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International Anti-Street Harassment Week 2016 Report

Argentina The Philippines

France The Bahamas

Egypt

Nepal


TaBle of Contents Page 3: Overview information about Int’l Anti-Street Harassment Week Page 9: A sampling of the actions that took place internationally Page 93: A sampling of the actions that occurred in the USA Page 130 : Examples of the week’s online activism

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Overview Information: What’s the Problem? Catcalls, sexist comments, gender-policing, leering, flashing, groping, stalking, and sexual assault: gender-based street harassment makes public places unfriendly and even scary for many girls, women, and LGBQT folks. It limits their access to public spaces. What is the Week? Meet Us On the Street: International Anti-Street Harassment Week is an opportunity to collectively raise awareness that street harassment happens and that it’s not okay. It began in 2011 as International AntiStreet Harassment Day and it expanded to a week in 2012. It is a program of Stop Street Harassment. Why a Week? Activists and individuals around the world work hard year-round to make public places safer but once a year we can amplify each other’s voices. Why Hold it in April? April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month in the USA and street harassment falls within the spectrum of gender-based violence. April is also springtime in the Northern Hemisphere While street harassment occurs year-round, spring is a time when there is an increase in the harassment because of the increased daylight hours and warmer weather that brings people outside.

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What Happened? For a week in April, groups, organizations, transit authorities, college campuses and people in 36 countries and on six continents spoke out against street harassment! Who made it possible? International Anti-Street Harassment Week is a community mobilization program of Stop Street Harassment and it was spearheaded by SSH founder Holly Kearl and Social Media Manager Lauren McEwen. They were helped by: •

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The leaders of more than 150 groups, organizations and campuses that took some form of action during the week. Stop Telling Women to Smile artist Tatyana Fazlalizadeh who organized an International Night of Wheat Pasting on April 15. National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC) that helped advertise the week to their networks for Sexual Assault Awareness Month. SSH social media volunteers, board members, and SSH correspondents who helped advertise the week and participate in tweet chats and events.

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Highlights • • •

We had co-sponsoring groups from 36 countries and 18 U.S states (and Washington, D.C.). We received more than 65 major news hits in at least 14 countries. There were rallies, events, sidewalk chalking, flyering, street theater, wheat pasting, and lots of online engagement, including four twitter chats. Since launching Stop Street Harassment eight years ago, there is much more awareness globally about street harassment and more concrete actions to address it. Awareness campaigns like International Anti Street Harassment Week contribute to that evolving shift. If you participated, know that your voice matters, you’re making a difference.

Their safe city will have freedom for girls.

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Media NPR Ms. Magazine Libres Del Sur (Argentina) el Retrato de Hoy | 2 (Argentina) La Republica (Argentina) La Manana (Argentina) Las Andes (Argentina) Daily Life (Australia) CBC Radio 1 (88.5 FM) in Montreal (Canada) CBC News (Canada) MTL Blog (Canada) Ottawa Metro (Canada) Ottawa Sun (Canada) Straight.com (Canada) Roundhouse Radio 98.3 Vancouver (Canada) The Third Wave on CHUO 89.1FM (Canada) Publi Metro | 2 (Chile) Bio Bio Chile Press Ocean (France) Les Nouvelles News (France) MadMoiZell (France) Emma (Germany) Reportaje De (Guatemala) Prensa Libre (Guatemala) Soy502 (Guatemala) Canal Antigua (Guatemala) The Hans India The New India Express (India) Hoy (Nicaragua) My Republica (Nepal)

The Himalayan (Nepal) Gorkhapatra Online (Nepal) Sajha Sabal (Nepal) El Diario (Spain) Gloucester Citizen (UK) The Pool (UK) 30 Anos Cotidiano Mujer Feminismo (Uruguay) Huffington Post Yemen Wanderful Little Village ABC9 (Iowa) Daily Iowan | 2 | 3 FOX 28 Iowa WAND 17 HD Illinois Homepage Daily Illini | 2 Safe Magazine The SU Crusader Mass Transit Magazine Huffington Post | 2 DCist Murray State News Safe Routes to School National Partnership ABC2 News Baltimore Baltimore Sun Little Village Magazine Loose Lips Magazine The Alliance Review Miss Heard Magazine

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International Efforts!

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AFGHANISTAN Free Women Writers, an Afghan blog for social justice and gender equality, called on people around the country to send photos with messages about the harassment of women and girls in public spaces. Within the first week, dozens of powerful pictures were sent over social media.

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Free Women Writers founder Noorjahan Akbar wrote about it: “Star Educational Society (SES), a private learning center with branches in several provinces in Afghanistan engaged hundreds of students and teachers in speaking out against street harassment. In three different branches located in Kabul, SES organized class discussions about street harassment in which men and women spoke about the problem and efficient ways of fighting it. Then students and teacher wrote and took pictures with signs about street harassment. The pictures and slogans were published in the center’s newspaper to encourage further debate. ‘With this campaign we not only stand against the negative perceptions that exist about Afghan men, but we also redefine masculinity & stand firm to build a better community,” said Ali Reza Yasa, Chairman and CEO at SES.’

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Using Free Women Writer’s campaign, SES not only created a meaningful debate about street harassment in their centers but also allowed students the opportunity to feel agentic by raising their voices. According to Yasa, one of the most encouraging outcomes of the campaign was that girls, who usually do not want to take photos due to fear of violence or harassment, participated with enthusiasm and passion. “We are so glad to have been part of this initiative. The culture of street harassment has to end. Let’s hope for a better Afghanistan, one we all deserve,” Yasa said.

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Argentina Last year, legislation passed in Argentina to designate an annual day against street harassment, to coincide around the time of International Anti-Street Harassment Week. Over it this year, the Movement of Women of the Motherland of Latin American (MuMaLá) released a new study showing 100% of women in the City of Buenos Aires had experienced street harassment. The full survey results are available in Spanish. They include: “Half the participants reported being subjected to sexually explicit comments, 59 percent reported obscene gestures, 47 percent had been followed by a man and 37 percent reported having a man’s genitalia exposed to them unasked… 87 percent reported avoiding dark or deserted streets, 63 percent won’t walk in certain areas unaccompanied and 51 percent dress in a manner that ‘doesn’t attract attention.”

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The survey is part of larger campaign launched by MuMaLรก called #ParemosElAcosoCallejero (#StopStreetHarassment). They held a press conference, did several media interviews conducted an awareness campaign in the Plaza Mitre.

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Argentina Acci贸n Respeto: por una calle libre de acoso organized a campaign focused on the street harassment of LGBQT-identified people.

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Australia Member of Parliament Fiona Patten MLC gave a statement in Victoria focused on LGBTI street harassment. “Ongoing and systemic harassment and discrimination led to higher rates of psychological distress amongst LGBTI Australians compared with the population at large. I do not think anyone should be harassed on the street — whether they are male, female, trans or whatever sexuality they identify as having. I call on the minister to help reduce gender and sexuality-based street harassment by working collaboratively with the LGBTI community to develop public campaigns that recognise the value of LGBTI people in our community.”

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The Bahamas Hollaback! Bahamas partnered with the College of the Bahamas for a chalking event along a main walkway on campus.

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Belgium

On April 13, Brusselzwerft hosted a debate: "Tintin in the Congo, the Buffalo's in Ghent, Zwarte Piet" focused on old stereotypes in public spaces and what to do about them. “A mission piggy bank at the box office, a vintage poster with Indians, stereotypical cartoon characters, Zwarte Piet and Noirauds ... Each of the old objects and traditions stereotypical about other cultures can lead to a fierce debate. How can we deal with this heritage in our public space? How can we conduct a peaceful debate about the place of this heritage in our society? How can the different voices in our super diverse society have enough space?� Panelists included Professor Noel Salazar, KU Leuven anthropologist with expertise in diversity, heritage and tourism; Omar Ba, an expert in diversity and heritage; Davy Verbeke, a Ghent University historian with expertise in colonial heritage in the public space; and Heleen Debeuckelaere, an historian and activist of the Belgian Renaissance. Thomas Holvoet moderated the debate. The debate was part of the exhibition BrusselZWerft in the library of Muntpunt focused on old objects such as posters, comics and postcards that propagate stereotypes about cultures and religions. The exhibit aimed to trace the origin context of these objects and set the prejudices that they propagate in question.

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Belgium

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BOLIVIA OCAC Bolivia was part of the joint social media campaign in Latin America that week called #NoEsMiCultura (#NotMyCulture).

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Brazil Chega de Fiu Fiu created a video looking at how movies, series, music videos and songs try to normalize street harassment and help perpetuate it.

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CAMEROON Women for a Change, Cameroon, hosted a workshop in Buea on April 17 with 17 young people. Key issues they discussed were the causes of street harassment, different forms of street harassment & ways forward. Youth wrote messages on cardboard paper, including: “I have the power to stop harassment.�

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Montreal, CANADA Women in Cities International, in partnership with Lucie Pagès, and NoÊmie Bourbonnais, hosted a vox pop on the street. They went into the streets of Montreal a few times and asked people questions regarding street harassment and did sidewalk chalking. They created a video and gave several media interviews across the week.

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PETERBOROUGH, CANADA Hollaback! Peterborough did chalking along the main downtown area.

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OTTAWA, CANADA Hollaback! Ottawa hosted a community event on April 15, including an info fair, a moderated panel with rad, local folks and a community discussion on street harassment and intersectionality.

They also hosted chalking & engaged passersby in conversation on April 17.

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VANCOUVER, CANADA Hollaback! Vancouver held a party with Good Night Out Vancouver on April 15 to celebrate consent and spaces free from harassment.

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CHILE A law amendment to criminalize street harassment was passed unanimously on April 12 in the Chilean Chamber of Deputies! Read more. Also, OCAC Chile was part of the joint social media campaign in Latin America that week called #NoEsMiCultura (#NotMyCulture).

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COLOMBIA OCAC Colombia was part of the joint social media campaign in Latin America that week called #NoEsMiCultura (#NotMyCulture).

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Costa Rica Launched for International Anti-Street Harassment Week by two students at the University for Peace for a course in “Gender and Media,” “It’s A Big Deal campaign is about “getting men to talk about street harassment, because they are directly involved and it affects them as well. Most of the time street harassment is seen as a joke or an inoffensive game. However, its consequences are much more important than we think. Street harassment is a sign of structural violence that exists toward women in most societies; it perpetuates gender inequality and is a source of insecurity. Because it is the problem of everybody, we need to talk about it.”

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Costa Rica Students from UPEACE went downtown San Jose on April 16 and wrote messages with chalk on the pavement and stuck messages on sanitary pads to lamp posts. Many passersby interacted with the students and talked about the issue.

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Student Sewon Choi made a video documenting it:

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Croatia Hollaback! Croatia focused on harmful, sexist advertising that contributes to street harassment and put up their own feminist signs around town.

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Democratic Republic of Congo ActionAid DRC organized an advocacy dialogue with local authorities. They released results from a street harassment survey and proposed their demands for change. They also took action online to raise awareness

“To fetch water around 5 AM in Kisenso, women & girls should walk on streets in groups to not be assaulted.�

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Ecuador On April 16, Hollaback! Cuenca hosted a CafĂŠ-Tertulia por Espacios PĂşblicos Seguros and women came together to share their street harassment stories over coffee. They also held a social media photo campaign across the week.

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Cairo and KORBA, EGYPT On April 10, HarassMap volunteers walked the streets and talked about how to stop sexual harassment in public spaces in Korba and Cairo.

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Mansoura, EGYPT HarassMap did awareness-raising actions at Mansoura University in Mansoura governorate on April 11.

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Menofeya, EGYPT HarassMap held a day of activities (awareness sessions, stand up comedy etc.) on April 13 at Menofeya University in Menofeya governorate.

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EGYPT Imprint Movement hosted an online awareness campaign across the week.

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FRANCE Across the week, STOP Harcèlement de Rue (HDR) coordinated a campaign throughout France. This included events in Grenoble, Lyon, Marseille, Montpellier, Nantes, Paris, and Toulouse.

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GRENOBLE, FRANCE

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Lyon, FRANCE Stop HDR in Lyon.

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Nantes, FRANCE Stop HDR Nantes.

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Paris, FRANCE Stop HDR Paris held an awareness event at a bookstore, chalking & more.

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Toulouse, FRANCE Stop HDR in Toulouse.

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Dortmund, GERMANY Across the week, ProChange called for action in Germany, offered free downloadable materials and links in German. In Dortmund, ProChange members Viola, Melanie and Gabi distributed red cards against sexism and pink cards against homophobia. They had the opportunity to talk to people and raise awareness. Furthermore they stuck informational materials and posters on park benches and advertising columns.

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MüNSTER, GERMANY Staff at the city’s women’s helpline brought attention to street harassment in several ways. – From April 11th to April 15th, they held a distribution campaign, “Harassment sticks with you.” They emphasized bystander intervention and to “Please get involved” when witnessing street harassment. – From April 11th to April 24th, they did placarding – Canteen on the Coesfelder Crossing and Canteen on the Aasee Münster. – On April 15th, in front of the historical townhall Prinzipalmarkt they held a street performance called “Me as a piece of meat” in cooperation with the girls’ theatre group 'Meat the girls’ at the Cactus Young Theatre.

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GUATEMALA OCAC Guatemala launched a pilot street harassment mapping project on April 11, held an interview with Congresswoman Sandra Moran, and started a social media campaign.

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OCAC Guatemala also held street action to raise awareness on April 16.

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MUMBAI, India On April 10, Safecity did sidewalk chalking in Mumbai.

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Delhi, India On April 11, Safecity did the following: “After a series of discussions and campaign activities, seen here are Anjali and Sahil of Sanjay Camp who have come together with other girls and boys of their neighborhood to paint a mural on equal access to public spaces and opportunities. Girls spoke of their restricted choices and options when they step out of their houses and boys spoke of how that wasn’t a concern until they heard the girls talk about it. They are looking to change this together. We are excited to see the mural they’ll end up painting.”

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Bangalore, India On April 13, Safecity organized 35 girls from the community of Indira Nagar to occupy a space generally used by boys to play a few matches of Kabaddi. “One way of creating safe spaces for girls and woman is to increase access to these spaces. The moment it stops being a space only for men and boys, women and girls will start to feel more comfortable there. This is especially in the case of public spaces, where even though girls have a right to occupy these spaces, they often don’t have access to them due to fear of sexual violence or societal pressures. Keeping this in mind, we used the girl’s love for the sport of Kabaddi to occupy Karkare Garden in large numbers….

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Before going to the garden, we had a short orientation of the reason of this activity. Most of the girls spoke of the importance of sport for health and to build confidence. The discussion lead to how girls are not encouraged to play outsidethey are often limited to school grounds or at the most the lanes near their house… During this discussion we also talked about how men playing sports are given much more importance than women playing the same sport (citing examples of the lack of attention given to the women’s cricket world cup that happened recently) and save for a few many sports women do not get the recognition they deserve. After reaching the garden, we noticed that besides the girls we were with, there were no other girls in the area. The girls picked a nice spot where there was shade and we requested the boys playing nearby to give us some space- which they readily obliged. We divided the girls into two groups- the older girls and the younger girls. Each group then had their match of Kabaddi. During the match, a few young boys gathered to cheer on the girls and watched them with great admiration. After four high energy rounds, the girls insisted on playing a game of Kho-Kho before we called it a day. After the game we talked to the girls some more…. We then asked the girls if they would come here again, on their own, to play a game to which all the girls gave a loud and confident yes!”

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Mumbai, India On April 16, Safecity organized 13 girls from Bandra Plot to occupy space generally used by boys as a way to address the harassment girls faced there. “Through sport and games Safecity, along with Vacha Trust, decided to make girls visible in the Highway Municipal garden in Jogeshwari East. It is a small garden. There were only boys playing there when we arrived. Before we started playing, we had a short discussion on girls and sports. Many of the girls said that they don’t go to a ground or garden to play- they are mostly limited to playing in their school or their homes. As one girl poignantly put, many girls stop playing altogether after the age of 12 or 13. The discussion moved to restrictions placed on the movements of girls, under the premise of keeping them safe…

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The girls then divided themselves into teams and began an engaging game of Kabaddi. Slowly some of the younger boys came to watch and cheer for the girls. After two rounds, when the girls were deciding between playing Kho-Kho or something else, the boys asked whether they could join in as well. It was interesting to see that these boys had no issue playing with the girls, and in fact had liked the way they were playing. We had a short discussion with them as well, about girls playing in gardens. They were happy to see girls playing here, as that never happens. When asked why, the boys said that older boys sometimes harass the girls, making the area unsafe for them. The discussion ended with them offering their full support to girls who wish to access public spaces. The girls continued with a round of Kho-Kho and also spent some time exploring the garden’s slides and monkey bars. We rounded up the evening with a short feedback session. The girls really enjoyed the day and appreciated the opportunity to engage in sports. They said they would try to come out more often. However, there are many more hurdles in accessing public spaces for these girls - mostly the restrictions placed on them at home. We shall work on this further in the duration of our campaign.�

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India Safecity also held an online campaign asking people to describe their safe city, using #MySafeCity, and they shared facts about street harassment and the law.

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Delhi, India Youth in Sanjay Camp and Dakshinpuri in India came together for a screening of a film on understanding gender roles on April 16, organized by Safecity. “Amid laughter, giggles, shy glances, and many conversations later, they opened up to discussing how when we are made to conform to socially defined roles and expectations, we somewhere let violence grow.�

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Italy Hollaback! Italia did sidewalk chalking.

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Latin America Seven countries (Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Nicaragua y Uruguay) that are part of the OCAC organization released a joint campaign #NoEsMiCultura — street harassment is not my culture — on April 11. “We want each country to stop justifying street harassment as part of their local culture. We want the people to know that street harassment is a global problem that affect us as a region. We know that our voices together are stronger, so we work organized to learn from each other’s experiences. We do that as OCAC Latin America and with other NGOs all around the world.” said Alice Junqueira, International Coordinator from OCAC Chile.

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Maldives Nufoshey raised awareness about street harassment by sharing stories, survey findings, and online posters with information about street harassment and how to respond. They also wrote an article for a local online newspaper.

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Mexico In 2015, a workshop titled “Reaproppriation of public space in face of sexual harassment in public transportation” was hosted by Habitajes AC and CoHabita DF. Twenty women living in Mexico City from different ages, occupations and backgrounds developed a campaign called “Space is public, my body is not”. It consists of a series of photographs created by the visual artist Cerrucha. The women’s network R2 Red Reapropiaciones (formed after the workshop) released the images across the week, #ElEspacioEsPúblicoMiCuerpoNo.

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The Netherlands The group Straatintimidatie held a social media campaign -- people posted antistreet harassment pictures -- and they released their first informational flyer.

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Nepal On April 12, Activista Nepal conducted the workshop ”SAFE CITY & STREET HARASSMENT” at KATHMANDU MODEL COLLEGE (KMC), Balkumari Lalitpur District. Around 50 students took part in the workshop.

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Activista Nepal held a street drama about street harassment on April 13 in Bhaktapur Durbar Square in the Bhaktapur District of Kathmandu.

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Nepal On April 15, Youth Advocacy Nepal (YAN) – in partnership with various likeminded social organizations – organized an interaction on “Harassment and violence towards women in public spaces and legal issues” at the National Women Commission, Bhdardrakali. They presented their street harassment study findings, including to the Deputy Prime Minister Shrijana Sharma.

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Nepal On April 16, numerous groups held a march against street harassment in Kathmandu. They received media coverage for their actions.

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Nicaragua OCAC Nicaragua was part of the joint social media campaign in Latin America that week called #NoEsMiCultura (#NotMyCulture).

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Papua New Guinea The UN Women Safe Cities programme site hosted an “Anti-Harassment Awareness Day” on April 12 in Port Moresby with more than 500 participants. Safe Cities Programme Specialist Lizzette Soria wrote about it: “In the morning, men, women and youths gathered at Gordons Market to listen to government and civic leaders talk about the serious impact of harassment in markets and other public places, and the ways in which they can deal with it. They were given postcards with information about harassment. The event was organized by UN Women’s Safe Cities Programme in partnership with the National Capital District Commission (the municipal administration) and the Royal PNG Constabulary (the national police force). The district commission’s Gender Desk officer, Kay Kaugla said: “Markets are important for the livelihood of many families, and we need to ensure women feel safe to move around freely. I am inviting all of you…listening today, to change your attitudes towards women and girls and start supporting us so we can make market space safe for vendors to generate more income.”

Kay Kaugla speaks at Gordons Market. Photo: UN Women/Christina Cheong

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“The same day, the Safe Cities team partnered with the Ginigoada Foundation to promote the anti-harassment campaign on the female passengers-only Seif Meri, or Safe Bus. The foundation is a local NGO that has been carrying out the UN Women-funded Safe Transport Project. Groups of female students from Bomana Primary School and Koari Park High School boarded the bus as it passed their schools. Guided by UN Women Safe Transport Project Specialist Bessie Maruia, the students discussed forms of harassment, their rights to public spaces, and what they can do when harassed. ”I think there should be more programs in schools on violence against women like harassment, especially primary level, so young boys can learn how to respect girls,” a 14-year-old from the high school said. “Parents should start teaching boys to be better citizens.” Many girls use public buses to go to and from school each day, so they said they were happy to have a safe bus to travel on. Sexual harassment, including during travel, is a serious problem in Papua New Guinea that limits the social and economic rights and opportunities of women and girls.”

Schoolgirls on board the Meri Seif bus discuss harassment. Photo: UN Women/Katherine Webber

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Peru Paremos el Acoso Callejero coordinated a Google+ Hangout about street harassment and the law with organizations in Chile and Argentina. Peru has one of the first country-wide laws and Argentina and Chile are also considering laws.

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Philippines Game Changers, a group of Communication Research students from University of the Philippines (UP Diliman), supported the UN Women Safe Cities Metro Manila Programme in the celebration of the Week with their original Photowalk posters in universities. #FreeFromFear #EndSH

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UN Women Safe Cities and the Quezon City local government worked with the Tricycle Drivers Association to train 100 tricycle drivers (tuktuk drivers) on gender sensitivity and to come up with joint solutions for addressing sexual harassment and sexual violence against women and girls in public spaces. The workshop facilitated identification of the role of tricycle drivers as partners in ending street harassment and promoting the new city law passed to increase fines and penalties against all forms of sexual harassment in public spaces. They also hosted a #FreeFromFear online campaign.

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Romania FILIA Centre held a picnic to create a safe-space to talk about issues of street harassment and they did flyering in their community. Also, they made a video with short affirmations in Romanian about street harassment.

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South Africa ActionAid South Africa hosted an awareness-raising effort on social media.

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SPAIN Hollaback! Barcelona raised awareness over Twitter.

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Bristol, United Kingdom Lorna James put up Stop Telling Women to Smile posters in Easton, Bristol on April 15.

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Cheltenham, United Kingdom

Joy-Amy Wigman made this video for Anti-Street Harassment Week in Cheltenham, UK, under the hashtag #cheltbitesback.

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UNITED KINGDOM UNmuted Productions released the film “I Smile Politely, film about street harassment (spoken word poetry),” starring April Hughes and written & directed by Ness Lyons. The Director of Photography & Editor is Luke Bartlett.

“This a specially edited version of the original 12-minute ‘I Smile Politely’, which was performed at Women of the World Festival 2016, Southbank Centre,” Lyons said, “A lot of people asked if the piece was on YouTube… so we made this :)”

Read the story behind the poem.

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London, UNITED KINGDOM

Katie Finnegan posted 40 Stop Telling Women to Smile posters along Regents Canal in North London on April 15.

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URUGUAY OCAC Uruguay was part of the joint social media campaign in Latin America that week called #NoEsMiCultura (#NotMyCulture). They also did a radio show interview.

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Yemen To Be for Rights and Freedom hosted an event in connection with an anti-street harassment campaign. At the event, NGOs displayed relevant survey results, films, and shared stories.

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Efforts in the U.S.A.

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California Tanya in the Los Angeles area contributed to the #HoundsAgainstHarassment hashtag during the week with photos of her street harassment deterrent German Shepherd Sapphire.

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Florida MYSVA founder Tena hung up Stop Telling Women to Smile posters in her town.

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Georgia Men Stopping Violence held a workshop with students at Emory University on April 7 and they designed social media posts.

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Georgia Slutwalk Atlanta/Alright, Rebel hosted a street event in Atlanta with chalking and placarding to raise awareness about street harassment. More than 70 people attended.

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Illinois CHLH 340 students at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign did tabling on April 11 on the campus quad to discuss sexual assault portrayal in the media.

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Illinois University of Illinois hosted a keynote speech with Stop Telling Women to Smile artist Tatyana Fazlalizadeh.

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Iowa End Street Harassment – Iowa City held a “Not in My Community: Music to Destroy Rape Culture!” event on April 11 with local artists and organizations tabling with relevant information. Read about it in the Daily Iowan.

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iowa The University of Iowa organized a photo campaign on campus called “#hawkeyesdontharass� to raise awareness. Students wrote on their flyers what someone has said to them if they have been harassed or why street harassment needs to end. On April 11, these photos and a pledge to end street harassment were on display in one of the main sections of the campus.

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iowa On April 14, End Street Harassment – Iowa City held a support group for individuals who have experienced street harassment to share their experiences in a safe environment. Participants created posters and other art projects for display to raise awareness and protest street harassment.

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Kentucky University of Kentucky students made and released a video about street harassment.

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Louisiana Hollaback! New Orleans did sidewalk chalking.

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Maryland FORCE: Upsetting Rape Culture hosted Not Alone Baltimore on April 10. The Monument Quilt blanketed two blocks of North Avenue between Howard and Charles Street with 1500 stories from survivors of sexual and domestic violence and messages of support from their communities. The day-long event included readings, discussions, workshops and performances.

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Maryland On April 16, Hollaback! Bmore and Collective Action for Safe Spaces held a rally in Baltimore. Attendees participated in wheatpasting, chalking, and creating squares for the FORCE: Upsetting Rape Culture monument quilt afterward.

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Massachusetts The Warrior Queen Initiative hosted chalking in Boston.

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Minnesota The Minneapolis Transit Authority did sidewalk chalking and raised awareness on social media.

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Missouri Students, including Actio (the feminist activism student group), at St. Louis University did chalking and handed out resources at a main entrance to campus for a “Take Back the Streets: Stop Street Harassment� event on April 15.

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New YOrk Brooklyn Movement Center hosted an event at which participants used improv and storytelling techniques to reimagine ways they would have responded to harassment, with time travel and community support on their side.

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New YOrk Hollaback! hosted their annual rally against street harassment in New York City on April 16 in Tompkins Square Park with many co-sponsoring groups.

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Nevada Hollaback! Las Vegas did tabling at Extreme Thing and did chalk walks at various high schools around Southern Nevada.

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New Hampshire Community members joined the Stop Telling Women to Smile wheatpasting on April 15. Photo by Crystal Paradis.

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Ohio People’s Justice League did chalking in Athens on April 16.

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Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Students at Temple University in Philadelphia put up posters around campus on April 14.

Explorers Against Sexual Violence at La Salle University in Philadelphia held a sidewalk chalking event on April 13.

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Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Pussy Division put flower art displays up in various spots around Philadelphia.

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Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania Susquehanna University’s Women’s Studies department hosted their annual chalking on campus on April 13.

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Charleston, South Carolina On April 10, Alright, Rebel organized sidewalk chalking at Marion Square.

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Columbia, South Carolina Alright, Rebel did sidewalk chalking around the state house on April 17.

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Virginia Stop Street Harassment, Rally Against Rape and Doorways joined the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority in flyering about harassment on the transit system at the Clarendon Metro Station in Arlington on April 12.

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Washington, DC Collective Action for Safe Spaces hosted chalking on April 10 to reclaim the streets at: 1) 14th & U St NW; 2) Anacostia Metro Stop in SE; 3) H & 8th St NE

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Washington, DC Stop Street Harassment, Collective Action for Safe Spaces, DC Rape Crisis Center, and End Rape on Campus joined the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority in flyering at a few Metro stations, including Metro Center, on April 12.

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For International Anti-Street Harassment Week, Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority, Collective Action for Safe Spaces, and Stop Street Harassment released the results of the first-ever survey on the Metro system. This is the biggest study of its kind for any transit system in the United States. In the 1,000 person-regionally representative survey conducted in January 2016 by Shugoll Research, 21 percent of riders in the Washington, DC area had experienced some form of sexual harassment, with verbal harassment being the most common form. Women were three times more likely than men to experience sexual harassment. In positive news, 41 percent of the riders were familiar with the latest antiharassment campaign and those who were familiar with it were twice as likely to report their experiences of harassment

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Washington, DC Collective Action for Safe Spaces (CASS) held a workshop about street harassment on April 12.

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Washington, DC End Rape on Campus co-founders Annie Clark and Andrea Pino edited a volume of stories by rape survivors — We Believe You — and hosted an event for its release at Politics & Prose on April 14. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand (NY) joined them.

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Washington, DC Defend Yourself held a free community workshop called “Dealing with street harassment� on April 16.

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Tweet Chats & Goolge+ HAngouts There were four tweet chats, a global tweetathon and google+ hangout.

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Video Series SSH board member Erin McKelle (with help from board member Manuel Abril) created a video series for the week that focused on the positive work of SSH and the work that still needs to be done. Erin posted on video per day on Stop Street Harassment’s YouTube channel. The videos covered a variety of subjects, from the findings of SSH’s 2014 national study, to easy ways to respond to street harassment, and her scariest experience of street harassment.

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Book Giveaway “Deeply moving, honest, and unflinching, Sex Object secures Jessica Valenti’s place as one of the foremost writers and thinkers of her generation. Her personal story highlights universal truths about being a woman, and makes the case for why feminism today is an unstoppable force.” – Cecile Richards, President, Planned Parenthood Federation of America

In honor of International Anti-Street Harassment Week, SSH partnered with Dey Street Books to giveaway 10 copies of @JessicaValenti’s new memoir.

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Guest Blog posts “Live up to the bravery you find inside you” by Britnae Prudy. “This past summer, at age 23, I experienced complete freedom of movement for the first time... I didn’t entirely know what to expect when I moved to Switzerland to pursue an internship opportunity at the World Health Organization….

The first time I rode public transportation in Geneva, two days after arriving, was to a work function that ended up keeping me out long past dark. I was literally shaking the entire ride home.. Not a single person bothered me that night. Nor the next night. In fact, throughout the three months I spent in Geneva I was not verbally or physically harassed once. Slowly, I realized that the fears I learned in the United States were not necessarily universal… I’m not saying this to tout Switzerland as the best country in the world, or start some kind of comparison between countries. What I do know is that my time in Switzerland shook up my deeply engrained sense of how I could travel and move as a woman. I now firmly believe that solo travel – whether domestically or abroad, long or short – can open up so many possibilities and lessons you might not even see coming. If I hadn’t pushed through my fears of traveling alone, I might never have known that such a freedom was possible. I’m ten times less timid than I was before I took a chance and jumped on that plane. In today’s world, travel can be scary – even more so if you’re a solo female traveler. Be smart, be informed, be precautious, be nervous – but go anyway.”

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“Because I wore a skirt that day” by Jill Santos “I still get a nervous feeling in the pit of my stomach at gas stations when I’m alone. I would pull over constantly months after the occurrence while driving, in fear I was being followed again. I stopped wearing dresses and skirts for a while, my favorite things to wear. I was blamed for what had happened to me… A man watched me at a gas station. I paid no attention, pumped gas in my car, and left as quickly as possible. I thought I was being my usual worry-wart self when I sensed he was following me. Through stoplights, unexpected turns, and neighborhood streets all the way to my then college campus I could see that man in his car in my mirror still lingering behind. After calling 911 and luckily having a faculty member help me, he sped away. Once when recounting this experience, it was suggested to me that this occurred because I was wearing a skirt that day and that is why he followed me after spotting me at the gas station… Street harassment is a learned behavior. How can it be addressed when we are focusing on the victim instead of the harasser? Street harassment continues its prevalence towards anyone, wearing anything, anywhere. I cannot count the number of times I have been catcalled in my 21 years and it is disgusting at how frequent this occurs to myself and those around me… Although I think back often to that experience any time I feel anxiety creeping up or may feel even the slightest hesitation leaving the house in a skirt, I know now that I was the victim. I know I am not alone in the world with people experiencing street harassment daily…”

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“Women Should Not Be Harassed at UK Clinics” Author and Everyday Sexism founder Laura Bates spoke at an Abortion Rights event in Parliament on protecting women from harassment and abuse at UK clinics. She gave permission to share the speech on SSH for International AntiStreet Harassment Week. This is an excerpt. “Let’s be very clear –this is not a debate about abortion. That debate already takes place, vociferously, elsewhere, from our parliament to our media to our universities to our streets. This is not about freedom to have a conversation that is already happening widely. This is about harassment. It is about the aggressive, intimidating, upsetting experience of women being harassed at the point of access to a wide variety of different healthcare services, including reproductive healthcare. This is not about protest, which could take place anywhere, it is about bullying women, making them feel anxious, creating a hostile and unpleasant environment for both service users and healthcare workers. This is not a debate about abortion… Across society, the voices we hear least in debates about abortion are those of people who have actually had one. Women are shouted down in these conversations because a lot of these conversations are driven by thinly veiled misogyny. The sexist idea that bearing children is a woman’s sole purpose and responsibility. The patriarchal notion that society has a greater right to dictate what happens to a woman’s body than she does herself. The misogynistic idea that women’s lives are less important. That’s why it is so vitally important that at the point when a woman is accessing the reproductive healthcare which is her legal right, she is, in that moment, at the very least, able to do so safely, without harassment, bullying, shaming or intimidation. This is not a debate about abortion. It is about harassment, misogyny and bullying.”

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“Healing after Assault Abroad” by Char Stoever As non-male travelers, we live uniquely gendered experiences. No matter where we are, women’s safety is an ever-relevant topic. Thanks to technology, we are more connected to information about traveling to different parts of the world. From deciding to go to Israel to attending protests abroad, safety matters to all of us. But how do we prevent or avoid smaller, more targeted crimes, like assault or petty thefts? I had never been assaulted until I came to Nicaragua, the safest country in Central America. I have traveled to several different countries and put myself in much riskier situations, so I did not expect to be assaulted at knife point in the morning as I ran up the huge hill…. As soon as I came home, I felt extremely unsafe. Instead of my post-run feeling of accomplishment, I was petrified. I didn’t know what to expect after an event like I had just experienced. Still, I vowed not to let this experience stop me from living and exploring this beautiful country. Just as I didn’t expect to be assaulted in a country where I feel relatively safe, I didn’t expect to recover immediately. I did realize the importance of taking steps to heal, so I learned what to do after an experience like mine. Here are the steps I took to help me recover from the assault [abbreviated]: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Report the crime. Write about it. Don’t do it alone. Be okay with your recovery time. Talk to a therapist. Be vulnerable.

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“#DoYouKazoo Anti-Street Harassment Action” by Karen Chasen “A committed group of people, brought together by Breakthrough Catalyst trainings, strive to use collective knowledge, energy, connections and commitment to end/reduce street harassment through cultural change. Breakthrough Catalysts and friends want to help raise awareness and promote a culture shift that discredits common street harassment myths and provide easy and effective responses to invalidate them with our posters and social media…

We chose the symbol and sound of a Kazoo to promote the idea that tools work best to call out rape culture and myths about gender violence, not to prevent it. The use of the Kazoo is inspired by a joke by comic Cameron Esposito, who wishes for a rape Kazoo instead of a rape whistle, in the hopes that its sound is more appealing and will garner help if she is attacked. Key Concepts: 1) Reinventing the “rape whistle” as a Kazoo; 2) “Sounding the alarm” about the issue of street harassment; 3) Changing culture through positive humor (vs. put-down humor) as Kazoos are often thought of as whimsical, fun, non-serious musical instruments anyone can play. Kazoos have a history of use as tools of social protest.”

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Meet us on the street in 2017! Join us from April 2-8, 2017 www.meetusonthestreet.org

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2016 International Anti-Street Harassment Week Report  

Groups in 36 countries raised awareness about street harassment from April 10-16, 2016, during a week led by Stop Street Harassment. www.mee...

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