven-days-a-week and include driver’s license and photo ID renewals; vehicle registration renewal; driver-history services; changes of address; driver license and vehicle registration restoration letters; and exam scheduling. There are no additional fees for using online services. A complete listing of PennDOT driver and photo license center closings in 2011 is available on the Web site under “News, Stats and Facts.”

Mayor Welch Plaza Dedicated By Ebun Adewumi

On October 1 at 9:30 a.m., council for four years, he ran for the plaza in front of the State mayor. Mayor Welch’s love for College municipal building was his town extended outside its dedicated and named the Mayor boundaries as he enjoyed fosterWelch Plaza after former mayor ing town and gown relations – Bill Welch. It was a cold and often participating in many Penn wet Saturday but people turned State activities, such as welcomout in spite of the rain. ing first-year students, taking Mayor Welch served as part in Penn State HomecomMayor Welch mayor of State College from ing, and attending campus dedi1994 until cations and activities. In 2002 he died after he was recognized as Penn State’s Renaissance complic aMan of the year in recognition of dedicated tions from service to the community and the campus. leg surgery Current Mayor Elizabeth A. Goreham on Septemspoke about Mayor Welch. “It was a perfect ber 4, 2009 fit,” she said talking about his terms as mayor at the age of of State College. “Bill loved being mayor and 67. Mayor A plaque memorializing the former the town loved him back.” Welch was Mayor’s service to the community was born in affixed to the municipal building. Philadelphia on November 23, 1941 and moved to State College at the age of two. Graduating from both State College Area High School and Pennsylvania State University, Mayor Welch love for State College was apparently his whole life. His father was responsible for getting State College its first public pool, Welch Pool. He was editor of the A rainy day didn’t deter citizens from attending the Centre Daily Times for 25 years. dedication of Mayor Welch Plaza in front of the State After serving on the State College borough College Municipal Building.

OCTOBER 7, 2011

Community Foundation Dinner & Awards Contributed by the Centre County Community Foundation

STATE COLLEGE – The Centre County a young adult community member who Community Foundation works with count- actively strives to improve the quality of life less people and organizations dedicated to in Centre County, will be announced at the the betterment of Centre County. CCCF dinner. holds an annual event to This year’s featured speaker recognize these community is Dr. Katherine Loflin, of the leaders, featuring a guest John S. and James L. Knight speaker and awards, which Foundation. Dr. Loflin serves will be presented to organias lead consultant and national zations and individuals who content expert in providing exemplify the foundation’s explanation and translation commitment to the future of of findings for community Centre County. action for the Soul of the This year’s dinner is Community project, a threeOctober 17 at the Nittany year $2.371 million partnerLion Inn, with a reception at ship between Gallup and the Dr. Katherine Loflin 5:30 p.m. and the program Knight Foundation. starting at 6:30 p.m. The Kathryn S. Weaver Dr. Loflin is also the founder of Loflin Award, which recognizes a local charitable Consulting Solutions and host of the weekly organization for noteworthy service to the radio show Place Matters with Dr. Katherine people of Centre County, will be given to Loflin. She will talk about why well-loved the Centre County Federation of Public communities are successful communities, Libraries. and how to increase people’s attachment to Winners of the other two awards, the where they live. Oak Tree Award, which recognizes an indi- Tickets are $60 per person and those vidual for service and commitment to, and interested in attending should R.s.v.p. as passion for, the Foundation, and the Future soon as possible. For more information, call of the Foundation Award, which recognizes CCCF at (814) 237-6229.

Special Olympics Receives Donation Kim Ring, left, of the Centre County Association of Realtors and member of the Community Services Committee, recently presented a donation from the CCAR Community Services Fund to Bella Bregar, right, manager of Special Olympics of Centre County. The funds will be used toward the purchase of sports equipment for athletes.

Chamber Launches Membership Campaign Contributed by CBICC

STATE COLLEGE – The Chamber of Business & Industry of Centre County (CBICC) recently launched its new membership campaign, “Over 1,000 Reasons….”  The goal of the campaign, which will run through November 15, is to bring in 60 new members in 60 days. “We’re very excited about this campaign, because it will provide us with the opportunity to reach out to businesses that currently aren’t members and spread the message about the many benefits and opportunities membership in the CBICC offers,” stated Jean Gerber, VP of Chamber Operations. With more than 1,000 members, the CBICC is the largest organization representing businesses in Central Pennsylvania. “The

strength of the organization depends on its membership, and growing the membership will help strengthen the CBICC and our relationship with the business community,” said Gerber. The membership campaign will feature member testimonials – their reasons for being members. More information can be found on the chamber’s Web site, which features member testimonials along with information on how businesses can join.  The page also has a means for members to submit names of prospective members, who will then be contacted by CBICC staff. For more information visit www.cbicc. org or www.cbicc.org/1000Reasons.aspx or contact (814) 234-1829 or events@cbicc.org. 

4th Annual Cranberry Festival is Saturday! Contributed by Black Moshannon State Park Families are invited to the fourth annual Cranberry Festival on Saturday, October 8 from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. at Black Moshannon State Park. Hosted by the Friends of Black Moshannon, activities include leaf printing, hay rides, making pine cone feeders, colonial candle-dipping, pumpkin races, and a cranberry drop competition. A bog walk will take place at 1 p.m. Walkers will visit the park’s bog area and can pick cranberries. Wear shoes that can wet. The hay rides and pumpkin races begin at 2 p.m. with prizes will be awarded for the pumpkin races. Food vendors and crafters will be located in the Environmental Learning Center lawn. Cost is $1 for a stamp to participate in events, available at the Friends of Black

Moshannon stand. Hay rides are an additional $1 per person. Stick around for the Draconids Meteor Shower watch from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Boat Launch #2. The peak of this meteor shower is during the early evening, so you should be able to spot up to 20 meteors per hour unless Draco the Dragon wakes up, then you might see many more. All proceeds benefit the Friends of Black Moshannon. If you need an accommodation to participate in park activities due to a disability, please contact the Pennsylvania Bureau of State Parks: 888-PA-PARKS (voice); 888-537-7294 (TTY); or 711 (AT&T Relay Service).


OCTOBER 7, 2011

WWW.CENTRECOUNTYGAZETTE.COM

PAGE 9

Boalsburg Weekend Celebrates Beginnings But Without 1776 Captain David Boal BOALSBURG – Nobody throws a birthday party quite like Boalsburg. The historic Pennsylvania village will celebrate the heritage not only of its own birthday of October 1808 but also of the beginning of America itself in October 1492, thanks to Boalsburg’s unique-in-the-nation connection with Christopher Columbus in the Columbus Chapel at the Boal Mansion Museum. Boalsburg’s big weekend October 8 - 10 will feature an elegant champagne ball Saturday at the Boal Mansion, and a colorful afternoon festival Sunday in the village with free wagon tours of the historic village, music by local music masters John “JT Blues” Thompson, traditionalist Bruce Young, harmonica expert Richard Sleigh, and rocker Chris Lee; food, crafts and even a BMX bike stunt show for the youngsters. The weekend concludes on Monday morning with the traditional invitation-only religious service in the internationally-renowned Columbus Chapel. Boalsburg’s Columbus Chapel was inherited and imported to Boalsburg in 1909 by descendants of the famous explorer in the Boal family. The centuries-old Spanish chapel contains fine art, the Admiral’s Desk of Christopher Columbus, and two pieces of the True Cross of Jesus. It is America’s strongest connection with Christopher Columbus whose world-cha nging voyage of discovery opened the door from the Old World to the New World in October 1492. The public is The Sunday festival in Boalsburg will include the Dialed Action Sports Team BMX Stunt Show, invited to share shown here performing before Amish children last in the festivities, Memorial Day at the Boal Mansion in Boalsburg. which will include

historical re-enactors bringing the heritage to life at both Saturday’s and Sunday’s events. But one person has been booted from the event – Revolutionary War Captain David Boal. Once thought to be the first generation of the Boal family of Boalsburg, recent research from primary sources has pruned him from the Boal family tree. Even though he did exist, he is no longer associated with Boalsburg’s history. Fortunately, there was Christopher Columbus (Bruce Young) and another David Boal, also a the pioneer David Boal (his descendant, pioneer, the one who built Alan Boal of Pittsburgh) will speak at a the 1804 tavern around fancy ball Saturday and a colorful festival Sunday on the Boalsburg Heritage which the village of BoalsBirthday Weekend of October 8-10. burg was established in 1809, and whose seven generations of descendants have had a hand in shaping today’s community. His descendants include a founder of Penn State University and of the nearby 28th division Shrine, site of the Boal Troop of World War I fame. Seventh-generation Boal family member, Boal Mansion Museum CEO Christopher Lee, will oversee the events. He is a founder of the heritage movement in Boalsburg which has rescued the village from its neglected status in the 1960s to its national renown as a top example of a typical Pennsylvania village with a unique identity as the birthplace of Memorial Day and the home of the Columbus Chapel. The Columbus Ball takes place at the Boal Mansion at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, October 8, and features contra-dancing to the Bruce Young band, portrait photography by Eric Smith, champagne and fine food from over a dozen Centre Region restaurants. Tickets are $100 and are available by contacting office@boalmuseum.com or calling (814) 466-9266. The Boalsburg Birthday Heritage Festival is all free,

including the wagon rides, and takes place in the Boalsburg square at Church and Main Streets on Sunday, October 9, from noon to 4 p.m. The Monday religious service is by invitation due to space constraints of the historic Columbus Chapel. For details, visit http://boalmuseum.com or contact (814) 466-9266, office@boalmuseum.com or the Facebook.com page: Columbus Chapel and Boal Mansion Museum. Local music masters performing at the Boalsburg Heritage Birthday Festival include the award-winning bluesman John “JT Blues” Thompson (shown here), blues harmonica expert Richard Sleigh, traditional music and folklorist Bruce Young, and rocker Chris Lee, president of the Central PA Musicians Association.

Guests at the Boalsburg Heritage Birthday Festival on October 9 enjoy a free guided wagon ride through the historic Boalsburg village and down to the Boal Mansion and Columbus Chapel to celebrate Boalsburg’s and America’s beginnings.

Buddy Walk Makes a Splash on Rainy Day Article & photos by Tiffany Woodall

STATE COLLEGE – Saturday marked the beginning of Down families who wish to adopt children with Down syndrome. Syndrome Awareness Month, and more than three hundred Reese’s Rainbow provided informational materials to participeople gathered to celebrate with the Centre County Down pants at the Buddy Walk, which helped CCDSS achieve its Syndrome Society for a day of family fun. The fourth annual goal of sharing knowledge and providing resources for comBuddy Walk raised more than $38,000 to benefit families in munity involvement. Centre County who have a child with Down syndrome. Despite the chilly air and rain, enthusiasm reigned The Buddy Walk committee spent the past several months Saturday as families and friends enjoyed live music, games, planning the event, from procuring donations to spreading crafts, and the opportunity to bid on silent auction items. awareness. It was rewarding to see hard work come to fruition. Hot chocolate and coffee helped ward off the brisk fall air, Congressman “GT” Thompson carries the CCDSS banner with Joe Nelson One in every 691 babies in the United States is born with yet snow cones were a popular treat for kids and adults alike and Matt Porter as they lead walkers around the concourse. Down syndrome; there are more than 400,000 people living – blue lips everywhere! I loved seeing everyone enjoy themwith Down syndrome in the United States. These facts are selves, whether decorating a pumpkin, blowing bubbles, or little known to the general public, so it was a goal of CCDSS just talking and swapping stories with each other. The atmoto increase awareness of people with Down syndrome and sphere was energetic, and the focus was on having fun. encourage the community to recognize their abilities. Congressman “GT” Thompson kindly addressed the I grew up with a good friend who had Down crowd prior to the start of the walk, as syndrome. My parents taught me to treat her like I would did Penn State LifeLink’s Terri Lindner. any of my other friends, so I learned at an early age to Each speaker thanked everyone involved accept people’s differences. Not everyone appreciated her for their effort and inspired listeners for who she was, though. Some kids at school would take with messages of hope for the future. advantage of her personality, making fun of her whenever The success of the Buddy Walk proves she’d do something to draw attention to herself. that achievements are made when a It angered me that people could mistreat her on the community works together to support basis of her disability. This is why it makes me so happy to an important cause. see a community like State College celebrate people with Ryan, a student at Penn State Ike the Spikes twirls and Buddy Down syndrome. I saw parents point to a poster during LifeLink, poses with Jenn Walk participant to the music of the Buddy Walk that read “It’s not about our disabilities, Martain, a student studying Jason McIntyre and Friends. A young girl admires her it’s our abilities that count!” and read it aloud to their Special Education at Penn State, medal after finishing the children, emphasizing the purpose of the event. I think after their potato-sack race. Buddy Walk. it’s important for us to be leaders by example, showing people (especially our children, nieces, nephews, etc.) how to A volunteer from the YMCA treat others with compassion. Teen Leaders group paints a Mike Jewell, CCDSS president, has a five-year-old son mustache on a Buddy Walk with Down syndrome. Jewell and his family shared their participant. story in an awareness video that played during the Buddy Walk. Jewell revealed a shocking, yet common, experience that occurred just days after his son was born: a social worker asked Jewell if he and his wife wanted to keep their son, who A glimpse of the was diagnosed with Down syndrome postnatal. Jewell replied silent auction items with a definitive yes, unsure as to why someone would even that were open for consider the alternative. bids throughout the A Star Wars character from The sad truth is that many children with Down syndrome event. The silent the 501st troop holds a sign to auction brought in encourage walkers as they make The Chick Fil A mascot kneels to higharound the world are abandoned by their parents. For this five a little girl. an additional $2,000! their way around the concourse. reason, Reese’s Rainbow was founded to provide grants to


PAGE 10

THE GAZETTE - SERVING CENTRE COUNTY

Scientist with Local Connections Pens “Engrossing Thriller” To speak at Schlow October 13 Contributed by Schlow Centre Region Library

STATE COLLEGE – Author Paul McEuen’s in-laws, State College residents Robert and Judy Wiser, are bursting with excitement about their son-in-law’s knock-out debut novel, Spiral. Penn State alumni, as is daughter, Susan Wiser McEuen, they’ve celebrated his many scientific and academic accomplishments over the years. Thriller writing was a new undertaking though – and McEuen has knocked the ball out of the park his first time up. In addition to stellar reviews from the Wall Street Journal to the L.A.Times, foreign rights to Spiral have been sold to 17 countries, and the movie rights have been optioned by Chockstone Pictures, producers of The Road. On Thursday, October “Paul McEuen’s techno- 13 at 7 p.m., author Paul thriller, Spiral, sounds McEuen will speak at Schlow like something written by Centre Region Library, sharing Michael Crichton in his his experience of creating prime…” – New York Times Spiral’s wickedly clever

“… a prominent scientist combination of science, techin a cutting-edge field, nology, hair-raising plot, and writing his first novel vividly appealing characters. in his ‘spare time,’ has Free to the public, this is a created what may be the great opportunity to hear one most gripping and engrossof the nation’s leading nanoing thriller this reviewer scientists talk about exploring has ever read in almost 50 the crossroads of fiction, bioyears of thriller reading.” – logical warfare, and nanosciBooklist (starred review) ence, i.e., the study of objects at the boundary of the molecular and microscopic worlds. MeEuen’s “day job” as The Goldwin Smith Professor of Physics at Cornell University and director of the Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, he’s received numerous research awards. Along the way his group “has made a transistor from a single molecule, along with the world’s smallest guitar and the world’s thinnest drum, with a drumhead only one atom thick.”

OCTOBER 7, 2011

Elks Club Welcomes New Members BELLEFONTE – Bellefonte Elks Lodge # 1094 recently initiated six new members into its Order. Shown are the new members, along with Exalted Ruler Dale Moore (rear, in the tux). L to R: Troy Weston, Jeremy Brooks, Mike Curfman, Tom Davidson, Bill Chambers, and Mike Buchanan.

PVCA Renewable Energy Bear Attack Victim & American Legion Donate $24,000 and Conservation Fair October 22 at Penns Valley High Article & photos by Sam Stitzer

OLD FORT – On October 18, 2010, Andrew Foor was hunting near Spring Mills when he was attacked and severely injured by a black bear. He was lifeflighted to Geisinger Medical Center in Danville, where he spent four days in the trauma unit. After extensive surgeries and therapy, he was sent home to recover. At that time, Andrew was (L to R) Doug Rossman and Donnie Aukerman, Vice President, and President, Sons of the American not eligible for insurance through his employer until the next year. Soon Legion; Andrew Foor, T.J. Coursen and Tim Shuey after discharge, he received a bill for of the Penns Valley HOPE Fund; and Connie Burger, President, American Legion Auxiliary. $138,000. Almost immediately, Andrew’s friends and the entire community sprang into action to raise money for him. Spearheaded by members of the Old Fort American Legion, including the Sons of the American Legion and the Ladies’ Auxiliary, a fundraising dinner was organized and held, followed by a large raffle and a silent auction. Many local businesses and individuals donated items for the auction, with values (L to R) Doug Rossman and Donnie Aukerman, Vice President and President, Sons of the American ranging from $25 to $2,500! American Legion Club Manager, Jim Clouse said Legion; Andrew Foor, Cindy Ross and Keith Peese, of the Penns Valley EMS Service; and Connie he was amazed by the response. “We sold Burger, President, American Legion Auxiliary.

1,700 raffle tickets at ten dollars apiece”, he said. With the money raised by the American Legion plus funds from Geisinger’s own medical assistance program, Andrew Foor paid his medical bills and had some money left over. In a great act of gratitude and generosity, he decided to donate the surplus money back to the community. On Tuesday, October 4, Andrew Foor and officers of the Old Fort American Legion handed a check for $19,000 to representatives of the Penns Valley HOPE Fund charity, and another check for $5,000 to the Penns Valley EMS Service. Mr. Foor thanked everyone in the community for their generous response to his financial plight. Representatives of the Penns Valley HOPE Fund and the Penns Valley EMS Service were very grateful for these generous contributions. We salute the Old Fort American Legion and the entire Penns Valley community for coming together to help Andrew Foor and his family in their time of need.

Texas Hold ‘em Poker Tournament Tuesday, October 11, 2011 at 6:00PM $25 Buy In, Must be 18 to Play Kitchen Opens at 5:30PM

State College Knights of Columbus Hall 850 Stratford Drive, State College

The Penns Valley Conservation Association invites the public to its Renewable Energy and Conservation Fair on October 22. The Penns Valley Area School District will host the Fair in the Penns Valley Area High School cafeteria from noon to 4 p.m. The fair is free and open to all. Energy cost and availability is critical to homes, businesses and communities. This multi-faceted fair will give the public a comprehensive look at the latest renewable energy and energy conservation technology in one afternoon. Vendors of solar, geothermal, biomass and energy conservation products will demonstrate their products. Financial institutions will promote financial incentives to own renewable energy. The Fair will start at noon with the presentation of the school district-wide renewable energy and conservation art exhibition winners. Attendees will see working renewable energy facilities. Bus tours will leave the cafeteria at 12:45 p.m. and 2:45 p.m. and return to the fair. Bus stops are: the new Penns Valley Area School District’s biomass-fired heating plant, a longstanding solar photovoltaic array, and a combination solar photo and thermal array. Owners of these facilities will be available to answer questions. At 2 p.m., Frank Migneco, Senior Energy Analyst, of SEDA Council of Governments, will give a keynote discussion on the latest renewable-energy technologies and incentives. SEDA COG’s Energy Resource Center provides a region-wide resource for renewable energy implementation. The Penns Valley Conservation Association and Penns Valley Learning Garden will describe and demonstrate how clean, abundant water and locally produced food conserve energy and foster business success. The association’s mission is to serve “as a steward for the natural and cultural communities in the Upper Penns Creek watershed.” They seek to preserve and honor the agricultural roots of Penns Valley by protecting and conserving its waters, farmlands, forests, and rural heritage. They are organizing this event in order to help area residents understand the power of renewable energy. For information, contact Mary Carol Frier at mcfrier@ yahoo.com or (814) 364 2847.

Proceeds donated to local charities!

Where Centre County’s On TV! Channels 7 and 98 on the Comcast and Windstream Cable Systems Tune in to C-NET for Coverage of Local Concerts, Sports and Community Events along with Meeting Coverage of • Centre Region Municipalities and Bellefonte Borough Council • State College and Bellefonte Area School Boards • Centre Region COG • Centre County Commissioners

Visit cnet1.org to take C-Net’s Online Viewers Survey. Your feedback is important to us!

Watch C-NET Programs On-line, On-Demand at www.cnet1.org

Free Stop-Smoking Classes Freedom from Smoking is a group smoking cessation initiative offered free of cost to adult Centre County residents by the American Lung Association and Centre Volunteers in Medicine (CVIM). Sessions will be held at CVIM, 2520 Green Tech Drive, Suite D State College, from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. on these dates: Wednesday, October 12 Wednesday, October 19 Wednesday, October 26 Wednesday, November 2 Monday, November 7 Wednesday, November 9 Wednesday, November 16 Monday, November 21 To sign up or ask questions, contact Shelley at (814) 231-4043


OCTOBER 7, 2011

WWW.CENTRECOUNTYGAZETTE.COM

PAGE 11

Wet Weather Can’t Stop the Dutch Fall Festival Apple Dumplings Left – Come & Get ‘Em Oct. 8! Article & photos by Sam Stitzer

AARONSBURG – The folks of Aaronsburg celebrated the Haines Township Dutch Fall Festival on October 1 and 2. This event, a combination of craft fair, folk festival, and yard sales, went on in spite of the cold, rainy weather on both days. Vendors lined the sidewalks along Route 45 with booths filled with a wide variety of hand-crafted items and food products. On the festival grounds, many food stands were serving up homemade soup, baked goods, fresh cider, and homemade bread, fresh from the ovens on the grounds. In a garage on West Street, behind the Penns Valley Area Historical Museum, the museum board members were selling their famous apple dumplings. Board members and volunteers had gathered weeks before the festival to make 1,500 dumplings, which were stored in freezers till Saturday. Sales were slow in the bad weather, so the board will have a leftover dumpling sale on Saturday, October 8, from 10 a.m. till noon to sell the nearly 700 remaining dumplings. Live music was featured throughout the festival. Jazz trombonist, Jay Vonada was belting out jazzy interpretations on Saturday morning to an appreciative crowd. Jay is a Penns Valley High School alumnus from Aaronsburg. The Penns Valley Men’s Chorus performed on Sunday. The streets, alleys, and yards of Aaronsburg were the scene of many yard sales during the festival. This attracted bargain hunters, with items of all descriptions being offered for sale at bargain prices. In the vendor area, I spoke to Keith and Beth Hackenberg, and Stacey Martin, from Mifflinburg, who are the proprietors of a store called Totally Nuts. Their shop sells German roasted peanuts, cashews, pecans, and almonds covered with a tasty sugar-and-spice coating. Stacey and the Hackenbergs are from Mifflinburg, and have taken their booth to 190 events in one year! They offered me samples of each kind of nut, and they were delicious!

Aaronsburg was busy in spite of the wet weather

Farther up the street along Aaron’s Square was Photographer Dennis Keefer, from Muncy. Dennis specializes in photos of rural scenes featuring flowers, streams, Jazz trombonist Jay Vonada played in the old barns, mills, covered bridges, and entertainment tent. other items of rural beauty. His photos were very professionally done, and attractive. Of course, his collection contained a nice photo of the Calvin Neff round barn near Centre Hall. As I walked through Aaronsburg, the cold rain fell, a chilly breeze blew, my Eric Long stirred a kettle of bea ns umbrella was up, and my sneakers were for ham and bean soup. soaked. I just wanted to get in my truck, turn the heater on full blast, and go home. But as I looked around, I noticed that the people there were Customers browsed through hundreds of used books smiling, talking, and laughing as on the festival grounds. if it were a perfect autumn day. It dawned on me that the enjoyment of this event was not weatherdependent. It was a celebration of community spirit, of greeting neighbors and old friends, and welcoming visitors to the town. I heard many folks joking about the bad weather (What else can you do about it?), and they’ll probably Beth Hackenberg, Stacey Martin, talk about it for years to come. and Keith Hackenberg sold German The spirit of this event can’t be roasted nuts in their booth. killed by a little rain A customer looked at natural honey and jelly products for sale. and cold, and that’s a good thing.

Customers lined up for homemade ham and bean soup.

Photographer Dennis Keefer displayed beautiful photos of rural central Pennsylvania.

Family History Resources in Centre County, Part 2: The Pennsylvania Room and Historical Museum

Flowers for sale brightened up a dreary day.

Article & photos by Karen Dabney The Centre County Library’s Pennsylvania Room and Centre County newspapers dating back to 1821, Historical Museum is a treasure trove of information for gene- and the Centre County Genealogical Society’s alogists and anyone interested in local history. Located in Belle- cemetery inventories. Census records, Centre fonte’s historic Miles-Humes House, 203 North Allegheny County estate files, tax assessment records, civil Avenue, the Pennsylvania Room has helpful and criminal court records, and Kitty Wunderly (left) and Ali (photo provided by Kitty Wunderly) staff and an extensive collection of non-circuindexes of marriage licenses are Zawoyski look at a book from the The Miles-Humes House in Bellefonte is home to lating reference materials focused primarily on available in the basement research Pennsylvania Room’s collection. the Pennsylvania Room and Historic Museum. Centre County and the surrounding counties, room or on microfilm. The first including a unique collection of local informafloor research area has local hisfloors, a new researcher may have difficulty knowing where tion in the Spangler Files. tories, county histories for every county to begin. The staff has created an inventory and a map of the “If your family’s from Centre County, in Pennsylvania, and 500 family histories collections in the basement to assist researchers. Pennsylvania, this is the mother lode,” said donated by researchers. The clipping files “We’re always happy to come down here and help people Kitty Wunderly, the current manager of contain information on county buildings out,” Zawoyski said. the Pennsylvania Room. “The dead are our and architecture, and many other subjects. Wunderly said researchers often assist each other. “Then The Linn Room of the Historical business.” The collection includes some additional you’ll have people sitting at the table from different places and Museum. She said that approximately three quarters information about other counties and the it’s turned out that they’re related, fourth cousins or someof the people who visit are researching family state, with a strong focus on the counties thing. That’s synchronicity to a fault.” histories. Others want to know why places and adjacent to Centre County. With the recent popularization of genealogy on televistreets have certain names, and about notable “A lot of people have been coming here for sion and the internet, Wunderly observed that some visitors firsts on various topics. Many property owners years,” said Wunderly. “It’s like an extension mistakenly think genealogy research is quick and easy. “You seek information about the history of their of their living room.” have to enjoy the chase,” she said. “I think everyone loves a older homes and buildings. Wunderly has a degree in journalism from mystery, and if it’s personal, it’s even more fun.” The Pennsylvania Room attracts many Penn State, with a deep interest in local history. The Pennsylvania Room is well-equipped to facilitate out of town researchers from Texas, CaliforShe previously worked for the American Phil- research. The Scan Pro microfilm readers can adjust the lightness The Textile Room of the Historical nia, and other states who have family conatelic Society as an educator and writer, and and darkness of images, and download them onto flash drives. Museum. nections to the area. This allows the institualso worked for herself as a freelance writer. Researchers can make photocopies or bring hand scanners to tion to obtain county tourism grants. Her book, Bellefonte and the Early Airmail make digital photographs. The copier also has a scanner. The Pennsylvania Room is home to the 1918-1927, was published in 2007. For those interested in local history, the four rooms Spangler Files, complied by Mrs. Adella Fink Wunderly is leaving her manager position on the second floor hold many items from the Historical Spangler (1871 to 1964) of Unionville in at the Pennsylvania Room in early October, Museum’s collection, including textiles, Civil War artifacts, Centre County. Mrs. Spangler, a genealogist but has shared her knowledge with Ali toys and dolls, Quaker clothing and artworks, and items from and local historian, wrote handwritten and Zawoyski, the new Historical Collections Bellefonte’s industrial history. The Linn Room showcases typed notes about information she obtained Manager. Zawoyski majored in history at furniture and portraits of the former owners of the house. from newspapers, legal documents, church Dickinson College, obtained a Masters John Blair Linn published the History of Centre and Clinton records, and other sources. The bound copies degree in Records and Archives Management Counties in 1883, and his daughter Mary Hunter Linn was The research area in the basement of her notes have been indexed on a quarter from the University College of London, and the first curator of the museum. of the Pennsylvania Room. of a million index cards to help researchers has experience in libraries and archives. The Pennsylvania Room and Historical Museum is open locate information from the 18th century to Zawoyski is looking forward to the chal- Tuesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more the early 1940s. lenge. “It’s good that we can provide this service,” she said. information, call (814) 355-1516, extension 214, or e-mail Researchers can look through indexes of obituaries from With such a large collection of records housed on two paroom@centrecountylibrary.org.


PAGE 12

THE GAZETTE - SERVING CENTRE COUNTY

Spring Creek Canyon Land Dedicated New trail open to the public

Zumbathon for Pets Come First

By Ebun Adewumi

BENNER TOWNSHIP – On the afternoon of Friday, September 30 at 2 p.m., the multi-partnered Spring Creek Canyon Cooperate Management group held a public dedication ceremony of 1,800 acres land recently acquired from the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections. The ceremony was held next to the Benner Spring State Fish Hatchery, on Shiloh Road. Previously part of the Department of Corrections’ Rockview State Correctional Institution, much of the 1,800-acre property had been closed to the public. In 2005, Pennsylvania considered the re-allocation of some land within the State Correctional Facilities at Rockview. In March 2006, 135 acres were transferred to the Centre County Industrial Development Corporation. Other local conservational organizations wanted to protect the land and waters known as Spring Creek Canyon. To that end, a Benner Township obtained a grant from the Department of Conservation and National Resources. The Spring Creek Canyon Conservation Strategy was born. The strategy provided the framework for ecological protection and restoration and cultural preservation with goals of public access, recreation, and conservation education. On July 9, 2010 Senator Jake Corman, and State Representatives Kerry Benninghoff and Mike Hanna co-sponsored House Bill 1890, known as Act 55, which authorized certain

OCTOBER 7, 2011

parcels of land, 1,827 acres total, to the Pennsylvania Game Commission, Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission, Pennsylvania State University, and Benner Township. A 4.4-mile main trail is now open to the public. It will provide access to many previously unseen views of Spring Creek, as well as recreational opportunities such as fishing, hiking, and biking. See our Facebook page for more photos from the Spring Creek Canyon dedication. (photos by Brian Baney)

Zumba® went Cats & Dogs this past Saturday (10/1) at The Fitness Circuit in State College. Three fabulous Zumba® instructors, Corrina, Dayana, and Carol led the Zumbathon in an enthusiastic three-hour tour of Latin America, the Caribbean, Europe, and Morocco – all in an effort to raise money for Pets Come First, The New SPCA! Grab your passports; they will be touring again on November 26. Register on line or for more information on how you can help, visit www.petscomefirst.com. Thank you to our proud sponsors The Fitness Circuit and M&M Copy Services in Bellefonte. The next Zumbathon for Pets Come first is Saturday, November 26 with registration at 11 a.m. and the ’thon from noon to 3 p.m. at The Fitness Circuit, 2301 Commercial Blvd., State College.

The dedication of the Spring Creek Canyon was well attended.

(photos by Brian Baney) Everybody Zumba’d for Pets Come First, the new SPCA.

Spring Creek Canyon land transfer is now OFFICIAL.

SCI Rockview’s Supt. Marirosa Lamas accepted a gift of appreciation from Carl Roe, PA Game Commission Executive Director.

SCI Rockview’s Color-Guard started the Spring Creek Canyon dedication ceremony.

Rep Kerry Benninghoff took a closer look at the new sign.

The Very Best in Austrian Home Cooking Everything Fresh . . . Every Day

PA Game Commission Deputies saluted the colors.

Brunch

CENTRE HALL LIONS CLUB Sunday October 9, 2011 11:00 AM – 2:00 PM

Using only local meats in our handmade sausages TM “WHERE BACON IS AN HERB!” 132 W. College Avenue Downtown State College

Eggs - Toast - Home Fries - Pancakes - Ham Bacon- Sausage Gravy - Biscuits - Muffins - Sweet Rolls Coffee - Tea - Milk - Orange Juice - Apple Juice

As Featured on ESPN’s “Todd’s Taste Of The Town” with Todd Blackledge!

WALK- INS ARE WELCOME Call Eunice Bowersox at 814-364-9625

(814) 238-0200

“Eat-In, Take Out, Catering, Franchising”

www.herwigsaustrianbistro.com

NEED CA$H? $ELL $CRAP! Highe$t Price$ Paid For $crap WE BUY:

Steel • Tin • Cast Iron • Junk Cars • Appliances Aluminum • Copper • Brass • Stainless Steel Batteries • Cardboard

WE PROVIDE: • Container Service • Prompt Service • Scrap Value Surveys for Commercial & Industrial Customers

Adults $8.00 – under 12 $5.00

for advance tickets to be picked up at the door. Benefits Lion Club Projects

Coming Soon To Centre Hall:

Keene’s

BARBER SHOP II “A Traditional Men’s Barber Shop” Located at 2821 Earlystown Road (Route 45)

A Boalsburg Tradition For 60 Years Is Now Bringing Its Services To The Penns Valley Area With A Second Location Open For Walk-Ins: Mondays 10am - 6pm, Fridays 10am - 6pm & Saturdays 9am - 12pm

  s"ACK-AITLAND2OADs,EWISTOWN /0%.- &!- 0-s3AT!- .OON

GRAND OPENING SPECIAL

Bring this coupon and Receive $1.00 Off Haircut Regular Price $14.00, Expires 12-31-11

National Pit Bull Awareness Day Celebration The people-loving, people-pleasing breed Contributed by Happy Paws Happy Homes

STATE COLLEGE – National Pit Bull Awareness Day will be celebrated in State College, on October 22. The event will showcase the true spirit and wonderful personality of the Pit Bull breeds that have been a beloved symbol of Americana. The fun-filled afternoon will feature dog ambassadors, games, dog massages, kid-friendly activities, great giveaways, educational materials, and much more! Everyone is invited to attend this free family friendly event from noon to 4 p.m. – to be held at the gazebo in front of the State College PETCO (Colonnade Way off of N. Atherton St.). Today, the Pit Bull is a beloved animal that is used in a variety of helping functions in society including police dogs, search dogs, therapy dogs, and farm dogs. Unfortunately, many people misunderstand the Pit Bull and fall victim to believing the stereotypes. This event will help the public to understand the true breeds classified as Pit Bulls and what amazing dogs they are. Pit Bull Awareness Day educates the public on the “real” Pit Bull breeds which are people-loving, people-pleasing breeds of dog. “Pit Bull” is a generic term often used to describe all dogs with similar traits and characteristics. The term “Pit Bull” encompasses American Pit Bull Terriers, American Staffordshire Terriers, and Staffordshire Bull Terriers. Happy Paws Happy Homes is an all-volunteer, 501(c)3 status non-profit organization, based in Tyrone, that serves as a liaison between rescues, shelters, and the public. We work with and for dogs that need to find their forever homes. Happy Paws Happy Homes promotes spay/neuter and the adoption option. We offer financial assistance to families who are unable to afford to have their pets spayed or neutered. There are 45 cats and dogs for every person born. Only 1 out of 10 dogs born ever get a home. Only 1 out of 12 cats born ever find a home. 800 dogs & cats are KILLED each HOUR in the U.S., because there are not enough homes for them.


OCTOBER 7, 2011

2011’s

WWW.CENTRECOUNTYGAZETTE.COM

11 Exceptional Men

PAGE 13

of Centre County

Judge Brad Lunsford

A Life of Public Service By Sandie Biddle

Judge Lunsford’s nominator said, “I nominate Judge Brad Lunsford as one of the good men of the county – he has brought so much common sense and practical wisdom to the job, I admire him immensely.� Bradley J. Lunsford was born and raised in Clearfield. He received a BS in Public Service from Penn State and his Law degree from Duquesne University in 1989, after which, he moved to State College. He’s served as Assistant Public Defender, Assistant Prosecutor, in private practice, and as Centre Region District Court Judge for 10 years. He became a judge in the Centre County Court of Common Pleas in 2005. He’s a professor at Penn State and also a musician – a drummer for the band AC Express. His professional passions are law and music. “Susan and I also enjoy cooking and traveling and our children are our greatest joy. Ryan (13) and Madison (11) are both budding musicians as well,� he said. When asked about his accomplishments, he said, “I am especially pleased with our progress on DUI Court. I

am inspired by the participants’ commitment to recovery ‌This program is showing great success in reducing recidivism and saving lives. “I am also thrilled with the success of the Courthouse Canine program. The idea came to me [while working out] at the Bellefonte YMCA. We were watching CNN and saw a short human interest piece about the success of a similar program in San Diego. With the help of Victim Advocate Faith Burger, we were able to create this program in less than six months. We were the first in Pennsylvania and only the second on the east coast. The program is geared mainly to helping young crime victims navigate the system. The service that Princess offers cannot be measured.â€? He’s a member of the State College Elks. Lodge President in 1999, he’s now chair of the Drug Awareness and Youth Activities committees – educating on the dangers of drug and alcohol use while recognizing youth for achievements and good citizenship. “My current goal is to make sure that any child who wants to play a musical instrument has that opportunity. The theory is that learning a musical instrument makes kids smarter and is much better than idle time or computer and video games,â€? he said The two awards that mean most to Judge Lunsford are the Ron Haring award for service to Leadership Centre County and the National Association for Community Leadership, Distinguished Leadership Award for service to the community. “The first award I ever received was the State College

Police Department’s O.F. Brown Memorial Award for good citizenship,� he said. “That meant a lot to me as well.� “I didn’t get into public service for awards and accolades,� he said. “DUI Court came about through a team effort. The canine program was also a team effort. I have been very fortunate throughout the years to have great people around me. I couldn’t do this job without their support, hard work, and expertise.� His favorite quote is from Alex Haley: “If you see a turtle on top of a fence post, you know he had a lot of help getting there.� “That quote pretty much sums it all up for me,� he said.

BRW Lawncare 0/ÂŹ"OXÂŹÂŹsÂŹ"ELLEFONTE ÂŹ0!ÂŹ BRWLAWNCARE YAHOOCOM ,OOKÂŹFORÂŹUSÂŹON

We offer: ,AWNÂŹ-OWINGÂŹsÂŹ%DGING 4REEÂŹÂŹ3HRUBBERYÂŹ4RIMMING -ULCHINGÂŹsÂŹ2OTOTILLINGÂŹsÂŹ7EEDING 3NOWÂŹ2EMOVAL 7EEKLY ÂŹ"I 7EEKLYÂŹANDÂŹ-ONTHLYÂŹ-OWINGÂŹ!VAILABLEÂŹ &REEÂŹ%STIMATESÂŹANDÂŹ&ULLYÂŹ)NSURED

&2%%ÂŹ%34)-!4%3ÂŹsÂŹ ÂŹ 

Original Fine Art & Handmade Crafts Now with live music every Friday eve 7:30-9:00 ! Art and music lessonscheck our website for details October’s Special show “Farmland - Love it, Use it, Preserve it� Reception Friday Oct. 7 from 6-9 pm

OptionLine. The Right Combination. The variable rate home equity line of credit that locks in the security of a fixed rate and term‌

Gallery hours: Thursday. 12-8 pm Friday 12-9 pm Saturday 10 am-8 pm Sunday 12-4 pm

101 West Main St., Millheim, PA 814-349-2486 • On the Web at greendrakeart.com

Centre Hall Home for Sale

1.99% APR 1 12 Month Introductory Rate

3.99% APR 2 Current Standard Rate

‌so you can unlock the value of your home to buy what you need.

OPEN HOUSE! Saturday, 10/8 11am-3pm

Built in 2000 on a gorgeously landscaped 0.46 acre lot, this house is a “must see� for those looking to relax in a roomy interior that is appointed with professional decorator quality touches. The new sun porch, added in 2004, offers extra storage as well as a cozy place to relax or entertain, and the outdoor fire pit provides nighttime delights for those cooler evenings when blazing logs help take away the chill of the night wind. Located just outside Centre Hall Borough in Potter Township, this three bedroom home with three full bathrooms offers the delights of town living but is literally just a step away from the ambience of the country and is Ideal for a primary residence or a second home close to State College. Priced to sell, it is a more affordable option to comparable homes in nearby developments. For more house details/pictures, the next open house, or for a house tour go to: http://www.cormanhomesales.com/listings/detail.php?listnumber=34084&type=1 or contact realtor Julia Long of Corman Associates, Inc. at 814-231-2214 (extension 167).

1.800.FULTON.4 l fultonbank.com Equal Housing Lender. Fulton Bank, N.A. Member FDIC. Member of the Fulton Financial Family. The product is a variable rate line of credit secured by the primary residence and not exceeding an 80% loan to value ratio. This account includes a fixed rate option. This rate may vary, but once established as a new Fixed Rate Advance, will not vary thereafter. A $100 rate lock fee applies each time you establish a Fixed Rate Advance. The fee is waived if rate is locked at closing. For properties in PA and DE, closing costs for lines of credit up to $500,000 typically range from approximately $117 to $623 depending on line amount, appraisal requirements and property location. Closing costs for properties in Virginia typically range from $196 to $2,346. In addition title insurance is required if the line is used to purchase the property or the line is for $500,000 or more. Also, there is a $300 Trust Review fee, if applicable. Borrower must pay mortgage satisfaction fees at loan termination. Property insurance is required. Rate and terms subject to change and may be withdrawn without notice. Rates are available to qualified borrowers and loans are subject to credit approval. Introductory rate offer does not apply to refinance of existing Fulton Bank debt or properties currently listed for sale. 1The advertised 1.99% APR (Annual Percentage Rate) applies to new lines of credit of at least $10,000 and an automatic deduction of payment from a Fulton Bank deposit account. Applications must be received by October 31, 2011. Borrowers with a credit score of 720 or better will receive 1.99% APR for 12 months from the opening date. For borrowers having a credit score of less than 720 (not receiving an introductory rate), APRs are variable and may range from 4.25% Wall Street Journal Prime (WSJP plus 1.00%) to 6.75% (WSJP plus 3.50%), depending on credit qualifications, payment option selected, and market area. 2After the expiration of the 12-month introductory rate period, the APR will be based on the WSJP as published daily plus a margin or minimum APR of 3.99%, whichever is greater. The advertised 3.99% APR is our current standard rate with automatic deduction of payment from a Fulton Bank deposit account. For borrowers having a credit score of 720 or better, depending on credit qualifications, payment option selected, and market area, APRs may range from 3.99% (Minimum) to 4.25% (WSJP plus 1.00%). APR may increase if automatic payment is discontinued. The maximum APR is 18.00%.


PAGE 14

2011’s

THE GAZETTE - SERVING CENTRE COUNTY

OCTOBER 7, 2011

11 Exceptional Men of Centre County

Joe Hartle

60 Years of Service By Sam Stitzer

Pastor P. Stevens Lynn

Unequalled, Faith-Based Service By Brian E. Bassett

It was about 60 years ago when Leland Bull, who later served as Pennsylvania SecrePastor P. Stevens “Steve” tary of Agriculture, suggested Lynn grew up in Bellwood, to 17-year-old Joe Hartle that attended PSU-Altoona from young people involved in agri1972 to 1974, and Penn State, culture should be represented University Park from 1974 to on the board of the Grange Fair. 1976. He studied to become a Joe agreed, and was soon elected to the board, representing social worker with emphasis on gerontology – after which the Young Patrons of Husbandry. Joe probably didn’t realize he worked two years at Allegheny Lutheran Social Ministry, it, but that was the first step in fulfilling his destiny. setting up services to keep people in their own homes. Joe Hartle has remained on the governing board of Lynn married in July 1978; and in September that year Grange Fair continuously for the last 60 years, and has served began a four-year course at Gettysburg Lutheran Theological as its president for the last 20 years. His strong leadership has Seminary, from which he graduated with a master’s of divinity. led the board through several expansions of the fairgrounds Pastor Steve worked at Williamsburg Lutheran Parish and the scope of the fair itself. The latest, and perhaps greatest from 1982 to 1990, Christ Lutheran Church in DuBois from achievement under Joe’s leadership, is the construction of the 1990-2004, ending at Grace Lutheran Church as lead pastor new indoor equine arena on the grounds, which was officially in 2004, along with two others pastors. opened in August of 2011. Joe’s friendly demeanor and “get Lynn is known to go the extra mile when it comes to it done” attitude has made him a great representative of the caring for others. He visits people at private homes, nursing Grange Fair, and of farmers all around central Pennsylvania. homes, hospitals, and rehabilitation facilities to provide spiri Joe was born along Spring Creek in Bellefonte, and has tual and emotional support. lived in the area all his life. In 1957, Joe and his wife Gladys “I serve the community primarily as pastor at Grace established a dairy farm on Buffalo Run Road, in Benner Lutheran Church. I see my call to help people feel so secure Township near Bellefonte. They have operated the farm con- and peaceful in their relationship and faith in Jesus that they tinuously since that time, and the farm is still in operation are subsequently bold enough to serve in the community. I today, being run by the Hartles’ son, with 78-year-old Joe serve as well, but my biggest role is to gather and feed people helping out as much as he can. Joe and Gladys have been with the word of God through preaching, sacraments, edumarried for 56 years. “That’s a lot of years” said Gladys. cation, prayer, and fellowship – then send them out to serve Besides his involvement in agriculture, Joe has been their family and fellow human beings in the community.” actively involved with St. John’s Catholic Church in Belle- “Pastor Lynn is the most caring, unselfish person I know,” fonte, where he has served in several capacities. At this said Cheri Woll, oncology social worker/nurse at Mount writing, Joe is in the hospital, fighting a battle with pneu- Nittany Hospital. “If he finds there’s a need out there, he is monia. We wish him well, and hope he soon can resume his there. If he cannot help someone with their particular need, Sales Commitment role as the guiding force of the Grange Fair, one of Centre he leaves no stone unturned until he finds them help. He has Sales Commitment work with County’s oldest and greatest traditions.At Dix Honda dealership, youtraveled hundreds of miles in a day to make visits; on top of Sales Commitment one andHonda only one sales consultant from start to pastor at Grace and making sure things run At Dix dealership, youbeing work with the senior finish and a manager ensuring an unmatched one and only one sales consultant from start to He is a true role model.” smoothly there. At Dix Honda dealership, you work with Sales Commitment

Dix Honda... Dix Honda... Dix Honda... Dix Honda... Dix Honda... Dix Honda... Dix Honda... Dix Honda... Dix Honda... Dix Dix Honda... Dix Honda... Dix Dix Honda... Dix DixHonda... Honda...

The benchmark in automotive sales The service benchmark in automotive and for over 36 years! sales The benchmark sales and service in forautomotive over 36 years! and for over 36 years! sales The service benchmark in automotive and service for over 36 years!

Dix Honda... Dix Honda...

Ron Pifer

Years of Mentoring Rewarded By Brian E. Bassett

Ron Pifer grew up in Bellefonte, graduated from Pennsylvania State University in 1962, and went on to the University of Wisconsin-Superior in 1963 when offered a fellowship while working on his master’s degree, during which he would coach the wrestling team. “I received a call from Superior-WI and was asked to coach the wrestling team,” Pifer recalled. “Several PA kids were on that team … and all graduated from there.” The 1963 Yellowjacket team was among the best-ever at UW-Superior. The team’s second-place WSUC finish was behind the only conference champion, River Falls State College, conference-title winners the previous year. Conference play was followed by the NAIA National Meet, where the Yellowjackets placed fifth – the highest finish of any Yellowjacket wrestling team in history. As an ROTC commissioned officer, Pifer received a deferment and joined the service from 1963 to1966. He was head-wrestling coach at State College Area H.S. from 1966 until 1976, after which took a head-wrestling coach position at West Point. “I came back to SCAHS as assistant principal in1980 – mainly so my kids could wrestle in Central PA,” Pifer explained. Pifer is proud to have been a two-time PA state champ at the 138 to154 pound class; a three-time all-American at PSU; and, of course, of this induction into the Superior College Hall of Fame. Even more special to him was to watch his own sons wrestle. Scott won a state title, runner up in PA, and qualified for the NCAA event with IA. Jeff was fifth in PA, and in 1986 qualified for the PA State Tournament. Coach Pifer’s son, Scott, drove him to WI, Saturday, October 1, for the Hall of Fame Induction Banquet. “Mr. Pifer is loved for his enthusiasm and dedication to young people,” said. Robin Bastress, SCAHS graduate and former colleague. “What a wonderful honor to have him featured in this way … and with a team he coached 48 years ago!”

The benchmark inautomotive automotivesales sales The benchmark in The benchmark in automotive sales The benchmark in automotive sales The benchmark in automotive sales The service benchmark in and service for 36 and for over over 36years! years! sales The benchmark inautomotive automotive sales and service for over 36 years! The benchmark in automotive sales The in automotive sales and service for over 36 years! and service for over 36 years! The benchmark in automotive sales The benchmark benchmark in automotive sales and service for over 36 years! and service for over 36 years! The benchmark in automotive sales The benchmark in automotive Steve Brown and service for over 36 years! The benchmark in sales and over 36 years! The benchmark in automotive sales sales and service forautomotive over 36 years! and service for over 36 years! Theservice benchmark in automotive sales The benchmark in automotive sales The benchmark in automotive sales The benchmark in sales andservice service forautomotive over 36years! years! and for over 36 and service for 36 and service over 36 years! The benchmark in automotive sales The benchmark inyears! automotive and service for over over 36 years! The benchmark in automotive sales sales Striving for a Healthy Community and service for over 36 years! and service for over 36 years! and service for over 36 years! The benchmark in automotive sales Steve Brown, FACHE, is the President and Chief Executive The benchmark in automotive sales and service for over 36 years! and service for over 36 years! and service forover over 36years! years! sales Theservice benchmark in automotive Officer of Mount Nittany Medical Center, State College. At and for 36 and service for over 36 years! The benchmark in automotive Mount Nittany, Steve is responsible for all aspects of the medical and service for over 36 years! sales center and subsidiary corporations, community outreach, and and service for over 36 years! the implementation of Mount Nittany’s strategic plan, a blue-

buying orsales leasing experience finishone and a manager ensuring an will unmatched one and only consultant fromthat start to exceed At Dix Honda dealership, you work with your expectations. We will provide you with a buying or leasing experience that will finish and a manager ensuring an unmatched exceed one and only one sales consultant from start to competitive price Youyou can with be assured your expectations. We will a buying ortrue leasing experience thatupfront. willprovide exceed finish andof a superior manager ensuring an unmatched service a friendly, true competitive upfront. You your expectations. Wecustomer willprice provide youand with acan be assured buying orof leasing experience that from will exceed stress-free environment a be dedicated superior customer and aassured friendly, true competitive price upfront.service You can Sales Commitment your expectations. We willsales provide you with a and professional and support Sales Commitment stress-free environment from a dedicated Sales Commitment of superior customer service and a friendly, staff. Sales Commitment true competitive price upfront. You support can be assured and professional sales and staff. Sales Commitment At Dix Honda dealership, you work Sales Commitment stress-freeSales environment from a dedicated At Dix dealership, youwork workwith with At Dix Honda dealership, you with Commitment of superior customer service and consultant a friendly, Sales Commitment one and only one sales from start At Dix Honda dealership, you work with and professional sales and support staff. Sales Commitment Sales Commitment one and one sales consultant from start toto one and only one sales consultant from startto Service Commitment At Dix dealership, you work with At Dix Honda dealership, you work with Sales Commitment stress-freeAt environment from a ensuring dedicated Dix Honda dealership, you work with finish and a manager an unmatched one and only one sales consultant from start to At Dix Honda dealership, you work with finish a manager ensuring an unmatched one and one sales consultant from start toto Sales Commitment Service Commitment finish and manager ensuring an unmatched one and only one sales consultant from start Sales Commitment Sales Commitment At Dix Honda dealership, you work with Receive unparalleled service from our team At Dix Honda dealership, you work with and professional sales and support staff. Sales Commitment Sales Commitment one and only one sales consultant from start to buying or leasing experience that will exceed At Dix Honda dealership, you work with finish and aa manager ensuring an unmatched one and only one sales consultant from start to buying or leasing experience that will exceed finish and manager ensuring an unmatched Sales Commitment buying leasing experience that will exceed finish manager ensuring an unmatched Sales Commitment one and only one sales consultant from start to Service Commitment of professionals and award-winning technicians. Receive unparalleled service from our team one andCommitment only one consultant from start toexceed AtDix Dix Honda dealership, you work with At Dix Honda dealership, you work with Sales At Honda dealership, you work with your expectations. We will provide you with buying or leasing experience that will finish and a ensuring manager ensuring an unmatched one and one sales consultant from startaa to AtDix Dixand Honda dealership, you work with finish aa manager an unmatched your expectations. We will provide you with buying oronly leasing experience that will exceed At Honda dealership, you work with your expectations. We will provide you with a buying or leasing experience that will exceed Sales Commitment Sales Commitment finish and manager ensuring an unmatched We offer only the manufacturer recommended of professionals and award-winning technicians. Sales Commitment finish and a manager ensuring an unmatched one and only one sales consultant from start one and only one sales consultant from start to At Dix Honda dealership, you work with true competitive price upfront. You can be assured At Dix Honda dealership, you work with your expectations. We will provide you with aa toto one and only one sales consultant from start Receive unparalleled service from our team buying or leasing experience that will exceed finish and a manager ensuring an unmatched one andHonda only one sales consultant from start to Service Commitment buying or leasing experience that will exceed true competitive price upfront. You can be assured At Dix dealership, you work with your expectations. We will provide you with one and only one sales consultant from start to true competitive price upfront. You can be assured Sales Commitment your expectations. We will provide you with ato buying or leasing experience that will exceed services and guaranteed competitive pricing. We We offer only the manufacturer recommended finish and a manager ensuring an unmatched buying or leasing experience that will exceed finish and a manager ensuring an unmatched one and only one sales consultant from start of superior customer service and aa will friendly, Sales Commitment true competitive price upfront. You can be assured At Dix Honda dealership, you work with one and only one sales consultant from start At Dix Honda dealership, you work with of professionals and technicians. finish and aaward-winning manager ensuring an unmatched your expectations. We will provide you with ato buying orsales leasing experience that exceed finish and asuperior manager ensuring an unmatched At Dix Honda dealership, you work with your expectations. We will provide you with a of superior customer service and friendly, true competitive price upfront. You can be assured one and only one consultant from start to Sales Commitment finish and a manager ensuring an unmatched of customer service and a friendly, true competitive price upfront. You can be assured Receive unparalleled service from our team your expectations. We will provide you with awill welcome your service and parts business. services and competitive pricing. Weto buying or leasing experience that will exceed your expectations. We will provide you with ato buying or leasing experience that exceed stress-free environment from aathat dedicated finish and aguaranteed manager ensuring unmatched of superior customer service and aaan friendly, At Dix Honda dealership, you work with We offer only the manufacturer recommended one and only one sales consultant from start finish and a manager ensuring an unmatched one and only one sales consultant from start buying or leasing experience will exceed true competitive price upfront. You can be assured your expectations. We will provide you with a buying or leasing experience that will exceed one and only one sales consultant from start to true competitive price upfront. You can be assured stress-free environment from dedicated of superior customer service and friendly, At Dix Honda dealership, you work with finish and a superior manager ensuring an unmatched buying or leasing experience that will exceed of professionals and award-winning technicians. Sales Commitment stress-free environment from abe dedicated true competitive price upfront. You can assured of customer service and astaff. friendly, welcome your service and parts business. your expectations. We will provide you with aawill Atsuperior Dix Honda dealership, you work and professional sales and support true competitive price upfront. You can be assured stress-free environment from aawith dedicated your expectations. We will provide you with buying or leasing experience that exceed one and only one sales consultant from start to services and guaranteed competitive pricing. We finish and a manager ensuring an unmatched buying or leasing experience that will exceed finish and a manager ensuring an unmatched your expectations. We will provide you with aa of superior customer service and a friendly, your expectations. We will provide you with true competitive price upfront. You can be assured of customer service and a friendly, and professional sales and support staff. finish and a manager ensuring an unmatched stress-free environment from dedicated one and one sales consultant from start buying oronly leasing experience that will exceed your expectations. We will provide you with atoto We offer only the manufacturer recommended of superior customer service and aaupfront. friendly, and professional sales and support staff. stress-free environment from abe dedicated true competitive price upfront. You can assured one and only one sales consultant from start and professional sales and support staff. of superior customer service and friendly, welcome your service and parts business. true competitive price You can be assured At Dix Honda dealership, you work with your expectations. We will provide you with finish and a manager ensuring an unmatched buying or leasing experience that exceed your expectations. We will provide you with aa buying or leasing experience that exceed true competitive price upfront. You be assured true competitive price upfront. You can assured stress-free environment from abe dedicated of superior customer service and awill friendly, stress-free from aathat dedicated and professional sales and support staff. buying or leasing experience will exceed finish and aenvironment manager ensuring an unmatched your expectations. We will provide you with acan services and guaranteed competitive pricing. We true competitive price upfront. You can be assured stress-free environment from dedicated and professional sales and support staff. of superior customer service and a friendly, The End Result finish and a manager ensuring an unmatched stress-free environment from a dedicated of superior customer service and a friendly, one and only one sales consultant from start to true competitive price upfront. You can be assured buying or leasing experience that will exceed your expectations. We will provide you with a true competitive price upfront. You can be assured of superior customer service and a friendly, your expectations. We will provide you with a of superior customer service and aassured friendly, professional sales and support staff. professional sales and support staff. stress-free environment a be dedicated your expectations. We will provide you with a Service Commitment buying orand leasing experience that will exceed true competitive price upfront. You can welcome your service and parts business. and professional sales support staff. ofand superior customer service and afrom friendly, Service Commitment stress-free environment from aathat dedicated The End Result buying or leasing experience will exceed and professional sales and support staff. stress-free environment from a dedicated finish and a manager ensuring an unmatched of superior customer service and a friendly, your expectations. We will provide you with a stress-free environment from dedicated true competitive price upfront. You can be assured of superior customer service and a friendly, true competitive price upfront. You can be assured and professional sales and support staff. The end result is that we build a stress-free environment from a dedicated Service Commitment true competitive price upfront. You canwith be assured Service Commitment your expectations. We will provide you ateam of superior customer service and astaff. friendly, stress-free environment from aservice dedicated Receive unparalleled from our Service Commitment and professional sales and support your expectations. We will provide you with ateam and professional sales and support staff. Receive unparalleled service from our buying orand leasing experience that will exceed and professional sales and staff. stress-free environment from dedicated true competitive price upfront. You can The End Result of superior customer service and afrom friendly, one-on-one relationship with stress-free environment aabe dedicated The end result issupport that we build of superior customer service and aassured friendly, professional sales and support staff. Service Commitment of superior customer service and a friendly, The benchmark in automotive sales true competitive price upfront. You can be assured stress-free environment from a dedicated and professional sales and support staff. Receive unparalleled service from our team Service Commitment of professionals and award-winning technicians. Receive service from our team Service Commitment Theunparalleled benchmark in automotive sales true competitive price upfront. You can be assured Service Commitment of professionals and award-winning technicians. Receive unparalleled service from our team your expectations. We will provide you with a and professional sales and support staff. of superior customer service and a friendly, and service for over 36 years! our customers for generations... for life. one-on-one relationship with stress-free environment from a dedicated and professional sales and support staff. stress-free environment from a dedicated stress-free environment from a dedicated The end result is that we build a The benchmark in automotive sales of superior customer service and a friendly, and professional sales and support staff. Service Commitment and service for over 36 years! of professionals and award-winning technicians. Receive unparalleled service from our team The End Result We offer only the manufacturer recommended of professionals and award-winning technicians. Service Commitment Receive unparalleled service from our team of superior customer service and astaff. friendly, We offer only the manufacturer recommended of professionals and technicians. true competitive price upfront. You can be assured our customers for generations... for life. stress-free environment from aaaward-winning dedicated Service Commitment Receive unparalleled service from our team and sales and support and service for over 36 years! and professional sales and support staff. The benchmark in automotive sales Receive unparalleled service from our team one-on-one relationship with andprofessional professional sales and support staff. Service Commitment stress-free environment from dedicated Service Commitment services and guaranteed competitive pricing. We We offer the manufacturer recommended We offer only the manufacturer recommended of professionals and award-winning technicians. Service Commitment Sales Commitment of professionals award-winning technicians. and service for 36 years! services and guaranteed competitive pricing. The endunparalleled result isand that weover build a dedicated Receive service from our team We offer only the manufacturer recommended stress-free environment from aservice of superior customer service and a friendly, and professional sales and support staff. Service Commitment of professionals and award-winning technicians. Receive unparalleled from our teamWe of professionals and award-winning technicians. Sales Commitment our customers for generations... for life. Receive unparalleled service from our team At Dix Honda dealership, you work with and professional sales and support staff. welcome your service and parts business. services guaranteed competitive pricing. Service Commitment services and guaranteed competitive pricing. We We offer only the manufacturer recommended Service Commitment Receive unparalleled service from our team We offer only the manufacturer recommended welcome your service and business. Sales Commitment one-on-one relationship with services and guaranteed competitive pricing. We one and only one sales consultant from startparts to Atand Dix Honda dealership, you with of professionals award-winning technicians. Receive unparalleled service from our teamWe and professional sales and support staff. Service Commitment stress-free environment from aanwork dedicated Receive unparalleled service from our team We offer only the manufacturer recommended of professionals and award-winning technicians. We offer only the manufacturer recommended finish and aaward-winning manager ensuring unmatched one and only oneyou sales consultant from start to team of professionals and technicians. welcome service and parts business. Receive unparalleled service from our At Dix Honda dealership, work with Sales Commitment welcome your service and parts business. services and guaranteed competitive pricing. Service Commitment Service Commitment of professionals and technicians. services and guaranteed competitive pricing. We buying or leasing experience exceed finish and aaward-winning manager ensuring an will unmatched our customers for generations... for life. welcome your service and parts business. Service Commitment We offer only the manufacturer recommended of professionals and award-winning technicians. Receive unparalleled service from our team We one and only one sales consultant fromthat start to Receive unparalleled service from our team and professional sales and support staff. of and technicians. services and guaranteed competitive pricing. We services and guaranteed competitive pricing. We We offer only the manufacturer recommended At professionals Dix Honda dealership, you work with your expectations. We provide you with a team buying or leasing experience thataward-winning will exceed We offer only the manufacturer recommended Receive unparalleled service from our finish and aand manager ensuring anwill unmatched of professionals award-winning technicians. Service Commitment welcome your service and parts business. We offer only manufacturer recommended one and the only one sales consultant from start to true competitive price upfront. You can be assured welcome your service and parts business. your expectations. We will provide you with a buying or leasing experience that will exceed services and guaranteed competitive pricing. We We offer only the manufacturer recommended of professionals and award-winning technicians. Service Commitment Receive unparalleled service from our team of professionals and award-winning technicians. Receive unparalleled from our team welcome your and parts business. services and guaranteed pricing. We We offer only the manufacturer recommended welcome your service and parts business. finish andservice a superior manager ensuring an unmatched of customer service and aservice friendly, true competitive price upfront. You can competitive be assured Receive unparalleled service from our team services and guaranteed competitive pricing. We your expectations. We will provide you with a of professionals and award-winning technicians. Service Commitment We offerand only the manufacturer recommended The End Result buying or experience that will exceed services competitive pricing. We pricing. We stress-free environment from a be dedicated ofleasing superior customer service and aassured friendly, true guaranteed competitive price upfront. You can welcome your service and parts business. services and guaranteed competitive The End Result We offer only the manufacturer recommended Receive unparalleled service from our team of professionals and award-winning technicians. We offer only the manufacturer recommended your expectations. We will provide you with a of professionals and award-winning technicians. welcome your service and parts business. services and guaranteed competitive pricing. We and professional sales support staff. stress-free environment from a dedicated welcome your service and business. of superior customer service andand aparts friendly, of professionals and award-winning technicians. Receive unparalleled from ourpricing. team We We offerand only the manufacturer recommended services competitive trueguaranteed competitive price service upfront. You can be assured The End Result welcome your service and parts business. Service Commitment and professional sales and support staff. stress-free environment from ais dedicated The End Result Receive unparalleled service from our team The end result we build a The Result welcome your service and parts business. services and guaranteed competitive pricing. We of professionals and award-winning technicians. of superior customer service and a that friendly, We offer only the manufacturer recommended services and guaranteed competitive pricing. We We offer only the manufacturer recommended welcome your service and parts business. and professional and support staff. The end result is parts that we build a We offer only the manufacturer recommended Service Commitment ofWe professionals andsales award-winning technicians. services and guaranteed competitive pricing. stress-free environment from a dedicated welcome your service and business. Service Commitment The End Result of professionals and award-winning technicians. The End Result one-on-one relationship with The end result is that we build a Receive unparalleled service from our team andguaranteed professional sales and support staff. Receive unparalleled service from our team welcome your service and parts business. We offer only the manufacturer recommended services and competitive pricing. We welcome your service and parts business. services and guaranteed competitive pricing. We The End Result one-on-one relationship with The end result is that we build The is that we build aa We services guaranteed competitive pricing. Service Commitment of professionals and award-winning technicians. Receive unparalleled service from our team The End Result We offer and only the manufacturer recommended welcome your service and parts business. our customers for generations... for life. one-on-one relationship with We offer manufacturer only the manufacturer We offer only the recommended of professionals and award-winning technicians. ofThe professionals and award-winning technicians. services and guaranteed competitive pricing. Receive unparalleled service from our teamrecommended welcome your service and parts business. Service Commitment welcome your service parts end result is that we aaand our customers for generations... forWe life. The End Result one-on-one relationship with one-on-one relationship with The end result isbuild that we build abusiness. welcome your service and parts business. services and guaranteed competitive pricing. We We offer only the manufacturer recommended The End services and guaranteed competitive pricing. We The End Result of professionals and award-winning technicians. The end result is that we build The End Result Receive unparalleled service from our team The end result is that we build a welcome your service and parts business. services and guaranteed competitive pricing. We our customers for generations... for life. services and guaranteed competitive pricing. We We relationship offerthe only the manufacturer recommended We offer only manufacturer recommended welcome your service and parts business. one-on-one with our customers for generations... for life. of professionals and award-winning technicians. The End Result our customers for generations... for life. welcome your service and parts business. one-on-one relationship with The End Result services and guaranteed competitive pricing. We welcome your service and parts business. one-on-one relationship with The end result isservice that we build awe The end result build a We offer only the manufacturer recommended The End Result one-on-one relationship with The end result is that build a welcome your service and parts business. welcome your and parts business. services guaranteed competitive pricing. We The endand result is that we build a our customers for generations... services and guaranteed competitive pricing. We for life. The End Result our customers for generations... for The End Result The End Result our customers for generations... forbuild life. aafor life. one-on-one relationship with The end result isparts that we build welcome your service and parts one-on-one relationship with The End Result The end result iswebusiness. that The End Result our customers for generations... life. one-on-one relationship with The end result is that build a we one-on-one relationship with welcome your service and business. The end result is that we build a The End Result The End The End Result one-on-one relationship The end result isResult that wewith build a The End Result our customers generations... for life. our customers for generations... for life.aafor life. one-on-one relationship with The end result iswith that we build The end result is that build one-on-one relationship with our customers for generations... our customers for generations... forwe life. one-on-one relationship our customers for generations... for life. The end result is that we build a The end result isResult that wewith build a The End one-on-one relationship The End Result

Dix Honda... Dix Honda... Dix Honda... Dix Honda...

print for growth laid out in 2009. The plan is focused on creating stronger healthcare resources for the region with expansions in services, technology, medical education and, most notably, regional growth to improve access to quality healthcare. Steve, a native of Central Pennsylvania, moved back to State College in 2010 after serving as CEO of the 275-bed Evergreen Healthcare System in Kirkland, Washington. He is a Fellow of the American College of Healthcare Executives, and holds a Master of Public Administration in Health Services Administration from The Pennsylvania State University. He enjoys speaking on healthcare initiatives and was a guest presenter at the Chamber of Business and Industry Centre County (CBICC) and other civic and business groups in the last year. Steve and his wife, Mary, have two sons, and two grandchildren, all of whom live in the Philadelphia area.

“He is happiest Nothing is More Important John E. Boob when he is busy Nothing is More Important helping others” Nothing is More Important Ready, Willing & Able to Help Than the Customer... Kay Boob, wife of 56 years Than the Customer... By Sandie Biddle Nothing is MoreThan Important This handwritten nomination touched me in a special way. It was beautifully crafted and the Customer... mailed to me by Kay Boob, the nominee’s wife. This kind couple from Woodward has been Than the Customer... married for 56 years, and their bond is stronger than ever. our customers for generations... forlife. life. one-on-one relationship with a for The End Result The end result is that we build a one-on-one relationship with The end result is that we build our customers for generations... When I asked Mrs. Boob what prompted her to nominate her husband, she said, “In The end result is that we build a one-on-one relationship with The End Result our customers for generations... for life. our customers for generations... forlife. life. The end result is that we build aa with one-on-one relationship with our customers for generations... for one-on-one relationship Sunday School a few weeks ago, they asked, ‘What is kindness?’ and I thought, ‘That’s my one-on-one relationship with Nothing is More Important The end result is that we build our customers for generations... for life. The End Result Thecustomers end result is Important that we build afor life. for life. one-on-one relationship with our for generations... Johnny.’” I confess to getting a little teary when she said that, and so did she. our customers for generations... Nothing is More our customers for generations... for life. Nothing is More Important one-on-one relationship with Nothing is More Important one-on-one relationship with a for life. The end result is that we build our customers for generations... “My husband, John E. Boob, 75 years old, is kindness personified,” she wrote. “He is Nothing is More Important Nothing More Important Than the Customer... our is customers for generations... for life. Nothing is More Important Than the Customer... ouriscustomers for generations... for life. Than the Customer... always ready, willing, and able to help anyone who needs a hand with anything, but he refuses one-on-one relationship with Nothing More Important Nothing is More Important Than the Customer... Nothing is More Important Than the to ask for help unless it’s absolutely necessary.” our customers for generations... forCustomer... life. Nothing is More Important Than the Customer... Nothing is More Nothing is More Important Than the Customer... Mr. Boob was a heating specialist for 30 years, and continues to ply his trade watching Than the Customer... Nothing is More Important Nothing is More Important Than the Customer... over furnaces in area churches, including St. Luke’s (now closed) and Trinity UMC. Nothing is More Important Than the Customer... Nothing is More Important Than the Customer... Nothing is More Important “I have three widow friends who depend on him to do numerous odd jobs, plus we do a Nothing is More Important Than the Customer... Than the Customer... lot of volunteer Nothing isisMore Important Nothing is More Important work through the church,” she continued. Nothing More Important ourrelationship customers for generations... for life. one-on-one with The end result is that we build a our customers for generations... for life. one-on-one relationship with our customers for generations... for life.

Than the Customer... Than the Customer... Nothing Important Than the Customer... Than the Customer... Than the Customer... NothingisisMore More Important Than the Customer... Than the Customer... Than the Customer... Than the Customer... Nothing isDix MoreThan Important Dix Honda Company the Honda Company Than theCustomer... Customer... Than the Customer... VOTED

2796 West College Ave., State College, PA

   #     www.dixhonda.com

“BEST NEW CAR DEALERSHIP” BY READERS OF STATE COLLEGE MAGAZINE

2796 West College Ave., State College, PA

   #     “BEST NEW CAR DEALERSHIP” B R O S C M www.dixhonda.com VOTED

Y

EADERS

F

TATE

OLLEGE

AGAZINE

John is not the only one doing the volunteering. This couple works side by side helping victims of floods and hurricanes. They’ve made seven trips to the Gulf Coast since Katrina and weekly trips to Mechanicsburg to volunteer in the Mission Warehouse. “We still make a trip every couple of weeks with donations of items that we collect from our area,” she said. Donations anyone? “All of this, from beginning to end, is done voluntarily and gladly. He is happiest when he is busy helping others,” she concluded. Thank you John – and Kay – for being such kind and giving people.


OCTOBER 7, 2011

2011’s

WWW.CENTRECOUNTYGAZETTE.COM

11 Exceptional Men

Michael Paul

To the Moon, Michael By Tammy A. Miller

Shaun Knight

of Centre County

A Knight That Shines By Tammy Miller

Shaun Knight has lived Michael Paul is relatively new in the State College area for to the Centre County area, but almost 25 years, moving here that hasn’t stopped him from from Maine to attend Penn making a big impact in the State. In his professional world, community. A modest man, he is the Director of EducaMichael is the Team Lead on tional Leadership at the Smeal the Penn State Lunar Lion College of Business at Penn State University, but his impact project, in association with the Google X Prize. This project on the community is far reaching. will be sending an unmanned spacecraft to the moon! He is Cheryl Johnson, the Executive Director of the Private quick to turn the conversation to promoting the work of the Industry Council of Centre County (PICCC), was “thrilled talented team he leads, modestly drawing the attention away that Shaun was chosen for this acknowledgment, as he works from his own talents. diligently behind the scenes to make a difference in the lives Michael is a Space Systems Engineer with Penn State’s of so many in Centre County and beyond.” Applied Research Laboratory. His experience includes One example she offered was Shaun’s involvement in the working with NASA Planetary Missions. Before joining Blueprint for Success program, a program designed to invest ARL, Michael was at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics in the youth of our area. Shaun was on staff at PICCC and Laboratory where he was the spacecraft systems engineer for helped develop this program, and has remained a staunch NASA’s MESSENGER Mission to Mercury. supporter even after leaving PICCC for other opportunities. One of Michael’s team members on the Lunar Lion She added that, “Shaun has a high level of integrity and a project, Randy Riesterer, says that “Working with Michael passion for all of the projects he undertakes.” on the Lunar Lion project is an exciting experience: his Shaun considers part of his greatest and most humbling enthusiasm is contagious, his excitement is addictive, and accomplishments the two trips he has taken to the areas ravaged his openness to innovation is invigorating.” by Hurricane Katrina. On both trips, he led teams of high When he is not planning the trip to the moon, Michael school students as they cleaned, reconstructed people’s homes, enjoys spending time with his family and is also very involved and helped the members of the community rebuild their lives. with scouting in this area, serving as a Cub Scout leader for a Shaun currently serves on the Board of the House of den of 12 young scouts in third grade. Care and previously served on the Board of the YMCA, His life-long passion for all things space related and for eduARC of Centre County and the State College Food Bank. cation are also evident in his efforts to introduce a wide spectrum In his spare time, Shaun enjoys racquetball, biking and is of diversity of skills in the Lunar Lion project. He believes that an avid runner, having completed two half marathons, with the scope of this project can involve people from many walks more in his future. One of his regular racquetball opponents of life, making this a true community project, not just here in is Dr. Graham Spanier, President of Penn State University. Centre County, but with far- reaching opportunities. According to Dr. Spanier, “Shaun is a superb athlete. Related to this, Randy adds, “In the spirit of a true More important is that he is the consummate team player, educator, he has welcomed both high school and university a gentleman even in the heat students to actively particiof competition, universally pate in the Lunar Lion project e Baked Goods supportive of those around to help tap into the enthusie Pork, Bison and Beef him, and generous in praise of asm of the next generation.” e Cheese and Raw Milk others.” Spanier also added, Michael and his lovely e Eggs and Fresh Past a “As a dedicated staff member wife, Suzanna, who grew up at Penn State, he works tirein State College and is very e Herbs and Fresh Flower s lessly in support of our active with the State College e Pumpkins and Gourds students and contributes sigFood Bank and Housing e Winter Squash e Mum Plant s nificantly to a positive climate Transitions, moved to the e Goat s’ Milk Soap for everyone in his college.”  State College area from the e O ther Seasonal Produce Shaun Knight lives in DC area in 2009. They are the the State College area with proud parents of two spirited See You his lovely wife, Sandy, and children, Ann Marie, age 11, their three children Ryan, 26, and Ezra, age eight. Michael At The Amy, 20, and Abby, 11. They said it was family and the Market! also share their home space exceptional school system in Saturday 8am-Noon with Carter and Lexi, their State College that brought Gamble Mill parking lot four-legged dog children. them back to this area. Find us on WEST LAMB STREET Facebook! For more information about the Lunar Lion project, go to www.lunarlion.psu.edu.

Fox Hill Gardens

Beautiful Japanese maples, shade plants, and native plants

FANTASTIC PERENNIAL SPECIALS! BUY 2 GET 1 FREE ON MOST PERENNIALS *

20%  30% OFF MOST TREES AND SHRUBS* *sale terms cash/check and carry

Fruit Trees - Sweet Cherry, Peach, Pear, Plum Blueberry & Raspberry Plants COLORFUL MUMS, PUMPKINS, INDIAN CORN & FALL DECOR ARE HERE! Landscape Consultation, Design, and Installation Services. 2.3 miles from Beaver Stadium at 1035 Fox Hill Road. Mon - Sat 9:30 - 5:30, and Sun 10:00 to 4:00, Closed Wed.

Phone 814-237-9087 E-mail: contactfhg@yahoo.com www.foxhillgardens.com

GIFT CERTIFICATES

PAGE 15

Colonel Gerald F. Russell A True Leader in Life By Brian E. Bassett

Colonel Gerald F. Russell USMC (Ret.) found his way to State College shortly after retiring from the marines in 1967. Ever since relocating in Centre County, he has been an avid area volunteer. He is known throughout Centre County and state-wide for his involvement with the Pennsylvania Special Olympics, Centre County Toys for Tots, United Way Day of Caring, and myriad other programs that benefit the community. “In my opinion, Colonel Gerry Russell should be honored for exceptional service for every year he’s lived in the State College area,” stated Greg Johnson, fellow retired marine and member of the Nittany Leathernecks. “He is a community-volunteer leader and as such has motivated many to do things for the community. A typical marine – he leads by example.” Col. Russell is a distinguished, decorated WWII combat veteran who served at Guadalcanal and Iwo Jima. He commanded a combat battalion in Korea, and a regiment at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba during the Cuban Missile Crisis. The Penn State College of Education benefitted from Russell’s efforts and abilities when he served as assistant vice provost. The Navy League of Central PA, in partnership with the Nittany Leathernecks Detachment of the Marine Corps League, will honor Colonel Russell during a banquet at the State College Elks Club next week, on Thursday, October 13. Russell will be the inaugural recipient of the Navy League of Central PA’s LT Michael P. Murphy Distinguished Citizen Award. This award is given to a non-active duty person whose character, distinguished military or civilian service and stature draw a wholesome comparison to the qualities the Central PA Council of the Navy League endorses. Guest speaker for the event will be General James T. Conway, USMC (Ret.). For ticket information visit www.navyleague-centralpa. org or call John Groenveld at (814) 863-9896.

Gerald “Gerry” Lyons

Caring for and Giving to Pets, Vets & “Family” By Brian E. Bassett

Gerry Lyons, a lifelong Bellefonte resident, opened Lyons Kennels in 1959 and is proud to provide full-service boarding and grooming for dogs and cats; including pet supplies and high-quality pet foods. Visit: www.lyonskennels.com or call (814) 355-5964 to learn more. Lyons goes out of his way to provide shelter for stray animals, and then does his best to match them with correct families and find them homes. When families are in crisis he often takes care of their pets as long as possible. The business provides facilities to Nittany Beagle Rescue, Pets Come First, the local SPCA, and Centre County PAWS while simultaneously helping them to find homes for unfortunate animals. Gerry gives freely to schools. He supports reading programs, donates level-appropriate books to school libraries to help struggling readers; and once donated playground equipment in honor of an outstanding teacher. He prefers to donate cash, thereby preserving his anonymity. Some of Lyons’ favorite causes include family, veterans, scouting (he is an Eagle Scout), and animals. His “family” is anyone he knows. “He never seeks the limelight nor will you see his name associated with his fund raisers but he is the driving force working in the background,” said Curtis Knepper, long-time friend and business associate. “Gerry will stop any local politician or businessman and put the squeeze on him to donate to his current cause.” “Once a Marine, Always a Marine.” Gerry is an active member of the Nittany Leathernecks. He raises money to donate K-Bar knives to Eagle Scouts, raised money to procure a van that now shuttles vets to doctors’ appointments, to support woundedveteran housing, and started a scholarship fund for veterans’ dependents and a fund raiser for needy veterans. Curtis promised that behind Gerry’s rough-looking exterior, you’ll find a man with a heart of gold who is, “just a big old teddy bear.”


PAGE 16

THE GAZETTE - SERVING CENTRE COUNTY

OCTOBER 7, 2011

Bellefonte Rotary Club Kurt Busch Enters Contention, Golf Tournament a Success Winning at Dover By Les Barnhart

By Matt Masullo

The Bellefonte Rotary Club held their annual golf tournament recently at the Nittany Country Club. This fundraiser supports the youth of Centre County as well as other Rotary projects. In the past, they have donated educational and craft materials to the Bellefonte Youth Center; supported the Centre County Library’s Summer Reading Program; donated to the YMCA Strong Kids Campaign; provided dictionaries to local third grade students; supported local high school students competing at the Rotary 4-Way Test speech contest and sponsored four youth exchange students. If you are interested in Place Name Score Amount learning more about the 1st Steve Fellows 64 $60.00 Bellefonte Rotary Club or Dick Fellows 64 $60.00 1st becoming a member, find 1st Harry Gearhart 64 $60.00 them on Facebook. They st 1 Roger Fetters 64 $60.00 have posted additional nd Denny Nau 65 $40.00 2 pictures from the recent golf nd 2 Greg Nau 65 $40.00 tournament. 2nd Ron Andrews 65 $40.00 Here are the results from nd Dan Badger 65 $40.00 2 the tournament: rd 3 Liz Toukonen 69 $10.00 3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd

Mary DeArmitt Howard Long Mark Johnston Hugh Mose Maria Lievano Kay Zinsner Bill Workman

Skill Prizes Prize Long Putt Closest to Pin Closest to Pin (2nd shot) Straightest Drive

Hole # #1 #8 #12 #18

69 69 69 69 69 69 69

Kurt Busch didn’t look like he was much of a contender in the first two races of the Chase for the Cup playoffs. After a trip to Dover this past weekend, Busch vaulted himself into contention by winning the latest installment of the Chase. Busch held off Jimmie Johnson on the races final restart to claim the checkered flag. Rounding out the top five were Carl Edwards, Kasey Kahne and Matt Kenseth. The current standings heading into this weekend’s race at Kansas are as follows:

3. Tony Stewart: 2113 points 4. Kurt Busch: 2113 points 5. Jimmie Johnson: 2109 points 6. Brad Keselowski: 2108 points 7. Matt Kenseth: 2108 points 8. Kyle Busch: 2107 points 9. Jeff Gordon: 22103 points 10. Dale Earnhart Jr.: 2088 points 11. Ryan Newman: 2081 points 12. Denny Hamlin: 2054 points

1. Kevin Harvick: 2122 points 2. Carl Edwards: 2122 points

Coverage this weekend will be on ESPN with the green flag dropping at 2PM.

$10.00 $10.00 $10.00 $10.00 $10.00 $10.00 $10.00

Winner Dan Badger Mark Johnston Ron Andrews Les Cutter

Contact The Gazette sports department by emailing: sports@centrecountygazette.com regarding your sports story Platinum Sponsor the YMCA of Centre County. Pictured from left to right: Howard Long, Mary Dearmitt, Liz Toukonen, Mark Johnson.

LASIK 599 EVERYBODY GETS

$

**

FOR

PER EYE

Pennsylvania’s Most Experienced LASIK SURGEON

STEVEN VALE, M.D.

Centre County High School

PLAYER OF THE WEEK

Has Performed over 21,000 Laser Vision Correction Procedures Since 1994.

Call today for your FREE CONSULTATION with a LASIK Counselor!

599

ACUITY’S SUMMER SPECTACULAR

599

3PECIAL0RICING%NDS 3EPTEMBER 

“I am “I free am of freemy of my glasses and glasses and contacts for the contacts first time in my for 133 Westlife.” Front Street, Berwick, PA the first time 1901 Columbia Blvd., Bloomsburg, PA Lyndall Stout in my life” (877) 520-3937 TV News Anchor Lyndall Stout – TV News Anchor

Experience Counts! Call Acuity Today!

Eagles’ Ripka Named Player of the Week

additional cost.

This offer ends August 15th, 2010.

In Focus Family Vision 2790 Earlystown Road • Centre Hall, PA Crystal Vision Center 264 Hogan Boulevard • Mill Hall, PA

877-520-3937

www.acuitylaservision.com *Simple Myopia only. Myopia with astigmatism at $999 per eye. Hyperopia with and without astigmatism for $1199 per eye. Does not include optional enhancements. Interest free financing not available with $599 price. Standard LASIK only. Custom LASIK available at additional cost. Optional off-site co-management incurs an additional cost. Other discounts may not be applied to this offer. This offer ends September 2, 2011.

The Centre County Gazette is proud to announce the Player of the Week for week five as being Bald Eagle Area’s Cody Ripka. The senior running back ran rough shod over the visiting Huntingdon Bearcats last week in 133 West Front Street, Berwick, PAFriday night. their 35-0 rout last 1901 Columbia Blvd., Bloomsburg, PA Ripka had 103 yards rushing on (877) 520-3937 fifteen carries but more impressively scored all five touchdowns for the Eagles. All five came on the ground. He edged out his teammate Matt Dillon who ran for 166 yards on five carries in the same game but didn’t find the endzone. Cody Ripka is the first player from Bald Eagle Area to be named as the Player of the Week this season.

azette The

Serving Centre County

This offer ends


OCTOBER 7, 2011

WWW.CENTRECOUNTYGAZETTE.COM

PAGE 17

Red Raiders Run Over by Huskies

State College Shuts Out Harrisburg

Bellefonte has been susceptible to giving up the big play all season long, and Friday’s contest with Mifflin County was no different. The Huskies rolled up 384 yards of total offense, with 324 coming by way of the ground, as the Huskies rolled the Raiders 56-11. The Huskies scored on three plays of over 40 yards and avoided an early scare to stop the Red Raiders attempt of getting in the win column this season. The Huskies took the opening kickoff, and ran the ball down the field almost effortlessly in their opening possession; with Harry Lowber scoring from five yards out to give the Huskies an early 7-0 lead. After fullback David Yale (21 carries, 192 yards and 2 touchdowns) scored from 41 yards out to give the Huskies an early 14-0 lead, the Red Raiders got a spark. Billy Thompson took the ensuing kickoff deep into Huskies territory to set the Bellefonte offense up with great field position. Four plays later, the Red Raiders were in the end zone by way of a seven-yard Jordan Fye scamper. Opting to go for two, Fye then found Tyler Haslet to cut the Huskies lead to six points, making the score 14-8. Bellefonte then stunned the Huskies with an onside kick off the foot of kicker Adam Johnson, with sophomore Doylan Deitrich recovering, giving the Red Raiders great field position yet again. However, the Huskies defense would hold, with Lowber making an acrobatic one-handed catch in the back of the end zone to thwart the Red Raider threat. From that point on, the Huskies dominated. They scored 35 unanswered points, coming by way of a 62-yard punt return, a safety, two touchdown runs, and a 59-yard pass. Bellefonte got its final three points from Johnson, who knocked home a 33-yard field goal. Mifflin County would add one more score to make the final score 56-11. This week, 0-5 Bellefonte hosts 1-4 Huntingdon. The Bearcats are coming off of a 35-0 loss to Bald Eagle, where they gave up five rushing touchdowns. That may just be with the doctor ordered for a Bellefonte team who has seen struggles in the scoring department. Bellefonte is averaging a little over five points per game this year. For the Bearcats, they may again be without the services of leading rusher Houston Riley, who missed last week’s game. Kickoff is set for 7 PM at Rogers Stadium Friday night.

The Little Lions defense had seen their opponents score a combined total of 132 points in their three losses. At some point, enough was enough, and the Little Lions came out and shut out their Mid-Penn foe Harrisburg Cougars 28-0. On the night, they held the athletic Harrisburg offense to under 60 yards of total offense. For State College, senior Jack Haffner added 196 rushing yards and three touchdowns to his already impressive numbers on the season, as he accounted for nearly 80% of the team’s total offensive yards. The Little Lions scored twice in a 90 second span right before halftime, as quarterback Josh Weakland hit Dan Fry with a 14-yard touchdown pass with just under two minutes reaming in the half. Haffner then scored on an eight-yard run with 30 seconds left to give State College a 14-0 lead. In the third quarter, Haffner ripped off a 59-yard run, where he outran the Cougars defense to extend the Little Lion lead. In the fourth quarter, he put the game away with a ten-yard run, making the score 28-0. The win gives the Little Lions a 1-3 record on the season. This week, they will make the trip down route 322 again as they head to Carlisle to take on the 3-2 Thundering Herd, who are fresh off of a 35-27 win over Susquehanna Township. Carlisle senior running back Hunter Robb leads all Thundering Herd rushers with 132 yards rushing and one touchdown on the year. For the Little Lions, Jack Haffner has rushed for over 125 yards in three consecutive games. In order for the Little Lions to come home with a win, they may need another big night from Haffner. Kickoff is set for 7 PM in Carlisle.

By Gazette Sports Department

Week 5

High School Football Scoreboard

Bald Eagle Area Huntingdon Mifflin County Bellefonte Philipsburg-Osceola Penns Valley Bellwood-Antis So. Huntingdon Tyrone Central State College Harrisburg Clearfield Central Mountain

35 0 56 11 46 21 34 7 35 7 28 0 35 19

Attention

Local Sports Fans, Parents and Athletes!!

Just a reminder that with the all the sports going on in the county, it’s especially important that I get the input of all of you as I am bound to miss many of those who are deserving of recognition in their respective sports. No sport should go unnoticed or worse yet, unplayed. You can even submit your own name and deny it to your friends and teammates. Please feel free to contact me at my email address: sports@ centrecountygazette.com regarding your sports story as well as a phone number where you can be reached if needed. You can also post your ideas for a story or a recap of your game on the Centre County Sports page on Facebook. In order to make the Centre County Gazette the paper of the people, I need you, the people to provide the best sports coverage around. Good luck to all you in your respective sports. Hopefully I will run into you at a sporting event sometime and it will be you I will be covering. — Les Barnhart, Sports Editor

Harry Shaw

By Gazette Sports Department

Dell Street, Milesburg, PA

PHsFAX

2 0 11 A r m c h air Q u ar t er b ac k S ta n d i n g s Games of the Week Iowa @ Penn State

Miami @ Virginia Tech

Auburn @ Arkansas

PITT @ Rutgers

Georgia @ Tennessee

Last Week

Season

Games Behind

Jeff Byers

4-1

10-5

2

Jeff Brown

3-2

7-8

5

Denny Mason

3-2

10-5

2

Todd Brown

4-1

12-3

Norm Brown

3-2

9-6

3

Last Week

Season

Games Behind

Bellefonte Red Raiders

2-3

8-7

5

State College Little Lions

3-2

8-7

5

Bald Eagle Area Eagles

5-0

13-2

Penns Valley Rams

5-0

9-6

Games of the Week Iowa @ Penn State

Miami @ Virginia Tech

Auburn @ Arkansas

PITT @ Rutgers

Georgia @ Tennessee

4


PAGE 18

THE GAZETTE - SERVING CENTRE COUNTY

Nittany Lions Win Big Ten Opener in Less than Impressive Fashion By Les Barnhart

BLOOMINGTON, Ind – Penn State opened their Big Ten schedule with a 16-10 road win over the Indiana Hoosiers last Saturday afternoon. Despite the Nittany Lions winning their conference opener for just the second time in their last six games, the offense again struggled against a team that they should have buried early in the game and cruised to an easy victory. Instead, on a day in which the offense averaged 5-4 yards per play in amassing 464 yards against a leaky at best Indiana defense, they needed a 22-yard field goal with just less than three minutes to play before halftime to draw even at 3-3. The offense had their opportunities but, as they have this season, lacked execution or focus, perhaps both as they failed to close drives with points. The opening drive looked to be the start of a good afternoon but Silas Redd’s touchdown run was nullified by a holding call and on the next play, Rob Bolden’s pass was tipped and intercepted. In the third quarter, Redd would fumble at the Hoosiers’ 2-yard line on a drive that would have provided much needed breathing room for a defense that has not been afforded much of that this season. For the third week in a row, the defense was solid if not impressive. They did allow 184 yards rushing but did force two turnovers. The defense allowed just the ten points with the lone touchdown coming in the final five minutes of the fourth quarter. The defense, despite not having D’Anton Lynn and Michael Mauti, played a good game and simply needed the offense to put points on the board. The lone Penn State touchdown came near the end of the third quarter when Matt McGloin hooked up with Derek Moye for a 74-yard touchdown that extended the lead to 13-3. Moye ended the game with 158 yards on just six catches to lead the Nittany Lion offense. Redd carried the ball 29 times for 129 yards (4.4 avg). The quarterback rotation was again employed and again it was with mixed results as McGloin went 10 of 22 for 204 with the long touchdown to Moye. Bolden was less impressive with a 6 of 14 for 67 yards and an interception game. Penn State has reached the point of their schedule where they will need to show just what kind of team they are as the soft portion of the schedule ended with Indiana. This weekend they entertain an Iowa team that has defeated the Nittany Lions three straight times and eight of the last nine times the teams have faced. The Hawkeyes (3-1) will bring into Beaver Stadium a no-huddle attack that proved successful in their last game two weeks ago. Quarterback James Vandenberg triggers an offense that has just one proven running back, sophomore Marcus Coker, but has a talented corps of receivers led by senior Marvin McNutt. Junior Keenan Davis and redshirt freshman Kevonte Martin-Manley (he of the leaping, game winner touchdown catch over Pitt) round out the three talented wide outs. Vanderburg has thrown 10 touchdown passes this season while being intercepted just once. He is an accurate passer, having completed 62.8% of his passes and along with his talented receivers should pose a challenge to the Nittany Lions defense. The game kicks off at 3:30pm from Beaver Stadium on Saturday afternoon and fans of the Nittany Lions will once again hold their collective breath as to which Penn State team shows up. If this team wants to entertain thoughts of staying in the hunt for a Big Ten championship, this is a game they should and must win.

Steelers Lose More than Just a Game in Houston By Matt Masullo

For a team that has had one of the statistically best defenses of this generation, to give up 155 yards to a running back (Arian Foster) who is fresh off of a hamstring injury is concerning to say the least. The Steelers were outplayed and outmanned all day in Houston, as the Texans defeated the Steelers 17-10. The Steelers even had the luxury of not playing against one the league’s most dynamic wide receivers for an entire game when Texans All-Pro wide out Andre Johnson went down with a hamstring injury. For Texans fans, the injury was a scary one, as Johnson went down without any contact and immediately grabbed for the back of his right knee. Following the injury, the Steelers had an opportunity to put points on the board before the half ended, but a Shaun Suisham field goal attempt would be blocked as the teams headed into the locker room with the Texans leading, 10-0. The Steelers would rally to tie the game at ten in the second half with a three-yard Rashard Mendenhall touchdown run and a 26-yard Suisham field goal. However, Foster would rip off a 42-yard touchdown run with just over 12 minutes remaining to ice the game. For the Steelers, they would see Ben Roethlisberger walk out of the locker room following the game in a walking boot with a sprained foot, Rahsard Mendenhall gimping with a tweaked hamstring, and James Harrison leave the game with an eye injury. Roethlisberger will lumber through the injury as he always tends to do, but the Black and Yellow will see James Harrison miss “several games”. Rashard Mendenhall is also likely to miss this week, with Issac “RedZone” Redman taking a majority of Mendenhall’s snaps. This week, the Steelers host Tennessee to take on the 3-1 upstart Titans.

Banged up Steelers Face Up-tempo Titans By Matt Masullo

For the Pittsburgh Steelers, last Sunday’s game against the Houston Texans was a worst case scenario. Ben Roethlisberger was injured, as were Rashard Mendenhall and James Harrison. Mendenhall and Harrison will both miss this weekend’s game, with Harrison likely to miss upwards of two more games at least with a broken orbital bone. Mendenhall’s hamstring may be iffy as well, as hamstring injuries to running backs are a touchy subject to begin with. For Big Ben, he plays through pain seemingly every week, so his sprained foot is nothing new to him. The fact that he is hurt this early into the season is concerning though. Oh, and they lost the game by the way, falling to 2-2 on the season. For the Titans, Matt Hasselbeck has resurrected his career in Tennessee. Right now, he is leading the charge on a team that finds itself tied for first place in the AFC South. The Titans are off to a fast start, and that fast start doesn’t necessarily include their fastest player, Chris Johnson. Fresh off of a big payday prior to this season, 4.24 has been slow to start this season. His longest run of the season is 25 yards, and he finally cracked the century mark last week, rushing for 101 yards last week against the porous Cleveland Brown defense. This week’s matchup at the big ketchup bottle could be a make or break for both teams. For the Steelers, who sit tied for last in the AFC North, a win with a banged up team would be great for team morale. For the Titans, defeating last year’s AFC Champs would be a huge step in moving forward in the AFC South. Coverage begins at 1 PM on CBS.

“Best Darn Bologna in the Area” We have Lunch Meat, Cheese, Myers Dairy Milk, Yoder’s Noodles, Martin Ham Products, Hand-Dipped Ice Cream and the “Friendliest Smile in the Valley”! We will process Venison Bologna and Deer

Walnut Rock Farm General Store

1685 Axeman Road, Bellefonte, PA 16823 814-353-8920 Hours: Mon. - Fri. 11 AM to 8 PM Sat. 9 AM to 4 PM, Sun. Closed

OCTOBER 7, 2011

Eagles Can’t Hold on Late By Matt Masullo

Michael Vick took the first offensive snap and the last offensive snap for the Eagles. However, that didn’t equate to victory for the Eagles, as they blew a 20-point lead early in the third quarter, only to see the 49ers come back to knock them off at home, 24-23. Eagles rookie kicker Alex Henery missed field goals from 39 and 33 yards in the fourth quarter that would have put the game away. He did connect on three field goals on the afternoon (32, 32 and 33 yards), as the Eagles offense sputtered in the red zone all afternoon. At one point, running back Ronnie Brown found himself being tackled near the goal line, and turned and tried to throw the ball to someone. The 49ers recovered and kept the Eagles from putting points on the board. On the other side of the field, was former Eagles kicker David Akers nailed a 37-yard field goal and was successful on his three PAT tries in his homecoming to Philadelphia. The 49ers found themselves down 23-3 in the third quarter before Alex Smith found Josh Morgan from 30 yards out. Following that score, Smith connected with tight end Vernon Davis from nine-yards out to make the score 23-17. Then Henery would miss the first of his two failed field goal attempts. In the fourth quarter, Frank Gore scored from 12 yards out to give the 49ers their first and only lead of the afternoon. The Eagles had a last ditch effort derailed when Jeremy Maclin fumbled after catching a quick screen from Vick and taking the ball up the 49ers sideline before being chased down by defensive lineman Justin Smith. This week, the Eagles take on one of the more surprising stories early this NFL season in the Buffalo Bills. “NOBODY, CIRCLES THE WAGONS, LIKE THE BUFFALO BILLS!”

Eagles Need to Circle the Wagons at Buffalo By Matt Masullo

The Buffalo Bills were an afterthought at the beginning of this football season, the Philadelphia Eagles were the talk of the country. How the tables have turned. The Bills are tied for first in the AFC East (I did say tied for first, that wasn’t a typo). The Eagles are bringing up the rear in the NFC East, a division that they have historically dominated over the past decade. The Eagles have several hurdles to leap over before taking control of the division yet again. They need to find an offensive line to protect Michael Vick, they need to find a group of linebackers that like to tackle and they need to find a secondary that can make up for the front seven’s mistakes. LeSean McCoy has been a bright spot this season, but other than that, the most hyped team in the league has yet to live up to their billing. The Bills are led by a crew of relative no-names. Harvard grad Ryan Fitzpatrick quarterbacks an offense that features up-and-coming wide receiver Steve Johnson and running backs Fred Jackson and speedster C.J. Spiller. They have surprised the league and are taking the AFC East by storm, in a division that the Patriots and Jets have owned as of late. For the Bills to take another step towards proving they are contenders versus pretenders, the need to knock off the Eagles at Ralph Wilson Stadium. The Eagles need to find a way to win; someway, somehow. They blew a 20-point lead at home last week. Should they blow another big lead, Andy Reid, the longest tenured coach in the NFL, could find himself on the hot-seat early in this 2011 season. Coverage begins at 1 PM on Fox.

Results for the Bellefonte Area Cross Country Team The Bellefonte Cross Country teams competed in the NEPA XC Invitational held at Bloomsburg University on Saturday, October 1st and the results were as follows on a cold and rainy day. BAXC Varsity Girls: (167 runners) 94. Miranda Boatman 23:19 97. Alexis Franks 23:22 139. Brooke Shirey 26:19 BAXC Varsity Boys: (206 runners) *13. Christian Hopple 16:48 *17. Mitchell Smith 16:53 95. Sean Gipson 18:51 119. Garrett Pensak 19:11 134. Zach Catherman 19:24 154. Manny Menien 19:54

159. Ian Marshall 20:08 * individual award winners The team placed 14th out of the 31 teams that competed in the event. BAXC JV Boys: (113 runners) 24. Sean Hough 20:11 28. Grey Rockey 20:25 31. Daniel Tanney 20:28 37. Tanner Fishburn 20:36 46. Ethan Diefenbach 20:51 59. Mike Covone 21:11 72. Ben Gibboney 21:42 The team finished third of out of the ten teams that competed. Awards are given to the top three teams.


OCTOBER 7, 2011

WWW.CENTRECOUNTYGAZETTE.COM

Bald Eagle and Penns Valley Streaking in Mountain League Soccer Bald Eagle and Penns Valley pushed their unbeaten streak to a combined six wins this week as the Rams forged their first two game winning streak in more than a year and a half and the Eagles pushed their winning streak to four straight with convincing wins over Tyrone and Clearfield. Bald Eagle caught Huntingdon in the 78th minute to grab a 2-1 victory over the Bearcats. Doug Turner took a feed from LJ Flood and earned the game winner fifteen minutes after Danny Styles staked the Eagles to a 1-0 from the penalty spot. Bald Eagle rounded out the week in convincing fashion with a 4-0 shutout of Clearfield. Doug Turner scored twice and Danny Styles and Eric Henderson each netted goals in the Eagles dominant performance. The Penns Valley Rams had an undefeated week besting Clearfield in a steady downpour and controlling their match against the Bearcats from Huntingdon. The Rams, as is their want, gave up an early goal to Clearfield and earned the equalizer tying the game at 1-1 when Martin Black placed a penalty kick right in the middle of the goal as the Bison keeper dove left in the penalty kick guessing game. As it turned out, this game would feature an unusual statistic for a soccer match. The referee’s whistled a total of four penalty kicks and Penns Valley scored on both of their spot attempts while the Bison beat Frankie Randazzo on one attempt and pushed a second attempt wide of the net. The game was played in a steady downpour and as the second half ensued, the field reminded spectators of their favorite duck hunting blind, but felt like an ice skating rink to the slipping and sliding players. In the end the Rams managed to retrieve 5 balls from the Bison net in earning the sloppy 5-2 victory. Penns Valley controlled the possession game against Huntingdon and Caleb Luse staked the Rams to a 1-0 lead eight minutes into the second half off of an assist from Morten Andersen. Twenty minutes later the Rams Martin Black earned the game winner when he took a feed from Ryan Riegel and tucked an agonizing ball just inside the far post. Ben Hsiung made it interesting for the Bearcats in the 75th minute as he beat Frankie Randazzo to pull one goal back for the visitors. In the final five minutes, Rams defenders Brian Markle and Dalton Ulmanic were able to hold their defensive line against a frantic Bearcats team as they desperately tried to earn the equalizer. Penns Valley outshot Huntingdon 9-2. Bellefonte played a tight game against Philipsburg on a slippery home field Tuesday afternoon coming up short 1-0 to the Mounties. In a tight marking game that went back and forth for eighty minutes, Philipsburg broke through on a short throw-in to Alex Boumerhi who dropped the ball back to Alex Golemboski. Golemboski ripped a shot from 25 yards out beating Jacob Mann, the Red Raiders goalkeeper, as his outstretched fingers tried to push the ball over the net. The lone Philipsburg goal would hold up in a shut out victory for the Mounties and goalkeeper Jay Prentice who managed six saves on fifteen shots. Bellefonte had fifteen shots and Mann eradicated 13 Mounties shots. Coach Scott Martz was pleased with his teams defensive effort in closing down a high scoring Mounties team that averages more than three goals per game. The Red Raiders found the win column against Tyrone as Tyler Rhoads scored twice in the Red Raiders 4-1 victory over the Golden Eagles. Paul Harrison and Jordan Newman had unassisted goals for the home team. Bellefonte had their Saturday match washed away by the steady rain that plagued the area. In a battle of AAA schools Central Mountain and Mifflin County played 100 minutes and no winner emerged from a 1-1 tie. Central Mountain and Juniata also had games postponed due to weather and the games will be made up in the coming weeks.

Mountain League Allegheny Division Overall Central Mountain 8-2-1 Philipsburg 7-2-0 Huntingdon 2-8-0 Tyrone 2-9-0 Clearfield 0-9-0 Nittany Division Juniata Bald Eagle Bellefonte Penns Valley

6-3-0 6-4-0 5-7-0 3-7-0

League 6-0-1 6-2-0 2-6-0 0-7-0 0-9-0 5-2-0 4-3-0 4-6-0 3-5-0

Baseball Postseason Opens Without Red Sox and Braves By Les Barnhart

With all the talk about both college and NFL football filling the radio airwaves, television coverage and morning water cooler talks, some may have missed the opening of the Major League Baseball postseason. That may be the case for some fans whose teams didn’t have a chance to make a run for the Fall Classic but for the eight teams that ultimately made the postseason as well as the two that didn’t, this is their time of year. The two teams that didn’t make the playoffs, the Boston Red Sox and Atlanta Braves, stole some of the spotlight upon the opening of the four postseason series. Both teams completed epic collapses with losses in their regular season finales to also lose what seemed a month prior to be a sure spot in the eight-team playoff field. While the Braves toyed with the National League East lead early in the season, they trailed the eventual division winning Philadelphia Phillies throughout the second half of the season. They did however take command of the Wild Card race and held a 10.5 game lead in that race on August 25th. The Red Sox and Braves had a September that no one wants to remember but few will soon forget. Each found ways to lose games and their Wild Card leads to the point where their postseason lives came down to the 162nd game of the season. The Red Sox posted a 7-20 record in September while the Braves weren’t much better with a 9-18 record in the month. Meanwhile, the teams chasing them, the St. Louis Cardinals and Tampa Bay Rays, took advantage of the collapse. The Cardinals played lights out down the stretch by winning 23 of their final 31 games including a win in their final game while the Braves were being swept at home by the Phillies. The Rays went 17-10 in September to catch the Red Sox and with an extra inning walk-off home run against the Yankees, they moved past Boston to win the American League Wild Card. Terry Francona ultimately took the blame, justified or not, for a Red Sox late season collapse that is already being hailed as one of the biggest in sports history. Francona led the Red Sox to World Series titles in both 2004 and 2007 and with his eight years at the helm was the most tenured manager in franchise history. That meant little to those looking for answers in the second straight non-postseason finish. Francona cited his difficulty “making an impact on players” as the reason why he and the team agreed not to pick up the option years on the manager’s contract. Both teams will likely spend the offseason trying to repair and rebuild their teams for another run next season. They are both proud and storied franchises with fans that will not stand for this type of play. The teams know this and will be ready when Spring Training opens next season. Each will have something to prove and in divisions which feature the Yankees and Phillies, respectively, they will certainly have their work cut out for them. Note: The two teams that won the Wild Card titles both opened their respective series with the Rays picking up a win over Texas while the Cardinals lost to the Phillies. The Rangers closed out their best of five series, 3-1, on Tuesday. The Cardinals also lost on Tuesday and trail in their series 2-1.

Bellefonte Youth Wrestling Announces Registration Registration for Bellefonte Youth Wrestling will take place on November 1, 2011 at 6:30 pm in the Wrestling Room at the Bellefonte HS. The cost is $50 per child and is open to youth in grade K through 6 who attend a school in the Bellefonte Area School District. Questions can be directed to Coach Tom Aikey at tom.ats@verizon.net

PAGE 19

CONGRATULATIONS TO Jason Brown of Bellefonte

WEEK 2 PIGSKIN PICK ’EM CONTEST WINNER He will be automatically entered in our Pigskin Pick ’Em Superbowl Playoff for a chance to win our Grand Prize Package including a 46" Sony Bravia HDTV and Sony Blu-Ray/DVD Player from Paul & Tony’s Stereo! Enter our Pigskin Pick ‘Em Contest weekly. You can’t win if you don’t enter!

B.E.A. Winter 2011-2012 Sports Physicals & Recertifications Students needing a physical for basketball, wrestling, cheerleading, or indoor track & field, should report to the cafeteria on Thursday, November 3, 2011 at 3:15 pm. Physicals will be on a first come, first serve basis. Athletes that played a Fall sport need to complete a recertification packet and turn it in to Mr. Dyke by November 13th. Winter parent & athlete meeting will be held on Monday, November 7, 2011 in the high school cafeteria at 7:00 pm. All parents are urged to attend to get important information from the head coaches. Physical & Re-cert Packets are available outside the Attendance Office.

Bald Eagle Area Little League Softball Meeting The Bald Eagle Area Little League Softball will be holding their regular monthly meeting on SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9 starting at 6pm at the BALD EAGLE AREA HIGH SCHOOL CAFETERIA. Regular monthly meetings are held the second Sunday of each month at the Bald Eagle Area High School. Issues on this month’s agenda include but are not limited to: • Announcement of league officers for the 2012 season • Fall Softball League “This will never be our league unless you are a part of it”

GAZETTE SPORTS

“Did you know…?” … that Ed Vosberg and Jason Varitek are the only TWO players to have played in the Little League World Series, the College Baseball World Series and the Major League Baseball World Series?

!

Where te Bellefoen Gath rs!

In Honor of Make a Difference Day, Donate a Non-Perishable Food Item and Recieve 20% Off Lunch (Valid from 10/10/11 to 10/31/11)

Send Your Story Ideas To The Gazette!

Now Open Thursdays until 7:00 PM French Pressing Now Available 814-355-1178

141 W. High Street, Bellefonte coolbeanscoffeeandtea@gmail.com


PAGE 20

THE GAZETTE - SERVING CENTRE COUNTY

Weekly Entertainment

Spirit and Beauty Meet in Veronica Winters’ Art By Karen Dabney

Walking into Veronica Winters’ State College home and studio is like stepping into feast of light and color. Her oil paintings and colored pencil drawings grace the walls and delight the viewer. Winters’ art varies in size and subject: landscapes, flowers, still lifes, and people. Some are realistic images created from life and some are

Winters paints in transparent layers to create luminosity, and also paints with a palette knife to achieve textural effects, both of which give a richness and depth to her paintings. She created a series of tree paintings with an imaginary, floating, bare tree. In Unrooted, she painted the tree itself from real life. “I wanted to put it on ice and make it disconnected from everything else, with its roots floating.” Winters said she did this as a response to how people abuse nature and throw out things that could be Veronica Winters recycled. She wanted to inspire people to be works of imagination. more thoughtful. She enjoys hiking, and has used some of her photographs For Moonlit Tree, from national parks and other trips to create paintings and another painting in drawings. the series, she said “I don’t paint everything as a final piece,” said Winters. she had the same idea “I paint some as studies. Studies are always small. [In a larger of detached nature. Unrooted, a Surrealist oil painting by Winters piece] you lose that freshness. You have two to three hours “I thought of myself and the light changes.” being detached from everything and everyone. It When the light changes, the was painted in winter when it’s cold and you feel appearance of the art’s subject melancholy. There’s a lot of art that’s very depresschanges. She works from photoing. I understand it but I want to bring hope with graphs she takes of the subjects so my paintings.” she can record the light and avoid Trips to Venice inspired Winters to create changes, such as wilting flowers. a series of paintings based on photos she took there. “Colored pencil drawing takes She went to Venice during the Carnival last year to a tremendous amount of time to take pictures of people in costumes, and used these finish,” Winters said. “With phofigures, along with Venice’s architecture to create tographs, I can lock in shadows “something that doesn’t quite exist.” and reflections in one spot so they One painting in the series, Galaxy Traveler, don’t move. Photography doesn’t was inspired by a National Public Radio program tell you everything, so I bring my on galaxies, the landscape she photographed in knowledge into the picture. I add Utah, and a costumed Venetian woman during colors that are not in the photo Carnival. “I wanted the galaxy to overlap her. The that I know are supposed to be skirt becomes part of the galaxy. I think we all A study painted in oil, inspired by there. It’s a selective process what evolve that way; we become part of the cosmos.” Flemish old master still-lifes to put in and take out.” Winters and her husband are natives of She studied the ImpressionMoscow, and hold dual citizenships in Russia and ists and their interest in light. “Any kind of painting is about the United States. They came to America on her Fulbright the light,” she said. “Over time I kept painting and realized Scholarship to study business at the University of Tulsa while what they meant. If you don’t keep this in your head, the her husband worked as a programmer. After graduation, she painting looks flat and dead.” took art classes, raised her son and became serious about her Winters says Surrealism is her favorite type of painting. art. They moved to State College when she was accepted into She finds it very challenging because it’s imaginary. The the Master of Fine Arts at Penn State. She also studied classiartist must work from her mind instead of real life. “I really cal painting at The Art Students League in New York. don’t like to give explanations to such paintings,” she said. Winters accepts students for individual art instruction, “I think they should be open to and teaches at the Art Alliance of interpretation.” Central Pennsylvania. She has pub She wants her Surrealist lished catalogs of her work and colored paintings to be more spiritual, pencil instruction books. Her work is to have a deeper meaning. The in galleries in New York, Harrisburg, choice of color affects the mood Florida, and Tulsa, and she accepts and message of the painting. In commissions. Enigma, she painted a quarter Winters has continued to seek moon, an owl, and a cup of chocexcellence as an artist, including the olate with cherries (pictured on business aspects of art. “I feel it’s imporfront cover). tant to make a living as an artist.” “This one is in blues,” she For more information, contact said. “It’s calmer, meditative, more Winters at (814) 235-9785 or veronithoughtful, unlike one in reds and Two Travelers was inspired by the costumed revelers casart@comcast.net. yellows.” (all photos submitted by Veronica Winters) at Venice’s Carnival.

Live

OCTOBER 7, 2011

t n e m n i a t r Ente Schedule

10/7/11 – 10/14/11 American Ale House – Toftrees/State College 10/7 Tommy Wareham, 6pm & 9pm 10/8 Tommy Wareham, 8pm Dominic Swintosky, 8pm 10/9 Ted and Molly, 8pm 10/12 Tommy Wareham, 7:30pm

The Arena – Martin Street/State College 10/7 Bad DaZe 10/8 G211

The Autoport – S. Atherton St., State College 10/7 DJ Troy Breon, 9pm 10/8 Brad Fey, 8pm

Centre for The Performing Arts – Eisenhower Audito-

rium, University Park

10/11 St. Lawrence begins Beethoven, 7:30pm 10/13 Paul Taylor Dance Company, 7:30pm

The Darkhorse Tavern – Downtown State College 10/7 5 Cherry Lewis, 10pm 10/8 The Dave Joyce Band, 10pm

The Deli – Downtown State College 10/9 Jazz Brunch, 11:30am

Elk Creek Café & Ale Works – Millheim

10/7 Farmland Preservation Artists, 6pm 10/8 Michael Hurley with Meg Baird, 8pm 10/9 Local Harvest Supper 10/13 Pub Hang with The Rounders, 7:30pm

Governor’s Pub – Bellefonte 10/12 Bisquit Jam, 6pm 10/13 JT Blues

Inferno Brick Oven & Bar – Downtown State College 10/7 DJ Fuego, 10pm 10/8 DJ Cashouts 10/12 Greg and Steve Acoustic 10/13 DJ Remedy

Mountain Valley Diner – Wingate 10/11 Parlor Pickers, 5:30pm

Otto’s Pub & Brewery – N. Atherton St., State College 10/12 Acoustic Music, 8pm 10/13 Acoustic Thursday with 18 Strings

The Phyrst – Downtown State College 10/7 Dom and The Fig, 8pm Ted and The Hi Fi’s, 10:20pm 10/8 Velveeta, 10:30pm Phyrst Phamily, 7:30pm 10/9 2TWENTY2 10/10 Open Mic Night Lowjack, Midnight

Pizza Mia – Bellefonte

10/15 Karoke with Ken Yeany

The Rathskeller – Downtown State College 10/7 Mr. Hand, 10:30pm 10/8 Table Ten, 10:30pm 10/12 Ken Volz, 10pm 10/13 Team Trivia

Red Horse Tavern – Pleasant Gap 10/7 Bob Timney, 8pm 10/13 Irish Jam, 7pm

The Saloon – Downtown State College 10/7 Velveeta, 10:30pm 10/8 Mr. Hand, 10:30pm 10/9 Atomic Supersonic, 10pm 10/10 Smokin’ Karaoke, 10:30 10/12 Table Ten, 10:30pm 10/13 My Hero Zero

State College American Legion – Science Park Road 10/14 The Screaming Ducks, 8pm

The State Theatre – Downtown State College 10/14 The Machine, 8pm America’s Premiere Pink Floyd Experience

The Tavern – Downtown State College 10/7 Jay-Mac+1, 11pm

Free Emily Dickenson Lecture Contributed by Penn State University

UNIVERSITY PARK – Acclaimed poet and educator Sharon Olds will give the 2011 Emily Dickinson Lecture at 7:30 p.m., Thursday October 13 in 129 Alumni Hall, the Hub-Robeson Center, on the Penn State’s University Park campus. The lecture is free to the public. Olds is the author of eight highly celebrated volumes of poetry including One Secret Thing and Blood, Tin, Straw.  Her writing, says Michael Ondaatje, is “pure fire in the hands.” Her numerous honors include an NEA grant, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and the National Book Critics’ Circle Award for The Dead and the Living (1983). Her poetry has

appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review, Poetry, The Atlantic Monthly, and The New York Times. Named New York State Poet Laureate (1998 – 2000), Olds teaches graduate poetry workshops at NYU as well as the writing workshop she helped found at a 900-bed state hospital for the severely disabled. Her latest collection is One Secret Thing (2008). The Emily Dickinson Lecture is made possible with the support of George and Barbara Kelly and the Penn State Department of English. For more information on the event, contact Mark Morrisson at mxm61@psu.edu

Zeno’s Pub – Downtown State College

10/7 Spider Kelly, 10:30 10/8 Pure Cane Sugar, 10:30 10/11 Natalie Berrena, 11pm 10/12 Any Tolins Bluegrass Revue, 12am 10/13 The Nightcrawlers: Featuring Natalie Berrena, 10:30pm Compiled by Abigail Miller Schedules subject to change. Call the venue for details. The Gazette is committed to providing you with a complete listing of upcoming live entertainment in Centre County. If your establishment provides live entertainment and would like to have your entertainment listed FREE in The Gazette, just e-mail your entertainment to ccgazette@hughes.net.


ATTENTION LOCAL MUSICIANS!!!

OCTOBER 7, 2011

WWW.CENTRECOUNTYGAZETTE.COM

HAVE A NEW CD COMING OUT? DID YOU JUST CELEBRATE A MILESTONE ANNIVERSARY IN THE BAND? DID YOU JUST WIN AN AWARD? HAS YOUR MUSIC BEEN FEATURED SOMEWHERE OUTSIDE THE AREA? LET THE GAZETTE KNOW ABOUT IT AND WE’LL TELL ALL OF CENTRE COUNTY!!! Just send your band information—however big or small the news is—to The Gazette! We have a feature called “Centre of the Music Scene� which will feature information about the local band scene in Centre County. Whether it’s country, rock, bluegrass, folk, jazz, rap— whatever—let us know what’s happening! We might even do a full-length feature about it!

PAGE 21

the ave SDate

Comedy Night

Nittany Valley Shakespeare Festival

A Moon for the Misbegotten By Eugene O’Neill The State Theatre October 6-October 16, evening & matinee A Moon for the Misbegotten is a play about finding peace – not the peace at the bottom of a whiskey bottle found by Harry Hope and company, but peace rooted in human kinship of the closest kind. It is a play about forgiveness and self-forgiveness. And it is a play about the close of life, though no one dies in it and there is no violence whatsoever in its conclusion. It feels like an autumnal play, a play which looks toward death without fear or bitterness. This play is tragedy concluding in a tone of reconciliation and lyrical sadness. Tickets are $20; $18 students & seniors.

French Film Series Thursdays, October 20 & November 11 113 Carnegie, University Park

The French and Francophone Studies Film Series offers free showings on selected Thursday evenings at 6:30 p.m. and 9:00 p.m. in 113 Carnegie on the University Park campus. Free to the public, all films are subtitled in English. For information, visit www.french.psu.edu or contact the French and Francophone Studies Department (814) 865-1492. Just send your info via e-mail to October 20: Deux de La Vague (Two in the Wave) by Emmanuel sales@centrecountygazette.com Laurent – This fascinating documentary traces the friendship of legendor if you have a CD that you’d like us to ary film auteurs François Truffaut and Jean-Luc Godard, renowned review, send it to... creators of the French New Wave. Through an array of archival film clips, newspaper articles, and interview footage, director Emmanuel Centre County Gazette Laurent focuses on the great triumphs of both men, their debut features, ATTN: Entertainment Editor and their inevitable split. P.O. Box 129 November 11: L’Illusioniste (The Illusionist) by Sylvain Chomet – As Warriors Mark, PA 16877 the follow-up to 2003’s The Triplets of Belleville, the animated film is set in the early 1960s and focuses on a middle-aged, slightly stoopshouldered magician who makes a devoted teenage friend, Alice, a poor cleaning girl who follows October 4 ~ 15 him to Edinburgh. The two form a touching father-daughter bond. Pavilion Theatre Though neither the magician University Park Campus nor his young charge speak each other’s language, The Illusionist shows the ways people understand each other nonverbally.

‡800-ARTS-TIX

WWW.THEATRE.PSU.EDU

2011–2012

Benefit Local Transplant Candidate Friday, October 21 at 8 p.m. & 10 p.m. The State Theatre There is an adult comedy show featuring Mike Vecchione on October 20 at 8 p.m. and 10 a.m. at The State Theatre. Vecchione has appeared on The Tonight Show, Comedy Central, and Last Comic Standing. Admission is $20 and benefits the Dana Hardy Transplant Fund.

Voices of Faith benefit concert

Saturday, October 22 at 7 p.m. Bellefonte High School auditorium The Voices of Faith concert on October 22 is sponsored By Watermarke Youth Group & RevFM. The concert features the Allan Scott Band, Matthew Knerr, and Isaiah Adu. Last year’s concert went toward projects including school supplies, Christmas gifts, Thanksgiving dinners, and gift cards. Doors open at 6 p.m. and donations are welcome – both at the door and during the freewill offering.

Glenn Miller Orchestra

Sunday, October 23 at 7 p.m. The State Theatre Hear one of the greatest bands of all time at The State Theatre – the Glenn Miller Orchestra will perform Sunday, October 23 at 7 p.m. Tickets are $35 Orchestra; $25 Balcony. The present Glenn Miller Orchestra was formed in 1956 and has been touring consistently, playing an average of 300 live dates a year all around the world. As of January 2011, trombonist Gary Tole is the orchestra’s musical director. The Glenn Miller Orchestra was originally formed in 1937 by Glenn Miller. The band became very popular and recorded a number of chart successes - among these Moonlight Serenade, In the Mood, Tuxedo Junction, Chattanooga Choo Choo and (I’ve Got a Gal In) Kalamazoo.

Music for Habitat

Sunday, November 13 at 7 p.m. St. Paul Lutheran Church, Pine Grove Mills St. Paul Lutheran Church in Pine Grove Mills will host Music for Habitat on Sunday, November 13 at 7 p.m. featuring choral and instrumental music of the Four Decades from Pine Hall Lutheran Church and St. Paul Lutheran Church. Offerings will support the housing ministry of Habitat for Humanity of Greater Centre County. The church is at 277 West Pine Grove Road. Phone (814) 237-2081 for info. Compiled by Sandie Biddle

WEEK 4

1. ENTER YOUR CONTACT INFORMATION Name: _____________________________________________ Address: ___________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ Phone: _______________ Email: _______________________

Think you know your football? Can you pick a winner? Use your prognosticating skills to WIN FREE STUFF!

✔  Pick the winners of our TEN GAMES OF THE WEEK. ✔  Then Predict the TOTAL POINTS SCORED by BOTH TEAMS for the WEEKLY TIE-BREAKER GAME (without going over). ✔  Mail your form to the Centre County Gazette. ✔  Look for winner’s announcement in the following week’s Centre County Gazette, or tune in to 105.9/106.9 QWiK Rock or 970 AM WBLF to hear winner’s announcement on the radio. Brought to you by:

Winners will be chosen from those correctly predicting the winners of the ten (10) games of the week. If more than one entrant correctly predicts all five winners, the tie-breaker will determine the actual winner. Closest prediction to actual total points scored by both teams during the posted “tie-breaker� game (WITHOUT GOING OVER) wins the weekly prize! Prizes are subject to change and may vary weekly. There may be more than one prize awarded per week. See contest rules below. All weekly Armchair QB contest winners will be automatically qualified for a chance to win the Super Bowl Grand Prize. A multi-week elimination right down to the Super Bowl final will take place. Playoff rules will be made available to the winners prior to the first playoff week.

Super Bowl XLVI Grand Prize Package: SONY BRAVIA 46� HDTV AND SONY BLU-RAY DISC/DVD PLAYER

Grand Prize Package Provided By:

Paul & Tony’s Stereo

2. CIRCLE YOUR PICKS FOR EACH GAME:

San Francisco Indianapolis Buffalo Jacksonville Philadelphia Houston Cleveland Dallas New Orleans Minnesota

@ Detroit @ Cincinnati @ NY Giants @ Pittsburgh @ Washington @ Baltimore @ Oakland @ New England @ Tampa Bay @ Chicago

WEEK 4

3. ENTER YOUR PREDICTION FOR THE TIE-BREAKER GAME (TOTAL POINTS SCORED) Cleveland @ Oakland

total points without going over

(Total points without going over) MAIL TO: THE GAZETTE PO BOX 129 • WARRIORS MARK, PA 16877 VOID IF NOT POSTMARKED BY 10/13/2011

You must be 18 and over to participate. Employees of Stott Publications, Inc., Magnum broadcasting and Wunderwear Inc. or any sponsor of the contest are prohibited to enter. Prizes must be picked up at our Magnum Broadcasting studios at 315 South Atherton St. within 30 days of winning. Only one entry allowed per person per week. Official contest entry blanks only (available in The Gazette). Weekly winners will be notified in advance regarding the Playoff and Super Bowl finals contest rules. Contest rules are subject to change without notice. Additional contest rules are available for viewing in Magnum Broadcasting studios at 315 South Atherton St, State College, PA.


PAGE 22

THE GAZETTE - SERVING CENTRE COUNTY

What’s Happening? Email your organization’s events to editor@centrecountygazette.com Please have them in by Wednesday noon in order to be included in Friday’s edition.

Arts, Crafts & Sales October 7 & 8 – Harvest Craft Show The Farmer’s Wife Harvest Craft Show is Friday, October 7 & Saturday, October 8 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day. Fall decorations, pumpkins, gourds, crafts, homemade baked goods, games for children, pumpkin house, petting zoo, hayrides, milk the mechanical cow, antique tractors, much more. Food available from local church, eat in or takeout. Groups are welcome. Hayrides all October. The Farmer’s Wife is at 413 Airport Rd., Centre Hall. For information, call (814) 364-1764. October 21, 22 & 23 – Sand Ridge Craft Show The Sand Ridge Craft Show will be Friday, October 21 from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., Saturday, October 22 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday, October 23 from noon to 4 p.m. at 116 Beech Bottom Rd., Howard. See signs with directions in Snydertown and Jacksonville. Jewelry, wood items, seasonal and holiday gifts, baby items, wreaths, hand-painted ornaments, blankets, stamped and quilted gifts, food and more. Fourteen local crafters are participating. Door prizes and snacks provided. October 22 – Craft & Flea Market There is a Craft ‘N’ Flea Market to benefit Queen of Archangels Banquet Hall and Recreation Center (The Rink), taking place at the Rink, Snow Shoe. It’s Saturday, October 22 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. featuring crafts, baked goods, quilts, collectibles, sport cards, comic books, Nascar items, yard sale items, antiques, and more. Kitchen will be open. 50/50 chance drawing. $5 per table/space. Vendors, call Doris at (814) 387-6785 or (814) 387-4286 to reserve a table. October 22 – Lemont Fall Market & Craft Show The Fall Market and Craft Show will be held October 22 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Granary on Mt. Nittany Road, Lemont. Live entertainment from noon to 4 p.m. Gifts of jewelry, natural body products, unique cards, flowers, photography, scarves, mats, health products, and more from a variety of local artists, crafters, and home business vendors. Food and beverages at Café Karla. Kids events can hear children’s stories written by local authors. Event benefits Alhzimer’s Association of Greater PA and Lemont Village Association.

Vendors Wanted for Holiday Bazaar The Holiday Bazaar will be November 19 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Pleasant Gap United Methodist Church, 179 S. Main St., Pleasant Gap. Tables provided at $15 each. Registration deadline is Oct. 24. To register or for more info contact the church at (814) 359-3011 or email pgumc1@verizon.net

Dining & Take Out October 7 – Roast Turkey Dinner There will be a Roast Turkey Dinner on October 7 from 5 p.m to 6:30 p.m. at Faith United Methodist Church, 512 Hughes St., Bellefonte. Adults $8; Children $4. October 8 – Roast Beef Supper The New Hope Lutheran Church of Spring Mills will serve a Roast Beef Supper on Saturday October 8 from 4:30 p.m. to 7:00pm. Eat in or take-out. Everyone is welcome. October 9 – Public Breakfast The State College Sons of the American Legion will host a public breakfast on Sunday October 9 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Legion post off Science Park Road in State College. This benefits their visits to the Hollidaysburg Veterans’ Home. October 9 – Turkey Dinner The Pleasant Gap Woman’s Club’s Turkey Dinner fundraiser will be served at Logan Grange Hall on N. Main Street from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Adults $8. Take outs available. October 16 – Ham & Turkey Buffet The Miles Township Ladies Auxiliary will be having a Ham and Turkey buffet-style dinner on Sunday, October 16 from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the fire hall. Adults $8 and take out $8.50. Ages five to 12 is $4 and take out $4.50. Under five is free and take out $1. They will serve ham, turkey, mashed potatoes, gravy, green beans, corn, rolls, stuffing, desserts, and beverages. October 20 – Pasta Fundraiser Altrusa International of Centre County, in cooperation with Fasta & Ravioli Co., is taking orders for its third annual pasta fundraiser to benefit State College Area School District Community Education’s literacy endowment. The event features a four pound ravioli variety pack that includes: two lbs. of three-cheese, one lb. of pizza, and one lb. of pumpkin. The cost is $28/box. To place an order, call (814) 234-3333 by Thursday, October 20. Pick up is October 27, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. at Mount Nittany Middle School parking lot. Questions, contact Donna Ricketts dmr13@scasd.org or (814) 231-1061.

814.359.2447

*FAX 814.359.2110 Email pamp@dejazzd.com *Pleasant Gap (*main office) 12 pieces LOW MINIMUM for printing!

NO SCREEN FEES NO SET-UP FEES NO ARTWORK FEES For embroidered NO MINIMUM items! ATTENTION STUDENT GROUPS:

October 21 – Chicken BBQ The Ferguson Twp. Lion’s Club will hold a chicken BBQ on Friday October 21 from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. You can eat in or take out. The cost is $8 for dinner and $4 for a half chicken. Any questions call (814) 238-6695

Sleeper Sofas Queen size starting at:

$699

Get your THON or other Group T-shirts done at PAMP

Proud to Support YMCA, Thon Bellefonte Cruise & Last Cruise

Central PA’s #1 Screenprinter & Embroiderer!

Tubbies Home Furnishings 2252 E. College Ave. 234-4566 • www.tubbies.net

Education & Life Matters October 10 – For Women in Cancer Treatment Look Good… Feel Better® is a free program for women in cancer treatment presented by the American Cancer Society. To register for one of these seminars, or for more information, call 1-888-227-5445. • Monday, October 10 from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at Greenbriar Subdivision, 2518 Sleepy Hollow Drive, State College. • Wednesday, October 26 from 10 a.m. to noon at Mount Nittany Medical Center’s Radiation Oncology, 1800 East Park Avenue, Stage College • Monday, November 14 from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., at Greenbriar Subdivision, 2518 Sleepy Hollow Drive, State College • Monday, December 12 from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., at Greenbriar Subdivision, 2518 Sleepy Hollow Drive, State College October 19 – CPR Classes Penns Valley Emergency Medical Service, Inc. will hold CPR classes on the third Wednesday of each month – October 19 & November 16 – at the PVEMS station at 106 Ross Hill Road, Spring Mills. Starting time is 6:30 p.m. Price is $25 per person. For more information or to register, call (814) 422-8015. October 20 – Teenage Dating Violence Seminar A Family Medicine Seminar Series titled “Signs of Teenage Dating Violence” will be held Thursday, October 20. Buffet dinner starts at 6 p.m.; presentation follows at 6:30 p.m. It will be at the Galen and Nancy Dreibelbis Auditorium at Mount Nittany Medical Center, 1800 East Park Avenue, State College. To register or for information, contact Jessica Bird at jbird@mountnittany. org, or (814) 234-6738.

Fundraiser/Social Events October 7 – Game Night First Fridays are back! You are invited to Game Night starting October 7 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at St. John Lutheran Church, 101 Mill Street, Millheim. Put your game face on and plan to have fun! Wear your favorite football jersey, bring a friend, a game, and a snack to share. October 8 & 9 – Wasson Farm Fest The Wasson Farm Festival is October 8 and 9 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Wasson Farm, State College. Hayrides to the pumpkin patch are $5. Homemade apple butter and soups (chicken corn, ham & bean, and beef vegetable) are for sale plus all kinds of fall items October 14 –Screaming Ducks dance The State College American Legion is hosting a dance featuring The Screaming Ducks on Friday, October 14 from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. Free & open to the public, but must be age 21 or older. Call (814) 237-6880 for information October 21-23 – Community Art Show The Watermarke Outreach Centre, located at 114 S. Spring St. in Bellefonte, will host the 2nd Annual Community Art Show, featuring artists from Bellefonte and surrounding areas. Opening reception is Friday October 21 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Additional exhibit dates and times are Saturday, October 22 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. & 6 p.m. to 8p.m., and Sunday, October 23 from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. All are welcome! October 22 – Pit Bull Awareness Day National Pit Bull Awareness Day is October 22 from noon to 4 p.m. at the gazebo in front of the State College PETCO (Colonnade Way off of N. Atherton St.). Sponsored by Happy Paws, it will showcase the true spirit and wonderful personality of the Pit Bull breeds – featuring dog ambassadors, games, dog massages, kid-friendly activities, giveaways, educational materials, and more! Everyone is invited to this free family-friendly event.

OCTOBER 7, 2011 October 22 – Fall Market & Craft Show This open market fundraising event is from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on October 22 and will feature local artists, crafters, and home business vendors offering their arts, crafts, and gifts including jewelry, natural body products, one-of-a-kind cards, fresh flowers, photography, woven scarves, table runners, mats, fabric purses, health products, ideas for holiday parties, and more! Live musical entertainment. Food and beverages for sale. Books by local authors will be read to kids on the half hour! The event is on Mt. Nittany Road and benefits Alzheimer’s Association of Greater PA and Lemont Village Association. October 22 – Howard Fire Company Fall Festival The Howard Volunteer Fire Company will hold a Fall Festival at the Bald Eagle State Park on October 22 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Planned activities include food vendors, craft vendors, live bands, square dancers, a pieeating contest, hayrides, and a boat parade. A Punkin Chunkin demonstration is featured. A trebuchet will catapult pumpkins nearly 1,600 feet towards floating targets in the lake! Admission and parking are free.

Kids’ Stuff October 22 – Benner Township Haunted Trail The Benner Township Haunted Halloween Trail is October 22 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. (rain date Oct. 29) at Buffalo Run Community Park, 2151 Buffalo Run Road, Bellefonte. Children and adults will enjoy a walk through our haunted, spooky park. It’s free. Donation of a canned food item appreciated to support local food bank. Questions, call (814) 355-1419. The trail is sponsored by Benner Township Park & Rec. November 19 – Kids’ Day: Dress Up and Discover! Kids of all ages get to try on field gear and head gear from the museum education collection at the Pennsylvania Military Museum in Boalsburg. Parents, bring your cameras, cell phones, and iPods as the kids pose at one of three backdrops in the museum theatre. Visit the education stations in the galleries for more fun discoveries throughout the day – from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Ages three to 13 get in for 1/2 price admission. A donation is requested for the Dress-Up Station. Parents need to remain on-site.

Competitions for Charity October 22- Breast Cancer Event Fight Like a Girl Breast Cancer event is October 22 from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at East Coast Health & Fitness. It features spinning, piloxing, pilates, Zumba, and Zumba Toning – all for a Great Cause Breast Cancer Research. $10 for non-members. November 6 – Give ’Em Five Veterans Race The Veterans Assistance Fund will hold its second annual “Give ’Em 5” charity race on November 6, starting and ending at the Bellefonte Middle School. Registration for the 5-mile run / 5-K walk is $20 beginning at noon. Early registration is $15 by visiting www.nvrun.com. The race starts at 1 p.m. Prizes will be awarded in the following categories: overall, age, and veterans. Proceeds benefit U.S. Military Veterans with financial hardship. For more information contact: Tara Murray, (814) 355-4558 or taraemily@gmail. com. November 19 – Bellefonte Lacrosse BINGO Bellefonte Lacrosse is hosting smoke-free Raider Lacrosse BINGO! 20 Games – 5 Specials – Jackpot – Saturday, November 19 at Central Pennsylvania Institute of Technology (CPI), Pleasant Gap. Doors and kitchen open at 5:30 p.m. Games begin at 7 p.m. $25 in advance; $30 at the door Compiled by Sandie Biddle


OCTOBER 7, 2011

GROUP MEETINGS Adult Bible Study & Kids Program is held each Wednesday at 7 p.m., offering practical help from the Bible and a fun and productive time for kids. For more info, visit nittanybaptist.org or call (814) 360-1601. AFSCME Retirees Subchapter 8304 of Centre County meets the second Monday of the month from April through November at 11 .a.m. at Hoss’s on N. Atherton St., State College with a Dutch-treat lunch following the meeting. All SERS retirees are welcome. On the second Monday in December, there is a Yuletime lunch at noon at Celebration Hall. For further information, contact subchapter president Don Rung at rung@math.psu.edu or (814) 571-8672, or VP Tom Sturniolo (814) 237-9610. Alzheimer’s Support Group is held the second Tuesday of each month at 6:30 p.m. in the Mount Nittany Dining Room at The Inn, Brookline. For more information, contact Anne Campbell (814) 234-3141 or Janie Provan (814) 235-2000. Ancient Mystic Order of Samaritans meet the fourth Thursday every month at 7:30 p.m. at I.O.O.F. Hall, 756 N. Main St., Pleasant Gap. AWANA Club is being hosted every Sunday at 6 p.m. by the First Baptist Church in Bellefonte. Fun activities and Bible lessons for youth aged three to 6th grade. The church is at 539 Jacksonville Road. Materials provided.  ALIVE Teens club will also meet Sunday nights. Call (814) 355-5678 or visit www. fbcbellefonte.org for more information. Bald Eagle Watershed Association meets on the fourth Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Milesburg Borough Building. Visit www.baldeaglewatershed.com BEA Class of 1964 holds its monthly breakfast on the fourth Saturday of each month at 9 a.m. at the Mt. Valley Diner in Wingate. Call Sue at (814) 625-2132. BEA Class of 1965 holds its monthly dinner on the last Friday of each month at 5:30 p.m. at the Bellefonte Moose. Any questions call Bob at (814) 383-2151. BHS Class ‘67 holds monthly breakfast on first Saturday of each month at Sunset West at 8:30 a.m. Location subject to change. For information call Vic (814) 360-1948. Bellefonte Elks Lodge meetings are held on the second and fourth Mondays of each month at 7 p.m. at the Bellefonte Elks. Bellefonte Encampment #72 and Ridgeley Canton #8 meet the second Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at Windmere Hall, 454 Rolling Ridge Drive, State College. Bellefonte Historical Railroad Society meets the first Monday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Train Station in Talleyrand Park, Bellefonte. All meetings are open to the public. Activities include: restoration; track maintenance; and Fall Foliage, and Santa Express train rides. Check out bellefontetrain.org or leave a message at (814) 355-1053. Bellefonte Intervalley Chamber events this month include – The BIACC Annual Dinner is October 12 with cash bar: 5:30 p.m. and dinner 6:30 p.m. at Celebration Hall, State College. Cost: $25 per person. Please R.s.v.p. COB October 7. Bellefonte Kiwanis Club meets every Tuesday at the Moose Club on Spring Street at noon. For information on Kiwanis, contact Richard King, (814) 355-9606. Bellefonte Sunrise Rotary Club meets every Friday at 7:30 a.m. at Diamond Deli on North Allegheny Street. Guests and visitors welcome.  For information, contact Debbie Rowley (814) 880-9453. Bellefonte VFW Post 1600 will hold their monthly post meeting the second Thursday of every month at 8 p.m. at the Post Home on Spring Street, Bellefonte. Bellefonte VFW Post 1600 Ladies Auxillary will hold their monthly meeting the second Wednesday of every month at 7 p.m. the Post Home on Spring Street, Bellefonte.

WWW.CENTRECOUNTYGAZETTE.COM The Gazette will publish the regular meeting dates & times for all Centre County social & service groups, organizations, clubs, etc that has membership open to the public. To have yours listed send to editor@centrecountygazette.com or mail to Stott Publications, PO Box 129, Warriors Mark, PA 16877 Better Breathers Support Group meets the third Thursday of every month from 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. No meetings Jan. or Feb. Location is HealthSouth Nittany Valley Rehabilitation Hospital, 550 W. College Ave., Pleasant Gap. Call (814) 359-3421 for info about any of their support groups. BNI (Business Networking International) meets weekly on Thursdays from 7 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. at Celebration Hall. $10 fee for room and breakfast. BNI is the largest business networking organization in the world. We offer members the opportunity to share ideas, contacts and most importantly, business referrals. Contact president Kelly Swisher for information (814)-280-1656 Brain Injury Support Group meets the second Tuesday of every month at 7 p.m. No meetings Jan. or Feb. Location is HealthSouth Nittany Valley Rehabilitation Hospital, 550 W. College Ave., Pleasant Gap. Call (814) 359-3421 for info about any of their support groups. Breast Cancer Support Group meets the first Monday of each month from 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. in Conference Room 4, Entrance B, Mt. Nittany Medical Center, State College. Call Kristin Sides for information (814) 234-6175 or e-mail ksides@ mountnittany.org. The Business of Art workshops will be held on the second Monday of each month – October 10 – at 7 p.m. at Sozo Institute of the Arts, in the KeyCentre building, 1224 N. Atherton Street, State College. These are free workshops for writers, artists, and other creative people. For more information, contact Will Snyder at (814) 880-9933 or info@sozoart.org. The Cancer Survivors’ Association Support Group  meeting will be Monday, October 17 from 1:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the United Way office. At this month’s meeting Dr. Jeffrey Allerton, Oncologist from Penn State Hershey State College, will hold a question and answer session. For more information call (814) 237-2120 or visit www.cancersurvive.org.  Centre County Real Estate Investment Club meets the third Thursday of every month from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at 1609 N Atherton St. State College. For more information call (814) 280-5839. The Centre Crest Auxiliary meets at 1:30 p.m. at Centre Crest in Bellefonte. The newly formed We Care Group meets at 6 p.m. Both groups meet at Centre Crest in Bellefonte the fourth Monday of the month from January to June. All are welcomed. Centre Crest Nursing Facility, 502 East Howard Street, Bellefonte, (814) 548-1140. Centre Hall Lions Club meets the second Tuesday of the month at 6:30 p.m. and the fourth Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Centre Hall Lions Club Building, 153 E. Church St. Centre Hall. Centre Hall-Potter High School Alumni will have a dinner at the Progress Grange in Centre Hall Saturday, October 22 at 6 p.m. Tickets are $12 and reservations must be made by October 8. Contact JoAnn (814) 222-1414 or joann4sold@aol.com. Centre Region Model Investment Club meets monthly in the Mazza Room at South Hills Business School, 480 Waupelani Drive, State College from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. on the second Monday.  Observe an interactive educational stock model investment club. This is a project of the Central PA Chapter of Better Investing and open to the public. Call (814) 234-8775 or e-mail cr20mic@aol.com. Circle of Hope, a support group for special needs children and families, will meet the second Thursday of each month  at 7 p.m. – October 13 – at the Tyrone Public Library. This group will be addressing concerns in an informal setting on aspects of raising a child with special needs, treatments, education, advocacy/legal issues, behavior, etc. For more information contact AngieLeVanish (814) 386-1826 or alavanish@live.com.

T P’s oal Sales and More, Inc.

730 E. Sycamore Road (State Route 144, ½ mile from I-80) Snow Shoe, PA

387-4487 or 571-9533 Open Monday-Saturday 9-5

Specializing in Hard Coal, Soft Coal, Premium Grade Hardwood Pellets, Limestone, Sand, Top Soil, River Gravel and Mulch in season. Approved LIHEAP vendor. Terry Park-proprietor

PAGE 23

Diabetes Support Group meets Thursday, October 13 from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Mount Nittany Medical Center, 1800 East Park Avenue, State College For more information, contact Amy Leffard at aleffard@ mountnittany.org, or (814) 231-7095 Dining with Diabetes Classes are Wednesdays, October 12, 19, and 26. (A three-month follow-up class will be Wednesday, January 11, 2012). Each class is from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at State College Area High School, South Building, 650 Westerly Parkway, State College. For more information, call 814.355.4897 Grief Support Group at Centre Crest will meet at 6 p.m. on the first Wednesday of the month, starting in September. It was previously the first Tuesday. For additional info contact Anne Boal, Social Service Assistant, Centre Crest Nursing Facility, 502 East Howard Street, Bellefonte, (814) 548-1140 I.O.O.F. Centre Lodge #153 meets the first and third Thursday of each month at 7:30 p.m. at I.O.O.F. Lodge Hall 756 North Main Street, Pleasant Gap. Keystone Guild of the Watchmakers Association of Pa. meets the second Tuesday of each month 1 p.m. at the Bull Pen Restaurant at the west end of Tyrone. Call George at (814) 238-1668. The Milesburg Lions Club invites the public to their meetings at the Milesburg center across from the Uni-mart on the first Tuesday and the third Wednesday every month at 7 p.m. Bingo is now presented every Thursday, doors opening at 5 p.m., bingo from 6:45 p.m. to 10 p.m. Food is available. Anyone can play. If you want to join, talk to any Lions’ member. Multiple Sclerosis Support Group meets the third Tuesday of every month at 6 p.m. at HealthSouth Nittany Valley Rehabilitation Hospital, use Outpatient Entrance, 550 W. College Ave., Pleasant Gap. Affiliated with the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. Call (814) 359-3421 for info. Nittany Mineral Society meets the third Wednesday of the month in Room 114 Auditorium of the Earth & Engineering Sciences (EES) Bldg on the west side of the Penn State Campus. Social hour at 6:30 p.m., refreshments until 8 p.m., followed by the speaker. Junior Rockhounds also meet on third Wednesdays, 6:45 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. in Room 116 Earth & Engineering Sciences Building. Call (814) 867-6263 or visit nittanymineral.org. Nittany Valley Woodturners meets on the first Thursday of every month in the woodworking shop at the State College Area High School, South Building, 650 Westerly Parkway, State College. For more information, contact Reg@MarketValueSolutions.com or visit www.NittanyValleyWoodturners.org. The Nittany Valley Writers Network holds an EarlyRisers Breakfast every third Wednesday from 7 a.m. to 8 a.m. at The Waffle Shop, 1610 W College Ave, State College. Ask for the writers table. The Writers Social the fourth Tuesday of the month from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. at The Autoport, 1405 S Atherton St., State College. Ask for the writers’ table. The All-In Writing group will resume meetings on Thursday, October 13 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the back room of Panera on Beaver Avenue in State College. All types of writing are welcome. For information, contact Steve: scuttlebeez@yahoo.com. Parent Support Group for Children with Eating Disorders meets the second Tuesday of each month – October 11 – from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., at Mount Nittany Medical Center, State College. The mediators are Nancy Campbell, LCC; Kristie Kaufman, MD; Jody Whipple, RD, LDN, CDE. Classes help children and parents to understand eating disorders. For info contact Kristie Kaufman at (814) 466-7921. Sacred Harp Singing meets the second and fourth Mondays of the month from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the University Mennonite Church, 1606 Norma St., State College. For information, visit www.StateCollegeSacredHarp. com.

Gynecological Exams Breast Exams Mammogram Referrals Contraception Emergency Contraception Pregnancy Testing STD/HIV testing & treatment Driver’s License, School, Sports,& Work Physicals Bellefonte Philipsburg 240 Match Factory Place 220 N. Front Street Bellefonte, PA 16823 Philipsburg, PA 16866 814-355-2762 814-342-6992 A branch of: A member of:

Spring Creek Watershed Association meets the third Tuesday of each month from 7:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. at the Patton Township Building. Most meetings feature a guest speaker with an expertise in watershed, water resource, or other conservation issues. All are welcomed. Visit springcreekwatershed.org.  Soroptimist International of Centre County is holding a dinner meeting on November 1 at 6 p.m. at Atherton Hotel, 125 South Atherton Street, State College. Contact (814) 234-0658 or HJLAW11@aol. com  for more information & meeting reservations. The November program will be a report on the Fall District Meeting held in Butler and the State College UN Dinner. For information, contact: Linda Wilson, HJLAW11@aol.com or (814) 234-0658. State College Downtown Rotary Club meets Thursdays at noon at Damon’s, East College Avenue, State College. State College Sunrise Rotary Club meets weekly on Wednesdays at Hotel State College (above The Corner Room, back the hall from The Allen Street Grill) from 7:15 a.m. to 8 a.m. State College Elks Lodge holds its meetings on the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at 7:30 p.m. at the State College Elks Country Club. State College Lions Club meets the first and third Thursday of the month at Damon’s of State College at 6 p.m. Stroke Support Group meets the last Tuesday of every month at 1 p.m. No meetings are held in August or December. Location is HealthSouth Nittany Valley Rehabilitation Hospital, 550 W. College Ave., Pleasant Gap. Call (814) 359-3421 for info about any of their support groups. TRIAD, a public safety group for senior citizens, meets the second Thursday of each month at 10 a.m. in the Life-Link Bldg off Puddingtown Rd. Helen Evans, chair, may be reached for details (814) 237-8932. Women’s Mid Day Connection luncheon is Tuesday, October 11 at 11:45 a.m. at the Elk’s Country Club, Boalsburg. For reservations and cancellations, call Margo at (814) 355-7615. Feature: “Sweet Confections” from Le Dolce Vita. The Women’s Welcome Club of State College offers women of all ages – newcomers or long-time residents – the opportunity to meet new people through a variety of activities. Monthly general meetings September through May, social events through the year, and special interest groups monthly. General meetings  on second Wednesdays at 7 p.m. at Oakwood Presbyterian Church (no affiliation) 1865 Waddle Road, State College. Call Kathi (814) 466-6641 for more information. Zion MOPS & Beyond meets the first Thursday of each month at 3261 Zion Road Bellefonte from 9:15 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. and on the third Thursday of the month from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. First visit is free; $10 annual membership fee when you join. Compiled by Sandie Biddle

Are you experiencing dizziness when rolling over or getting out of bed? You may benefit from physical therapy which focuses on vestibular retraining. Make your outpatient therapy appointment at

Pleasant Gap Outpatient Clinic and experience the best in individualized treatment!

Call HealthSouth Pleasant Gap today at

814-359-5630 550 West College Avenue s Pleasant Gap, PA 16823

“12 ROOM SHOWROOM!” s, Display ells &S ts e k r a M e urnitur Your F

Natural Finish Table and 6 Chairs

“Just one of the 100’s of items you’ll find on display!”

fÓn™

Find us on

£ÎʈÀÃÌÊ-ÌÀiiÌ]ÊœVŽÊ>Ûi˜ÊUÊxÇä‡nxn‡xÓxn Located behind Walker’s Hardware


PAGE 24

THE GAZETTE - SERVING CENTRE COUNTY

This Week’s

CENTRE COUNTY LIBRARY ACTIVITIES

Centre County Library/Bellefonte, Centre Hall, East Penns Valley, Holt/Philipsburg & Bookmobile CENTRE COUNTY LIBRARY BOOKMOBILE – Fully accessible library on wheels! The Fall Schedule is now available. Check out our website for locations and hours. Stop by the library or your local Post Office for your copy. The Bookmobile travels to many communities reaching thousands of visitors each month. Look for it in your neighborhood. Centre County Library/Bellefonte—call (814) 355-1516 for more information: Facebook: Centre-County-Library-and-Historical Museum The Centre County Library & Historical Museum will be closed Monday, October 3 for staff development. HOOKS AND NEEDLES – Bring your projects to share ideas and tips with others who love to knit! Every Thursday 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. AFTER SCHOOL DROP IN CRAFT—Drop by our spacious children’s area for educational and fun crafts. Thursday afternoons at 3 p.m. ADULT BOOK DISCUSSION GROUP—Check for title on library website. Wednesday, October 19 at 6:30 p.m. PRE-SCHOOL STORYTIME – Stories and crafts especially for children under 5 years old with an adult. Monday & Wednesday mornings at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday afternoons at 1:30 p.m. BABY LAP SIT STORYTIMES – Stories for the “littlest ears” with an adult. Wednesday mornings at 9:30 a.m. USED BOOK SALE – Visit during regular operating hours for used books, videos and music. Friday, October 28 & Saturday, October 29 PUMPKIN DECORATING—In partnership with the Bellefonte Community Children’s Garden – come to the garden located behind our Historical Museum and decorate pumpkins with natural garden materials and celebrate the harvest. Saturday, October 22 at 10 a.m. Holt Memorial Library/Philipsburg—call (814) 342-1987 for more information: The Holt Memorial Library will be closed Monday, October 3 for staff development. MOTHER GOOSE ON THE LOOSE— For children ages three and under and a favorite adult – a musical, rhyming adventure through the world of Mother Goose. This program is a form of a baby lap-sit, with the focus on rhythms, rhymes, music, and interaction between baby and adult. Mother Goose on the Loose aides in the development of prereading and social skills. The program runs about 30 minutes. Stay after for some fun with friends and educational playthings. Tuesdays at 10:30 a.m. October 11, 18, 25 PRESCHOOL STORYTIME—geared for three- to six-year-olds with a favorite adult. Come enjoy stories followed by related activities and interaction with some of your peers. Some crafts and activities involve parts or directions not suitable for children under

This Week at

East Penns Valley Branch Library at 225 E. Main Street in Millheim (Millheim Borough Building)— call (814) 349-5328 for more information: ADULT BOOK CLUB—Come together with others who have read and want to discuss Cleopatra, A Life by Stacy Shiff. Tuesday, October 11 at12:30 p.m. NEEDLES NIGHT AT THE LIBRARY – Bring any portable needles project you are working on and share ideas and tips with others. Every Thursday evening at 6 p.m. CHILDREN’S AREA – Join us in the spacious children’s area for air conditioned time enjoying our huge selection of books, music and videos. New drop-in crafts every week! PRE-SCHOOL STORYTIME – Stories and crafts especially for children under five years old with an adult. Monday mornings at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday mornings at 1:30 p.m.

Sunday, October 9

OCTOBER 10 – OCTOBER 13

MON, OCT. 10 PSU/ AGRICULTURE ADMINISTRATION BLDG., SHORTLIDGE 9:00–2:00 AND CURTIN RD,. **APPOINTMENT ONLY ** Bleed Blue Drive TUES, OCT. 11 RED CROSS DONOR CENTER, 10:00–4:00 135 PUGH ST., STATE COLLEGE ** Bleed Blue Drive TUES, OCT. 11 MILES TOWNSHIP FIRE HALL, 1:00–7:00 102 BROAD ST., REBERSBURG *2RBC ** Bleed Blue Drive TUES, OCT. 11 PSU/ KELLER BLDG. 9:00–2:00 **APPOINTMENT ONLY ** Bleed Blue Drive TUES, OCT. 11 PSU/ STATE COLLEGE PARK CLUB HOUSE, GAME AND SOCIAL 1:00–7:00 ROOM, 348 BLUE COURSE DR. ** Bleed Blue Drive WED, OCT. 12 PSU/ PHYSICAL PLANT BLDG., 9:00–2:00 **APPOINTMENT ONLY ** Bleed Blue Drive THUR, OCT. 13 PSU/ KATZ BLDG., SCHOOL OF LAW, BIGLER RD., 11:00–4:00 **APPOINTMENT ONLY ** Bleed Blue Drive **BLEED BLUE - all presenting donors will be entered to win a “Donor of the Game” package for Alabama, Iowa, Purdue and Nebraska games. Package includes 2 tickets to the game, pre-game hospitality passes, sideline visit during the game, radio and video board recognition during pre-game and PSU t-shirts.

State Parks

Please call the Bald Eagle State Park Office for more information at 814-625-2775!

Friday, October 7

Red Cross Blood Drive Schedule

Pennsylvania

Bald Eagle State Park

three. Wednesdays at 10:30 a.m. and Thursdays at 2 p.m. October 12 & 13: Feeling Blue October 19 & 20: Looking Green October 26 & 27: Halloween – come dressed up and pick up an extra treat! ELEMENTARY PROGRAMS—Activities for children in grades Kindergarten through sixth grade. There may be small parts or difficult instructions involved. Thursdays at 6 p.m. October 13: Tissue Paper Sun Catchers October 20: Halloween Craft FAMILY PROGRAMS—Presenters or activities geared towards the whole family. Come in and enjoy some quality family time! Thursdays at 6 p.m October 27: Pumpkin Decorating Contest – bring in your best-dressed pumpkin to see just what it might win! Adults may participate also. ADULT PROGRAMS October 10 at 6 p.m.: Adult Readers’ Circle – come in and discuss whatever you’re reading. You might inspire another reader, or get inspired yourself!

Centre Hall Area Branch Library—call (814) 364-2580 for more information: PENNS VALLEY AREA KNITTERS—Enjoy an evening at the library sharing your ideas and tips with others who love to knit! Thursday evening, October 22, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. CHILDREN’S AREA—Drop in after school for the coolest crafts. Wednesdays at 3 p.m. PRE-SCHOOL STORYTIME—Stories and crafts especially for children under five years old with an adult. Thursday afternoons at 2:30 p.m. Friday mornings at 11 a.m. TEEN NIGHT—Trivia game, popcorn, and drinks. Come enjoy our library on Teen Night. Wednesday, October 12 at 6 p.m.

OCTOBER 7, 2011

and learn all about the art and science of bird watching?  If you answered yes to any of these questions, feel free to join Bald Eagle State Park and the State College Bird Club for a day of bird watching! Location: Beach Area. Event is from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Afternoon Stroll Get outside and enjoy the vibrant colors of the fall while you meander around the local trails to explore what Bald Eagle State Park has to offer. Natural history topics from insects to plants may be discussed. (Participants will be walking at least a mile on uneven surfaces). Meet at the Nature Inn Lobby. Stroll is from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Thursday, October 13 Full Moon Paddle Join Tussey Mountain Outfitters and the Bald Eagle State Park staff for this paddle on F.J. Sayers Lake. Exploring the lake at night is a whole new experience! Call the Park Office to reserve your spot and to get more details. Cost is $15/person for canoe or kayak. This program is for ages 10 and up. Pre-registration required by October 7. Meet at the Park Office. Paddle is from 8 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.

Astronomy: Looking into the Past! Have you ever wanted to visit the past? Well, here is your chance! Join the Park Naturalist for an evening of observation as you view the night sky and look into the past. Participants of this “out of this world” celestial program will have the opportunity to examine constellations, learn how to navigate at night, and explore the history of stars! Meet at the Russell P. Letterman Campground Amphitheatre. Event is from 8 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Friday, October 14 Environmental Learning Center Open House Stop in at the Environmental Learning Center to look around at various mounts and educational displays. A park volunteer will be on hand to talk or share general information about Bald Eagle State Park. Open house is from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

The Bird Watching Big Sit! Have you ever wondered about birds and their avian way? Do you want to participate in a nation-wide bird watching event? Would you like to meet local bird watching enthusiast

VISIT US ONLINE

www.centrecountygazette.com or Centre County Gazette

azette The

Serving Centre County

Look for the names of Breast Cancer Awareness S X G S S F U D H H R W B S C Z N Q G Z B E P I T Y MW J S Y P L E K D R E S U R E A W Y W X A D X D V

L F E T N U X K I V W N Z F K M O H W J V B S I Q K

M V I N P E E W E W J K T N L V E Z O L Q K A F V R

C A Y P E Y I I C R O S S O F P D E P O H X P A C B

F X O F C R L R B A P J Z Z W Q C Y Z E O N Q M C T

W R M O K E A O F V P F C R B T X N B V G I P I E T

T Y I H B E J W I F O R S S H H H D R E A M B L I O

W H A Q B U P R A D D B A P N Q T I Z Z M E E Y R V

K H B X I X K H O C Q L Q J Z O M L A J E I P R G M

X A U G T R Q Q N G K V P K A A F A B G N S N O U T

B N R F G P H G I F J M B K T I Y G C I T T P V G C

Q A C H I E V E B T D V R D P E A N P Y K R J O W B

E F L Y H B B Y X Z R V Z D L K F B J O Q E C J V A

P B V W K T O T X V H U C H K M W R Q Q V N D T P Z

G M V A P M X R K W B J O E A N U T V M F G R L V F

E G D E L W O N K V L Z P M G B J T Z U D T O E H C

P E V D Y J V C R T V Y M O D H Z G K O J H L D M Z

A F S Q Q L S U U N F O F W D E O R B N B E M W M B

B E L U O B V J J E G Y P I B D G K Z K N G R X X G

S Q O V R Y K P Z R P O O N Q T P J N L I A S N E O

B P E P J V L I A A D O C N H Z K B A L N R W D Y D

V I I L Y R I M E C E X P L V E B R R L N U A T A J

Y E N R U O J V A E B Z G L U Z N N Z A J O C U Y H

N F Q F I Q X H O K M W K X I V T O F O I C X O N L

D Y L V L T R N A R L S J L U J M X J K E N H G P K

ACHIEVE AWARENESS BELIEVE COURAGE CURE DREAM FAITH FAMILY FRIENDS HOPE JOURNEY KNOWLEDGE LOVE MAMMOGRAM PINK POWER SPIRIT STRENGTH SUPPORT SURVIVOR

YOUR AD COULD BE

Here!! CONTACT US AT

814-632-6700 OR BY EMAIL AT

SALES@CENTRECOUNTYGAZETTE.COM


OCTOBER 7, 2011

WWW.CENTRECOUNTYGAZETTE.COM

Centre County Deed Transfers S: Lowery, David L. B: Lowery, David L. Maatman, Gail B. 1358 Vineyard Haven State College, PA 16803 $1.00 T/M: Ferguson S: Harvey, Cynthia L. B: Swarey, Jesse U. Swarey, Nancy E. 194 Penns Creek Rd. Spring Mills, PA 16875 $149,900 T/M: Gregg S: Susquehanna Home Finance LLC B: Leitzell, Rebecca J. 2309 Abington Circle State College, PA 16801 $225,000 T/M: Ferguson S: Fuglin, Thelma by Atty. B: Spahr, Dale 403 S. Allen St. $280,000 T/M: State College S: Johnson, Darlene K. B: Boudwin, Teresa 110 Falls Lane Howard, PA 16841 $130,000 T/M: Liberty S: Swope. Bradley A. Swope, Michelle D. B: Packard, Carol L. 705 Elmwood St. $137,000 T/M: College S: Weaver, Charles L. Est. Weaver, Emile C. R. Extr. Weaver, Mitchell C. Weaver, Marian B: Weaver, Emile C. R. Weaver, Linda M. 4624 Jacksonville Rd. Howard, PA 16841 $1.00 T/M: Marion

S: Packer, William Clark B: Haines, Colby R. 124 Pine St. Howard, PA 16841 $27,000 T/M: Walker S: Rolls, Melissa M. Kothe, Gregory O. B: Rolls, Melissa M. 412 E. Linn St. Bellefonte, PA 16823 $1.00 T/M: Bellefonte S: Wingard, Harold L. by Agent B: Thompson, David M. 265 Coburn Rd. Coburn, PA 16832 $70,000 T/M: Penn S: Rowles, David E. Rowles, Donna M. B: McGee, Sandra A. 112 Kelsey Lane Bellefonte, PA 16823 $167,225 T/M: Spring S: Burgwin, Margaret Blair Burgwin, Marion Allison B: Shock, Robert R. 711 Elmwood St. State College, PA 16801 $1.00 T/M: College S: Dreibelbis, Galen E. B: Dreibelbis, Galen E. 341 Science Park Rd. $1.00 T/M: Ferguson S: Lingle, David D. Lingle, Brenda L. B: Swires, Joseph J. Swires, Holly M. 195 Hancock Rd. Bellefonte, PA 16823 $310,000 T/M: Walker

S: McKinley, Judy Ann Est. S: Weaver, Charles L. Est. Bucha, Rhonda L. Extrx. Weaver, Emile C. R. Extr. B: Noecker, Kelly Jo 150 Jack Pine Road B: Weaver, Mitchell C. Bellefonte, PA 16823 Weaver, Marian $1.00 Jacksonville Rd. T/M: Boggs Howard, PA 16841 $1.00 T/M: Marion

S: Calipo, Clara Alverta B: Dorman, Michael T. Dorman, Tracy S. 324 Old 220 Rd. $17,000 T/M: Boggs

List compiled from information provided by Centre County Recorder of Deeds, Joseph Davidson. Publisher not responsible for typographical errors. The published information is believed to be accurate, however, publisher neither warrants or accepts any liability or responsibility for inaccurate information.

S: Reese, Melvin L. Reese, Jean D. B: Lego, Joseph R. Lego, Patricia L. Stahl Lane $43,480 T/M: Taylor

S: Schultz, Albert C. Estate Schultz, Emma M. Extrx. B: Schultz, Frank Conrad 725 Valley View Rd. $1.00 T/M: Benner

S: Catherman, Robert T. B: Catherman, Robert T. Catherman, Elizabeth L. 2424 N. Eagle Valley Rd. $1.00 T/M: Howard

S: Kepler, Craig S. S: Zimmerman, William H., Jr. Kepler, Linda M. S: Esch, Samuel K. Esch, Barbara L. Rider, Paul E. by Sheriff B: Johnson, Gregory S. Johnson, Sheri L. B: Russell, Robert B. B: U.S. Bank Tunnel Rd. Benner Rd. Pennsylvania Housing $6,500 $160,000 Finance Agency T/M: Walker 118 W. Manchester Ln. T/M: Penn $7,236.31 S: Wert, John A. S: Herzog, Nicki S: Miller, Douglas C. T/M: Bellefonte Wert, Janice L. B: Nicki M. Herzog Miller, Connie Jean B: Wert, Jeffrey G. Revocable Trust B: Bower, Lori L. Wert, Rebecca J. S: Templeton, Thomas J. Herzog, Nicki M. Tr. McCracken, Patricia A. 124 E. Ridge St. by Sheriff 115 Cambium Ave. $1.00 Templeton, Christine L. 2399 Harvest Ridge Dr. State College, PA 16801 Bellefonte, PA 16823 T/M: Centre Hall by Sheriff $158,000 B: Northwest Savings Bank $1.00 T/M: Ferguson T/M: Walker S: Shoemaker, J. Paul 34 High Meadow Ln. Shoemaker, Virginia L. $14,185.81 S: Workman, Carol A. S: Newburg Shop, Inc. B: Shoemaker, Allen D. T/M: Patton Heverly, Carol A. B: Ahmed, Omar I. 137 Brackenbourne Dr. Heverly, Patrick Ahmed, Carol J. Port Matilda, PA 16870 S: Hensel, Patrick Ray B: Meeker, Nycole Dawn 7779 S. Eagle Valley Rd. $1.00 by Sheriff 122 Pine St. T/M: Patton B: U.S. Bank $120,000 Howard, PA 16841 RASC 2007KS1 T/M: Worth $40,000 S: Reese, Helen 1195 Moose Run Rd. T/M: Walker $6,088.64 S: Malone, Mary Kathryn Resse, Helen J. B: Reese, Robert L., Jr. T/M: Boggs B: Zhang, Xian Rong S: Brber, Norma Jean Est. Reese, Cissy J. 806 Stratford Dr. Mills, Diana L. Extrx. Reese Hollow Rd. S: Claar, John O. $123,000 B: Cassick, Singin R. $1.00 Emel, Kimberly A. T/M: State College Murphy, Rebecca T/M: Worth Claar, Kimberly A. 201 Shady Ln. B: Claar, John O. S: Katsoff, James D. Philipsburg, PA 16866 S: Reese, Helen Claar, Kimberly A. by Sheriff $82,000 Resse, Helen J. 1142 Pine Creek Rd. B: Verma, Shyam K. T/M: Rush B: Reese, Helen J. Woodward, PA 16882 Verma, Suman 395 Reese Hollow Rd. $1.00 710 S. Atherton St. S: Galchus, John P. Port Matilda, PA 16870 T/M: Haines $76,000 Galchus, Rita R. $1.00 T/M: State College B: Koenig, Herman J. T/M: Worth S: Butterfield, Robert W. 458 E. College Ave. Butterfield, Louise E. S: Garbrick, Debra K. $13,962.16 S: Gardner, Gloria J. Est. by Sherriff by Agent T/M: State College Garbrick, Christopher O. Gardner, Michael James B: Miller, Douglas C. B: Gardner, Michael James Miller, Connie J. B: Federal National S: Lucas, Viola C. Ritenour, Annette M. 1444 Beaver Rd. Mortgage Assoc. B: Port, Georgia D. 125 Graden St. Julian, PA 16844 247 ½ N. Spring St. 3285 Penns Valley Pike Howard, PA 16841 $195,000 $6,206.17 Centre Hall, PA 16828 $148,000 T/M: Huston T/M: Bellefonte $1.00 T/M: Howard T/M: Potter S: Cells, Michele A. S: Swires, Joseph J. S: Smith, Gary Bruce Cells, Caitlin S. Swires, Holly M. S: Catherman, Robert T. B: Smith, Gary Bruce Cells, Vincent J. B: Smith, Christopher B: Catherman, Robert T. Adams-Smith Mary B: Krape, Thomas A. Smith, Lindsay Catherman, Elizabeth L. Blue Ball Gap Rd. 202 Pebble Ln. 180 Blarney Ln. $136,000 Centre Hall, PA 16828 $1.00 824 N. Eagle Valley Rd. T/M: Walker T/M: Walker $340,000 $1.00 T/M: Potter T/M: Boggs

S: Catherman, Robert T. B: Catherman, Robert T. Catherman, Elizabeth L. 125 Moose Run Rd. $1.00 T/M: Boggs

S: McKinley, Judy Ann Est. Bucha, Rhonda L. Extrx. B: McKinley, Deborah Ann 1753 Egypt Hollow Rd. Bellefonte, PA 16823 $1.00 T/M: Boggs

Farmers’ Markets

ers’ Market Ever y Tuesday – Boalsburg Farm a “producer s is et Mark ers’ Farm g sbur The Boal products are all that ns only” market, whic h mea local folks that locally grown or produced by the ever y Tuesday at sell them – from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Route 322 um Muse the Pennsylvania Military rm, usua lly perfo s ician mus l Loca g. sbur in Boal p.m. 4 or beginning at 3:30 s – State College Tuesdays, Fridays & Saturday Farmers’ Market will run through State College Farmers’ Markets ys from 11:30 Frida and November on Tuesdays , and on Saturdays Lane st Locu on p.m. 5:30 to p.m. Depot. Visit www. from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Home centralpagarmers.com. – Bell efon te Ever y Wed nesd ay & Satu rday Farmers’ Market y Saturday from Bellefonte Farmers’ Market is ever Mill parking lot on 8 a.m. to noon at the Gamble a Farmers’ Market West Lamb Street. There is also a.m. to noon on 7 from in front of the cour thouse book. Face on them Find ays. nesd Wed h Air Market Ever y Saturday – Milesburg’s Fres y Saturday ever open is et Mark Milesburg’s Fresh Air t in Milesburg. from 8 a.m. to noon on Market Stree available. Vendor Fresh baked goods and produce welcome. For ors vend of s set-up is free. All type 8886. 353(814) y Sand call n, matio infor

Historical Exhibits at Ce ntre Furnace Mansion

09/19/2011 thru 09/23/2011

PAGE 25

Ce ntre Co unt y Histori cal Soc iety is hosting two exhibits in October dur ing Pennsylvania Archae ology Month. “Those Who Cam e Before - The Archae ology of Centre County’s Nat ive Americans” and “Bu ilding on the Past” will be availab le through Sunday, Nov ember 13 at the Centre Furnac e Mansion, 1001 East Col lege Avenue, State College. Admission is free and open to the public. Tour hou rs are Wednesday, Frid ay and Sunday from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. or by appointme nt. For more information, visi t ww w.c entrec ountyh istory. org, email info@centrec ountyhistory.org, or call (814) 234 -4779.

S: Wert, Geraldine M. Est. Wert, John A. Extr. B: Wert, John A. 124 E. Ridge St. $1.00 T/M: Centre Hall

Pasta Sales Fundraise r

Alt rus a Inte rna tion al of Ce ntr e Co unt y is sponsoring a fundraise r to benefit the State Co lleg e Are a Sch ool Dis tric t Co mm uni ty Education Literacy End owment.  Orders are being taken for a Rav ioli Variety Pack which inc lud es two pounds of thre e-c hee se, one pound of piz za, and one pound of pumpki n ravioli made locally by Fasta & Ravioli Co.  Cal l (814) 234 -3333 to ord er this $28 variety pac k Deadline to order is Oct ober 20. Orders can be picked up October 27 from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the Mt. Nittany Middle School parking lot.

Thursday Turkey Shoots

The Ferg uson Twp. Lion s Club is host ing its turkey shoo ts on  Thu rsda ys at 7 p.m. and will host the shoot ever y Thursday until Thanksgiving. The kitchen will be open for food. Any questions contact Charlie at (814) 238- 6695.

Wednesday Bingo

night at Lions Club Park, Centre Hall Lions Club Bingo is every Wednesday Early Bird at 6:45 p.m. p.m. 6 at opens n Kitche Hall. Route 192, Centre at 49 numbers, Begins . $1500 l Jackpot worth $1,000. Extreme Specia . weeks two every r numbe increasing one

nted: Stories Wa ome Maternity H Residents ” to a home

t away irl who wen enn Are you a “g ar s ag o? P ye rs he ot m ts ed an w ip un ic r fo s pa rt ar ch er se ek t your ou ab S ta te re se s w ie ntial interv be for confi de nc e. M ust me ex perie ho ty ni er lish, and ng mat E t en flu d, speak Fo r 18 years ol ni ty ho m e. to a m ater ne 14) (8 go at ve er ha eath ation, call H u.edu. ps more inform @ 06 a1 e-mail hb 321-7402 or

Gamble Mill Gallery Exhibit An ar t

ex hi bi t, “N ew W or ks by M em be rs of th e Ce nt ra l Pennsylvania Pa stel Society,” is showing at the BHCA Gallery at the Gamble Mill through Januar y 13. The Gallery is at the Gamble Mill Tavern, 16 0 Dunlap Street, Be lle fo nt e. Ex hib it ho ur s ar e Monday to Satur day 11:30 a.m. to 10 p.m., close d from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. For infor mation, contact James Dunne (814) 355-3613 .

for 2012 Bellefonte Relay Meetin3gp.m. on Friday, June 1

be held from The Bellefonte Relay for Life will at Governor’s Park in Bellefonte. This 2 June rday, Satu on p.m. 3 through ff will be held Thursday, October Kicko Life for y Rela fonte year, the Belle Society Offices in the Match telic Phila rican Ame the at 13 at 7 p.m. e will be announced at this them new The . fonte Belle in Factory Building in the Bellefonte Relay sted intere ne anyo or ins meeting. Team capta for Life are welcomed.

S=Seller B=Buyer T/M=Township/ Municipality

S: McKivison, Ray M. B: McKivison, Dallas G. N. Beach St. $1.00 T/M: Liberty S: McKivison, Ray M. B: McKivison, Dallas G. 350 N. Beach St. $1.00 T/M: Liberty

S: Shvenke, Victor G. Shvenke, Julia R. B: Guo, Man S: Ilgen, Elizabeth L. Catherman, Elizabeth L. 155 Kensington Dr. $700,000 B: Catherman, Robert T. Catherman, Elizabeth L. T/M: Patton 504 W. Dowdy Hole Rd. S: Esch, Samuel K. $1.00 Esch, Barbara L. T/M: Howard B: MacDonald, Donald Mark S: Hankey, Ronald L. MacDonald, Laura Hankey, Carolyn K. Ellen B: Hankey, Pamela 492 Benner Rd. 181 Doe Dr. Port Matilda, PA 16870 $140,000 T/M: Walker $1.00 T/M: Halfmoon S: Traxler, Timothy C. Traxler, Timothy S: Murray, Mack I. B: Traxler, Timothy C. B: Mayes, Isabell J. 1960 E. College Ave. Flory, Osker K. 984 S. Eagle Valley Rd. Bellefonte, PA 16823 $1.00 Bellefonte, PA 16823 T/M: Walker $130,000 T/M: Boggs S: Liszka, Edward G. S: Walker, Margaret L. Est. Liszka, Jane M. Walker, Stephen C. Extr. B: McQueary, Michael J. McQueary, Barbara L. B: Engle, Marilyn A. 623 N. Burrows St. 394 Park Ln. State College, PA 16801 $150,000 $555,000 T/M: Patton T/M: State College S: Dugan, Gerald F. S: Partsch, Gary B: Gandhi, Anukampa B: Partsch, Stephanie Gandhi, Farhan 713 Ingleby Rd. 127 Westminster Ct. $1.00 $188,000 T/M: Haines T/M: Patton S: Amberleigh LP B: Appleby, Jodi L. 140 Exeter Ln. Bellefonte, PA 16823 $234,115 T/M: Spring

SEND YOUR STORY IDEAS TO THE GAZETTE

Death Notices and Obituaries James Allen Maynard, 57, passed away Thursday, September 29, 2011. He was born September 21, 1954, in Huntington, WV. Burial was in Wildwood Cemetery, Williamsport. In lieu of flowers memorial contributions may be made to The Brent Russell and James Allen Maynard Scholarship Fund, benefiting students from Philipsburg Osceola High School, Lycoming College, 700 College Place, Williamsport PA 17701. Online condolences may be made to the family at www.wetzlerfuneralhome.com. Pleasant Gap James R. Frantz, 80, of Pleasant Gap, passed away Thursday, September 29, 2011. He was born October 2, 1930, in Big Run, PA. Burial was in Pleasant Gap Lutheran Cemetery, Spring Township. Online condolences may be made to the family at www.wetzlerfuneralhome.com

Death notices are a free public service involving people with a direct Centre County Connection. Obituaries are paid. Call for more information - 814-632-6700 www.CentreCountyGazette.com

Your Community Newspaper is FREE! Readers! Visit Gazette advertisers first. You support them. They support us. We support you.


PAGE 26

THE GAZETTE - SERVING CENTRE COUNTY

GAZETTE

azette The

OCTOBER 7, 2011

CLASSIFIEDS

Mail To: The Serving Gazette P.O. Box 129 Centre Warriors Mark, PA County 16877

MAIL IN OR PLACE ONLINE ONLY. NO PHONE-IN ADS PLEASE. ALL PRIVATE PARTY CLASSIFIEDS

JUST $5.00

NAME

(UP TO 20 WORDS) Plus 15¢ per addl. word

ADDRESS CITY

STATE

PHONE (

FILL IN AD COPY BELOW

ZIP HOW MANY WEEKS

)

CALL FOR COMMERCIAL RATES Cash, Check Or Money Orders Only $25.00 Returned Check Fee Applies. DEADLINE: Ads Must Be Received By Monday At NOON For Friday’s Edition

PLEASE TYPE OR PRINT NEATLY - ONE WORD PER BLOCK DO NOT ABBREVIATE - PLEASE USE PROPER PUNCTUATION (COMMAS, ETC.). MAKE CHECK OR MONEY ORDER PAYABLE TO: The Gazette

EACH ADDL. WORD 15¢

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

MAIL OR PLACE ADS ONLINE AT WWW.CENTRECOUNTYGAZETTE.COM

POLICY: The Publisher reserves the right to revise, reclassify or reject any ad for any reason at any time. Liability for any error is limited to the cost of the first erroneous insertion. Publisher must be notified within 3 working days.

Would You Like A Mailed Subscription to the

$48 for 6 Months or $96 for A Year CHECK OR MONEY ORDER ONLY

azette The

Serving Centre County

P.O. Box 129 Warriors Mark, PA 16877 PLEASE PRINT NEATLY AND REMEMBER TO CHECK THE BOX BELOW

$48 for 6 Months

azette The

?

Serving Centre County

Name:_____________________________________ Address:____________________________________ Phone: ____________________________________ $96 for A Year

New subscriptions will start weekly with the first issue of the following month with your payment.

The Gazette, P.O. Box 129, Warriors Mark, PA 16877 Papers will be mailed out no later than the Monday after the issue date. SUBSCRIBE ONLINE TO PAY BY CREDIT CARD: WWW.CENTRECOUNTYGAZETTE.COM

Clip Out The Form, Mail It And Your Payment To:

NOTICE

Marty Cattuzzo Author of CountDown

FOR SALE

FOR SALE

E-MACHINE COMPUTER Windows 7, 64 bit, 19� monitor, speakers, keyboard, 4g DDR2 memory, less than 2 years old, in excellent condition, $400. Call 814355-7881

FIVE PIECE PATIO SET with 4’ round table, and 4 swivel chairs plus umbrella. Reduced to $175. Good Condition Call 814-355-4417. 1961 International B414 tractor, diesel, good rubber, w/7’ brush hog mower, 7’ grader blade & tire chains, $3,500, 814-360-1937, State College

BRI-MAR Dump Trailer, drop down sides, 10,000 GBW. Pictures on Craig’s List-posting 1-6-11. $4,800. Call 814 364-9668. 1961 Farmall Cub, w/(2) sets AB LOUNGE SPORT, in rear tires, belly mower, low, good condition. $50.00 OBO disc, harrow & blade, also Call 814-867-5553 and leave 3K#natilt trailer, $3,500, 814360-1937, State College message.

MAKE THE LARGE PINE Cupboard MOST OF YOUR Hutch, 2 piece with beveled DOLLARS BY glass, excellent condition, Published December 2011. $300, call Dick Kisslak 355- ADVERTISING IN A true workman who neededth 8389. THE GAZETTE not be ashamed, rightly dividing the Word of Truth, comparing PUBLIC NOTICE scripture to scripture who has studied to show himself approved! 2 Timothy 2:15 May 21, 2011-October 21, 2011 is All Classified Legal/Public Notice ads are a great period for salvation for God’s chosen ones. 153 days = discounted for the month of October. a Great Multitude of Fish which did not break the disciples Reg. rate $15.00 per column inch. net. Five months or 153 days Special: $10.00 per column inch! of salvation. After Peter drew in the net Jesus then said Attorneys – Municipalities “Come and Dine.� John 21:12. Come ye who hunger and School Boards – Businesses – Individuals thirst. Isaiah 55:1. Today is still the day of SALVATION! Jesus ,EGAL.OTICESs%STATE.OTICESs4AX.OTICES said to “watch and pray.� He is waiting on YOU! Do not delay )NCORPORATIONSs&ICTITIOUS.AME&ILINGS as His coming is nigh, even unto All Classified Legal ads discounted! the door! For more information please go to www.studies. Call 814-632-6700 or com and or You Tube and type in 2011studies. There you will email Sales@CentreCountyGazette.com find the answers you may have to place your ad today! well been searching for. To The Last Day The Final 153 Days of 2011 A.D.

PUBLIC NOTICE AD SALE!

CA RS

CA MPERS

TRUCKS

1997 Jayco M 3230 RKS 5 whl. camper, 33’, 14’ pwr. slide out, new 20’ awning, $8,500, 814-360-1937, State College th

2000 Dodge Dakota, V6, needs body work, $2,000, 814-237-1922, State College

1989 Chevy 1500 Scottsdale 4x4 Plow Truck, at, V8, 8’ bed, Meyer pwr. angle plow, B OAT S 1999 Triton TR21 bass boat, good tires, $2,500 obo, 814W%VINRUDE(/MOTOR 571-8762, Poe Valley VGC, gar. stored, $10,500, 1995 Ford F150 XLT 4x4, 814-933-6850, Howard 302, at, pw, pl, new insp., SELL YOUR UNWANTED $3,200 obo, 814-571-8762, Poe Valley ITEMS HERE

HELP WANTED HELP WANTED MEDICAL BILLING & COLLECTIONS We have a career opportunity at our Bellefonte location:

Fulltime position with experience in medical billing and responsible for patient counseling, insurance verification, billing and collection. Minimum requirements are a high school diploma or equivalent and a willingness to actively pursue payment from patients and third party payers. 1997 Chevy Cavalier, VG Prior experience in the healthcare industry is preferred body, needs eng., $500 obo, with 1-3 years medical billing experience. This position 814-353-8096, Bellefonte requires working a flexible schedule including evenings, and 2000 Toyota Sienna LE, participation in the company’s Saturday/holiday rotations. V6, 183K, great family car, orig. owner, dark green, new We offer a competitive compensation and benefit program brakes & batt., recent insp., to those who share our high organizational values. Interested ac, ABS, cd, $3,400 neg., applicants may submit their resume and salary history to: 814-360-7979, Port Matilda Vicky Barto 2009 Ford Fusion SEL, V6, at, 70 Sky Harbor Drive fully eq., lthr., Sirius radio, 36K, Port Matilda, PA 16870 VGC, August insp., $15,700, Fax: (814) 692-0099 814-360-1937, State College Email: hiresmart1@gmail.com 1988 Toyota Camry, runs great, high mi., 1/12 insp., $800 obo, 814-280-4179, State College

Equal Opportunity Employer

REAL ESTATE FOR REAL ESTATE FOR SALE OR LEASE SALE OR LEASE BEAUTIFUL 4 BD/3.5BATH HOME close to new Boalsburg %LEM AND -T .ITTTANY Middle school, St. Joseph’s Academy, PA Military Museum grounds and Nittany View park. Off private lane with public s/w. Listed by Keller Williams Advantage Realty at $324,900 or lease at $1900/mo. plus utilities. 9 mo lease available and pets considered for additional fee of $20/ per pet per mo.-AXOFPETS and under). Contact Pat Long 814-571-7280.

FREE GIVEAWAY

Giveaways are listed FREE of charge as a service to our readers. LIMIT 35 WORDS.

WO R K WA N T E D NEED?

YARD WORK DONE OR HOME CLEANING OR A ROOM PAINTED

814-355-4417 NOW EXPANDING TO THE STATE COLLEGE AREA!

LEGAL NOTICE G o v e r n o r ’s Gate Apartments, Bellefonte, is accepting applications. Rent is based on income. All utilities included. Off-street assigned PARKING ,OCATED NEXT TO public park. Call 355-3682. Professionally managed by Housing Development Corp. MidAtlantic. EOH.

SELL IT WITH A GAZETTE CLASSIFIED!


OCTOBER 7, 2011

WWW.CENTRECOUNTYGAZETTE.COM

PAGE 27


PAGE 28

THE GAZETTE - SERVING CENTRE COUNTY

OCTOBER 7, 2011

Karaoke Saturdays With Ken Yeaney Every Saturday 6:30-9:00

3-Topping 14� Pizza

$11

Good for Dine-In or Carry Out ONLY

Good for Dine-In or Carry Out

Buy ANY PIZZA & receive the 2nd Pizza of equal or lesser value

FREE! Delivery Customers: Buy 1, get the 2nd Pizza of equal or lesser value Half Off Limit 2 per customer *Please mention this ad when ordering.(Limit 1 special per person. Cannot be combined with any other offers. Dine-in or Carry Out Only.)

355-3738 www.BellefontePizzaMia.com

FREE, ACCURATE and FAST delivery in Bellefonte, Zion, Pleasant Gap, Milesburg, Continental Courts, Innovation Park and along the Benner Pike to the Nittany Mall.

For wacky contests and Pizza Mia news: www.facebook.com/BellefontePizzaMia


10-07-11 Centre County Gazette