__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

Michael Storey michael@thegiftofbread.org Tel : 01935 824408 UK

w w w . t h e g if t of br e a d. or g

PRESENTED BY

MICHAEL STOREY

THE GIFT OF BREAD

Sourdough Bread Tutorial How to make Real Bread that IS a Real Food

• • • •

WHOLEGRAIN STONEGROUND SOURDOUGH LONG SLOW FERMENTATION

REAL BREAD – THE STAFF OF LIFE


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

2 of 56

REAL BREAD – A FOOD YOU CAN LIVE ON

WELCOME TO OUR TUTORIAL

TEACHING HOW TO MAKE REALLY HEALTHY NUTRITIOUS BREAD

MICHAEL & NELLEKE STOREY THE GIFT OF BREAD LTD WWW.THEGIFTOFBREAD.ORG A dedicated facility for training in making and understanding the value of real bread. We operate as a charity. All our classes are free in the UK. Michael is a coeliac. Today, almost half the population has a problem with digesting bread for one reason or another. How did this problem arise? ‘Bread’ in this day and age has become an ultra-processed commodity – not the real food it once was. That is where we come in. Real bread with real health benefits; huge benefits. Excellent tasting, very quick and practical to make. AND – virtually everyone can eat it, including myself, a coeliac.


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

3 of 56

TABLE OF CONTENTS PA G E WHAT I S REAL BR EAD ? HISTORY

6, 7

B RE AD AS A F OOD TO LI VE ON

8, 9

IN VE NTI ON OF YEAST

10, 11

IN VE NTI ON OF THE ROLLER MILL AND WH I TE F LOUR

1 2, 13

ADVA NTAGES OF SP R OUTED FLOU R

1 6, 17

N UTR I TI ON I N BREAD

18, 1 9

N OTES F OR COELI ACS AND GLUTEN I NTOLERANT

2 0, 21

HE ALTH BENEF I TS OF RE AL BR EAD

2 2, 23

B E IN G F OOD I NDEP END AN T

2 8, 29

B RE AD M AKI NG TH E BASI C S

3 0, 31

SOUR D OUGH STARTER

32, 3 3

MIXING THE BR EAD DOUGH

38, 39

SHAPI NG THE DOUGH

4 2, 43

PROVI NG TH E DOUGH

46, 47

SCORING AND P REP ARATION FOR O VEN

4 8, 49

B AKING

5 2, 53


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

4 of 56

VIDEO CONTENTS MAKING A STARTER 6.30

PAGE 33

• What is a starter • Basic history • Purpose of a starter • How to make from scratch – Day 1 to Day 5 • Float test REAL BREAD – A FOOD YOU CAN LIVE ON

• What to do with left over starter. DRIED STARTER 3.00

PAGE 33

• How to make it. • How to activate it. STONEGROUND FLOUR

2.15

PAGE 17

History • What is stone grinding • Why is it better? • Hand stone grinder • Household electric stone grinder • Semi commercial stone grinder. SPROUTED GRAIN FLOUR

2.25

PAGE 17

What is sprouted grain flour? • Process of making it • Stone grinding the dried sprouted grain. CONTAINERS FOR BAKING 2.00

PAGE 31

• Options for containers for baking. • Le Creuset saucepan. • Cast iron open dish. • Baking ring (for cakes) • Aluminium foil container. • Free form. BAKING BREAD – THE OVENS 6.50

PAGE 53

• Conventional ovens, fan/element/gas • Temperatures to start baking cycle • Containers: cast iron dishes, Le Creuset style saucepan, freeform, alternatives • Probe thermometer for checking temperature • Basic small microwave/convection oven • Campfire baking in Dutch oven • Wood fired pizza oven • In a Crock Pot. MIXING THE DOUGH 6.15

PAGE 39

• A quick easy process. • Weighing the flour. • Mixing in water. • Mixing in salt. • Mixing in the starter. • Some tips.


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

SHAPING THE DOUGH 9.50

5 of 56

PAGE 43

• After being in the fridge, fermenting and shaping are much easier to understand when seen (in the video) than explained. • Three loaves are made ready for proofing in about two minutes. PARCHMENT PAPER TIPS 1.25

PAGE 49

• Parchment is not grease proof paper • Use a good quality • General usage and reasons for using parchment paper. SCORING THE BREAD 2.00

PAGE 49

Why do we need to ‘score’ bread? • Quick guide to basic best practice with a visual guide. SOURDOUGH CRUMPETS 5.25

PAGE 34

• Two methods, in a frypan and in an oven. • Variation for gluten intolerant. • Sourdough crumpets go back hundreds of years. • This is the original and still the best way. SOURDOUGH OAT BISCUITS 2.40

PAGE 34

• Very simple and quick way to make oat biscuits with left over starter. REVIEWS WITH OUR CLASS BREAD MAKERS

PAGE 26

Watch and listen to people that have experienced the difference this bread makes. SOURDOUGH BREAD ON A CAMPFIRE 13.12

PAGE 53

• A ‘feature video’ out in the field making bread from raw wheat to the finished loaf – and enjoying eating it. • Demonstrates that only basic equipment and methods are needed to produce good bread. SPROUT MASH SOURDOUGH

PAGE 41

• There are many ways to make bread. This demonstrates one very different way by taking wheat soaked in water for 24 hours and passing it through a meat mincer to make the dough.


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

6 of 56

WHAT IS BREAD? WHY DO WE NEED TO GET BACK TO REAL BREAD? Half the adult population in the United States and almost as many in the UK and Europe suffer from one or more of the following: diabetes, obesity, being REAL BREAD – A FOOD YOU CAN LIVE ON

overweight, gluten intolerance, food allergies and metabolic syndrome. The cause of this is generally accepted as the result of food being ultra processed. Dig a little deeper and the real culprit is sugar, the everpresent ingredient added to virtually every modern commercially made food. Commercial bread is well and truly an ultra processed food. By the time the flour is reduced back to just pure starch, and so fine that it digests in our system in about thirty seconds, we end up receiving a sudden sugar spike. Not to mention the up to a hundred chemicals added in as well. For all those in the above health bracket, eating commercial bread is only adding to their discomfort. On the other hand, real bread is the exact opposite; it can compensate and relieve all those symptoms.

Ancient empires were built on bread


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

7 of 56

History If you go back just a short distance in time – to the latter half of the Industrial Revolution, bread changed, dramatically. For thousands of years, it was known as the ‘staff of life’. What does that mean? Empires were built on bread. Bread was something you could live off. If you had bread, you were doing ok. A standing Roman army of 20,000 men consumed sixty tons of grain per day. They could march all day, build roads all day. They could fight for their lives, all day… on bread. Hard evidence on what food the Egyptian pyramid builders ate and hauled their giant stones into place is proven. They ate bread. When we come to today in the UK, the media reminds us every winter not to feed the ducks and swans bread. With full tummies, they feel satisfied. The reality: in a short time they could die of malnutrition. Bread is not what it used to be.

WHY WERE THE ROMANS INTERESTED IN EGYPT? WAS IT CLEOPATRA’S GOOD LOOKS? The coastline of North Africa from Tripoli to Morocco was the breadbasket of the then known world. The fertile crescent of North Africa grew high protein (bread) wheat. Stuff armies could march on. The climate in Europe could not provide the quantity Rome needed. At their peak, the Romans had four standing armies of approximately 20,000 trained soldiers in each. Situated in Asia, Western Europe, Central Europe and North Africa, each of these individual armies needed 60 tons of grain delivered every day. The famous road networks of the Romans were for this purpose. An Empire cannot survive without its army. The army cannot survive without food. Logistics, the supply chain, is always the backbone of any military regime. Back in Rome, for hundreds of years, the Emperors handed out free grain to its citizens for making bread. They knew how important it was to ‘keep the natives happy’. Bread was the staff of life. It was real food. Bread built the Roman Empire and other empires before it and after it.


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

8 of 56

REAL BREAD – A FOOD YOU CAN LIVE ON

REAL BREAD – IS A FOOD YOU CAN LIVE ON.

THE ROMAN EMPIRE WAS DEPENDENT ON THE FOOD VALUE OF BREAD THE PYRAMIDS WERE FUELED BY BREAD!

New evidence proves the pyramid builder’s main diet was bread.

In the early 1900s, there was a raging argument in the USA. Doctors had noticed a drop in the well being of their patients and bread was being blamed. The argument was still in full stride in the 1970s. The New York Times ran an article showing that rats fed as much commercial bread as they could eat, died of malnutrition. That experiment has been repeated many times – with the same results everytime. We have gone from bread fuelling empires, to a place where even a mouse cannot survive for long on modern bread. Why? What happened? Two events substantially changed the total concept of bread. These were the invention of commercial yeast and the invention of the roller mill. For thousands of years, bread had been made with stoneground flour and a natural fermentation we now call a sourdough starter, in history and the Bible known as – leavening.


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

9 of 56

BREA D I S FA T A L TO R A TS , B U T TH A T’ S N OT TH E P O I NT NEW Y OR K T I M ES 1970. N O V 17. B Y C H A RL O TTE CU RTI S

“ Ar antds scoa ,n floi vr ewohna tnmo tahyi nbge btuhte o1r,d0 i0n0atrhy twi mhei t,et hber eqaudehs at iso nb eoefnwrhaei st ehde raogra inno. t The answer is still no, yet a lot of people are in a dither. After the 42 rats died, their demise was duly reported last month in respected publications under such head lines as “White Bread Diet Starved Rats, Scientist Reports.” And across the nation, the consumer who cared was ask ing questions. Is bread safe? Are some breads better than others? Is there any way to make bread better? Should I see my doctor? Write my Congressman? What can I do about it? NO SECRET The lead statement ‘For the thousanth time’ shows just how long this argument had been going on. I personally remember as a young boy watching a BBC documentary in the UK (black and white TV in the late 1950’s) and being distressed watching all the laboratory rats dying of malnutrition. I had pet mice. That bread had no nutritional value at all, was not a secret. During the Second World War it was recognised that bread had become seriously distanced from any benefits. In 1940 the Committee on Food and Nutrition recommended the addition of thiamin, niacin, riboflavin, and iron to flour. This was solely to overcome deficiencies that had been introduced by industrialisation. Since then food continued to go down the ‘ultra processed’ road. Today in the UK, the Guardian newspaper reported up to a hundred chemicals are now added into a loaf of white bread. All of this still brings us to the point where every year at the beginning of each winter in the UK, we are told not to feed ducks and swans bread; it will lead to their malnutrition and death.


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

10 of 56

REAL BREAD – A FOOD YOU CAN LIVE ON

THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION – THE PRECURSER TO ULTRA PROCESSED FOOD THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN COMMERCIAL YEAST AND NATURAL STARTER

COMMERCIAL YEAST Commercial yeast makes the bread rise.The species of manufactured yeast feeds on the sugars (starch) with carbon dioxide as a by product. Raising agents can be used on their own as in Irish soda bread (Bicarb of soda). Raising and softening bread dough is what commercial yeast does. Different commercial yeasts are produced depending on which other chemicals are added to the bread dough.

NATURAL STARTER – USED FOR THOUSANDS OF YEARS A fully active starter is designed (by nature) to react with the starch in the flour fermenting it and as it works its way through the dough, gas is produced as a by product. The dough is predigested by the microorganisms and transformed into a different product. The gluten structure is modified (the gliadins responsible for intolerances). Starch sugar is reduced. Fibre is increased. Anti nutriants – phytase – is modified. Bio availability of phytochemicals is enhanced for health benefits. Bread dough fermented by the natural microbiota found on the wheat surface (sourdough starter) remain in the flour during its production. It is a completely natural (intrinsic) system. The activity of the microorganisms also perform the necessary ‘work’ of the kneading stage. Using a natural starter is the practical way anyone in possession of wheat could make nutritious bread that becomes a real food.


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

THE INVENTION OF COMMERCIAL YEAST

WHEN DID BREAD CEASE TO BE A FOOD? Two moves sent bread from being real food to fluff. First in the late 1860’s Louis Pasteur (formally) discovered yeast. Yeast had always been there but not understood, or made commercially. That was left to Charles Fleischmann in 1876 to make available the first commercial yeast. The bread industry said ‘thank you very much’. Before commercial yeast being available, all bread-making was produced by ‘natural’ yeast or a sourdough culture as we know it. (Leavening in the Bible). This had been the practice for thousands of years. It is a spontaneous reaction when water comes in contact with flour. No rocket science needed. Way back in time, the first cave with a leak in the roof would have done the job.

11 of 56


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

12 of 56

REAL BREAD – A FOOD YOU CAN LIVE ON

THE INVENTION OF THE ROLLER MILL

10,000 YEARS OF BREADMAKING TRADITION – STOOD DOWN

Next came the invention of the roller mill. At the Paris Exposition in 1867 the first white flour was on show (invented). Roller mills break down a grain of wheat into eight individual fractions. The ‘germ’ (embryonic seed) laden with vitamin E oil is removed to give the new white flour an extended shelf life. The incorporated oil would send traditional flour rancid within a few months. The outer layers of ‘bran’ laden with invaluable health-giving phytochemicals were sold elsewhere. Getting rid of the precious vitamin E oil and other benefits was ‘a business decision’ due to shelf life considerations. Up until this moment, for thousands of years, ALL flour had been stone ground and included the entire grain’s valuable contents. Even if sifted repeatedly, it would still retain a portion of the whole


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

13 of 56

grain’s nutrition from the outer layers. With the advent of the roller mills, effectively, bread was now being made with starch, just one part of the grain, instead of ‘wheat’, the whole grain. One thing the grain millers quickly found out; even the insects could not survive in the new white flour, such was the lack of nutrition. The rollermills dispense with the outer six ‘bran’ layers, as well as the germ. The outer layers contain phytochemicals (Greek: phyto = plant). These are to protect the plant from invasion from and including: pathogenes, moulds, funguses and an array of microbial adversaries. The value of the phytochemicals for us is – they protect our systems from challengers to our health. They also contain loads of antioxidants.

The Milling industry found out – even insects could not survive in the new white flour TH REE CO MMENTS F RO M SCI ENTI F I C P A P ERS:

• “The health-promoting effects of whole-grain consumption have been attributed in part to their unique phytochemical contents and profiles that complement those found in fruits and vegetables”.

• “The wheat-food products are principally made from refined white flour from which the outer layers of the wheat grain are removed. However, these layers (i.e pericarp, the seed coat, the nucellar epidermis, aleurone), which are eliminated in the milling fraction called by the millers as “bran”, contain most of the fibre, phytochemicals and micronutrients of the wheat kernel that could contribute to increasing the nutritional quality of human food”… • “Furthermore, wheat [the outer layers] provides essential amino acids, vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and dietary fibre components to the human diet”.


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

THE RIGHT FLOUR FOR REAL BREAD The time-proven stoneground flour is not only complete with all the valuable ingredients. The process of being ground between the stones mangles, rips and shreds the particles of grain, leaving a very coarse uneven surface that takes two hours for your tummy to work its way around. This is good – very good. No fast release of BREAD – M ODERN AS TODAY, ANCIENT AS HISTORY

sugars and it stays with you keeping you feeling satisfied for those two hours. You do not just feel content; the nutrition is there as well. Compare this to modern roller milled flour. Besides being just the starch content of the grain, it is rolled into such wispy thin platelets; it can dissolve in your system in 30 seconds. This is why commercial bread is disastrous for people with diabetes – instant sugar spikes. A few minutes later, and you are left feeling empty, which promotes snacking. Bottom line: for any benefit both for nutrition, digestion and well being, flour must be the whole grain and stone ground. Until the invention of the roller mill, all flour for thousands of years was stoneground wholegrain. But this is only half the story. Ingredients still need to be in a form available to our system. This is where the sourdough starter culture comes in. More on that later.

THE FIRST STEP IN MAKING REAL BREAD IS CHOOSING THE FLOUR To receive the maximum health and nutrition benefits possible, the choice of flour will be critical. Since white flour has had so much of the value removed, it is tough to justify it as real food. All processed foods contribute to (cause) the onslaught of sickness that the modern world suffers. Such a simple choice, the flour you use, can help reverse ill health’s tidal currents.

14 of 56


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

15 of 56

THE GIFT OF BREAD PRODUCES SPROUTED WHOLEGRAIN STONEGROUND FLOUR WE ARE THE MOST ECONOMICAL SOURCE. PLEASE USE OUR WEBSITE TO ORDER

Modern hand stone grinder

Three day old fermented dough

SOURCING YOUR FLOUR Obtaining stone gound flour is not difficult with the help of the web. Generally all stoneground flour will be wholegrain, but do not presume that, ‘check the label’. IN THE UK There are many small mills providing good quality stoneground flour. One highly recommended source that we use is Shipton Mill. Our own sprouted flour is make from high quality organic grain from Doves Farm who also provide stoneground flour. IN THE USA Bob’s Red Mill is one source for stoneground flour. Lindley Mills also provides sprouted flours as well.


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

16 of 56

Advantages Of Sprouted Grain Flour At The Gift of Bread we go one step further. We use sprouted wholegrain flour. REAL BREAD – A FOOD YOU CAN LIVE ON

Our sprouted stoneground flour uses high-quality premium Doves Farm organic grain. (See the video links accross the page.) ADVANTAGES AND REASONS FOR USING SPROUTED GRAIN FLOUR • Nutrition and • digestibility and • health benefits are the three areas that stand out. INCREASED NUTRITION Increased nutrition comes by way of the seed (wheat grain), mainly starch, starting on its journey towards being a plant. ‘Sprouting’ means germinating, which takes place when water activates enzymes in the seed. Significant changes begin to take place. The root is already emerging when we re-dry the grain ready for stone-grinding. It is now partly vegetable. The starch has been converted to simple sugars to sustain the new plant’s growth (well before the starch/sugar conversion occurs i n y o u r s t o m a c h ) . There is an increase in Omega 3 and 6 oils. The levels of iron and vitamins B, D and E are increased. DIGESTIBILITY The sprouted grain is closer to being a vegetable and is much simpler for us to digest than standard wheat. An indication of the change’s extent is our sprouted grain flour will not function to feed a sourdough starter. There is not enough s t a r c h ( s u g a r ) l e f t f o r t h a t p u r p o s e .  Added to the flour itself being more beneficial, remember it is still to go through three days of fermentation under the sourdough microbiota’s influence. Every step along the way is turning the eventual bread into a superfood with vastly different characteristics from commercial bread. HEALTH BENEFITS The sprouting process alters the grain’s internal portion; however, the outer layers loaded with phytochemicals still retain all their rewards. Overall, as the volume of fibre increases, the carbohydrate (sugar) level


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

17 of 56

decreases, which is very important for diabetics and other health issues. The gluten content decreases. Different nutrient levels are increased, and digestion is much easier for our bodies to tolerate.

THE IMPORTANCE OF FIBRE As sugars in commercial food come under the spotlight, one famous example demonstrating some confusion is quoted: ‘a glass of pure orange juice may seem a healthy choice’. However, it contains dangerous levels of fructose sugar. If, on the other hand, a whole orange is eaten, the fibre content of the orange counters the effect of the sugar. Fibre is the primary defence against sugars the body cannot handle. Both soluble and insoluble fibre are needed to form a gut barrier, preventing sugar absorption where it will be harmful. L IGH TL Y SP RO U TED REA DY F O R RE-DRY I NG A ND MI LLING

In the UK we manufacture it, in the USA it is readily available. UK

HTTPS://WWW.THEGIFTOFBREAD.ORG

(USA) HTTPS://WWW.LINDLEYMILLS.COM/SHOP/BULK-FLOUR.HTML SPROUTED GRAIN FLOUR WATCH VIDEO NOW STONE GROUND FLOUR WATCH VIDEO NOW


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

18 of 56

Real Food Means Real Nutrition

REAL BREAD – A FOOD YOU CAN LIVE ON

Sourdough Starter Is For Nutrition FERMENTATION Fermented foods have been with us for thousands of years. They provide fantastic health bonuses, practical assistance and taste bud treats. Practical, because without fridges, fermentation provides a means of preserving foods safely. Healthy, because fermented foods look after our gut biome. When it comes to the taste buds, many people do not realise chocolate is the result of an extended five-day fermentation process. We do not digest many foods very well; for many people, that could be milk. However, once it is yoghurt, kefir or cheese, it is very digestible.

A SYSTEM Fermentation is not a gimmick we ‘lucked out on’. It is so endemic in the world’s scheme of things; it is best looked at as a system. Cows, sheep and goats etc. (the ruminants) best demonstrate this. Without fermentation, all these animals could not eat grass and hay, all their everyday foods. They cannot digest them. An outer layer of cellulose needs to be broken down. In our diagram of a cow’s multi-chambered stomach, food goes into the rumen, the first stomach and together with the microbiota in the grass and the organisms already in there from the last meal (a sourdough starter?) fermentation takes place, breaking the food down. They bring the food ‘back up’, re-chew it (chewing the cud) and swallow it again. It goes to a different portion of the stomach, and the sheep, cow, deer or goat will now have a satisfying meal. For us, now we end up having access to milk, wool, meat, leather etc. If the grass did not have the microorganisms, if the animals did not have the multi-chambered stomachs, neither would we be here if the fermentation process was not there. We are dependent on having our range of domestic animals. No matter which side you take, the


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

19 of 56

Proven Traditions Thousands Of Years Old – Dismissed ‘Mother Nature’ of evolution or the Word of the Bible, someone or something went to a lot of trouble to organise this all for us. It is a system that is replicated many times over. Look at sauerkraut as an example of the benefits of fermentation: “Raw cabbage on its own already contains moderate amounts of vitamin C — around 30 mg per cup. When you ferment cabbage into sauerkraut, its vitamin C and antioxidant levels skyrocket. “According to researchers at Cornell University, levels of antioxidants and vitamin C in sauerkraut range from 57 to 695 mg — with raw, fermented red cabbage having the highest levels of vitamin C, hitting almost 700 mg per cup”.


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

20 of 56

FERMENTATION AND BREAD The beneficial effect of fermentation is critical to understand, especially as it applies to our bread, as shown in this tutorial. It is a fully fermented product that has become a powerhouse of nutritional and health advantages. By comparison, commercial bread contains no single benefit and goes a long way to being a source o f e v e r y t h i n g t o b e a v o i d e d a s u l t r a - p r o c e s s e d f o o d . WHY YEAST WILL NOT MEET REQUIREMENTS

REAL BREAD – A FOOD YOU CAN LIVE ON

Modern commercial yeast will only cause the bread to rise (in 5 minutes using the UK Chorleywood Process – 9.2 million loaves a day ). Five minutes will not extract any goodness for us. Only a sourdough culture will do that, and only if given enough time. Most academic papers state a minimum of 48 hours. The minimum we use is three days and a maximum of five days.

FOR COELIACS AND GLUTEN INTOLERANT First up, I am a coeliac. I suffer a severe reaction to gluten and have done for 25 years. I came across a science/academic paper that showed that if bread was made in the strict ‘traditional’ way with a sourdough starter and left to ferment for a minimum of 48 hours, it was, in their words, “non-toxic to coeliac disease p a t i e n t s ” .  No one disputes the technical findings of the paper. The question surrounds the small number of participants in the study. Only 20 people were involved. At The Gift Of Bread, as of early 2021, we are approaching one hundred coeliacs and hundreds of gluten intolerant people able to convert to our bread. Our success rate with coeliacs is approximately 90%.

For people who are only gluten intolerant, this bread has been successful in almost 100% of cases. How does it work? The fermentation process modifies the gliadin protein in the gluten that causes the problem. Fermentation does many brilliant things, much more than working on the gliadin. When you factor in the additional stage of sprouting the grain first (optional), the changes and benefits in the final bread are more pronounced.


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

21 of 56

Note: Several doctors working with coeliacs have taken part in our bread programme. After two years of practical experience, they are most enthusiastic.

For those who go down this road, from my own perspective as a coeliac and together with other coeliacs’ feedback over the past two years, here are some additional considerations. • All precautions handling wheat flour should be observed. Be aware of any bowl etc., that has had gluten flour in it. • The dough after being fermented for several days is ‘safe’, having been worked over by the sourdough microbiota. However, when using flour to line baskets or tea towels for proofing, it must be gluten-free flour. We use rice flour. • Since I am working with wheat flour daily, packing and handling, I wear a mask to prevent breathing in wheat flour dust, which does affect me. Making bread is fine, but handling bulk quantities (shop floor), I need to be careful. • Do not ‘lick spoons or fingers’ if that is a habit when preparing food that is yet to be fermented. • Just because I can eat this bread day in, day out, I cannot forget that I am a coeliac. • It is always recommended not to eat bread when it is still warm out of the oven. Always let it cool first. • We are currently making a broad range of cakes and biscuits from just the ‘starter’ with no additional flour. In this case, after having fed the starter, wait until it reaches peak activity and then wait one more day – 24 hours before using it. The starter is concentrated and does not require the entire three days to ferment its way through a whole batch of dough. In the UK, we offer a sample of the extended fermentation bread in the mail to ascertain its suitability. We advise you to try a 1/4 inch square piece and wait the appropriate time to see how you respond. (In my case, that is two hours). If there is no adverse reaction, try a slightly larger piece. After you have eaten a whole slice without upset (i.e. no reaction at all other than enjoying the taste and feel of real bread), then it will be a life-changing start to enjoying some real bread with all its extra benefits. The expression ‘life changing’ is what we receive back from coeliacs all the time.


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

22 of 56

SO, WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF REAL BREAD

JUST SOME OF THE BENEF

DAY TO DAY WELLBEING

REAL BREAD – A FOOD YOU CAN LIVE ON

Two slices of the real bread and you know all about it. First, you feel full. You will stay that way for several hours. This means no need to snack. Great as a starting point for losing weight. After a couple of days, the bran takes effect in the stomach. Regular as clockwork. We receive hundreds of accolades from people in our past classes. Thinking is sharper.

• • • • • • • •

GUT HEALTH BRAIN FUNCTION DIABETICS FODMAP DIETS IBS LOSE WEIGHT ASTHMA AMINO ACIDS

• • • • • • • •

NATUR BREAST NEURA CHRON GALLST HEART LOW CA FIBRE R

Muscles are in better tune. Almost everything improves as the main organ, the stomach, provides what the rest of the body needs. If a mouse cannot live on modern bread, and the Roman armies could march all day, every day, on this bread – you would certainly expect a difference. It is hard to imagine that something as simple as bread could make such a difference, but remember, you can never be anything more than what you eat. What is remarkable is almost everyone benefits from this bread. We have gluten intolerant, diabetics, FODMAP, people with many pre-existing conditions, and the very fit and healthy. Athletes and sports enthusiasts have also benefitted. Those that have no health issues love the taste, and they still feel the benefit of a substantial meal that does not weigh you down and will keep you going.

HEALTH BENEFITS We have a long list of health benefits gained from this bread. World-renowned research institutes using thousands of test case examples provide a long list of valuable wholegrain advantages. (See our website for more information.) For some speciality diets, we at The Gift of Bread go one step further. We are the only producers for sprouted grain flour in the UK. This flour is much easier to digest and contains very little sugar for people with diabetes and is suitable for low FODMAP diets. It is good for a lot of other conditions. We use the recommendations and guidelines from Monash University, Australia, recognised experts in specific diets, particularly regarding bread.


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

23 of 56

Wholegrain sourdough fermented bread contains more phytochemicals than fruit and vegetables

FITS

RAL LAXATIVE T CANCER AL DECLINE NIC INFLAMMATION TONES DISEASE ARB DIET RICH H TTP S : //W W W . TH EGI F TO F BREA D.O RG/ H EA L TH -BENEF I TS-O F -BREA D

THE BENEFITS OF BREAD MADE WITH WHOLE GRAIN • WEIGHT LOSS A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition: This Harvard Medical School / Brigham and Women’s Hospital study collected d a t a o n o v e r 7 4 , 0 0 0 f e m a l e n u r s e s a g e d 3 8 - 6 3 y e a r s o v e r a 1 2 y e a r p e r i o d . . . Whole grains led to weight loss. How does this work? Sugar is the acknowledged cause of weight gain. Sucrose in particular. Our bread, particularly when using sprouted flour, provides the fibre network that traps sucrose and prevents it from reaching the liver. The flour’s stoneground nature is slow to break down, keeping you feeling full, avoiding the desire to ‘snack’. Sugar (sucrose) is addictive and also causes leptins (hormones that regulate our feeling full) to not function. People who eat our bread ‘feel full,’ demonstrating the absence of sugars causing this effect. • REDUCE RISK OF METABOLIC SYNDROME (PREDICATOR OF TYPE 2 DIABETES) What is metabolic syndrome? A group of five health factors. If you suffer from any three of them – you have metabolic syndrome and are classified as seriously


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

24 of 56

Phytochemicals Wheat comes loaded with phytochemicals, more than what is present in fruit and vegetables. What are they?

REAL BREAD – A FOOD YOU CAN LIVE ON

“Phytochemicals are chemical compounds produced by plants, generally to help them resist fungi, bacteria and plant virus infections, and also consumption by insects and other animals. The name comes from Greek ‘φυτόν’ plant’. Some phytochemicals have been used as poisons and others as traditional medicine”. (Wikipedia) These plant chemicals are very effective. The outside six layers that make up the ‘bran’ are there to protect the plant from all invaders. In the microbial world, it is sustained warfare. Somebody is out to get you. In our bodies, we are waging a battle against microbial invaders constantly. We have our defences, our immune system, T cells and a whole range of helpful organisms. However, it all needs to come from somewhere, and the bottom line is – we can never be anything more than what we eat.

“Phytochemicals have great antioxidant potential and are of great interest due to their beneficial effects on the health of human beings, and they give immense health benefits to the consumers. Epidemiological and animal trials suggest that the regular consumption of fruits, and vegetables, and whole grains reduces the risk of various diseases linked with oxidative damage”. (Science direct)

Grain has been found in tombs dating back several thousand years. Some seeds were still viable. Those phytochemicals had been active, protecting those grains all that time. Not bad. It just so happens, the efficacy of plant phytochemicals works for us. This is where we can get our anti-oxidants and many other benefits from the bran. White flour disposes of all these benefits, and somehow we are expected to think modern bread is better for us.


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

25 of 56

ill. 25% of the US and European population are in this category. The 5 are obesity, insulin resistance, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, high cholesterol. (In laymans language.) In Diabetes Care, researchers analyzed data on over 2,800 participants in the Framingham Offspring Study, found: metabolic syndrome was… 38% l o w e r   a m o n g t h o s e w i t h t h e h i g h e s t i n t a k e o f f i b r e f r o m w h o l e g r a i n s . 

• WHOLE GRAINS SUBSTANTIALLY LOWER TYPE 2 DIABETES RISK Magnesium, a mineral in whole grains, acts as a co-factor for more than 300 enzymes, including enzymes involved in the body’s use of glucose and insulin secretion in this 8-year trial, involving 41,186 participants. The risk of type 2 diabetes was 31% lower.

• CHRONIC INFLAMMATION What is chronic inflammation? Inflammation occurs naturally in your body. With chronic inflammation, your body is on high alert all the time. This prolonged state of emergency can cause lasting damage. Chronic inflammation is associated with heart disease, diabetes, cancer, arthritis, and bowel diseases like Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition... diets supplied with betaine… have levels of inflammatory markers at least 20% lower than diets with low betaine intake. Wheat bran/wheat germ is the single highest source of naturally occurring betaine.

• GALLSTONES An American Journal of Gastroenterology study showed eating foods high in insoluble fibre, such as cereals and breads made from whole wheat, had a   1 3 % l o w e r r i s k   o f d e v e l o p i n g g a l l s t o n e s .  • GETS YOU GOING (BULK LAXATIVE).  A fibre-rich diet, primarily composed of whole wheat breads, was shown to alleviate diverticular disease symptoms (pain, nausea, flatulence, distension, c o n s t i p a t i o n , e t c . ) i n 8 9 p e r c e n t o f p a t i e n t s . 


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

26 of 56

• FIBRE FROM WHOLE GRAINS AND FRUIT PROTECTIVE AGAINST BREAST CANCER A study involving 51,823 postmenopausal women for an average of 8.3 years showed a 34% reduction in breast cancer risk. In the subgroup of women

REAL BREAD – A FOOD YOU CAN LIVE ON

who had ever used hormone replacement, those consuming the most fibre, e s p e c i a l l y c e r e a l f i b r e , h a d a 5 0 % r e d u c t i o n i n t h e i r b r e a s t c a n c e r r i s k .

• WHOLE GRAINS AND FISH HIGHLY PROTECTIVE AGAINST CHILDHOOD ASTHMA Increasing consumption of whole grains and fish could reduce the risk of childhood asthma by about 50%, suggests the International Study on Allergy and Asthma in Childhood. The probability of having asthma with bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR), defined as having an increased sensitivity to factors that cause narrowing of the airways, was reduced by 72 and 88% when children had a high intake of whole grains and fish.

• PHYTOCHEMICALS WITH HEALTH-PROMOTING ACTIVITY EQUAL TO OR EVEN HIGHER THAN THAT OF VEGETABLES AND FRUITS The American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) shows that whole grains, such as whole wheat, contain many powerful phytonutrients whose activity has gone unrecognized.

• LIGNANS PROTECT AGAINST HEART DISEASE One type of phytonutrient, especially abundant in whole grains, including whole wheat, are plant lignans, including one called enterolactone that is thought to protect against breast and other hormone-dependent cancers a n d h e a r t d i s e a s e .  CLASS ATTENDEE REVIEW OF BENEFITS – CHASKA WATCH VIDEO NOW CLASS ATTENDEE REVIEW OF BENEFITS – CHARMIAN WATCH VIDEO NOW


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

27 of 56

• SIGNIFICANT CARDIOVASCULAR BENEFITS FOR POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN A 3-year prospective study of 229 postmenopausal women with CVD in the American Heart Journal showed slowed progression of atherosclerosis, the build-up of plaque that narrows the vessels through which blood flows, and less p r o g r e s s i o n i n s t e n o s i s , t h e n a r r o w i n g o f t h e d i a m e t e r o f a r t e r i a l p a s s a g e w a y s . 

• CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE Whole grains are concentrated sources of fibre. Studies including more than 150,000 persons, those whose diets provided the highest dietary fibre intake had a 29% lower risk of cardiovascular disease. In addition to the matrix of nutrients in their dietary fibres, the whole-grain arsenal includes a wide variety of a d d i t i o n a l n u t r i e n t s a n d p h y t o n u t r i e n t s t h a t r e d u c e c a r d i o v a s c u l a r d i s e a s e r i s k .  Our bodies are like an ocean where carnivores roam. We need all the help we can get.


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

28 of 56

BEYOND BEING AWARE OF REAL FOOD… BECOME FOOD INDEPENDANT ! Real bread is a food you can live on (definition). In times of shortages or unforeseen upsets, it is handy, if not vital, to have that capability as a

REAL BREAD – A FOOD YOU CAN LIVE ON

reserve. Real bread is always going to be a win-win situation, but to have that same superlative staple available when times are not quite as expected is comforting.

GLOBAL WARMING

FINANCE MARKETS

Wheat is extremely vulnerable.

The 2008 financial meltdown

It is not grown with irrigation

almost rocked the boat beyond

but is solely dependant on

its ability to float. In this super

prevailing weather cycles at

sophisticated complex world we

just the right time. The UK had

live in; upsets will be the new

its worst grain crop for ninety

norm. When currencies crash, so

years in 2020. Unsettled weather

does the ability to provide food

caused damage with price rises

(an international commodity

as a result. In 2021 the USA had

these days). The news today is

a successful early grain season,

replete with warnings of another

Other parts of the world were

bubble about to burst.

not so lucky. Prices rose as demand rose.


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

29 of 56

Food is essential. It used to be that food was sourced locally. The local farmers and growers would gather their produce and head for the town market. Other than a disastrous growing season, not much risk there. Today food is an international commodity. Food is business pure and simple and can collapse like any other financial concern. Food is still subject to weather, a particular problem for wheat, but many other factors now come into prominence. International finance, shipping and logistics and politics are all elements that must connect – seamlessly – for food to arrive at our store or supermarket.

POLITICAL – BREXIT

UNFORSEEN – PANDEMICS

Politics in the world are always

Who would have foreseen

fluid. In the UK, we still have

that one bat from the Wuhan

no clear picture of how Brexit

market would stop the world

issues will settle. Currently, we

in its tracks? Such is the

receive a lot of food from the

interconnected world in which

EU; however, transport is in a

we live. Our food supply is

shambles. Political bedlam, local

not that different from a row

or overseas, is always a loose

of dominos which needs no

cannon, but spats are not good

encouragement to fall.

for regular food trade in this

The more complex our world, the

interdependent world.

less it takes for the left field to throw a curveball.


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

30 of 56

Bread making – The basics There is a mystique about baking bread, especially when it comes to sourdough. Don’t let yourself be intimidated. It really is straightforward. You do not need any fancy equipment; a few items we suggest help, but think

REAL BREAD – A FOOD YOU CAN LIVE ON

about how bread making has gone on for thousands of years without fancy ovens, no thermometers and and no modern conveniences. They still fed themselves, making bread every day. We will show you how to make bread with a standard electric oven, on a humble campfire, or even in a crockpot.

THE INGR EDIENTS Flour, water and salt – that is all you need. It is also a quick procedure; hands on time is about six minutes for three small/medium loaves. Yes, there are some issues with the type and quality of the flour. We will come to that. EQUIPMENT The three essentials are: • A set of scales that can handle 1 gram increments. (28 grams in an ounce) • A pair of suitable heatproof gloves. • We like a probe thermometer. Scales measure small amounts of flour for a starter and small and accurate amounts of water and salt. Measuring by volume (cups of flour etc.) is not accurate enough since different flours can vary drastically in their weight/volume ratio. The heatproof gloves or mittens need to be able to handle hot pans up to 250C. Bread needs a hot oven, higher than the average temperature for cakes etc. The probe thermometer is the only quick and foolproof way of knowing when your loaf is fully baked. Even if you are using a crockpot or going on a campfire, if you can gauge the exact temperature in the loaf centre, you will get it right every time. SLIGHTLY MORE DETAIL: • A starter is required. In the old days and 3500 years ago in the Bible, this was called ‘leaven’. It is made from flour and water. The natural microbiota in the flour will ferment and provide an ongoing starter. It only needs to be made once; it is just a matter of maintaining the starter from then on. (Sourdough


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

31 of 56

starters are readily available to purchase as well.) Avoid commercial yeast. • Some good quality flour. Stoneground wholegrain. Almost every dietary problem centres around ‘refined’ or ‘ultra processed’ ingredients. White flour is highly processed and to be avoided. It is pointless trying to make a healthy, nutritious bread with yeast and all white flour. • Salt, no particular type or quality. • Water for the dough can be ordinary tap water. For the starter, tap water is okay but not with chlorine in it. Leave the tap water in a jug overnight, and the chlorine will evaporate out. Chlorine is for killing bugs, and we are trying to breed them (very healthy ones). OPTIONAL • Cast iron dishes or saucepans. What are the issues from the class experience? After running hundreds of classes, we are very aware of the common problems encountered. We know how to explain the issues; better still, we steer you in the right direction to avoid any problems in the first place. However, so that you know, this is what trips some people up: • Sourdough Starter. The difficulty is the conflicting information ‘out there’. People are just plain confused. • Weighing the ingredients. Volume measurement is too prone to variation with stoneground flours. • The temperature of fridges can be a problem if too cold. Less than 4C is too cold. • Types of ovens are not an issue. • You do need steam in an oven, which is only a matter of placing a shallow container in the oven with a cupful of water. • A common reason for ‘not rising’ is the dough was over-proofed (left too long to rise). No steam/water in the oven does not help either.

POTS AND PANS FOR BAKING BREAD WATCH VIDEO NOW


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

THE SOURDOUGH STARTER OBTAINING A STARTER • Buy one. A quick Google search will provide many places to buy an existing starter. In the UK Freshly Fermented is a good source. It does not matter what type of starter you buy, as you feed it with the flour that you have on hand, it will soon migrate to be your ‘own’. BREAD – M ODERN AS TODAY, ANCIENT AS HISTORY

The Gift of Bread does provide dried starter; send us an email. MAKING A STARTER FROM SCRATCH • Begin with bread flour (not for cakes etc.). Take a small amount (tablespoon) and mix it with the same weight of water, stir together and leave in a warm place – with a lid on. Weigh the container first and keep a note of it. The next day repeat the amounts, stir again and leave for another 24 hours (warm place). On day three, probably nothing has happened yet. Weigh what you have, it may be about 50 grams in total. We need to double that – by weight. Twenty-five grams of flour and 25 grams of water, we now have a total of approx 100 grams. Leave this for another 24 hours in a warm place. On day 4, some bubbles should have appeared. It might be very bubbly depending on the flour and the warmth. Feed it again by doubling the total amount. If we have 100 grams, we need 50 grams of flour and 50 grams of water. Stir it up and leave for another 24 hours. This time it should be active (bubbly). This doubling process is known as ‘feeding it’. MAINTAINING THE STARTER • A common practice is to feed a starter each day if left out at room temperature. To avoid excessive use of flour and building up the quantity, it can be placed in the fridge and put in ‘slow motion’. It only needs to be fed every 3 or 4 days and can be left for longer (up to 2 weeks on occasion). • If you are going away the starter is happy in the freezer. When it comes out, bring to room temperature and give it a good feed. It should activate, if it is not lively enough to ‘float’, feed once more. • Alternatively you can make some dried starter. Take some active starter, spread it thinly on parchment paper etc., let dry in room temperature (do not heat). It will become crispy when fully dry (24

32 of 56


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

33 of 56

hours). Break into little bits and store in an airtight container. To reactivate, place a heaped tablespoon in a container, cover, no more than, with water and leave until it goes back to a paste again. Feed as normal. Usually, two feeds are more than enough to get it back to bubbling activity.

DRIED STARTER

MAIN STARTER VIDEO WATCH VIDEO NOW

GOLDEN GOLDEN RULE RULE ALWAYS FEED THE STARTER THE NIGHT BEFORE YOU INTEND TO MAKE ANOTHER BATCH OF DOUGH.

DRIED STARTER WATCH VIDEO NOW


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

34 of 56

FEEDING THE STARTER • As explained ‘feeding the starter’ means giving it some extra flour and water. The living culture needs water to drink and flour for food. It also requires a little bit of oxygen. When stirring the flour and water together get a bit of air into it but do not stir the mix vigorously. As a general rule, you always double the entire amount - by weight. Equal weight of flour and equal weight of water.

REAL BREAD – A FOOD YOU CAN LIVE ON

EXCESS STARTER • It becomes evident that you could end up with a lot of starter if you keep ‘doubling it’. When you have enough for practical purposes (200 grams max), you tip half out into another container and double the amount leftover, which will continuously maintain the same amount. (200 grams starter, half tipped out leaves you with a 100 grams. Feed that, and you will have 200 grams again.

THE QUICKEST, EASIEST WAY TO USE UP EXCESS STARTER IS MAKING BISCUITS (OR CRUMPETS)

BISCUIT EXAMPLE WATCH VIDEO NOW

CRUMPET EXAMPLE WATCH VIDEO NOW

HOW TO ACTIVATE A DRIED STARTER WHAT IS A ‘DRIED STARTER’? Two ways to keep a starter for the long term. Normally a sourdough starter needs to be fed regularly. At room temperature, everyday. If kept in a fridge it needs to be fed every three or four days. ( See ‘feeding’ below.) The lower temperature puts it in slow motion. A regular sourdough starter can be stored ‘indefinitely’ in two simple ways. • It can be frozen. Left over or excess starter can be placed in the freezer where it will survive for a long time. To use it is just a matter of bringing it out and letting


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

35 of 56

DON’T THROW IT AWAY • There is no end of ways to use excess starter. Pancakes, biscuits, cakes, crumpets. See our website for videos etc. See page 37 for photos of cakes etc made with excess starter

it return to room temperature. Regular feeding from then on is all that is required. • Dried starter. This is simply a regular sourdough starter that is fully active, spread out on some parchment paper and left to dry. If it is spread out thinly with something like a spoon, knife blade or any type of spreader, more or less ‘paper’ thin, it will dry very quickly (12 to 24 hours) into a crinkly crispy sheet that breaks up readily on its own and or by hand. To make storage a little easier, it can be placed briefly in a blender and ground down to a powder. If stored dry in a sealed container this will keep for a long time (years).

TO ACTIVATE A DRIED STARTER • Take a small amount e.g. a heaped tablespoon, place in a container (jar, or plastic clip lock style) of at least large cup size or twice that, preferably with a wide mouth to help placing flour etc in. • Place just enough water to cover the ‘powder’ and no more. This will allow it to return to a paste in an hour or so. Give it a bit of a stir to speed it up. • Once you have a ‘paste’ – it is ready to give it a regular ‘feed’.

FEEDING A SOURDOUGH STARTER A starter is a live culture. On the outside of grains (e.g. wheat grain) there are billions of micro organisms. Ground up grains such as wheat flour contain all that is needed to start the culture off once water is added. All that is needed is some bread flour (higher protein than pastry or biscuit flour) and water and nature will do the rest with some very basic help. In the case of the dried starter it is already ‘active’ it is just having a ‘rest’. To become fully active it needs food to eat and water to drink. It also needs a little air to breath. The flour is its food. Note: the water used to feed a starter should not be fresh tap water. It contains chlorine which is there to kill bugs, and we are trying to breed bugs. Tap water can be used, but leave it standing overnight for the chlorine to evaporate out. Never use fresh tap water to feed a starter. Keep a supply of tap water in a jug somewhere specially for feeding your starter. You can use freshly boiled water that has cooled.


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

36 of 56

• THE GENERAL IDEA IS TO DOUBLE YOUR STARTER WHEN FEEDING IT. Example: if you have 100 grams of starter (1/3rd of a cup) then you would add 50 grams of flour and 50 grams of water. Stir it gently together (30 seconds or so) and fold in some air as you go. No need to ‘whip’ it. It is not essential to double it every time. Sometimes a ‘snack’ will do, however it will need a full feed (doubling it) most of the time. If you were to double the quantity the next time you feed it, you would need to

REAL BREAD – A FOOD YOU CAN LIVE ON

have 100 grams of flour and 100 grams of your trusty de-chlorinated water. Always do this ‘doubling’ by weight, not by volume. • ‘Discard’. It should be apparent that before too long you are going to have a lot of starter. To prevent this, once you have a reasonable quantity (200 grams would be sufficient) then before you ‘feed’ it, you tip half out. Now you double what you have left and in this way you maintain a constant amount of your choosing. The only time you build up your reserves of starter is when you want to make a large batch of cakes, crumpets or pancakes etc. Another subject. The left over starter you tipped out is not wasted; it is used for various sourdough starter recipes. (Google: ‘starter discard’ recipes or ‘left over starter’ recipes). Back to the ‘dried starter’. Once you have the ‘paste’ set up, you double it by weight as above. This may be a very small amount (with the one heaped tablespoon). Example: add 15 grams of flour and 15 grams of water. Stir it up. In warm summertime room temperature, in a few hours (two or three) it should have a few bubbles in it. Feed (double the quantity) it again, this time it may be about 20 grams of flour and 20 grams of water. Stir it up and leave it for a few more hours in a warm place. If the temperature is not so warm, it may take overnight but pretty soon it should be very bubbly. If you want to speed up the process, place your container of starter in a bowl of warm water (not above what your hand is comfortable in) to keep it nice and warm. It is possible to give a starter three feeds in a day like this, doubling it each time to get to a larger quantity if you need it.

FLOAT TEST (NOT AS CRITICAL AS SUGGESTED) To know if your starter is ready to use, give it a float test. Take one teaspoon’s worth of the starter and plop it into a glass of room temperature water (not fridge) and see if it floats. It will vary between bobbing like a cork to sinking to the bottom. If it floats you are ready to go. If it sinks, then either it is not ready yet, leave it another hour or so, or warm it up in the bowl of warm water and try again. If it still will not float, give it another feed. Once a starter has been fed and it becomes very bubbly it will be in its ‘window of


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

37 of 56

opportunity’ for several hours before it gets ‘tired out’ and wants another feed. If the starter is left out in warm room temperature, it will need feeding everyday. Most people will find it more practical to leave it in the fridge. When cold it will only need feeding every three or four days. However, you should always feed it the night before you want to make up some bread dough and test it to see if it floats when ready to make your dough.

GENERAL NOTES • I have kept a starter in the fridge without feeding it for up to eight weeks. It may not look too healthy at that point, but three feeds later and it was fully active again. • A starter that has been in the freezer may take two feeds to bring it out of hibernation. • The flour I use for feeding is the standard Shipton Mill No 4 flour. A very good white bread flour. (No white flour is very good for you, another subject).

SOURDOUGH (LEFT OVER) STARTER CAKES

SEE PAGE 55


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

Once you have your starter, it is time for:

BREAD – M ODERN AS TODAY, ANCIENT AS HISTORY

MIXING THE BREAD DOUGH

NO KNEADING • One advantage of the long slow fermentation process is the microbiota perform all the hard work for you. They not only ‘predigest’ the ingredients extracting the goodness, but they also work it over thoroughly, including the function that kneading calls for. The microbiota are little miracle workers.

38 of 56


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

39 of 56

TIME: TWO MINUTES This is the easy stage. Flour, water, salt and some starter. 1 kilogram of flour makes two large or three medium/small loaves.

BAKERS PERCENTAGE : Example for I kg of flour: If you are just beginning your bread journey it is more helpful to understand ‘bakers percentage’ than use recipes. Bakers percentage is the system where the main ingredients are expressed as a percentage of the flour’s weight. Here is a bakers percentage breakdown for what is known as a 75% hydration loaf. (Hydration being the total amount of water in the mix) Flour 100% – 1kg. (1000 grams). (Any combination of bread flour as long as it is 1kg total) Water 75% – 750 grams. Note. Important: we only place 700 grams of water in the flour since there will be another 50 grams in the starter. Salt 2% – 20 grams Starter 6% to 10% – 60 grams to 100 grams. (Since half of the starter is water, if we add 100 grams of starter, 50 grams will be extra water added to our water total making it 750 grams of water in total =75% of the weight of the flour).

MIXING DOUGH WATCH VIDEO NOW

METHOD • Place flour in a bowl. • Place salt in flour. Mix dry ingredients. • Place water onto the flour. (Fresh tap water is adequate). • Pour up to 100 grams of starter into the water and then mix all together until incorporated. Do not over mix.

SLOW RETARDED FERMENTATION Place a lid or cling film to cover the


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

40 of 56

dough container and place in a fridge for 3 or 4 days. That’s it. You will notice little change after one day. At the two full days mark, it will start to rise with air bubbles in it. After three of four days, it looks like a sponge and will be more than double its original size. Make sure your fridge is not too cold. 4 to 5 centigrade is good. Below 4C will slow it down too much. (If need be, bring

REAL BREAD – A FOOD YOU CAN LIVE ON

the dough into room temperature for half a day to speed it back up).

MIXING DOUGH EXTRA • TWO BOWLS There is an advantage in using two bowls to mix the dough. Typically when mixing flour and water, a quantity of flour always seems to stay on the bottom and takes effort to mix it all in. Using two bowls and placing all the liquids in one bowl and all the dry ingredients in the other, when it comes time to mix it all, pour the dry ingredients into the liquid. It mixes together in half the time. This is so quick and easy by hand; it is not worth using a machine when you consider the washing up.

• WEIGHING INGREDIENTS Europe is used to weighing the ingredients. North America prefers to go by volume. When it comes to bread flours, they can vary so much in volume; it is necessary to weigh the ingredients.

• WATER For mixing the dough, tap water is fine. Chlorine is the issue; however, when feeding a starter, fresh tap water may have chlorine, so it should be avoided.

• FLOUR OF YOUR CHOICE By ‘choice’, we mean for a one-kilogram mix, you could choose three different flours, sprouted regular wheat, some stone ground spelt and some oat flour – adding up to one kilogram in total. Should you want all the benefits of sprouted grain flour, reserve at least half of the mix for this.


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

41 of 56

EXTRA: MAKING DOUGH AND BREAD IN A MEAT MINCER WATCH VIDEO NOW

• SALT Any salt works fine. • STARTER FED THE NIGHT BEFORE As a general rule, it is practical to always feed the starter the night before you intend to mix the dough. If the prevailing temperature is very warm, place it in the fridge overnight. In cooler circumstances, it can be left out in the room. It will be ready for you all the next day. • FRIDGE Once the dough is mixed and with a lid or cover on it, place it in the fridge for three or four days to develop the fermentation. We use a minimal amount of starter so that the process is not accelerated. If you look at other sourdough methods, you will notice they use double or triple the starter we use. Don’t be tempted to use more than instructed. • IF THE FRIDGE IS COLD, LEAVE IT OUT FOR A WHILE Should your fridge be very cold (below 4 C) and you notice after two days the dough has not started to rise and look like a sponge, place it in room temperature ( not above 25 C) until it has doubled in size (one day) and then use it.

NORTH AMERICA TEMPERATURE AND WEIGHT CONVERSIONS TEMPERATURE CONVERSIONS

WEIGHT CONVERSIONS

250 C. 230 C. 180 C. 35 C. 4 C

1 Kg (1000 grams)

35 ounces (US) 2.2 lbs

600 grams

21 ounces

400 grams

14 ounces

100 grams

3.5 ounces

25 grams

.88 ounce

20 grams

.7

480 F 445 F 355 F 95 F 40 F

10 grams

ounce

.35 ounce


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

42 of 56

SHAPING THE DOUGH BIT OF A KNACK… REAL BREAD – A FOOD YOU CAN LIVE ON

Another quick process. Once you have done it a couple of times, it is two minutes maximum. Scrape the sides of the container and turn upside down, the dough will fall out. Give it a bit of help if necessary. It will not look as you would expect bread dough to be. It looks like a sponge. It is a mass of air bubbles showing the activity the microbiota have been performing. Next gently but firmly spread it all out by ‘pushing’ it out to a rectangular shape. (Using your hands to do the same job a rolling pin would do). When flattened out give it a letter fold as per the photos and video. The lump of dough will weigh approximately 1800 grams. Divide it into three equal parts of 600 grams each – for three loaves, or two pieces of 900 grams for two large loaves. Flatten the individual pieces again and give them another letter fold. Notice – the dough changes this second time completely. It is springy and resistant, regular bread dough – tuck the edges underneath, forming a rough ball shape. The video gives an excellent overall quick view of the process. Also, ‘Sourdough Bread On A Campfire’ goes all through the basics as well. There is a ‘trick’. Do not lift the dough. In our classes, everyone tends to raise their hands off the table, which also lifts the dough as you do it. That


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

43 of 56

Stretch the surface… Keep your fingers glued to the table will cause the sticky side of the dough to earn its name. We explain – do not raise your fingers off the table while drawing the dough towards you. Draw the dough forwards and quickly release your hands backwards away from the dough (fast is the operative word) keeping your hands on the table. Do not raise them! When the surface of the dough is stretched, it does not stick. Watch the video.

SHAPING THE DOUGH WATCH VIDEO NOW


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

44 of 56

EXTRA FOR SHAPING DOUGH

WHAT IS SHAPING? WHAT ARE YOU TRYING TO ACHIEVE? Shaping is a process of stretching and working the dough to help the gluten structure build strength for it to become a loaf. Stretching the outer skin makes it ‘tougher’ and will retain the loaf’s basic shape as it rises during REAL BREAD – A FOOD YOU CAN LIVE ON

proving and when it is rising in the oven.

• ADDING INGREDIENTS FOR DIFFERENT FLAVOURS. One objective for our wholegrain bread mix is to try and achieve a universal dough. It succeeds well. The same batch of dough can be used for fruity, sweeter flavoured bread and savoury flavours loaded with mushrooms and tomatoes. It also works very well in a wood-fired oven for pizzas. To achieve a variety of ambience in the loaves, it is simply a matter of folding in whatever ingredients you have a soft spot for. All fruit mixes will work well — dried apples, figs, sultanas, dried apricots, prunes, almost anything. Then you could add walnuts as well. The list goes on. On the savoury side, the same freedom exists: dried onion, dried mushrooms, dried tomatoes, small chunks of cheese, seeds, sprouts and herbs. Try to keep additions as dry as possible; this will prevent too much moisture from being added to the dough. And, remember adding ingredients will alter the time it will take for the dough to be fully baked. A probe thermometer lets you know when it is done – above 94 C in the centre. The procedure is straightforward. When the last of the two-letter folds are underway when spread out, place some of your ingredients evenly all across the dough, fold one third over, as usual, place some more ingredients on that surface and continue the folding and adding ingredients as you go. The loaf should end up with a uniform spread of contents in the finished loaf. How much can you add? The limit to how much additional ‘bits’ you can add is no more than 40% of the dough’s weight. That is a lot. As you do the final shaping, some odd characters may want to pop out. Just tell them to get back in, give them a poke in the right direction. It will all work out.


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

45 of 56

(Try to keep it healthy, don’t even think of spreading layers of Nutella inside the folding process). • BASKETS AND BOWLS AND TINS Banneton baskets are the traditional way of leaving the bread to rise. The only real benefit is the pattern of the indents in the final bread. Any bowl the shape and size that is suitable will do. Use a tea towel or cloth, well-floured, as a liner to prevent the dough from sticking. • FLOUR FOR BASKETS AND BOWLS Remember, for those that are gluten intolerant or coeliacs, never use gluten flour. Use rice flour or other gluten-free flour. • SHOWER CAPS A shower cap is the handiest item to cover the dough with to prevent it from d r y i n g o u t . H o w e v e r , a l m o s t a n y t h i n g t h a t w i l l s e a l i t u p w i l l d o .

SOME MIXED FRUIT ADDITIONS


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

LET THE DOUGH RISE – PROVING Once the dough is shaped, it is placed in a basket or bowl and left to rise.

REAL BREAD – A FOOD YOU CAN LIVE ON

Traditionally this would be up to double in size. However, we find that after lying around for three or four days in the fridge to ferment, the dough is not feeling that ambitious. If it has risen ‘appreciably’ it will catch up in the oven. There are two ways we do this. 1) Shape it and let it rise in a warm place (traditional) until risen, then bake. Just leaving at room temperature for a few hours will allow it to rise. However, there are advantages in letting it rise in slow motion in the fridge. If you are going to bake on day three, at the end of day two (minimum 48 hours), do the shaping, place it in the basket or bowl and return it to the fridge for another 12 to 24 hours to rise. Use a shower cap or a cover to prevent drying out – see the video.

ADVANTAGES RISING IN FRIDGE • Not locked into a full ‘afternoon’ baking. • Does not stick to the basket. • Much easier to score. • Holds its shape better in the oven (does not spread out) for free form baking.

46 of 56


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

47 of 56

NB. Caution for coeliacs and the gluten intolerant. The fermented bread dough is modified by the microbiota changing the nature of the gluten. Flour used to line baskets etc. must be gluten-free. We use rice flour all the time.

BASKET AND BOWLS Traditional looking artisan loaves are shaped in a Banneton basket. These are made from cane, rattan, willow or bamboo. Most instructions say to be very liberal with dusting the basket with flour before placing the shaped dough. TIP: We place the dough in the flour, roll it around and then place that in the basket. It never sticks. Any bowl can be used, even a saucepan if the shape is somewhat correct. Use a tea cloth as a liner with plastic, glass, steel bowls etc. Loaf tins work as well.

RISEN, NOT AS MUCH AS DOUBLE C O MP A R E T O THE PHO TO AB O VE


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

SCORING & PREP FOR OVEN • Scoring why? As the dough rises in the oven it will want to act like

REAL BREAD – A FOOD YOU CAN LIVE ON

a volcano and erupt somewhere. Scoring, which is a light cut mark made with the sharpest knife you have, helps the bread ‘erupt’ under your control. • Parchment paper is used to lift the dough into a hot container. Do not use a cheap supermarket brand, it will stick to the bread and can only be used once. • Place the parchment paper and a hand over the basket and invert onto a table • Use a sharp knife, cut any pattern. • Lift the dough by the parchment and place in (hot) container of choice.

48 of 56


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

49 of 56

D O UGH RISING AND THE ‘P OKE’ T ES T You may have come across the term ‘poke test’ to determine if the dough has proved sufficiently. This works well (despite some arbitrary judgement called for) only with ‘soft white flour’ quick rise style bread and is less applicable to stoneground heavier doughs that have been through our three or four-day fermenting process. It is sufficient to take a more straightforward approach and observe that it has ‘risen substantially but not necessarily doubled in size.

PARCHMENT PAPER WATCH VIDEO NOW

SCORING WATCH VIDEO NOW


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

50 of 56

THE DOUGH HAS RISEN; IT IS TIME TO GET IT INTO THE OVEN. The design of your cut is not critical; that is up to your sense of

REAL BREAD – A FOOD YOU CAN LIVE ON

decoration.

WARM DOUGH VERSUS COLD DOUGH Warm dough. If you perform a quick rise using a warm place or hot box, the dough will be warm and sticky, making it more difficult to score without it dragging the loaf out of shape as you cut. A very sharp knife or razor blade helps. The video best demonstrates that a swift single stroke is preferable to a multiple back and forth motion which will disturb the dough and could cause it to deflate, especially if the bread has been over-proofed.

THE DOUGH WILL SPREAD OUT IF WARM – YOU NEED TO BE QUICK You need to be quick scoring a warm piece of dough. It will want to flatten out. This is another reason for the parchment paper. Using the parchment paper to take the dough out of its basket or bowl helps you transfer it to the container it will be baked in very quickly or onto the oven stone/tray if baking freeform. The video clearly shows this procedure. Turn the bread out and do a quick score and get it into the oven as quickly as is practical. Cold dough. This is when you place the shaped dough in the fridge to rise overnight. Or, a very cool place, but not below 4 C, which would slow it down too much. If the dough has not risen very much at all, then you could place it in a warm place or leave it at room temperature for a while. ADVANTAGES OF COLD DOUGH In many ways, the overnight fridge is a more practical procedure. No time is wasted waiting for the dough to rise. The significant advantage is


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

51 of 56

the dough is very much easier to score. Now you can spend some time doing fancy designs. Being cold, it will not spread out nearly as quickly – if at all. You have much more time up your sleeve. Don’t worry about the dough being cold when it goes into the oven. Many use this popular method of baking, and it works fine. SCISSORS AS AN ALTERNATIVE TO A KNIFE You can use scissors to snip a cut. Make sure you join the snips together as if it was one extended cut. Only go 10mm (1/2 inch) deep. If you use a Le Creuset style saucepan that is quite deep, you could lower the dough into the pot before it starts to spread out and use the scissors once it is in place. • Parchment paper is used to lift the dough into a hot container. Please do not use a cheap supermarket brand; it will stick to the finished loaf and can only be used once. Better quality parchment paper means you can use it several times, so it is more economical. • Place the parchment paper and a hand over the basket and invert onto a table. (See video) • Use a sharp knife, cut any pattern. • Lift the dough with the parchment and place in a (hot) container of choice. • Part of the container’s function is to contain the loaf and stop it from spreading both before it goes into the oven and in the early stage of baking. In the ‘ c o n t a i n e r s f o r b a k i n g ’ v i d e o , y o u w i l l s e e ‘ b a k i n g r i n g s ’ . 

VERY EASY STRAIGHT CUT SCORING STYLES


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

52 of 56

BAKING If we look at two baking bread extremes, using the lowest temperature and the highest, you will have a good idea of how flexible the process can be. Baking bread in a crockpot is possible. The temperature is minimal, and it takes about two hours. The key is using a probe thermometer. When the REAL BREAD – A FOOD YOU CAN LIVE ON

centre of the loaf eventually reaches 94C or above, it is baked. It will be a regular loaf except for one detail. The crust will not have had enough heat to caramelise the surface – which means it will not have the typical brown colour. The browning of the crust imparts a lot of the flavour we associate with bread. Some of that flavour will be missing. Otherwise, it will be an excellent healthy, nourishing loaf of bread. The other extreme would likely be a campfire. Here the probability is the fire will be much too hot, and the outside of the loaf will burn. Anywhere in-between these extremes will work. Whatever type of oven you have – it can do a good job.

THE IDEAL SITUATION Hot oven: Bread likes a hot oven. If you can preheat it to 240 C before you bake, or even 250 C, that is ideal. Not all domestic ovens will go that high; they will all go to 220C. Once the bread has been baking for five minutes, turn the oven down to 230 C or leave it at 220 C, if that is the maximum you have.


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

53 of 56

Steam: The next thing we need is some steam in the oven. Moisture prevents the crust area from drying to the degree it is not flexible enough to let the dough expand (rise). To achieve this, place a shallow pan in the bottom of the oven and pour a cup of water into it when placing the bread dough in the oven. You can ‘spritz’ the surface with water before it goes into the oven. Lots of detail for all this is in the video. Cast iron dishes: Not essential, but gets a great result. In the video, we show that even an aluminium tray works fine. Historically, bread baking was ‘free form’. That meant no containers at all. With a bit of know-how, this works fine. Heat is the issue; if you have a preheated baking stone, the bread will get off to a good start. Dutch ovens and Le Creuset style cast iron pots and pans work well and do not need steam if used with a lid. Gloves: Since the oven is hot and preheated cast-iron dishes may be the chosen means of baking, some good protection is needed to handle everything.

BAKING BREAD GENERAL WATCH VIDEO NOW

BREAD ON A CAMPFIRE WATCH VIDEO NOW


THE GIFT OF BREAD

Page

54 of 56

Probe thermometer: Is an inexpensive item that takes all the guesswork out of knowing when the bread is adequately baked. With all the different ovens and even cooking styles (wood-fired oven, campfire), a simple check on the temperature at the centre of the loaf – 94 C – lets you know it is ready. If you were to place lots of ‘filling’ in the dough (olives, dried tomatoes, fruit, figs, nuts etc.), that loaf could take 15

REAL BREAD – A FOOD YOU CAN LIVE ON

minutes longer to bake than the same weight of dough without anything. It will rise and look the same on the outside but be far from done on the inside. Timer: Besides the oven’s timer, I like a separate one to take with me should I leave the room, not to forget. The system we use to bake our bread is designed to be a quick, easy process for working and busy people, and the idea is not to be locked into ‘an afternoon baking session’. It is a few minutes here, a few minutes there (six minutes in all) and thirty minutes baking. The keys to a successful bake are: A hot oven. Pre-heated pans/dishes. Steam in the oven for the first five, ten minutes. And a probe thermometer to ensure when it has reached optimum temperature.

HAPPY BAKING!


THE GIFT OF BREAD

S ince

Page

55 of 56

you are at the end of this tutorial, the chances are that you have

already made some of this ‘real’ bread and discovered how different it is from conventional modern bread. This ‘degree of difference’ is a problem for us. How can a simple loaf of bread be so different? We have a plausibility gap. One bread is nothing, just fluff; the other looks a bit similar, but all comparisons end. This loaf is real food. After only a few weeks, you can feel the difference it has made to your body. This bread is the ‘staff of life’! Only after having eaten it for a while can you truly appreciate it. We have our former class attendees telling us they have never bought a commercial loaf since their class, and even when visiting friends, they take their bread because, as tactfully as possible, they do not want to eat what their host provides. Now we want to ask for your help. If this tutorial enabled you to discover something very worthwhile, please help others by promoting this tutorial – for their sake.

Essentially, we operate as a charity providing free classes for everyone that can attend our home base in the UK. Our goal is to give this tutorial entirely free worldwide. For today, we do need to raise some income; this tutorial allows us to do that. However, if we could reach an acceptable scale, we could continue just with donations from then on. We would appreciate your enthusiastic recommendation of this tutorial to others to help achieve that level. SOURDOUGH CAKES Starting in June 2021, we will have our new website, ‘King Alfreds Larder’, featuring an extensive range of beautiful sourdough cakes with the same principles of real food and health benefits that wholegrain fermented products allocate. Cakes that are so nutritious become a natural health food – and a safe option for those with existing health problems.

KEEP AN EYE ON OUR WEBSITE FOR UPDATES OR SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTER.


Interactive Digital magazine

TUTORIALS THIS TUTORIAL CAN BE UPDATED, MODIFIED AND ADDED TO. PLEASE FEEL FREE TO CONTACT US WITH SUGGESTIONS TO IMPROVE.

King Alfred Cakes

Truly Healthy cakes Made with sourdough starter

Tutorial

COMING SOON

MORE DETAILS ON OUR WEBSITE

www.thegiftofbread.org

CONTACT US The Gift of Bread Ltd Tel :01935 824408 www.thegiftofbread.org coming soon www.kingalfredslarder.com

Unit 11 B Great Western Road Martock Industrial Estate Martock Somerset TA12 6HB Phone UK 01935 824408

Profile for Michael Storey

The Gift of Bread Sourdough Tutorial  

The complete tutorial for making sourdough bread for maximum nutrition and health benefits. We don't forget taste either. Fifty-six pages an...

The Gift of Bread Sourdough Tutorial  

The complete tutorial for making sourdough bread for maximum nutrition and health benefits. We don't forget taste either. Fifty-six pages an...

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded