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SCOOP The

AUgUST-SEPTEMBER 2013

www.thescoop.ca

celebrates rural life

Summer Fun!

The Storring Family

Charles & Elizabeth Koch

Merlin the Falcon

SCOOP Writing Contest Winners


THE

SCOOP CELEBRATES RURAL LIFE Founded in 2005 by Richard Saxe PUBLISHER / DESIGNER / AD SALES Karen Nordrum stonemills.scoop@gmail.com EDITOR Angela Saxe angela.saxe@gmail.com PHOTOGRAPHER Barry Lovegrove barrylovegrove@bell.net All photographs are by Barry Lovegrove unless otherwise noted. HOW TO CONTACT US Phone: 613-379-5369 Email: stonemills.scoop@gmail.com Web: thescoop.ca facebook.com/thescoop.ca For written enquiries please reach us at: Stone Mills Scoop 482 Adair Road Tamworth, ON K0K 3G0 THE SCOOP is published six times a year by Stone Mills Scoop. We mail The Scoop for free to 6000 households in the communities of Tamworth, Centreville, Enterprise, Erinsville, Camden East, Newburgh, Colebrook, Yarker, Verona, Hartington, Sydenham, Roblin, Selby, Parham, Kaladar, Stella, & Godfrey. We also arrange with local retailers to display 1200 additional issues of The Scoop in Napanee & many other locations. SUBSCRIPTIONS 1 year: $30 + HST = $33.90 CONTRIBUTORS TO THIS ISSUE Sebastian Back, Jordan Balson, Linda Cooper, Mary Jo Field, John Finley, Beverly Frazer, Ashliegh Gehl, goldenboughmedia, Kate Kristiansen, Thomasina Larkin, Debbie Lingen, Barry Lovegove, Blair MacDonald, Digger MacDougall, Susan Moore, Reba Pennell, Angela Saxe, Michael Saxe (writing & contributing copy editing), Linda Selkirk, John Sherbino, Grace Smith, Terry Sprague, Stella Thompson, Jeff Whan, Anne Marie Young The contents of this publication are protected by copyright. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part without prior written permission of Stone Mills Scoop is prohibited. The Scoop is an independent publication and is not affiliated with nor funded by any corporation or interest group.

Here’s The Scoop... By Angela Saxe

E

xtreme weather. Two words that strike fear into each person’s heart, especially after this spring. Canada experienced extreme flooding in Calgary and Toronto and extreme thunderstorms in Ontario and Quebec and extreme heat in BC and Alberta. When did we start adding the adjective to describe an act of nature? Floods, thunderstorms, tornadoes, fires are all destructive forces – just ask Noah who was astute enough to take some good advice and was prepared for a flood of “biblical proportions.” Unfortunately, we aren’t taking the hint, and have been ignoring the very causes that have rained this misery down upon our heads for a long time. Let’s take the example of the flooding in India, which coincided with the floods in Alberta. In the state of Uttarakhand in the Himalayan foothills, cloudbursts and unprecedented heavy monsoon rainfall brought flooding that caused the death of 1,000 people, stranded 70,000 and destroyed the livelihoods of hundreds of thousands. Extreme weather? Yes, of course but man-made factors are at play as well. The growth of tourism in the area brought unchecked construction that altered the ecologically sensitive area, and new hydroelectric dams have disrupted the water balance. The spectre of climate change cast its shadow as well, as glacial lakes, melting at twice the global rate and surrounded by compromised landscape, burst their banks, adding to the destruction. Extreme weather and man-made factors all contributed to the social catastrophe for the people in Uttarakhand. But let’s not be smug and think that it can’t happen here. For decades politicians at every

The SCOOP is looking for writers! Are you a community-minded person who loves to write? Well then join our team and have fun writing for the best little newsmagazine in the area! Contact Angela Saxe: angela.saxe@gmail.com

level of government have ignored the infrastructure of its cities and provinces and now Canadians are worrying about their own security. Water damage is now the leading cause of property damage in Canada. Severe rain and flash flooding backs up storm sewers and floods basements, and in extreme cases like in High River, destroyed people’s homes completely.

our quest to develop land by filling in wet lands and cutting down trees we are ignoring nature’s basic laws. Climate change is seen by many as the real culprit behind extreme weather and it very well may be. We have radically changed the planet we live on and there are consequences. Our federal government is reluctant to embrace the science that points to our culpability; they support the view that unfettered development brings wealth that bring jobs and that helps the economy. Yet the cost of extreme weather is just starting to be felt, and it’s not just about money: just ask Noah. Luckily for him and his family, he didn’t ignore the signs and the warnings.

Solutions vary. Of course we need to build storm sewers and culverts that can handle greater volume of water; flood-proof highways, build diversion ditches, and reinforce our electrical grids to prevent outages. It means redrawing flood-plain maps to prevent people from building homes in areas that are in the path Napanee District Community Foundation of a river that in the right “extreme” conditions destroys everything in its path. But we can’t ignore the green infrastructure and that means protecting our wetlands, planting more trees, and building or preserving more ponds. Nature often has solutions to its own problems; in

47 Dundas Street East, Napanee, ON K7R 1H7

Ph: 613-354-7333 F: 613-354-4613

info@ndcf.ca www.ndcf.ca

Waddell Apples

ORCHARD & BAKERY 2645 Washburn Road, Kingston (Hwy 15 at Washburn Rd, 10 min N of the 401)

Open 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Daily

Fresh-picked apples from our Farm store (Call or check online for Harvest updates)

Pick-Your-Own opens August 31

Schools & other groups welcome – call ahead to book

Farm store with home-made Apple Pies & Crisps, Sweet Cider, Honey, Maple, Fudge, Preserves

Join us September 1 for AppleFest! Proceeds to Easter Seals Ontario

613-546-1690 www.waddellapples.com

A Walk On The Wild Side

Letters and submissions are most welcome and encouraged. This is your community magazine devoted to celebrating the stories and lives of the folks who live here. Get involved! Let us know what’s happening in your area. COVER PHOTO Summer fun in the Beaver Lake Swim Program this July. Back row: Gord Russell, Eli Barker, Olivia Hodgen (instructor), Madison Lyman, Emily Lyman, Gavin Rogers, Callum MacGregor (instructor). Middle row: Sydney Laursen, Aidan Laursen, Max Bednarski, Timothy Curran, Spencer McGrath. Front row: Isabel DeMarsh Photo by Barry Lovegrove.

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THE SCOOP • AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2013

I found a Merlin Falcon on the side of the road while I was out cycling. He may have damaged its wing while swooping down to get his prey. I took him to Sandy Pines Wildlife Centre in Napanee and they said they would look after him. What a beautiful bird! We don’t often get a chance to see a bird like that up close. Thanks SPWC for all you do to help mend the little critters that come our way. Barry Lovegrove


Summer Fun - Beaver Lake Swim Program

T

he first year of The Beaver Lake Swim Program is well on its way with over a hundred children registered. Two very capable Red Cross Certified swimming instructors, Callum MacGregor and Olivia Hodgen, have been hired to teach young children how to swim on Monday to Friday from 9:00

to 12:00 and 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. At the end of the season the Tamworth Lions will be holding a BBQ when the children will be awarded their report cards, badges and stickers. A big thank you to the Stone Mills Township and the Napanee District Community

Foundation for their support; to Kelly Rogers for the signs, to everyone who volunteered their time and of course to all the community organizations and individuals who made financial donations. Seeing the smiles on the children’s

faces and the fun they were having was priceless. The program has been so successful that it will certainly return next year. Visit www.tamworth.ca regularly for all that’s going on, especially the Community & Sports section or you can email swimbeaverlake@gmail.com for more information about the program.

Meet... Ethan Bucholtz

C

ongratulations to Ethan Bucholtz from Enterprise for capturing a spot on the Canadian Junior National Dance Team! This year the competitive dance team will travel to Mikiolajki Poland to compete in The World Dance Championship run by the IDO (International Dance Organization). It is a world-wide organization involving over 90 nations and representing more than 250, 000 dancers from six continents. Twelve year old Ethan will be one of twentynine members competing from Canada. Ethan studies jazz, acro, ballet, hip hop, lyrical, contemporary and most recently tap dancing at TK Danceworx with Tina Kyle in Kingston. Having danced since the age of four, he is passionate about

dance. “The reason I love it so much is that I can be whoever I want to be when I dance. I love being on stage and entertaining people but I also love to compete and win.” In order to attend the competition in Poland, Ethan has to raise $3550 and he and his parents, Stephanie and Chris are busy helping him meet that goal. Apart from holding a bottle drive, they are all looking for sponsors. To date they’ve received local support from Ken’s Gun Shop in Tamworth and from the Copper Cliff Acoustic Concert Series in Sudbury. The Stone Mills Soccer Association is holding a fundraiser for him at their year-end tournament in August. You can’t miss the excitement in

Ethan’s young voice: “I’m super excited to be a part of Canada’s dance team especially since some of my teammates also study at DK Danceworx. I can’t wait to get my Team Canada coat and meet other dancers from around the world. This will be my first time on a

plane ever!” Anyone wishing more information or offering to help sponsor Ethan can contact his parents at: scbucholtz@ hotmail.com or call them at 613-3799065.

MELLON CREEK MARINA MARINE REPAIR & STORAGE BILL & CAROLE SPROULE 613-813-0501 bill.sproule@gmail.com 7927 Cty Rd 41 Erinsville K0K 2A0

ENgINE REPAIRS FREE STORAgE WHEN YOU SHRINK WRAP YOUR BOAT SHRINK WRAP $12.00 PER FOOT WINTERIZINg AVAILABLE AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2013 • THE SCOOP

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The Storring Family By Angela Saxe

T

he large tin box holds treasures that any archivist would envy: an assortment of documents, including letters, ledgers and land deeds belonging to a family that can trace its roots back to the United Empire Loyalists. Greg Storring handles each piece of paper gently, his finger skimming along the page as he identifies the names of families that still live in what was once called Sheffield Township, now Stone Mills. “Of the five Storring brothers,” Greg tells me, “two stayed in the United States and three came up to Canada - then the British colonies. One brother moved to the Centreville area; one went to Cooper, which is near Madoc and the other came here. We live on the original homestead of my ancestor, Marenus Storring and this whole area was once called the Beaver Lake Settlement.” Bibles, worn but durable, open to pages filled with meticulous cursive script recording the family’s marriages, births and deaths. Generations of ancestors right there on the page to be remembered by their progeny centuries later. First names repeat themselves. Some die young. Others live a long fruitful life. Women marry and move to other communities. There’s no way one can doubt one’s place in the world with all that information. Today Greg and his wife Cheryl, who is a Smith from the Inverary area, live in what was once the family cottage across the street from Beaver Lake. Right next door sits the large, two-storey stone house (the original homestead burned down) where he grew up. “We lived with my grandmother in the house but in the summer my parents would move into the cottage. You know how it is,” explains Greg with a big smile, “two women in the same household. They both needed a break.” Since his mother Vera moved into a senior’s residence, his son Ian lives there with his wife Lily and their two sons. The Storring homestead, which is bordered by Beaver Lake to the west and the Salmon River to the east, expanded over the years as the growing family required more land to farm, and then as farming was replaced by other businesses the land was parceled out and sold. But family and local history doesn’t just consist of yellowed papers in a tin box: there is a graveyard behind the house and the building that was once the local school can still be found on the property. The Beaver Lake school (School Section 10 Sheffield) was built in 1848 on land then

owned and later sold to the Storrings, by its first superintendant, Christopher Thompson, a Methodist clergyman. Thirty pupils were enrolled and by 1915 the number had reached sixty-two. Greg’s paternal grandmother taught in the school and his father Grant attended the first grade there before transferring over to the school in Tamworth. The Beaver Lake Cemetery was also established by Christopher Thompson who set aside some land on his property to serve as a cemetery for anyone who was of Christian faith. The number of burial sites is not clear. In 1981 the Lennox & Addington Historical Society transcribed the names and information of the twelve standing headstones naming fifteen people. The earliest stone recorded the death of a one-year old child who died in 1846. When Greg and Cheryl decided to clean up the neglected burial ground they and a group of volunteers unearthed many field stones and headstones that had toppled over. Greg’s father had told him there may be as many as three hundred buried there. Using divining rods, he has attempted to find some of the graves and some of the hidden stones buried beneath the soil. The cemetery closed in the early 1900s and apart from a few individuals who received special permission to be buried in their family’s plot, no one has been buried there since the 1930s. Among the papers Cheryl brought out to show me was a three-ring binder containing correspondence between one of the women who married into the Storring family and her friends and relations from the Morrisburg area. The letters, dated from the mid1800s, were written on small pieces of now yellowed paper. Intriguingly, each letter was written in two directions – first horizontally and then vertically, creating a cross-hatched pattern of script - probably to save paper. Sent in small envelopes, the post mark was either from Morrisburg, C.W. or from Brockville U.C. (Upper Canada) and the envelopes were sealed with a wax stamp. Greg’s mother Vera had not only read each letter but she painstakingly transcribed them. The original letters are kept in plastic sleeves in a three ring binder next to the typed sheet with all the information Vera was able to gather from the envelope and from the letter. The letters were chatty and intimate; a conversation between two close female friends about where they went, who they saw, how they felt, the latest gossip and the local news. A wonderful glimpse into women’s lives in the early years of Sheffield Township.

The Storring family’s passion for keeping meticulous notes on family history included recording business transactions from the early 1900s. The worn, brown leather ledger of John Storring’s General Store (where the Grindstone Beaver Lake Schoolhouse, 1908. Built 1876. First school Restaurant now built 1845 on this site. [Sheffield S.S. 10]. Photo courtesy sits) contains Lennox & Addington County Museum & Archives. the names of 4

THE SCOOP • AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2013

customers who bought on credit, what they bought and the price they paid. Details a b o u t cottage and boat rentals from the Storring f a m i l y prop er ties along the shore of Beaver Lake are listed as is the cost of feed and livestock bought and sold. This passion for record-keeping extends into the current family business: Storring Septic Service. “First the records were kept in a shoe box, eventually replaced by a coat box,” Greg says. “Now of course, we use computers, but I don’t want to throw forty years of records out.” Grant Storring realized that supporting a family by farming (the family had always raised beef and turkeys) was becoming extremely difficult so in the mid 1960s he went to work at Strathcona Paper as a machinist. But in 1971 after having his own septic system pumped, he recognized an opportunity. Cottages were being built on Beaver Lake and the township required that they install holding tanks – for which the cottage owners would require service. Grant quit his job, sold some property on Beaver Lake to finance the equipment and together with his son Greg they applied for a Certificate of Approval from the Ministry of Environment to build two lagoons. In August of 1974 approval was issued and a bulldozer dug two clay based cells which would each hold approximately 450,000 gallons. By 1990 the need for septic pumping grew to the point that they applied for an additional two lagoons, each one able to hold approximately one million gallons. In 2007 a second pumping truck was bought to deal with the increasing demand and five years ago, Greg’s son Ian joined the family business. Family, community, land, history: these are the things that are important to Greg and Cheryl. As Greg drives through the small towns in the counties of Lennox & Addington and Frontenac, he encounters the descendants of the first settlers. Family names such as Brown, Lloyst, Kearns, York, Hannah, Waters, Milligan, Long, and Smith form the backbone of these communities. Knowing his own family history and the connection they have to this land is important to Greg, especially as he witnesses the changes in the area as people from away move in, build new homes or renovate old farmhouses and settle down to raise their families. I asked Greg and Cheryl if their children, Ian and Amber, have the same interest in all this historical material and they laugh. “Only if I scan it all and put it on the computer for them,” says Cheryl. “I think they care but they aren’t

greg & Cheryl Storring. interested enough to go through all these documents. Life is busy for all of us but we will plan a special family day and we’ll pull out the old tin box and have Greg explain them all. Who knows what they’ll decide do with it.” Greg packs up the tin box and puts away the boxes. “Looking through these ledgers and letters may not mean much to anybody else, but I love to look through them. All those names. I know so many of them and most of them are still here.”

Book Shop Quality second hand books Tamworth, Ontario 613-379-2108 www.tamworthbookshop.com info@tamworthbookshop.com

Reading with Stan Dragland & Phil Hall Sunday Sept. 22 @ 2 pm All are welcome, light refreshments will be served.


Winners of the 2013 Scoop Writing Contest C ongratulations to John Sherbino of Hartington and Jordan Balson of Napanee!

We’d like to thank everyone who entered the contest this year. There were many excellent entries and the judges spent ample time discussing the strengths of

each piece. Community resident Jeannie Harrison and Scoop Editor Angela Saxe, read the blind entries, created a short list and then met to make a final decision. In the adult category, they decided that John Sherbino’s poem, The Visitor, is a humorous observation on the differences

between country folk and city folk. Its free verse style and ironic tone worked together to create a winning entry.

place and for a long poem, the sustained rhythm and flow of the piece were impressive.

In the teen category, Jordan Balson’s entry, The Constant Heart, is a sensitive poem reflecting the rural landscape. The images evoke a sense of time and

The Scoop would like to thank The Tamworth/Erinsville Economic Development Council for sponsoring the contest.

The Constant Heart The shy sun rises in the dawn, Over peaks, sparkling on the lawn. Unoppressive masses of land, Infinite to those of man. The sun’s early rays awaken, Shines brave in places forsaken, The warm rays thaw out the dark night, Bringing to life the tranquil sight. Soft cloud wisps float through the blue skies, A laughing breeze whispering lies, The vibrant blue pulses steady, The constant heart throbbing, ready. Trodden grass beaten underfoot, Creaky old barns worn dark from soot, Traipsing dirt roads meander through, The endless fields seen by few. Long hay stands proudly bright and tall, Higher than the weeds, it rules all, Billowing in the breeze it bows, Awaiting lunch time for the cows. Bright sun glimmers through the branches, Granting life to the snug ranches, Quiet lives burning with passion, A shy, unspoken compassion. The dirty, smeared cement barn floor, The cracks telling of tales more, Tales of the lives started here, Tales of those we hold so dear. Persistent rocks scatter the ground, Patiently waiting to be found, For those with eyes that see much more, Than the rocks coating the earth’s core. The day wears on, colours appear, Quilts follow the sun’s parting rear, Quilts of the beauty of good-bye, Quilts of nature’s hues in the sky. Collage of colours fight to go, Sparking bright with their amber glow. In the west, the sun’s colours fall, Night’s cloak veiling us all. But in the dark, embers of light, Glowing strongly flicker so bright. Unknown worlds shine with all their might, Making their presence known that night. Protesting the dark, stars glimmer, Even as they’re fading dimmer, Sun crawls as they linger to stay Giving way to a brand new day. Jordan Balson, Napanee Teen Winner

Jordan Balson and John Sherbino, winners of the 2013 SCOOP Writing Contest.

The Visitor “How do you like living back of beyond?” I guessed she missed the traffic. Maybe she needed cement under foot or the city air you can chew.

Something was missing. The wind in the trees seemed to bother her. She thought the Loons were dogs and grimaced as she perched on the edge of the chair.

We hugged and she said we were lucky. She stumbled on a pinecone while heading for her car. The air conditioning seemed to cheer her up as we waved goodbye.

John Sherbino, Hartington Adult Winner

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2013 • THE SCOOP

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preservatives as well as tasty baked goods but it continues to grow and expand especially now under their new owners: Dalton Cowper and Beverly Frazer. As a team they work By Thomasina Larkin long hours but it is quickly evident ne they of the about that areworst doing things what they love. Stand with feet parallel and about Lie face down on a mat with your arms exercising is not having enough hip width apart. Push your hips back, extended in front. Simultaneously raise us still time toMany do it. of Luckily, you recall don’t thelowering as if you’re sitting on a chair. your arms, chest, head and legs off the need much time to have an effective Keep your weight in your heels and your floor and hold for 2 seconds. Slowly lower original Poppy workout and youowners will see and feel Harrison great chest up. At the lowest, your thighs down. Repeat. resultsand fromDavid short bursts of training. should be parallel to the ground. Your Greenland who openedknees should never extend far in front of Targets: Glutes, Hamstrings, Back & Core High their Intensity MODIFICATION 1: OPPOSITE ARM & doorsInterval boastingTraining, that “theyormadeyour ankles. HIIT, has been gaining popularity over Targets: Butt & Quads LEG SUPERMANS bestbecause bagels init Eastern recent the years typically Ontario.” only Start in regular superman position, but takes about 20 – 30 minutes to complete MODIFICATION 1: SQUAT JUMPS time simultaneously raise your right Overyouthedon’t years theanyBakery changedStart by doing a regular squat, but when this a session, need equipment arm and left leg. Hold for 2 seconds, then and calories are burned for up to 24 rise up jump as high as you can and lower and raise the left arm and right leg. owners but the quality of the foodyou hours after the workout. reach for the ceiling. When you land, Keep repeating. lower back down into the squat position. and the baked items only got bet- sioned as the culmination of a five Targets: Glutes, Hamstrings, Back The idea of the technique is to switch Targets: Butt & Quads (especially the muscles along the spine) & between trainingwith for the ter.speeds Nowand Bevtypes and ofDalton, year plan when they first moved to Core a more effective workout. For example, MODIFICATION 2: SQUAT CALF aid ofyou David, who does the bulkRAISES Kingston. While working at a full- MODIFICATION 2: SUPERMAN one minute might do still a high-energy, quick burst of cardio such as jumping by doing a regular squat. Once you of the baking, have expanded theStart time position, Dalton managed to RETRACTORS jacks; and the next minute you might lower, hold it there and slowly lift your Start in regular superman, follow menu with an active recovery stage of heels off the ground. Lower your heels simultaneously raising your arms, chest, and offer a greater variety ofand fitthenin several years of part-time work head and legs off the floor. While keeping less-intense muscle conditioning with press yourself up out of the something like lunges Breaks take-out items.or push Bev ups. always has asquat.learning more about dog training the legs up, draw your shoulder blades can be taken throughout as needed. Targets: Butt, Quads & Calves down your back, squeezing your elbows warm smile to greet everyone who with boarding experts in Kingston. together as close as you can. Lower The following outline gives a basic 3: SQUAT JUMPING and then return to the start entersHIIT Thesession, Bakerywith andvariations many of herMODIFICATION Dalton believes that when dogs are everything 10-minute JACKS position and repeat. that can add more challenge and time to a jumping jack, ending with Glutes, Hamstrings, Back recipes are now in demand. AnnettePerform boarded, they are embarking on Targets: the workout. It’s not recommended to do your feet hip width apart and then (especially mid back) & Core more than 30 minutes of HIIT at once, a squat. Wilson, along with Anita Wilson,immediately their ownlowering holidayinto from home.Hold They and no more than three sessions per for a few seconds and then rise out of the MODIFICATION 3: SUPERMAN welcome the ways patrons Cowperintodogs who livejack. there WEIGHT PASS week. Th ere are many to doand HIIT,provide so squatjoin andthe straight a jumping Start in regular superman with a light I’m going to offer one that requires little You could also do two or three or four firstwithclass Customers popjumping (all seven of them)every for squat. the duration weight near your extended hands. When thinking yourservice. stopwatch. jacks between raise everything, pick up the weight Butt, Quads & Outer Thighs by to pick up a bagels, bread, muf-Targets: of their stay; they become a part of you Start with a warm up for 3 – 5 minutes. in your left hand, and then move both Bridge Probably warmofupotherBasic arms down by your sides (keeping fins,thepieseasiest and away widetovariety theExercise dog pack. 2:Dalton’s love of dogs your is walking on the spot and gradually them off the ground) and pass the weight backwhen on a he mat with your increasing speed.orAfter bakedthegoods they the can warm sit downLie on wasyour evident rhymed off his to your right hand above your butt or knees bent and feet hip-width apart. up, alternate between cardio and muscle low back. Bring your arms back up to and training have a delicious lunch from theKeepown names: your dogs abs tight and liftDabney, your hipsSaxon off resistance until you’re finished the extended superman position. Take a the floor, squeezing your glutes. Slowly the workout. You might want to start if you need to, then repeat in the expanding old favou-lower(the newbie), Porter,Repeat. Kilty, Cooper, break yourself back down. by doing 30 secondsmenu. of eachThe component, opposite direction. & Butt and then gradually increasing the time rites, such as the much-loved lemonTargets: LacyCore, andBack Louis Target (yes, he is so Targets: Glutes, Hamstrings, Back & Arms each session (without doing more than 2 1: BRIDGE minutes of each tarts are component). still available but look forMODIFICATION special he has his ownPULSES last name). Basic Exercise 4: Bicycle Crunches Start by lifting into a regular bridge. new. just A bigtryhittohasdobeen are twoposition, Labs, three the highest lowerBeagles, your In thewhat’s beginning, the theFromThere few inches and then pulse them up on your back on a mat with your knees basic level of each of the four resistance slow-cooked arelook offeredhips aa Bloodhound and a Coonhound; all Lie and down. bent and feet off the floor so your lower exercises listed belowribs so itthat would Core, Back & Butt parallel to the mat. Gently hold like this: warm up, cardio, squats, cardio, Friday nights as part of a prix fixeTargets: of them serving as excellent hosts legs ers,arethis is a huge relief knowing that your hands behind your head, keeping bridge, cardio, superman, cardio, bicycle 2: BRIDGE MARCHES chinpets off are yourinchest looking up crunches, stretch. menu with five delicious courses. MODIFICATION welcoming the other dogs into the your their goodandhands. Even Lift into a regular bridge and keep your at the ceiling throughout. Move your up without overextending the low right toward your left was kneedrawn while In following sessions, Dalton, try wellstarting knownwith for hiships kennel. as elbow a youngster, Dalton back. Slowly walk your feet off the floor, straightening your right leg (trying to the basic exercises and then cycling year-round kennelto forone after theSome mayimportant never have keepto itdogs, caring forground). his ownRepeat family’s other.dogs It’s not parallel to the on through the sets ofboarding modifications how high you march your feet, just focus the other side and then keep repeating. switch things up and challenge your body dogs ways. called the Regal Beagle onon squeezing experienced this before, andand forfocus thoseonhecontracting walked asthea your glutes and core.but dogs Dodogs it slowly in different Butt &with Calves muscles onjob thewhile sides growing of your torso. Hwy. 41, had already brought theTargets: loveCore, to Back, socialize other dogs. ab part-time up. Bev Targets: Obliques & Abdominals Some examples of cardio are: high-knee 3: SINGLE-LEGGED marches, butttokickers samejumping level ofjacks, attention detail andMODIFICATION Since they are free to mingle and also loves dogs and Labrador ReBRIDGE MODIFICATION 1: TURBO BICYCLES (jogging on the spot and kicking your a love quality organic pet foodsLift roam a safebridge, environment, they Dotrievers have a special into ainregular hold, then the same as above, but place speed in it her up heels to yourfor butt), skates (alternating extend one leg so that foot points up and feel the burn in a different way. stepping one foot on a diagonal behind withinto littlea skate or noposition), preservatives to theiron alearn to enjoy of aarerou- Targets: heartObliques as she always had a loving Lab diagonal angle the and comfort your thighs & Abdominals the other football Hold, or try pulsing the hips up and feet, invisible jump rope, boxer shuffle, kennel. I share Dalton’s love of dogseven. tine that includes a nap and, yes, a MODIFICATION growing up. 2: BOAT BICYCLES down while extending one leg. Repeat on power punches. side. yourhas knees up and can appreciate the attention hethe other weekly campfire night on Saturdays Sit on a mat Thewith kennel manybenthome and feet on the floor. Place your hands Targets: Core, Back, Butt & Quads Resistance Exercises: the mat atincluding your sidesair and behind you pays to keeping both his and his cli- when humans and all the dogs are oncomforts conditioning, just a bit. Keep your chest open and lean Basic Exercise 1: Squats Basic Exercise 3: Superman ents’ dogs on a nutritionally sound quite literally “happy campers”. backhomemade branded a little, so and that you’re still organic on the diet which gives the lucky pooches Dalton was pleased to learn that the treats and CBC radio for their listenwonderful immune systems and su- burn ban has been lifted for now so ing pleasure. Some visitors of the perior health. So it’s not a surprise the dogs won’t have to miss this spe- canine kind stay for a month or 6 that Dalton and Bev wanted the very cial campfire night. Returning “cli- weeks at a time. There is a feeling of best for the customers that visit The entele” recognize their holiday spot comfort and safety communicated Bakery. and jump out of the cars looking by the resident dogs to newcomers 61 3-929-3200 weeselandscaping@icloud.com The Regal Beagle was envi- forward to another visit. For own- and plenty of time to enjoy human

HIIT for Fit O

• home and property maintenance • digging • leveling • topsoil, gravel delivery • brush removal • gravel driveways/trenches/culverts • cleanups

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SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 2011

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my dogs, sit on the patio and talk “dogs” with Dalton. Sounds like a new show: Dogs with Dalton… never a dog’s breakfast! The website for the Regal Beagle www.regalbeagleuncushy part of your butta and not on leashed.com offers wealth of your intailbone. Lift both feet slightly off the formation dog lovers. ground, thenfor alternate between twisting the right shoulder toward left knee, then Theshoulder websitetoward for the left rightBakery knee. is in Targets: Obliques, Abdominals and some progress: www.riverbakery.com serious Core MODIFICATION 3: EXTENDED LEG Top photo: Dalton and Bev. BOAT BICYCLES Do like aDalton, boat bicycle, but while Bottom: Anita, and Bev. one knee is coming close to the opposite shoulder, Photo credits: Barry Lovegrove. the other leg extends straight and hovers above the floor. Repeat on the opposite side. Targets: Obliques, Abdominals & Legs Always finish each session by stretching all the major muscle groups. Hold each of the following for 15 – 30 seconds. Glute stretch: Standing on one foot, hold knee to chest. Repeat on the other side. Quad stretch: Standing on one foot, hold heel to buttock. Repeat on the other side. Hamstrings & calf stretch: Standing on both feet, keep your back flat and legs straight and slower lower your chest towards your thighs. Triceps & rotator cuff stretch: While standing, raise both arms straight up in the air, bend one arm and hold the elbow with the other hand. Repeat on the other side. Bicep & chest stretch: While standing, interlace your fingers behind your back, open your chest and squeeze your shoulder blades together. Abs stretch: Lying on your stomach, place your hands under your shoulders and push into your hands to slowly raise your chest off the floor. Back stretch: Sitting on a chair or crosslegged on the floor, sit with a tall spine and gently twist to one side while keeping the shoulders relax. Repeat on the other side. Thomasina Larkin is an RMT and Personal Trainer. For more information visit www.thomasina.ca.

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Napanee District Community Foundation: The Group That Keeps On Giving By John Finley

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aking a difference in the communities of Lennox and Addington County …. Forever! That is what the Napanee District Community Foundation is all about. Don’t let the name mislead you. Our goal is to help people improve the quality of life in their communities throughout the County. It has been doing so since 1987 when the Hogarth family of Napanee established the Foundation with a donation of $100,000. We are a community foundation. There are over 180 in Canada today and the number keeps on growing each year. Community foundations differ from other charities in that the money donated is never spent. Instead it is invested and the annual returns on the investments are given out. In this way a gift to a community foundation is one that keeps on giving in perpetuity. Since 1987 NDCF has grown substantially due to the generosity of many donors. We started with one fund and now manage twenty-six, which total approximately 2.4 million dollars. In the early years the annual amount of grants distributed was about $4,000. This year we dispersed almost $80,000 at “Take It for Granted”. Where did all that money go? Read on!

The Beaver Lake Swim Program Children in the area have not had the ability to take swimming lessons locally. Barb Cronin and a group of volunteers recognized the need last summer and decided to do something about the situation. Over the fall and winter, with the assistance of the Red Cross, the group organized a swim program. With the help of a $2,500 grant from NDCF there are 100 children participating in swimming lessons this summer. It is running at Beaver Lake at the municipal park on Neville Point. A “tip of the hat” to this group for identifying and solving a problem!

Hospice Lennox and Addington NDCF assisted in getting a bereavement program started in four elementary schools in the past. This year the Foundation provided funding again to allow the program to be expanded. The grant of $3,000 is being used for facilitator training and increasing the number of schools in the program. “Rainbows for Children” is the name of the program. It helps children and youth who are experiencing loss in their lives – divorce, death and so on – deal with their situation in a group setting.

The Gymnastics Club of Greater Napanee This group has received funding the last two years from NDCF. In 2012 funding was provided to purchase safety equipment. This year $2,500 is being used to replace the foam in a landing mat and the rails on the uneven parallel bars.

The Community Garden / Salvation Army Food Bank

Volunteers grow vegetables on a plot of land donated by a local farmer. The produce goes to the Food Bank, the Morning Star Mission and Interval House. Our funding ($1,060) was used to purchase seed, sets and starter plants, an irrigation system and truck loads of compost.

Special Olympics One of the markers of a civilized society is the way it treats the disadvantaged. The Foundation helped last year with the purchase of sports equipment; this year funding of $2,500 is being used to promote and establish children and youth recreation and sport opportunities for disadvantaged athletes in the community at large. NDCF is pleased to support this organization.

The Multicultural Association A festival is held annually to recognize diversity in our communities. This year the Foundation provided $1,500 for a 3 day festival to celebrate their 10th anniversary.

L&A Christian Academy NDCF honoured a request for $2,000, which was put towards the cost of purchasing a defibrillator for their school. This not only helps this school but it will also be transported to various community and sports events in the Greater Napanee community.

The Rock Solid Foundation Started in 1997, this organization endeavours to provide a bullying protection program to elementary school children across. The Limestone District School Board initiated the program in 2012. Our grant of $3,500 will launch the WITS program (Walk Away, Ignore, Talk it Out, Seek Help), in ten more elementary schools in L&A County.

Lennox and Addington 4H Association The 2013 Lennox and Addington 4-H Dairy Club is having another great year. Thanks to the Foundation’s donation of $1,700, the club has organized a one day bus trip to the Durham Region.

Lennox and Addington 4-H Dairy Club. Photo contributed by John Finley.

“The money received from NDCF really allows us to do ‘big things’ which we could not do without their financial support,” according to club leaders Joe O’Neill and Kevin MacLean. During the field trip the members will visit three state of the art dairy operations, a large juice processing plant, a beef operation and a mushroom factory. Each of the dairy operations will allow the members to see the different styles of milking methods and to learn firsthand the day to day management tips which have allowed these farms to grow and become successful. Some of the farms will be operated by recent graduates of college or university whom the 4-H members can discuss “farm transition” and different career options. Educational and fun excursions of this nature have also encouraged more members to join the club. We realize that some of the dairy club members may never be dairy farmers, but they will all be consumers who are keen to get the facts and learn about the importance of agriculture in Ontario. In addition to the technical information, a trip of this nature allows the members to take on a leadership role in planning, organizing and public speaking.

Charlotte Uens Scholarship Fund Because students are our future NDCF is grateful that we are able to administer this fund. A total of $51,400 was given to fifteen graduates of Napanee District Secondary School. They each have received a scholarship from the

Uens Fund to enable them to begin post-secondary education in the fall. University bound are as follows: Amanda Sherwood, Blake Gozzard, Ben Milligan, Sarah Fabius, Steven Brazda, Breanna Webb, Nicole MacLauchlan, Alexa Scott, Calvin Silva, Daniel Hoyle and Branden Blunt. The recipients going on to college are: Paige Sebastiani, Alyssa Berry, Emma Hepburn and Colleen Shannon. In addition to supporting the groups and individuals noted above, The Napanee District Community Foundation, through ten other funds that it manages, helped others in our communities. For example, the Leone Frances Bursary is directed at women of L&A County. It pays tuition costs for educating or training to enter/re-enter the work force. The Land Stewardship Fund provided a bursary of $500 each to two local high school students who are continuing studies that have an environmental focus. NDCF is pleased to do its part in making L&A a healthy, vibrant county in which to live. The Foundation is governed by a Board of Directors with the help of committee members. Together they volunteer their time and expertise knowing that their efforts make a difference. Everyone takes pride in the fact that because the organization operates on volunteers only one part time staff - administration costs are very low. As a result, 98.5% of the investment income is put back into the community each year.

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Introducing - The Health Hut! By Stella Thompson

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homasina Larkin first heard of yurts from a massage instructor a few years ago, and as soon as she saw a picture of one she knew that one day she would have a yurt. Yurts are traditionally lived in by Mongolians, nomadic herders who break down, move and rebuild their homes about five times a year. Its circular shape provides a very calming effect; as soon as you walk in there’s an instant sense of serenity. Thomasina hopes to offer that experience to everyone who comes to The Health Hut, whether it’s for a massage, yoga class or personal training. Thomasina moved back to Enterprise after living away for 15 years and began teaching fitness and yoga classes at the Enterprise Hall since November 2011. “The classes have been a blast and I’ve received so much positive feedback that I wanted to expand what I was doing,” said Thomasina. “I really hope more new people will come and see what it’s all about. I’d love for The Health Hut to become a vibrant little space for everyone within our county.” The Health Hut will operate year-round, with air conditioning in the summer and electric heat in the winter. A variety of new classes will be offered, but since space will be limited to about 25 per class, participants are encouraged to check online if there’s any space and book ahead of time. Classes start at The Health Hut the week of September 9. In addition to Zumba, Piloxing and Yoga – classes she offered at the Enterprise Hall – she’ll add a barre class (Barre Belles), a High Intensity Interval Training class (HIIT), a full body sculpting classes (Full Blast), a morning yoga class and a class for Moms & Babies.

A variety of massage and wellness treatments will also be offered at the yurt. For the past two years she’s used a spare room in her home to treat clients, but because it’s been in a very personal space it’s been limited to word-of-mouth only. As a registered massage therapist, she can provide insurance receipts for many types of massage: Cranial Sacral Therapy, Lomi Lomi, Thai Yoga Massage, Indian Head Massage, Ultrasound Therapy, Hot Stone Massage, Swedish Relaxation and Therapeutic Massage. To book your massage or class, go to her website www.thomasina.ca or to The Health Hut’s Facebook page. Also, check out the promotions on right now. If you go to The Health Hut page on Facebook and either like or share the page to be entered into a draw to win one of 20 free class passes. And from now until The Health Hut’s Grand Opening, any time anyone buys either a 10-class pass or a massage treatment (including a gift certificate) they will be entered in a draw to win one of three amazing prizes: 1) A One-Month Unlimited Class Pass. 2) A One-Hour Massage Treatment. 3) Three Nutrition & Wellness Counselling Sessions. The Grand Opening will be Saturday, August 24 from 1 – 4pm. Drop by and take a peek inside this very cool structure!

Class Descriptions BARRE BELLES Barre Belles is a mix of low-impact cardio, killer core sequences and micromovements that target smaller muscles to enhance that long and lean look. Using a ballet barre we will combine yoga, Pilates and muscle toning, ending with an ab routine on the mat. With an emphasis on form, alignment and

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A yurt is a portable dwelling structure traditionally used by the nomadic people of Central Asia. The structure comprises a ring in the centre at the top, supported by rafters that spread down to where they meet the lattice wall. The structure is traditionally covered by layers of fabric and sheep’s wool felt for insulation, but Thomasina’s shell is made of vinyl and aluminum insulation. Photo courtesy Thomasina Larkin. strength, you will strive yourself toward a slim, strong and sculpted dancer’s body.

fat, stimulate anti-aging hormones and boost metabolism for up to 24 hours.

ZUMBA To say the least, zumba is super fun and extremely effective. It’s an exhilarating, effective, easy-to-follow, Latin-inspired, calorie-burning dance fitness-party™ that’s moving millions of people toward joy and health. You won’t stop smiling or sweating through an hour of getting your groove on to Latin beats and rhythms. Classes are very dynamic, so you use a range of different muscles and continue to challenge your body. Anyone is welcome to come -- and don’t worry if you’ve never even danced before! Let’s party!!

FULL BLAST This dynamic class combines resistance and endurance training that will melt fat and define your muscles. You will sweat. You will burn. You will feel like an athlete as you sculpt your body into its ideal physique. The high-energy and fun classes are easy to follow, but the exercises continually change and challenge you so you never plateau.

DEEP STRETCH YOGA Students are taken through a series of standing, seated and lying poses. Each class will focus on slowly taking the time to lengthen muscles with deep stretches. Different problem areas of pain and injury such as the neck, low back, hamstrings, upper back & chest are targeted each week, and classes have a heavy emphasis on breath work, meditation and relaxation. Start to let go of tensions that keep you stuck. Bring a yoga mat and try not to eat 90 minutes before class. PILOXING Piloxing blends the best of Pilates, Boxing and Dance into a highenergy and barefoot interval workout that burns maximum calories and increases stamina. In addition to Pilates and boxing movements, the exercise incorporates the use of 1/2 pound weighted gloves, which add to the workout by toning the arms and maximizing cardiovascular health.

Avenstone The garden is a natural space filled with birds, butterflies, bees and other creatures that support its growth. The rows in the cutting garden are mulched and the paths around the property are mowed grass. We have gloves and scissors to use while you’re here and we provide buckets and water to help keep your flowers fresh on your trip home. Please keep in mind that your safety is your responsibility. Visit us online -- we’re part of the new Gardening and Giving program www.gardeningandgiving.ca > open gardens > visit an open garden > Avenstone

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THE SCOOP • AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2013

HIIT This High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) focuses on shedding pounds and toning the abs, butt and thighs. In just 30 minutes, HIIT classes burn tons of body

MOM & BABY FIT & FLEX Reconnect with your post-pregnancy body, start feeling stronger and sexier and show your baby how important an active lifestyle is. The first half of the class focuses on shedding extra pounds and toning up key areas and the second half of class takes you through basic yoga postures. Babies can either be incorporated into the exercises or can sleep or play by themselves. All classes are appropriate for all levels and modifications can always be made. The Health Hut is located at: 2990 County Rd 14, Enterprise. To contact Thomasina Larkin call - 613-358-2401 or go to www. thomasina.ca

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Kingston WritersFest The Fifth Edition By Ashliegh Gehl

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ingston WritersFest featured Margaret Atwood during its first year. It was 2009, and she had just released The Year of the Flood, the second in the Oryx and Crake trilogy. This year, as the festival celebrates its fifth birthday, alumni such as Atwood are returning to what has become one of the most talkedabout literary festivals in Canada. The festival opens with its signature International Marquee event at the Grand Theatre where Atwood and American novelist Nathaniel Rich will slice into the post-apocalyptic worlds of their latest novels.

Set in New York’s near future, Rich’s Odds Against Tomorrow plays off the mathematical calculations of catastrophe. For Atwood, it’s MaddAddam, the final installment of her dystopic trilogy. These fictional worlds explore the fate of the human race, isolating contemporary issues that will have festival-goers contemplating how the future will truly unravel. Atwood resurfaces the next day for a conversation and a reading with authors

Madeline Ashby and Corey Redekop in an event called “In Other Worlds,” where the three will discuss the art of inventing fictional future worlds. Ashby’s debut, vN, the first in The Machine Dynasty series, has drawn comparisons to the work of American author and biochemistry professor, Isaac Asimov, who wrote I, Robot and Bicentennial Man. Her latest release, iD, is about self-replicating humanoids and giant squids. Redekop, who currently lives in Fredericton, New Brunswick, and works as a publicist for Goose Lane Editions, presents Husk, an outlandish story about a zombie who trudges through life’s nuances: a mother with dementia, a bank account with a hair of savings, and the issue that all zombies must come to terms with – cannibalism. Of course the festival is jam-packed with more than end-of-the-world revelations. From September 25 to September 29, a wild assortment of events will showcase the writing talent of more than seventy writers. Nearly every genre and reading taste is represented. “We continue to refine what has become our signature approach to programming,” said Merilyn Simonds, the festival’s artistic director. As they have done every year for the past five years, the Festival is inaugurating a new event – The Robertson Davies Lecture. “We wanted a writer who would embody what I think of when I think of Robertson Davies,” said Simonds. “A very accomplished man of letters who moved freely amongst the genres.”

Award winning author, Joseph Boyden will be interviewed by Shelagh Rogers. Photo credit Bryan McBurney.

Alberto Manguel more than fits the bill. Born in Argentina, where he was a reader for Jorge Luis Borges, he grew up in Israel and lived in Canada for two decades before moving to France where he continues to add to an impressive library of 30,000 books.

Much like Davies, who wrote plays, poetry, essays, humour, serious literature and murder mysteries, Manguel’s work is all-encompa ssing. He’s a translator and an anthologist. Tel: 613-379-5874 Email: soscsvcs@gmail.com His published works Web: www.s-o-s-computers.com include The History of Wm. (Bill) Greenley Reading, The Library Kim Read at Night and most Network and Internet Security Specialists recently, a novel, Wired, Wireless, Network Design and Implementation All Men Are Liars. Computer repairs and sales He’s received the New or reconditioned Milovan Vidacovic Literary Award and the Canadian Writers’ Association Award for

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fiction. “Both Robertson Davies and Alberto, for me, symbolize what this literary festival is about,” said Simonds. “It’s about people who love books and believe, as Robertson Davies said, ‘Everything matters.’ And that is, in fact, the topic of the talk that Alberto Manguel will be giving.”

Margaret Atwood appears at the grand Theatre Thursday Sept. 25. Photo credit Jean Malek. and Indigo top pick for the summer.

The Robertson Davies Lecture series is launched both in honour of the fifth birthday of WritersFest and the centenary of Davies’ birth. Although born in Thamesville, Ontario, Davies lived in Kingston as a young man, where he wrote poetry and started the KCVI Literary Society. He later returned to attend Queen’s University and to start his life as a writer. He’s widely known for novels such as Fifth Business and A Mixture of Frailties. Davies, who died in 1995, isn’t the only writer who has made his mark on Kingston. The Limestone City boasts more than a handful of award-winning writers, many of whom will make a festival appearance this year. Novelist Helen Humphreys will present her first memoir, Nocturne: On the Life and Death of My Brother. Humphreys unloads the weight of grief by writing an extended letter to her brother Martin, a gifted classical pianist who was diagnosed with stage 4B pancreatic cancer when he was just 45 years old. He died four months later. It’s an intimate read, and those who have lost a loved one will connect deeply with her story. Poet Sadiqa de Meijer will be launching her debut collection, Leaving Howe Island. In 2012, she was awarded the CBC Poetry Prize for the poem “Great Aunt Unmarried.” Veteran nonfiction writer Wayne Grady will discuss his debut novel, Emancipation Day, which was an Amazon

And then there’s memoirist and humourist Iain Reid who brings his second book, The Truth About Luck, a lighthearted story about a Kingston “staycation” Reid shared with his 92-year-old grandma. Local luminaries will share the stage with writers from across the country including Joseph Boyden, Anne Michaels, Marcello Di Cintio, Michael Winter, Ania Szado, Saleema Nawaz, Thomas King, Kenneth Oppel, Michael Crummey, Joy Fielding, and many, many more. As well as onstage events, the festival is offering seventeen Writers Studio master classes, intensive explorations of particular points of craft from dialogue and screenwriting, to graphic novels and poetry. A special Writers Retreat Pass gives participants the opportunity to learn new tricks of the trade while building in their own writing time around the ebb and flow of the festival. “I know so many writers who come to literary festivals and go home feeling really pumped for their writing because the conversation is all about books for four days solid,” said Simonds. Kingston WritersFest runs from Sept. 25 to Sept. 29. Tickets are on sale at the Grand Theatre Box Office, online, by phone, or in person, starting August 8. To learn more about the festival, visit their website at www.kingstonwritersfest.ca.

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The Battle Rages On! W By Jeff Whan

e live here because we love it here. We love the natural beauty of our forests and fields, and the clear healthy air and water of our lakes and rivers. Most of us have had a relatively small negative impact on the land. But, we have learned not to take all of this for granted. The world’s largest garbage company, Waste Management, has a billion dollar business opportunity here and there are some people who think we should encourage them. Our economy is not the best and the opportunity to supply trucks, gravel and such is attractive. The company is a big donator to local causes. It is asking us to turn a blind eye to the potential damage to our environment when there is the hope for money to be made. The company sales pitch has influenced some area politicians. This scenario is common to environmental disasters elsewhere in our country. This is a pretty scary situation. The false argument that a mega-dump here would be positive for our health, reputation, real estate values, and ability to attract new citizens has been accepted by some. Hard to believe.

A dedicated team of volunteers has been working on making sure the Richmond Landfill is properly closed and monitored and to prevent the establishment of a new mega-dump on the same leaky land. The Environmental Commissioner of Ontario has called this “Possibly the worst place for a landfill in Ontario”. With the help of the celebrated environmental lawyer Rick Lindgren, the group has scored some major successes. In 2006 the Minister of the Environment refused Waste Management’s first application for a mega-dump. In 2010 the MOE ordered Richmond Landfill closed. In 2012 the Concerned Citizens were granted Leave to Appeal the terms of the Environmental Monitoring Plan that Waste Management had proposed and the MOE had approved. In 2013 as part of the ongoing Environmental Review Tribunal the company and MOE have signed agreements that acknowledge that the dump is leaking, and that

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further investigation is required to know the extent of the leaking and to develop proposals for how to contain it. Every landfill produces leachate. This is a highly toxic liquid that contains thousands of chemicals. Literally everything that goes in the dump leaches out in this liquid. Think of old medication, think of industrial waste, think of old batteries, think of …. The real danger is that this poison finds its way into the ground water, household or farm wells and then the rivers and lakes. It poses a real danger. As noted in a previous SCOOP article leachate from the dump is trucked daily to an intake behind Napanee District Secondary School. Through the Napanee sewer system, it is delivered to the sewage treatment plant. Sludge from this plant has been finding its way to local farmer’s fields and eventually into our food chain. Yikes! It leaks! After years of denial by Waste Management and the Ministry of the Environment, there is finally a formal acknowledgement that it leaks. Something must be done to find out where it’s going, contain it and prevent further damage. Evidence of leaking has been found in the data that has been collected by Waste Management over the years. How could they have been denying these leaks for so long? How could the MOE have accepted these denials? These are difficult questions. As recently as this April a Waste Management ad that appeared in the Beaver and Guide claimed: There is no risk to public health or the environment. Wow! So the battle rages on. The dedicated Concerned Citizens group has received fantastic support as $20,000 was raised in a raffle to help pay for technical experts. (More is needed). With the help of these experts, they are winning the war of science. All experts now agree that the site is complex and difficult to monitor. There is no question that the site’s fractured bedrock is not a safe place for a mega-dump. Detailed contingency plans are being developed, and new protocols are in place for odour management and public notification. Just recently the Concerned Citizens, the Mohawks of the Bay of Quinte and the Canadian Environmental Law Association have collaborated to request Ontario Regulations to be amended to prevent the siting of new landfills or the expansion of existing landfills on geologically unsuitable locations like fractured bedrock. The application also requests that a new regulation would prohibit applications for landfills on or adjacent to sites that have had previous landfill applications declined for environmental reasons. If these requests are granted the Richmond Landfill battle would finally be over! The final choice to accept or reject the mega-dump, now branded ‘The Beechwood Road ENVIRONMENTAL Centre”, is a political decision. There is still much work to do to convince the politicians and their influencers. Those who would like to help or just keep up to date should check www.LeakyLand.com.

THE SCOOP • AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2013

From the Archives 19th Century Traffic Reports By Michael Saxe

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re you someone nostalgic for a time when life was slower and less stressful? Do you long for a simpler era when horse-drawn wagons and carriages were the primary mode of transport and the clip-clopping of horses’ hooves announced the arrival of neighbors at your door? Or do you embrace the GPS installed in your vehicle and look forward to the self-driving car? Whatever your sentiments on progress and transportation, most will admire how much technology has advanced our ability to move from A to B over the last 150 years. But while we may be able to move faster, are things better, or safer for us? Local archivist Cora Reid turned us on to some newspaper stories about equine accidents from the Napanee Beaver and the Napanee Intelligencer in the mid to late 1800s. While these traffic reports don’t compare to the problems experienced on our roads today, we’ve selected a few to share here to show how things have – and, to a degree, haven’t – changed. In June of 1880 Mr. Cornelius Clancy was driving across McKitterick’s Bridge in Forest Mills with his wife and daughter. Startled by stepping on a loose board on the bridge, the horse was frightened so badly that it jumped over the bridge, depositing Mr. Clancy and family into the Salmon River. The heroic Mr. Clancy carried both wife and daughter to shore under his arms, and no one was injured. In an interesting follow up story, it was reported that Mr. Clancy presented a bill to the Richmond Township Council for $25 to cover sustained damages. In response to council’s questioning on how Mr. Clancy arrived at such a figure, the newspaper writer offered the opinion that “each of the skeptical parties should take turns rehearsing Mr. Clancy’s experience.” Seems like a fair way to validate the claim, although one would assume that council would take a pass on

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the experience. In the same week that the Clancy family was splashing down in the Salmon River, Mr. Robert Page, of North Fredericksburgh, his wife and baby experienced a terrifying ordeal when the horse attached to their vehicle was frightened and began bucking out of control. Fearing that the reigns were not strong enough to hold the horse, Mr. Page leapt out of his vehicle to grab the horse by the head in order to calm the animal down. The horse then took off, with Mr. Page, still clinging to the horse’s neck. They came to a stop when the horse jammed Mr. Page into a wire fence, resulting in both wife and child being thrown from the vehicle. Thankfully, no serious injuries were sustained, although the wagon was a little worse for wear. Lastly, a sad story from Marlbank circa 1879 – after tying his horse “head and knee” to prevent the horse escaping the pasture, a farmer returned to find that the horse did in fact escape and was drowning in a nearby river. The farmer narrowly escaped drowning himself while attempting to rescue the horse, which did not survive. Are we confusing advancement for improvement? Has one set of problems replaced another, or are our modern accidents, breakdowns, malfunctions and operator-errors simply an evolution of the same old trials and tribulations that have always accompanied our desire for increased mobility. While we may no longer rely upon a horse and buggy to get us around, we still have careless drivers, “technical” difficulties, and infrastructure that crumbles beneath our feet – along with the thrill of the open road and the wonderful connections and luxuries that advanced mobility provide us with. Things may have gotten faster, but how much have times, or even human beings, really changed? Researched by Cora Reid

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Stocking Up the Harvest By Beverly Frazer

Plants For Sale Sold! By Mary Jo Field

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his has been a tough year for green thumbs, starting with a warmer than usual end to winter and then a colder than usual start to spring. We even saw some snow and frost in late May. The less than ideal start to the season saw gardeners rushing to the aid of their freshly sprouted plants, some rushing to cover them at night with blankets and straw in a bid to keep the frost from the roots and from the delicate new leaves. The rollercoaster growing season even saw temperatures as low as 6 degrees in late July and that came just after a heat wave scorched across the county and province.

hey say it takes a village to raise a child. I say it takes a community to host a successful plant sale. On Saturday, May 25 the Tamworth/ Erinsville GrassRoots Growers (GRG) held their fourth annual plant sale at Beaver Lake Park in Erinsville. It was a resounding success.

But for all that the gods threw at us this year, there is sure to be a harvest season after all: the corn is high, the tomatoes are filling out and the blueberries are ripe. The peaches near picking and other fruits will find that their time on the branch and vine has come to pass and they will make the incredible journey to the table and our plates. The most wonderful thing about harvest season isn’t the culinary delights it allow us to plate; it is the journey the fruits and vegetables make. Whether it is from a basket of potatoes and greens from an old friend, or a shopping bag full of delicious corn from the roadside stand you saw on way to the cottage or the six quarts of fresh strawberries picked at a family outing, the journey is really the wonder of it all.

Fast Favorite Garlic Dill Pickles

What can be more special than fresh harvested produce from friends, family and neighbours who proudly give you the bounty from their gardens? All the work that went into getting the produce to you is really a gesture of proud giving. What the gardens give is more than sustenance it’s love. The journey is months long: from sowing each seed into the ground regardless of sore knees and backs, to cleaning the dirt from under their fingernails, to harvesting each plant until it reaches your plate and heart. What a gift!

PREPARATION

So grab your favourite cookbook or family recipe, the journey isn’t over yet. Soon jars of pickles and jams will make it back to the barren shelves of pantries all across the county. It really is the journey. Enjoy! This is a great Pickle Recipe I found at www.epicurious.com.

Often called kosher-style dill pickles, these are quick to make. Use either small whole cucumbers or cut larger ones into quarters. For an additional interesting flavor, tuck a small dried hot red pepper into each jar. INGREDIENTS • 8-10 small pickling cucumbers (about 3 lbs/1.5 kg) • 2 cups (500 mL) white vinegar • 2 cups (500 mL) water • 2 Tbsp (25 mL) pickling salt • 4 heads fresh dill or 4 teaspoons dill seeds (20 mL) • 4 small cloves garlic

1. Cut a thin slice from the ends of each cucumber. 2. Meanwhile, combine vinegar, water, and salt in a saucepan and bring to a boil. 3. Remove hot jars from canner. 4. Place 1 head fresh dill or 1 tsp (5 mL) dill seeds and 1 clove garlic into each jar; pack in cucumbers. 5. Pour boiling vinegar mixture over cucumbers to within 1/2 inch (1 cm) of rim (head space). 6. Process 10 minutes for pint (500 mL) jars and 15 minutes for quart (1 L) jars.

With stiff breezes threatening to topple all the plants, the first order of the day was to move the plants and the tables to the more sheltered south side of the old train station. No small task, but many hands make light work - well, maybe not light, given the weight of the very heavy picnic tables. Two hours later everything had been relocated, re-organized and priced. Thanks to generous donations of plants the overall impression was of wellorganized abundance, colour and great variety. Despite the entreaties of early bird shoppers, the noble GRG folks held firm to the 10 o’clock opening time – it seems only fair to those who patiently wait for the official start. But once the (metaphorical) gates opened, eager buyers swarmed the perennial, annual, herb and vegetable seedling tables. A special children’s table with free seedlings proved popular and will likely be repeated next year. The increased number of requests for heritage varieties of vegetables and perennials was perhaps in part a reflection of the efforts of the GRG over the past few years to promote local and organic gardening. In any event, the interest in heritage varieties is encouraging. Did anyone see the article in the Globe and Mail recently stating that about 90% of the world’s broccoli seed is grown on one farm in Mexico? Besides the fact that broccoli from seed harvested in Mexico likely grows best in Mexico, what happens if disease or some

other catastrophe hits that farm? By noon, the frenzy had slowed to a dribble and the organizers and volunteers had time to contemplate both the reasons for the success of the sale and what they might do differently next year. Well-deserved thanks go out to everyone who contributed plants and seedlings, including the Lennox & Addington Horticultural and Garden Club who donated plants left over from their sale a week earlier. Special thanks go to all the volunteers and to Lois Smith whose popsicle-stick pricing system kept things moving briskly along in the checkout area. The Lions’ Club mushroom compost was a “no-show” apparently due to a breakdown in transport; we know some people came specifically for that compost and we hope they at least found a plant or two to mitigate their disappointment. In keeping with the community theme, it is worth noting the plants left over from the GRG sale went on to the Grandmothers by the Lake (Stephen Lewis Foundation) event held in Harrowsmith the following weekend, and contributed to their best sale ever. Proceeds from the GRG plant sale fund the various free events sponsored by the GRG during the year. Everyone is invited to these events. Tamworth/Erinsville GrassRoots Growers is a communitybased group whose main activities focus on encouraging interest in local and organic growing of both food and ornamental plants. We strive to raise awareness of issues surrounding food production and to improve our practical knowledge of gardening in all its glory. We welcome new members. Visit our website at http://te-grassrootsgrowers.weebly.com

Tip: Garlic may turn blue or green in the jar. Nothing to be alarmed about, it is only the effect of the acid on the natural pigments in the garlic. The complete recipe link is: http://www. epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/FastFavorite-Garlic-Dill-Pickles-230707

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NOTICE The Lions Compost Sale was cancelled because our volunteer truck driver’s truck blew an injector on Friday May 24 at 11 a.m. He called me right away, but it was too late to get another truck. We will try this again next year, but I will have the material on hand long before the sale. On behalf of the Lions Club of Tamworth I apologize for the inconvenience to any of our potential customers. LION FRANK ROWAN AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2013 • THE SCOOP

11


Lessons Learned Kids’ Olympics at Desert Lake I By Blair MacDonald

t is with good fortune that I was able to make it back to the area this summer. The weather may have been extreme at times (at least for what I remember as a typical July) but nonetheless it was great to return to familiar surroundings once again. There were a few things I thought about writing for this month’s column: the price of gas, the under-appreciated virtue of The Waltons, the unparalleled value of one dollar ice coffees from McDonald’s, but no, today I write on an idea that captured my attention the other night while watching (of all things) the ESPY awards: faith.

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For those that watch TSN religiously, and from what I’ve gathered, you either do or you don’t (there is no in-between on this), you’ll recall that they recently aired what I’ll call the Grammy’s of professional sports: the ESPY awards. In terms of engagement, I think most of us would agree that award shows can be hit or miss (for instance, The Huffington Post review of the night called the show spoiled by a lot of ‘celebrity fluff ’).

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Nonetheless, what makes these shows great is that sometimes, amidst the spectacle, something ‘real’, sincere and/or insightful can occur. The big award of the night was the Arthur Ashe Courage Award presented by Lebron James to Robin Roberts, a broadcast journalist with ESPN since the 1990’s and ABC’s Good Morning America who has recently overcome very public battles with both breast cancer and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS).

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ometimes in life, if you’re fortunate enough, you find a place that brings so much happiness and holds tons of memories. A place where you feel welcome no matter what. A place that keeps you smiling when you remember it long after you leave.

I could give to a new generation of kids this past Canada Day. Because, now, thirteen years after my stint as an Olympic athlete, I work at Desert Lake Family Resort and I was recently given the task of organizing and coordinating the 2013 Kids’ Olympics.

For me, this place is found on a windy road, at the tip of Desert Lake.

This was a daunting task. How was I going to live up to my own experience? I wanted it to be the same, but different—I wanted to put my mark on it without ruining it completely. I spent quite a bit of time brainstorming with friends and family and I finally decided on my events. I would run the Water Balloon Triathlon, the Olympic Ring Event, the Golf Ball Sprint, the Great Potato Sack Race, and the Wet Sponge Relay.

Since I was a young child, my family and I have spent many hours pitching tents, blowing up air mattresses, swimming, kicking around the soccer ball, enjoying In her acceptance speech, she expressed cotton candy, and even trick or treating her gratitude for her career and the at Desert Lake Family Resort. It has support of family and colleagues always been our favourite place to throughout her years in broadcasting. of wonderful “Hope, Purpose & Belongingcamp—full in Long Term Care”people and Of special interest was her perspective bulging with excitement. on overcoming adversity. She talked about how her triumph came when she Perhaps the event that was the most fun was able to find the meaning in what for me at Desert Lake was the annual she was going through and transform Kids’ Olympics held every Canada Day her experience into something positive weekend for the last fifteen years, give or while nonetheless battling through it. take. It consists of several creative and What she learned was as simple as her fun Olympic-style events designed to motto: “When fear knocks, faith opens get the kids excited, but also to promote the door.” teamwork and fair play. After all, at Desert Lake, everybody’s a winner. While it is true that faith and fear go hand in hand, this got me thinking: There have been many different events is faith strictly a religious concept? over the years, everything from balloon Perhaps she was indeed talking about toss to jawbreaker discus—where you divine faith, but could she not also literally see how far you can spit a be talking about faith as personal jawbreaker. I know all of this because I fortitude, faith in oneself, or simply, was a proud member of Team Canada faith in a future imagined otherwise? in the Desert Lake Family Resort 2000 Kids’ Olympics. It was a family affair and I’m not sure. I think that the real power my sisters competed along my side. of faith emerges from the feelings that 47 Dundas St. Etell•you Napanee are formed from our connection with I honestly couldn’t what place we something bigger than the personal, finished, where 613.354.6601 we stood on the podium, in the belief of our role in something or what prize we won, but I know that greater than us of which we play an www.napaneechamber.ca we had a lot of fun that day. I made a few essential part. In this sense, faith is friends, got a little wet, and spent some no small feeling, but perhaps, a larger quality time with my family—it was all than life force that, as Roberts alluded a kid could ever ask for on a beautiful to, really is the foundation for all our summer day. accomplishments. And honestly, it was what I was hoping

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The day of the Olympics came and I was nervous. I desperately wanted everyone to have as much fun as I had. And they did. The events went off flawlessly (with a little help from some volunteers and parents). And by the end, I realized I shouldn’t have been worried. Because it’s not about what you’re doing, it’s about the people you’re with and the feel of the experience and it might have a little to do with the place you’re at. Not long after the 2013 Kids’ Olympics, I found an old picture of Team Canada standing proudly on the grounds of Desert Lake. And in it I found a scrawny, but happy little girl grinning much like most of the kids participating in the same event many years later.


gwynneth glendenning The First Hundred Years By Barry Lovegrove

J

ust recently I had the pleasure of photographing a 100 year “young lady” and when I say lady I mean it in the true essence of the word. Gwynneth Glendenning turned 100 last May 8th. Gwynneth and her daughter-in-law Donna McNeil share a home together in the outskirts of Tamworth. I drove down a long winding driveway until I came to their beautiful post and beam woodframed house that is embraced with gorgeous flower gardens that stretch out into the surrounding rocks. The view was filled with an abundance of textures and colour. I had to stop for a minute just to look at the way the gardens had been carefully and meticulously laid out to fit in with the surroundings. I was welcomed at the door by Donna and a small white poodle named Danny that had more licks than bites. Donna led me to the part of the house that had been built especially for her in-laws: Gwynneth and her late husband Herbert. Gwynneth was sitting in a comfortable chair next to a window overlooking the garden with a book in her hand and a Globe and Mail crossword puzzle sitting on the table next to her. It didn’t take long for fourteen year old Danny to jump up and nestle in beside her.

Gwynneth has been living here for the last nine years but sadly her husband Herbert passed away in 2004 three month after they moved in. Gwynneth loves to read in fact she devours books as fast as Joan Larkin, the Tamworth Librarian, can get the large print versions for her. She also has an appetite for crossword puzzles that goes back to around 1927 when one of her teachers in her school in England planted the seed and it has never stopped growing. On top of all this Gwynneth is a prizewinning gardener with a green thumb which is still very much working. Gwynneth started the beautiful gardens that surround their home when she first arrived. She said, “It took me about four years to get it where I was satisfied.” She still works in the garden everyday even on the hot sunny summer days we have been having lately. “This year the broccoli isn’t doing that well but the tomatoes are coming on nicely,” she told me as we walked around the garden for a little while. She identified the different plants while I took a couple of photos of her at work. Gwynneth has lived a rich and interesting life. She and her husband Herbert moved to Canada from England in 1951 and she traveled around the world accompanying her husband Herbert who worked for Alcan. Always active and seeking challenges, at eighty years of age she became a gold medalist in table tennis. One of her granddaughters Kristin Muller put together a beautiful coffee table book for her 100 birthday; it is filled with family photos creating a timeline of her life that will be a keepsake for family members.

been so nice to me.” I feel personally blessed to have had the time to sit with Gwynneth and hear her stories and watch her puttering in her garden. I asked her what her plans are for the next hundred years. She just looked at me and smiled. One hundred years young, she’s amazing!

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There is a special closeness between Gwynneth and her daughter-in-law Donna which is really nice to see. Over the past one hundred years Gwynneth has been to a lot of places and has experienced lots of things. But she told me, “I love living here in Tamworth gwynneth works every day in her garden. and the people here have

 What are you waiting for! Guiding is the place for today’s girls and women. Girl Guides offers girls and women fun-filled opportunities to discover new interests, use their talents, challenge themselves and learn valuable leadership and life skills. Our programs explore issues that are important to girls, giving them the tools they need to be confident, courageous and resourceful, and to make a difference in the world. REGISTER TODAY! Make a difference in the lives of girls and they’ll make a difference in yours. VOLUNTEER TODAY!

For more information visit www.girlguides.ca or call 1-800-565-8111 AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2013 • THE SCOOP

13


A Natural View Rock Dunder is a Climb to the Top of the World By Terry Sprague

W

hen I attended elementary school back in the 1950s, all of us kids always looked forward to visiting “The Big Stone” on Arbour Day. It was located at the back of a farm not far from the school, and we would spend the afternoon clambering up to the top of this huge erratic, one of several that had been deposited in this field during the days of the Wisconsin Glacier. Some 60 years later, I visited the big stone again, only this time, it seemed to have shrunk considerably in size. Certainly I have seen erratics much larger than this two-metre high midget – most notably, the seven metre high Bleasdell Boulder near Frankford, but our big stone seemed really big to us as kids at the time. In fact, the big stone left such an impression on me as a child, I even included mention of it in my book, Up Before Five – the Family Farm.

The igneous feature we wandered about on was beautiful pink granite, more than a billion years old. This is true Canadian Shield, part of that extension known as the Frontenac Arch or Axis. If you follow this backbone of eastern North America far enough, you will come to the Adirondack Mountains. Lake Ontario actually owes its existence to this outlier of the rugged Canadian Shield. As glaciers carved out the basins of what was to become the Great Lakes, these basins filled with water and eventually overflowed in their search for the sea, finding it initially down the Oswego River. As the glaciers continued to retreat and the land rose higher, Lake Ontario found a new exit towards the east, spilling between the giant hills of granite. The numerous hummocks of protruding rock became the Thousand Islands in this now flooded landscape.

In comparison the stone, named Rock Dunder that we were now standing on is 84 metres, or 275 feet in height, and I cautiously duck-walked my way out onto the narrow horn that towered above the cavernous space below. In the distance, a greenery of forest tops seemed to go on forever. Just to the north was Jones Falls with its lock station and historic Arch Dam. To the southeast, we could clearly see the distinctive shape of the Thousand Islands Skydeck, even without binoculars. This is one huge rock and we had been walking on this rocky terrain for about an hour. Morton Bay lay nestled below us, and a stone’s throw away, the unmistakable tracing of the Rideau Canal as it made its way to the lock station at Jones Falls.

In geological terms, Rock Dunder is a pluton, a distinctive mass of igneous rock, not unlike Foley Mountain at the nearby village of Westport. In geology, a pluton is a body of intrusive igneous rock, called plutonic rock that crystallized from magma slowly cooling below the surface of the earth. References say that it took form in the roots of the Grenville Mountains that a billion years ago towered over this part of Laurentia, the ancient geological core that is North America. One can’t help but be overwhelmed by the enormity of Rock Dunder and its dizzying height. Soil is sparse up here and shrubs and trees are stunted and gnarled. In places, as we followed the trail, pitch pine with its tiny clusters of needles growing out the trunks fought for nourishment in the thin soil. Rock Dunder and nearby Jones Falls represent the northernmost stands of this southern tree species in North America. Trees of any kind at the summit are rare enough that only a few can be found where trail arrows have been attached. Elsewhere, blue arrows have been painted on the rocks to guide hikers along the way. Now and again, a thoughtfully placed Inukshuk points the direction.

So, what is the origin of the name, Rock Dunder? No one seems to know. The Internet’s Urban Dictionary says that “dunder” is a combination of the words dirty and underwear. Okay. Another entry makes reference to a person who is utterly useless and incoherent. It goes on to say that the IQ of this person almost always matches, or is close to, that of an average person’s shoe size. The dregs from a rum barrel. Another claims it is a word for a drunk. And last, but not least, a polite word for “cutting the cheese”. Hardly flattering definitions – any of them - for such a spectacular piece of property.

In places, the trail is similar to Kaladar’s Sheffield Conservation Area, a mere four kilometres or so in length, but one which takes a good two hours to complete due to its extreme ruggedness. Unlike Sheffield

Terry ventures out onto the horn at Rock Dunder, 275 feet above the ground below. Photo credit Mike Burge. though, the trail at Rock Dunder is a perpetual climb, broken only by brief stretches of rocky level ground. Forming a loop, the trail descends, passing by two deserted cabins, a reminder of the days when this 230-acre property was a wilderness Boy Scout camp for forty years. The squared timbered structures are now convenient rest stops for weary hikers. The property was purchased several years ago by the Rideau Waterway Land Trust whose praiseworthy intentions are to preserve this remarkable wilderness area as part of the United Nations designated “Frontenac Arch Biosphere Reserve.” There are two loops in the property’s trail system; the hike from the parking lot to the summit is five kilometres in length and is indeed the most rugged. Another, less challenging trail, is only two kilometres in length. Both reconnect to a one kilometre easy gravelled trail back to the parking lot where there are washrooms, benches and a plaque secured to a backdrop of granite rock recognizing forty major donors who made the purchase of this property possible.

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EXPLORER’S

Rock Dunder is located a half hour’s drive north of Kingston, on the southern edge of the village of Morton. Entrance is via Stanley Ash Lane, directly across from the Township of Rideau Lakes welcome billboard. Terry Sprague lives in Prince Edward County and is self-employed as a professional interpretive naturalist. For more information on birding and nature and guided hikes, check out the NatureStuff website at www.naturestuff. net.

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The Scoop Backroader Spelunking the Tyendinaga Cavern Story and photos by Stella Thompson “The cave you fear to enter holds the treasure you seek. Fear of the unknown is our greatest fear. While caution is a useful instinct, we lose many opportunities and much of the adventure of life if we fail to support the curious explorer within us.” Joseph Campbell

T

he day was unbearably hot. The sun was relentless and the humidex level was high. A perfect day to go underground where the temperature is a constant 10°C. I called up my friend Mirielle and suggested we take a day trip down some back roads and explore the Tyendinaga Cavern – the largest known cavern in Ontario. I assured her that we’d find some relief from the heat, but also learn a few things about caves. Tweed residents and cavern owners Charles and Elizabeth Koch purchased seventy acres on the Harmony Road west of the Shannonville Road almost twenty years ago and have spent most of those years exploring, excavating, clearing boulders and debris away and turning the site into a tourist destination. There’s ample room for parking and you can make arrangements for a guided tour at the gate when you purchase your tickets. A covered area holds a wonderful display of fossils and rocks from the cavern. The property may look like any farmer’s field, but under the ground lie hundreds of feet of passageways, caves and a large cavern.

walls dated back to 1817 and in one of the side passage there was evidence that someone was there in 1812. Sinkholes, which are really entrances to underground caves, were uncovered and he set to work to discover what lay buried beneath the surface. Three solution caves (limestone caves) were discovered and were identified as: the water cave, the hour glass cave and the soda straw cave. The water cave has been explored to a depth of 60 feet and serves as an excellent indicator of the rise and fall of the water table depending on the type of spring we have. It’s been closed to the public because it’s too dangerous. The hourglass cave is named for its unique shape. It is 100 feet long, 6 wide and 7 high and lies 20 feet below the surface. The formations are well preserved and the Kochs hope to open this cave to the public sometime in the future. The soda straw cave named for the soda straw formations is also closed to preserve the formations.

Our guide, Emma Riley, a second year Carleton university student, was brimming with enthusiasm and facts. She explained the various fossils found in the area: common sponges can still be seen trapped in the rock along with sea shells and pieces of coral. Squid-like creatures called Cephalods are clearly visible after she points them out to us. These sea creatures date back to the Ordovician and Silurian time periods (300 – 450 million years ago) when one of the largest major extinction events in Earth’s history took place.

Charles closed the entrance to the cavern after buying the property to preserve and encourage the growth of cave formations which require a stable temperature. Centuries of freezing and thawing and interference from people have had a negative impact on the cave ecosystem. But after spending years clearing out the debris he started to prepare the cavern for visitors. A set of stairs leads us down to the entrance to the cavern; huge metal doors swing close as soon as one is inside. With electric lighting, a poured cement floor, and stone steps with hand railings, it is quite easy to move from one level to the next.

The existence of the cavern was common knowledge in the area and when the Kochs bought the property they found debris left behind by people who had entered the cave. Graffiti carved into the

Along one side of the cavern Charles built a wishing well where visitors can thrown in coins and make a wish or they can aim to land their coin into a circle of coins and win a prize. He used a cenote (which

is a sinkhole that has collapsed in the limestone bedrock thus exposing groundwater below) reinforced the sides and added Emma Riley guides visitors through the cavern, a railing for safety pointing out different formations of flowstones. reasons. Mirielle and I were amazed with the clarity of the water – it was wanted to create images before our eyes, invisible. We learned that cenote water but really we were facing nothingness, is extremely clear because it’s really rain the ultimate terror for humans. The only water that has been filtered as it moves living creatures that inhabit this lightless slowly through the ground shedding any world are bats. The Tydendinaga cave is suspended particulate matter. home to big brown, little brown and east pipastrelle bats that hibernate in the As we walked through the cavern, which cavern during the winter, leaving in the lies 35 feet below the surface, measures early spring and returning in the late fall. 22 feet floor to ceiling and includes 300 Spiders sometimes get in when the doors feet of side passages some of which you are open but they are found only in the can explore with a flashlight, we stopped entrance way to the cavern. to examine the various formations. Emma explained to us that speleothems We left the cavern reluctantly; there’s are cave formations of calcite deposits a great attraction to being beneath the formed when water flows down the earth’s surface, to be surrounded only by walls or along the floors of the caves rocks and water. The doors opened and depositing minerals after the water welcomed us back into the heat and the can no longer hold them in a solution. light. There are different forms depending on whether the water drips, seeps, For information about visiting the condenses or flows. Flowstones are Tyendinaga caves call: 613-919-5686 or sheet-like in appearance. Stalactites drip 613-478-5708. Visit their website at www. down from the ceiling, and soda straws tyendinagacaves.blogspot.com or email are hollow, very thin and long stalactites. them at tyendinagacaves@gmail.com. She also pointed out small knobs of formations she called cave mushrooms. Napanee District Community Foundation At the end of our tour, Emma told us to stand still for a minute. Suddenly we were plunged into complete darkness when she turned off all the lights. A velvety blackness enveloped us – not a crack of light anywhere. With no visual sensory information our mind

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11 Concession St. S., Tamworth, ON

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AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2013 • THE SCOOP

15


great Music at the Sharbot Lake Inn By Barry Lovegrove

I

t seems to me that these days you don’t have to go very far for some live entertainment. Just recently my wife and I visited The Sharbot Lake Inn which overlooks Sharbot Lake north on 38 HWY. If you’re driving from the Kingston area it’s about 45 minutes. We headed crosscountry from Erinsville and it took about the same amount of time. We went on a Friday evening and found out that Andrew James O’Brian and Catherine Allen were performing. Andrew James O’Brian is a three times music Newfoundland and Labrador Award Winner. Catherine Allen sings harmony and plays mandolin ,piano and accordion. They sing a lot of original songs and their performance was wonderful. The atmosphere in the Inn and the close proximity to the performers made you feel very much at home. Between the musical sets, I sat down and talked to Sandra White co-owner of the Inn along with her husband Frank. They have been the owners since May of 2010 so this is their third year of operation. Sandra described their business and life in Sharbot Lake: “Things have been going very well and we have seen an increase in business since we bought the Inn. Bringing in live acts has certainly helped to attract new customers and we have a good reputation because of the quality of the bands and singers that we bring in. We hear about them by word of mouth and we’ve started to learn that side of the business quite well.

Sandra & Frank White.

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“Frank and I are originally from Stephenville Crossing on the west coast of Newfoundland and because of those ties we have brought in some great acts from out east. Andrew James O’Brian and Catherine Allen who are playing this evening, are no exception. We have had Sherman Downey and the Ambiguous Case from Corner Brook, Newfoundland - they were the winners of this year’s CBC’s Searchlight Competition. We keep our website up-to-date with coming events so customers can look on line to check our future line-up.

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Our services are offered in: Napanee, Deseronto, Amherstview, Bath, Odessa, and Tamworth. Home visits are also available.

613-354-8937 ext. 115 or 154

“It’s really a family business, our daughter Jessica is our main chef and one of our other daughters Jennifer cooks mostly in the daytime. It’s a busy life as we also have a horse farm so there is no shortage of things to do. We have a great local staff and of course we can’t say enough about our regular customers that just keep coming back. They help make the Inn what it is today giving it a true down home-friendly feeling. “Our future plans are to turn the nine motel units into long term rentals but as I said that’s in the future. We have enough to keep us going at the moment.” It was a great evening so folks, if you are passing by and would like to drop in The Sharbot Lake Inn is open every day from 11:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. except for entertainment evenings when they stay open much longer. All the information that you need to find Sharbot Lake Inn is on their website: www.sharbotlakeinn.com. 16

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613.561.4233

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QUALITY WORKMANSHIP || 15+ YEARS EXPERIENCE || DESIGN & BUILD

THE SCOOP • AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2013


grace Centre Art Exhibition By Kate Kristiansen

T

he newly renovated Grace Community Centre in Sydenham is a beautiful and spacious multiuse venue. The Arts Committee is kicking of Cultural Days with a new exhibition of regional artists on September 29th from 2 pm to 4pm. “Art contributes to the broader well being of the community,” said Wilma Kenny, who is a member of the Grace Centre Arts Committee. Cultural Days is a national celebration of all forms of art and culture across Canada. In an effort to build links between artists and community, the Arts Committee decided to hold an event to launch art exhibitions during this year’s annual Cultural Days. The former Anglican Church (now known as The Grace Centre) was built in 1861 and served not only as a place of worship but also as a meeting place for the community to gather. Much of the original log frame, brick and stonework remain intact. The sloping floor and walls have been updated to enable a variety of uses for the community today such as: Sparks and Brownies, Art exhibitions, Music, Yoga, Taoist Tai Chi, VON Smart exercise program, Alzheimer Support Group, Caregiver Support and many other services. In October 2012, the new centre opened in the renovated Grace Hall. The Arts Committee was thrilled to host a special event to mark this transformation. “The opening was a broad range of work from music, poetry and food – everyone had a marvelous time,” Wilma, who has a permanent installation in the front of the Grace Hall, told me. This Heritage Exhibit was made possible through a grant from Canadian Heritage to assist and kick off the centre. The objective of the committee is to provide direction for the development of Grace Hall to include an arts/ cultural/ heritage center, all of which will celebrate the diversity of expression in the Southern/Central Frontenac Community. Wilma is one of many tireless volunteer artists who work on the Arts Committee. Other members of The Arts Committee, which is a volunteer group of professional artists, include: Jill Fergusen – painter Hanna Back – sculptor Rose Stewart – abstract painter Don Connelly – painter Nonna Mariotti – Board Member and on Arts Committee – (representing SFCC)

For the exhibition, Frontenac artists submitted their work for review by the Arts Committee. “The Committee was impressed with all of the submissions,” said Hanna Back. “It’s going to be difficult to choose which artists to exhibit at Grace Hall.” The September show will consist of three local selected artists: Theresa Mrozick, David Gilmore and Denise Tipton. Each artist will share their background, the techniques they use, the source of inspiration and philosophy behind their work during a twenty minute talk. Art is available for sale and a portion of the sales and commission will be donated to the Centre. Kathryn O’Hara, Fund Development Coordinator for the South Frontenac Community Services which provides health support and social support services to the area, is responsible for maintaining Grace Hall and welcomes the support, which the Arts Committee provides. “We have amazing local artists. The Arts Committee supports our overall mandate for the community centre,” said Kathryn. “They are a very generous group of volunteers. It takes hours to organize these events. We are very lucky to have such an amazing group to not only help with these much needed fundraising events but for their collective creativity when we need it too. I often reach out to them for help brainstorming ideas for other SFCSC activities,” says Kathryn. 80% of funding for the South Frontenac Community Services comes from the Local Health Integrated Network. With 726 clients in the region, SFCSC provided over 11,000 services. Service levels have increased by 15% in two years despite a 0% funding increase in both years. “This year we are launching the first ever Donor Campaign. Our total operating budget is over $800,000,” said Kathryn. “Non-profit organizations need a minimum of six months operating costs to cover extra costs; we have about 4.8 % of the minimum savings required. To maintain our services we need support from the community. “We hope that local community residents will show their support by attending one of the many events organized by the Arts Committee at Grace Hall or perhaps leave a legacy donation in their will or a gift annuity.” Anyone interested to do so should contact Kathryn O’Hara to

specific how they would like their donation applied. Call: 613-3766477 ext. 205, email Kathryn. ohara@sfcsc. ca or donate online at w w w. s fc s c . ca. For more information on upcoming a r t i s t submissions p l e a s e visit www. sfcsc.ca or contact Arts Committe e Members H a n n a Back, 613372-5240, or Rose Stewart, 613-3723656.

Wilma Kenny, member of the grace Centre Arts Committee.

The next deadline for submissions is October 15 for shows in January, February, March 2014. Please send your application to Hanna Back mailing address: 3261 Holleford Road, Hartington On K0H 1W0.

Kate Kristiansen is owner of The Hummingbird Studio and works as a freelance writer. You can contact her at hummingbirdmktg@gmail.com or follow her blog on www.LadydinesAlot.com for her weekly food column.

Below is a list of other events. For more information contact Grace Hall 4295 Stagecoach Road, Sydenham or online at www.sfcsc.ca. *Volunteer for the Community Garden – all produce goes back to the local food bank and seniors programs.

Your vacation wardrobe starts here!

*Crock Pot Cooking classes Sept. 24 & Nov 19th – Join in the fun, learn a new recipe, receive a crock-pot, utensils and ingredients. Contact Elizabeth Petersen 613-376-6477 ext. 203

Patio dining?

*Caregiver Support Centre – Drop by the adult group and seek support and advice – Contact Mary Gaynor Briese 613-376-6477 ext. 305 *Diners Club – Monthly opportunity for seniors to enjoy entertainment and a meal for only $11.00 To participate contact Bob Abrams – T. 613-376-6477 ext. 303

new dresses just arrived, in time for casual gatherings with friends

Sand'n'Sea

summer essentials with your perfect fit in size 2 or 24, and collect Loyalty Points too.

3 Dundas  St.West  of  Centre,  Napanee

613.354.3545

Relaxed Hours  =  Tues.  thru  Sat. sand n sea.napanee

www.

sand n seaboutique.com

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2013 • THE SCOOP

17


Meet... The Woodlands: New Owners of the Marlbank Convenience Store I By Linda Selkirk

Watching patrons come and go in an almost endless stream and observing many standing out front catching up on news from friends, you quickly realize that this store sits at the heart of the community. Along with fresh produce and a wide variety of grocery items, ice cream and chips are popular purchases. As time passes more items will be stocked. The Woodland creed is: “If we can get it, we will get it”. Special requests and seasonal summer items include clothing, deli meats, fishing

OPEN: Mon. - Fri. 8 - 7 Sat. 8 - 6 Sun. 11 - 5

Annual Customer Appreciation BBQ CHECKAugust US OUT 24, FOR11ALL Saturday a.m.YOUR - 4 p.m. GrOCerY Needs & MORE! FREE DRAW PRIZES, FREE HOTDOGS , HAMBURGERS, DRINKS , ICE CREAM, CAKE, COFFEE & MUCH MORE! BALLOONS & GAMES FOR THE KIDS!

Freshminiature Bakeryhorses • Deli • Produce • Fresh Cut Meats LIVE BAND from the Tiny Hooves Miniature Horse Club

South of Seven

Donations are being accepted for the Beaver Lake Swim Program 672 Addington St., Tamworth 613-379-2440

672 Addington Street, Tamworth

613-379-2440

CHALK WELL DRILLING

LTD.

Established since 1922

Wells for home, farm & industry Rotary & cable tool drilling • • • •

Prompt service Free estimates Pump installations & service Wells decommissioned & abandoned

ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED Licensed by the Ministry of the Environment 18

THE SCOOP • AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2013

Drop by and meet Kerry, Faith, and their son Levi at their new store. gear and fresh bait. They stock Quinn’s Meats and Wilton cheese and jellies as well. From a gallery in Oakville, Canadian paintings are now on display for sale. For those of us who savour our morning cups of Joe, fresh locally roasted coffee is offered. Their hours of operation, from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays, enable customers to stop in at all hours. They do relish being closed for some well-earned downtime on Sundays.

Look for the History Wall, which is a work in progress. Located near the front of the store it will celebrate current and past events in the area as well as the lives of those who chose to make their home here over many years. If you have memorabilia or pictures of the area, stop by and add them to the History Wall. If you haven’t been there, the Marlbank Convenience Store should be on your “bucket list” this summer.

c i r o t His Downtown Napanee

Scarecrow

Festival

• Live Music “ Cangig Country Showcase “ • Local Artisan and Vendor Booths • 4-H BBQ • Lots of Children’s Activities • 4-H Livestock Demonstrations • Cow Pattie Bingo • BeaverTails Thousand Islands And Much More!

Contact: The Napanee BIA at 613-354-9508 or napaneebia@bellnet.ca

RR 6 Napanee

1-800-850-2881 chalkwel@kos.net

Saturday Sept, 21, 10am - 3pm Downtown on Dundas St. & Market Square &D

EE

Driving by the Marlbank Convenience Store, you might not realize how large it is or how much it offers. From stamps and post office boxes to video rentals and

Kerry knows the community well after spending many years at the family cottage on Lime Lake and for the past five years he and Faith and their children have lived in the area. With three boys and a girl in the family it will be well staffed for many years to come. Solomon, their son, is already a fixture there. As the family’s children are home-schooled, they benefit from the normal range of subjects covered as well as a hands-on programme in running a prosperous business!

Downtown

PA N

This store has been an important part of life for those living in Marlbank for years and now more history will be written. For more than 20 years Charlie Poirier and his son, Doug, owned and operated this store and provided the local community with staples and summer visitors with camping, biking and cottage needs. When Charles Poirier passed on, it was a huge loss to the community and he is sorely missed. Doug took the reins and kept everything thriving until May 1st of this year when Faith and Kerry officially took up the challenge of maintaining the reputation of their business and adding their own ideas and new product lines. A power outage during the very first week wasn’t welcome but they forged ahead.

fresh baking, there is not much you can’t find there. There are plans to stock Phyloxia’s products including their beeswax candles now that Phyloxia has re-located.

NA

f you drive north up Hwy 41 you will see signs for the hamlet of Marlbank. Take the exit and as you drive along the pastoral country road, you’ll see lovely new homes being built amid the old homestead. In the village you’ll find a newly-risen Phoenix Restaurant and in the Marlbank Convenience Store you can meet its new owners - Faith and Kerry Woodland. Just down the road the proposed Dragon Lake spa will attract even more visitors to Marlbank.

CH

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Barry’s Photo Tip By Barry Lovegrove

E

veryone has a camera these days but how much time do you actually spend thinking about the photograph you are about to take?

look like. Remember that what you see through it will be what you get. Here are a couple of examples I took of a barn on Hwy 41.

One of the most important elements to consider when taking a photograph is Composition. The right composition can turn a photo from a good picture to a great picture. Let your view finder be your guide to what the final photo will

Focus on composition when taking your next shots. See what a difference it can make. There will be another tip in the next issue of The Scoop... Till next time keep that camera handy...

Tamworth Soccer

S

occer came to Tamworth in 2000/2001 thanks to the hard work of the Tamworth Lions, Stone Mills Township and a lot of volunteer workers. Together they built a soccer field just behind the Fire Station and the Family Food Market. Over the years there has been a steady increase in the Stone Mills Soccer Association. Every year there are more and more families getting involved. This year is no exception with over 240 children playing from the ages of four up to seventeen years. Teams are made up into groups like U5, U17 meaning (under five and under seventeen). This year there were four teams under 5, four under seven, four under 9, four under 12 and two under seventeen that play Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 6:00 to 8:00pm. The viewing benches are filled with mums, dads, grandparents and siblings encouraging every move the players make - especially when activity is taking place around the goal. Recently a group of soccer mums gather Monday evening at 7:00 p.m. to kick off their own game. According to the mums there is no referee. Relaxed rules are well

used and they just have a lot of fun. No age limit or experience is required and if you don’t want to play you can come out and just watch and shout out some encouragement. Some of the mums bring their children and they pick their own game up while their mums are chasing the ball around on the other half of the pitch. They play in the evening air while getting fit for about an hour. What more could you ask for? A special thanks goes out to the organizing committee, the Tamworth Lions that have taken over the maintenance of the Soccer Pitch along with Stone Mills Township. It has never looked better... Kudos go to all the referees and the volunteer coaches who patiently teach children the fine art of playing soccer and building team spirit among all the players. Thank You! If you are interested in playing with The Soccer Mums or getting involved you can email for info at soccer@stonemills.com or check it out at Tamworth’s website www.tamworth.ca.

Consider photo #1: If you just want to take a photo of the barn, ask yourself: why do you want to take that photo? Use your zoom feature on the camera to get closer to the image of the barn. Look at the barn and see how the light falls on it. Look at what surrounds the barn. Change the angle. Change your position a couple of times. Take in the country side and its surrounding settings, smell the air and be a part of it. Let your photo tell a story.

Consider photo #2: Here is the barn in question set back in a field of wheat that has wonderful old trees close by. By including them in your frame, the photograph of the barn gains much more presence and interest. Remember composition is very important to the outcome of a great photo.

Clothes, jewelry, and shoes

50% OFF

until AUGUST 18

New Hours: Wednesday By appt Thursday & Sunday 10 - 2 Friday 10 - 5 Saturday 11-5

100 St George St, Deseronto Phone: 613- 396-2874 Cell: 613-539-0491

Soccer moms Kelly Kouri, Carrie-Lee Jeffrey, Tammy Newton, Margaret Long and Lisa Clarey.

facebook.com/ComeAndSeeTrishasCloset AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2013 • THE SCOOP

19


Robert Storring

Broker

OFFICES 44 Industrial Blvd. Napanee 14 Concession St. Tamworth LONg LAKE Fabulous sunsets are free and plentiful with the western views over Long Lake. Tidy cottage has 2 bedrooms and 3 bunkies in the double garage. Level lot, good shoreline, with great swimming for kids. 3 piece bath has shower and is on septic system. Access all year round. $169,900 MLS 13603725 100 ACRES

Hiking, riding, hunting, cross country skiing, nature photography, bird and wildlife watching are all right at your front door step on your own property. Back to nature, serenity & privacy would best describe private spot 10 minutes from 401. Mostly wooded, and a dug pond near the home. Open concept, vaulted ceiling, 3 bdrms, 2 baths, hdwd floors, granite counters, front & back decks, fireplace & central air. See www.privatehomeacreage.com

$399,900

MLS 13603805

A SUPER BUY! Village home has it all! Updated kitchen, nice size living/ dining rms, main floor laundry & half bath, family room with doors to deck, 3 bdrms & bath with jacuzzi tub and separate shower on 2nd floor. Single garage, large corner lot and paved drive complete the picture. Call now, a super buy! See www.villagefamilyhome.com

$179,900

MLS 13604677

SALMON RIVER FARM Maple bush, beautiful rolling land, and Salmon River are some of the features of this 156 acre farm near Tamworth. Older home with wide plank and hardwood floors, recently painted, some updates. Large barn and various sheds typical of an older homestead. Land divided by road so part could be sold off without severance. See www.salmonriverfarm.com

$319,900

MLS 13603001

CONTACT Direct: Office: Toll Free:

613-379-2903 613-354-4347 1 866-233-2062 storring@kos.net robert.storring@century21.ca

CHERYL FURLONG Sales Representative

DIRECT: 613-217-3330 EMAIL: cherylfurlong07@aol.com

www.cherylfurlong.com

2018 Centreville Road, Stone Mills Beautiful 2 acre lot for children or pets to play plus well equipped play ground nearby. For the retiree, vegetable & flower gardens & shop for the hobbyist. Custom built Angel stone, 3 bdrm home, 2 baths on first & second floors & balcony off master bedroom. Family room on main level with large deck for entertaining. Attached garage and large detached 30 x 50 garage/ workshop. Asking$325,000 MLS13605079

1583 Lake Road, Stone Mills Great family home w/ lots of original character in village setting on Lg lot w/ Lg detached garage. Home offers 3 bedrooms, 4pc bath. Main living area offers 2pc bath, formal living/ dining room w/ country kitchen w/ abundance of oak cupboards. Large bright main floor family room & large rec. room for the kids to have their own space. Great community w/ schools, store & recreational field close by. Asking $229,000 MLS#13605185

VACANT LAND - LOT#1, COUNTY ROAD 14, STONE MILLS 2.5 Acre building lot located on well maintained road just minutes from village. Lot offers mixture of trees with level terrain. Great well and water in area. Just a short drive (20 min) north between Kingston and Napanee. Asking $45,000 MLS13603918 Finest Realty Inc., Brokerage

Independently Owned and Operated

gar & a W

Myatt L td.

Real Estate Brokerage

www.wagarmyatt.com

85F SOUTH SHORE DRIVE, BEAVER LAKE A Neat Little Package! Hop, skip and jump into the lake. Here’s a rare opportunity for your family. A wonderful little cottage on Beaver Lake. This tidy summer home

112A Industrial Blvd., Box 384 Napanee, Ontario K7R 3P5 Bus: 613-354-3550 . Fax: 613-354-3551 Toll Free: 1-866-461-0631 Cell: 613-484-0933 BARRY BRUMMEL Email: barrybrummel@sympatico.ca Sales Representative

HOUSE TO HOME SERVICE

comes fully furnished with fridge, stove, kitchen table, living room furniture and beds. Currently set up to sleep 7 quite comfortably. The waterfront is outstanding with dock and gradual decline to the deeper water. There’s even a sitting area by the water for your outdoor picnics and campfires. Lake intake for water supply and holding tank for septic. Woodstove for those cooler nights or for your winter visits to enjoy the ice fishing. It’s not big in size but it is BIG on value for your family! Be sure to call today to set up a time to see it for yourself.

$154,500 MLS 13606298

20

THE SCOOP • AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2013

• General excavation - land clearing, basements, retaining walls, trenching, etc. • Septic systems - design and licensed installer • Landscaping • Trucking - sand, gravel and topsoil • Demolition - buildings, barns, etc. For all your excavating needs call RICK at

Phone: 613-388-2460 Cell: 613-561-6585

Email: rick.tuepah@gmail.com


Inspiration Blues Free to Be Happy By Sebastian Back Graduating student, Sydenham High School

I

t is a sad thing when a person loses their inspiration. To lose one’s creative outlet is a dreadful experience indeed. To have a story to tell, a feeling to express or a passion to share and then to find oneself unable to do so is frustrating. It is the ultimate defeat. Suffice it to say, it is the paramount bummer. As a young, creative, knowledgeable young fellow, I assume that new artistic material should sprout from my fingertips whenever necessary. Not so. Apparently some higher power has dammed up the river of innovation flowing to my brain. My tree of creativity has ceased to be fruitful. Should it be watered? Is there a type of bone-meal to fertilize my creativity tree? I am stumped. It seems there is nothing I can do. But where does inspiration come from anyway? If we don’t feel inspired are we doing something wrong? Do have to go out and look for it or do we simply wait for it to knock on the front door? It is terrifying to think that, at the

By Reba Pennell Grade 12 student, Napanee District Secondary School moment when our need is greatest, we can be denied access to inspiration, our creativity sealed in a box. When I speak of “the moment when our need is greatest” my mind is on the article I am now writing. I had intended to write a tribute to summer: to the open fields, the campfires, the screen porches and free spirits. But the structure would not be built, the words never came together. I burnt the midnight oil. I sat in a lawn chair gazing at a single cloud in a blue sky, squeezing my mind to procure the juices required to mix the perfect summer drink for a reader’s consumption. Unfortunately, I couldn’t translate the beauty, fantasy and wonder of the season into words. So as you can see, I am thoroughly confused by the comings and goings of inspiration. I can do nothing but vent my confusion. Yet in so doing I hope to provide some food for thought: a snack which the brain can munch on. Where does inspiration go leaving us to feel so parched and hungry?

Tamworth Lions Club

ANNUAL FISH FRY AND CORN ROAST

S

ummer is supposed to be a time when we can catch our breath, forget about school assignments, schedules and deadlines, and sleep in until noon. My summer however has consisted of baseball and work. During the occasional time when I am not intent on getting as much sleep as I can, I read or write - which ever I feel like doing. Since I have aspirations of being an author or a journalist, I’m going into my grade 12 year this September in high gear. I realize how important it is for me to write as often as possible.

a workout that you like and enjoy but you have to be happy too. The moment you aren’t happy is the moment that you can forget about living a healthy lifestyle.

I need one or two things that I really love doing to maintain that balance in life between what I have to do and what I like to do. That’s what keeps me happy. Sure there are the times when I curl up and cry because life is so hectic and I don’t know what else to do but those are few and far between now.

Writing a book has really helped me be happy. I enjoy seeing how the story progresses; how the characters change. I feel proud of creating these characters: what they look like and who they are. My book helps me to maintain my health. It’s the one thing that is truly and utterly mine and nobody can take that away from me.

Healthy living isn’t always about being fit and active or eating the right food. It’s about knowing when something is wrong, it’s about knowing when what you are feeling isn’t right and most important it’s about being happy. Yes, it’s about watching what you eat and finding

So do something you love: swim, run, hike, do cardio, do yoga or just walk but make sure you are happy. Make sure you have your “me time.” Make sure you go to a movie or read a book; lie in the pool or write. Do something that de-clutters your mind. Shut out the world and be you because you are the only person who can maintain your healthy lifestyle.

So remember to be happy, remember to read or write or sing or dance or watch a movie that you want to see even if no one else wants to. Strength doesn’t only come from a healthy meal or exercise.

Tamworth Arena

Sunday August 18th, 4:00 - 7:00 p.m.

Ontario

Music by Land O’ Lakes Cruisers (Music starts at 3:00 p.m.) Adults $14.00 Children $6.50 Children under 5 FREE Enjoy lots of fish & corn Dance to good country music

QUINTE FILM ALTERNATIVE GREAT MOVIE WEDNESDAYS! The Empire Theatre, 321 Front St. Belleville For more info call 613-480-6407 or visit www.quintefilmalternative.ca ‘Like’ us on Facebook Sept 11 - KON-TIKI Adventure on the high seas Sept 25 - MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING A modern remake Oct 9 - RENOIR Visually stunning Oct 23 - THE RELUCTANT FUNDAMENTALIST Based on the popular novel

ROBLIN HOLINESS CAMP 2013 1 km. North of Roblin, 3418 County Rd. 41

The Proverbs August 10

in concert

th

FAMILY CAMP

at

7 pm

August 10 – 18

Evening services 7 pm

Rev. Ian Dunn, Aug 11 - 15 -- Rev. Peter Moore, Aug 16 - 18 VBS “ATHENS”

August 12 – 16

mornings

INFO: roblinholinesscamp@gmail.com or RWC 613-388-2518

SUMMER DRIVER’S ED COURSE:

Aug. 12, 13, 14, 15, Monday - Thursday, 8:00 A.M. - 1:30 P.M.

EVENING DRIVER’S ED COURSE:

CHRISTINE PEETS Professional Writing, Blogging & Editing Writing Instruction: Creative Writing, Memoirs, Travelogues Business Communications Training Workshop Planning & Facilitation

CHRISTINE@CAPTIONSCOMMUNICATIONS.CA 613-329-5134

October 1-24, Tuesdays & Thursdays, 5:00 P.M. - 7:30 P.M.

WEEKEND DRIVER’S ED COURSE: Dec. 7, 8, 14, 15, 8:00 A.M. - 1:30 P.M.

(Dates pending approval of school rental)

COURSE LOCATION: 245 BELLEVILLE ROAD NAPANEE (NDSS)

Contact us to book your spot today!

613-967-7770 collision.prevention@bell.net

For more information:

www.collisionprevention.ca

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2013 • THE SCOOP

21


Repairing Our Old Barn By Sally Bowen

T

he barn at Topsy Farms was built in three stages, starting a long time ago with the most recent work done in the 50s.

concrete with special adhesive properties that he had mixed in a wheelbarrow. That was all trowelled smooth, to prevent water from getting in further.

Over the past half century, the concrete foundation at the northwest corner has shifted outwards because of an inadequate weight-bearing base and possibly, the pressure of the materials inside, pushing out. The shifting of the foundation has caused the vertical siding boards to shift too, curving out at the bottom. When the rain comes off the end of the barn roof it soaks the boards which leaches the moisture through to the big old hand-hewn wooden beams. As they rot the barn settles more and the process accelerates.

The beams were next; they needed to be jacked up and repaired. It was a challenge to locate stable points for the jacks inside and out. It was necessary to get the beam high enough to remove the old, rotted material with a scraper, chisel, chainsaw and wire brush. These larger gaps were replaced by segments of new and recovered material already in storage - 2 to 3 six foot chunks. The beams less badly eroded were patched by sandwiching in good wood, using metal plates, screws, bolts and ingenuity.

The northwest side of the barn - facing the prevailing winds - was the worst area. We needed to do the best job possible: accomplish the most repairs for the least cost, effort and time. In the end, we scrounged virtually all the materials - almost nothing was purchased. The adage, “Someday it might come in handy,” actually works. Jacob first tore the worst of the siding off by hand and just studied the damage for a few weeks, contemplating the rot, forming a plan, knowing the look of it would drive his Virgo sensibilities crazy. The timing was good - the end of winter before the lambing season. Still, the work had to be done in fragments of time. First job was to tackle the repair of the concrete foundation. Where the cement had cracked and separated, Jacob filled the space with wire mesh and injected

Flashing was next - this is thin metal cut to length, about 8 inches wide and nailed to the top of the beam, overlapping the top of the concrete foundation to direct the flow of any water/ice outwards. The siding was all salvaged boards we’d stored when one of our houses changed to metal siding. The old stain had faded to pink so those boards are on inside out. The windows were also reframed and flashed, so they are shaped to actually hold a window. With reasonable conditions, this repair should extend the life of the barn for another half century. Of course, there is still more work to be done... You can follow Sally’s blog at the Topsy Farms website: www.topsyfarms.com.

The FSR Wants More Friends! By Digger MacDougall and Susan Moore

F

or more than nine years the Friends of the Salmon River have worked at safeguarding the Salmon River Watershed and providing information for residents and visitors about conservation and healthy river practices. We are a grassroots organization – a group of volunteers who live near or visit the Salmon River and enjoy the watershed. Organized since 2004, the annually elected Board of ten members meets regularly to identify environmental issues related to the river and its watershed. In doing so, we initiate projects – often with other partner groups – in an effort to protect and promote the natural beauty and pristine features of the watershed. The Friends have access to excellent resource people and we use that knowledge to recommend care for the river and forge new connections that nurture the watershed and its communities. The Friends of the Salmon co-operate with the Stewardship Councils of Frontenac, Lennox & Addington, and Hastings, as well as Quinte Conservation and other like-minded groups interested in our watershed. We are currently working on a history of the Salmon Watershed, a shoreline restoration program, a watershed education program in local schools, a mussel survey project, and other initiatives. If you live near the Salmon River

or one of our watershed lakes, you already have a special interest in the care and maintenance of this magnificent environment. We welcome you and your family to join the Friends of the Salmon River to show support for our gem of a watershed. With a little effort, together we can protect the watershed so that we can enjoy clean water, recreational opportunities, and all the Salmon River and its watershed have to offer for generations to come. If you would like to take a step beyond an individual or family membership, the Board of Directors of the Friends of the Salmon River invites you to join us as a volunteer Board Member - to meet with us every other month and share your experience, knowledge and opinions. No special background is required; primarily a strong interest in a healthy river system and watershed. For further information: Please contact Digger MacDougall, Chair of the Nomination Committee at 613446-2734 or send an email to digger. macdougall@sympatico.ca. Elections to the new Board will take place at our AGM in October. Please visit our website: friendsofsalmonriver.ca to read about the group and how we are serving you and Salmon River Watershed residents of all ages.

Old and new beams, concrete repairs and flashing. Photo credit Jacob Murray.

The Roblin boat launch on the Salmon River. Photo courtesy of the FSR.

Jacob prepares to do the cement work. Photo credit Sally Bowen. 22

THE SCOOP • AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2013


The great L&A County Scarecrow Festival geocaching Event T W By Linda Cooper

hether you are an avid geocacher or know little about the sport, everyone is are invited to attend the 2013 Discover Lennox & Addington Geocaching Event taking place on Friday, August 23rd and Saturday, August 24th in Napanee.

This year’s annual event is being dubbed a ’24-hour blitz’, and features a number of new activities that appeal to both avid geocachers as well as the general public. Beginning on Friday, August 23rd at 6:30pm, The Kim Pollard Band will be performing live at Conservation Park in Napanee. Pollard and the members of the band (Tim Sheffield, Bruce Cowle, Roger Law, and Dean Crouse) are all Lennox & Addington County residents and are excited to play both new recordings as well as some of their all-time favourites. The public encouraged to bring their lawn chairs to the park and enjoy an amazing mix of rhythm & blues, gospel, folk and rock. When the sun goes down on Friday evening, cachers can use UV lights and flashlights and partake in some entertaining night caching. In addition to the dozens of night caches already in L&A County, three new permanent ‘night only’ caches will be able to be found after 9 pm. On Saturday, August 24th beginning at 9 am, the Southview Public School

gymnasium will be home base for a day of geocaching fun. Throughout the day at the school there will be geocaching and non-geocaching games available where you can win a number of L&A County prizes. If you are new to geocaching, staff will be on hand all day to answer any questions you may have. The main attractions, however, are hidden in containers throughout L&A County. More than 100 geocaches will be hidden specifically for this event. Dinner will be served and prizes will be awarded in the gym before the event draws to a close at 6pm. One of the main goals of the “Discover L&A County Geocaching Event” is to take both residents and visitors on a tour of our County using geocaches as reference points. Since teaming up in 2011, the Lennox & Addington County Economic Development Department and the L&A Geocachers have hosted two successful events and continue to make L&A County a year-round destination for geocaching enthusiasts. In total, there are more than 1,000 geocaches found within the borders of Lennox & Addington, making the county one of the premiere locations for geocaching in Ontario. For more information contact Rob Plumley, Economic Development Officer, Lennox & Addington County or visit www.LandAGeocaching.com.

he Napanee Scarecrow Festival will kick off the fall season in Napanee on Saturday September 21 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

The festival returns to downtown Napanee with all the popular events from last year and a few new ones. The 4H club will be back with their petting zoo, which is always popular with the young and old. For the kids there’s an air ride, face painting and lots of other activities. There are over forty vendors signed up for this year’s festival, which brings the total up from last year. As well, the Talents of the Town Market will be going on at Market Square at the same time. The very popular Beaver Tails will be at Market Square again. And for lunch the 4H club is putting on their tasty BBQ. Dennis Whitty is bringing the Cangig Country Showcase back to the outdoor stage at the corner of Dundas and John streets. He has a variety of performers including some up and coming local performers.

You will want to try your luck at Cow Patty Bingo on John Street while you’re there. A fenced in area will be marked with numbered squares, and you can purchase a ticket on your lucky number. At a designated time, the 4H will turn one of their well fed cows loose in the fenced area. The cow will determine the bingo winner by making a “deposit” on a lucky square. The day promises to be a great way to spend the day with friends or family, as we enter the fall season.

For Garden Help Cho�e

Colleen’s Gardening Service We can: Design and Maintain New Beds or Old! Flowers, Her�, Shru�, Vines, Bul�, Planters, House Plants

For Free Estimates Call Colleen at 613-379-5959

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2013 • THE SCOOP

23


Centreville Fair

Time Capsule Project A

s the Centreville Agricultural Society directors and volunteers work to bring new and exciting elements to this year’s Labour Day Weekend fair (a Learning Barn and the Family Fun Zone), we recognize the need to honour the countless hours of hard work contributed by community members, as well as the many years of great memories that the fair has brought to fair attendees. As we approach the 160th Centreville Fair, we are hoping that you will share your memories with us as we launch the Centreville Fair Time Capsule Project. Over the next year, we will be gathering pictures and postcard memories of the

fair to place in the time capsule which will be unsealed in 2053 during the 200th anniversary. Please join us on Friday, August 30th at the Grandstand for the Opening Ceremony of the Fair and the official launch of the Time Capsule Project. Join us on Facebook at https:// www.facebook.com/pages/CentrevilleAgricultural-Society/601195843224951 or twitter @CAS_fair for more information about this project or about the fair. For more information please contact Kim Allen, Communication Director at communication.centrevillefair@gmail. com.

Do the “Wooly Bully Run” On Amherst Island

R

unners of all ages and abilities are invited to participate in the Wooly Bully Run, set for Sunday morning, August 18, 2013 on Amherst Island. Start time is 9:15 a.m. While one might think the name of the race stems from the 1960s pop song by Sam the Sham and the Pharaohs, it is an acknowledgement of the many sheep farm operations on Amherst Island. This and the image of runners making the trip over from the mainland to experience its beauty made the decision to organize a run an easy one. Runners have the choice of either a 5K or 10K event. Both start and finish from the

Municipal Works facility on the Stella 40 Foot Road, just north of Front Road. It is about half a kilometre from the ferry dock. The race is supported by the Amherst Island Recreation Association and the Island School Liaison Enthusiasts with the help of local volunteers. Net proceeds will be diverted to Amherst Island Public School for their extracurricular activities. Complete details, which include event day information and online registration, can be found at https://secure.eventsonline. ca/events/wooly_bully/ Email race director, Joe Du Vall at joeduvall@rogers.com if you have any specific questions.

C o m i ng E v e n t s Tamworth Legion Branch 458

Santa Claus Parade Sunday, Dec. 1, 1 p.m., Tamworth Anyone wishing info or want to participate please call Lorraine 379.2684 or Marilyn 379.2727.

Village Christmas Craft Fair Sunday, Dec. 1, 10 am - 3 pm. For more information please call Kathryn 379.2959. 4G Fixed Wireless in most areas. Two 4G Satellites now available. Call or email for details.

Desmond Technology

Derek Troyer Owner 24 Desmond Road RR#3 Yarker Ont. K0K 3N0 Cell (613) 328 5558 Phone (613) 378 2331 desmondtechnology@gmail.com http://desmondtechnology.com

Authorized Hi-Speed Internet Dealer + Installer 4G Fixed Wireless and 4G Satellite Service Solar Systems Integration

Desmond Technology

Derek Troyer Owner 24 Desmond Road RR#3 Yarker Ont. K0K 3N0 Cell (613) 328 5558 Phone (613) 378 2331 desmondtechnology@gmail.com http://desmondtechnology.com

24

Authorized Dealer + Installer Hi-Speed Internet, Fixed Wireless and Satellite Service THE SCOOP • AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2013

Sharbot Lake Farmers Market at Sharbot Lake Beach Every Saturday from 9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Last FREE Local Food Cooking Workshop September 24 from 7 - 9 p.m. Oso/Soldiers Memorial Hall in Sharbot Lake Please note that the August 22 workshop was changed to Desmond Technology September 24 to take advantage of the greater variety of Derek Troyer produce available in September. Owner

Andrea Dickinson, a local food instructor, cooks regularly 24 Desmond Road with local

food. Attending the farmer’s RR#3 market, getting know Yarker Ont.toK0K 3N0local farmers Cell for (613) 328 5558 and buying seasonal produce allows great inspiration in the Phone (613) 378 2331 kitchen. Andrea has lived in Central Frontenac for ten years. She is desmondtechnology@gmail.com the former owner/chef ofhttp://desmondtechnology.com Sunsets Restaurant, a food blogger and cooking instructor. She has an extensive background in cooking, baking, catering, event and food safety, with an Authorized Dealercoordination + Installer Hi-Speed Internet, Fixed Wirelesson and Satellitecooking. Service emphasis healthy

Check out her blog at www.cookwithandrea.com.

We will discover the best that the September harvest has Desmond Technology to offer and explore how the local available ingredients Derek Troyer can dictate your late summer menu. Official menu to be Owner released later in the summer! There are so Road many fantastic 24 Desmond recipes to choose from, RR#3 it’s guaranteed to 3N0 be great. Of Yarker Ont. K0K CellBBQ (613)will 328be 5558 course, cooking the bounty on the showcased. Phone (613) 378 2331 See you then! desmondtechnology@gmail.com PLEASE PRE-REGISTER by email: http://desmondtechnology.com info@handsonharvest.ca. Limited to 20 participants.

Authorized Dealer + Installer Hi-Speed Internet, Fixed Wireless and Satellite Service


Bon Echo Provincial Park Special Events August 2013 Most events are sponsored by the Friends of Bon Echo Park

Saturday August 3 - Margaret Hall & Chris Jackson Discover things you never knew about Group of Seven painter A.J. Casson from his daughter, Margaret Hall. Ms.

Hall accompanied her father on some of his painting trips

including some to Mazinaw Lake. She will share anecdotes

Thursday August 22 — Margaret Axford Bon Echo: The Early Years Would you like to know more about the early years of Bon Echo and the Bon Echo Inn? Join Margaret Axford, Curator

about her famous father, known for his depictions of

of the Cloyne Pioneer Museum & Archives and a Director of

Time: 7 pm Location: Amphitheatre

of Weston Price and Flora MacDonald Denison and her son

landscapes, forests, and farms of southern Ontario.

the Cloyne & District Historical Society as she tells the stories Merrill Denison.

Saturday August 10 — Robert McLeman Climate Change

Time: 7 pm (Also 8 pm on July 18 ) Location: Amphitheatre

around Bon Echo have changed over the past 1000

Saturday August 24 - Bill White & White Pine

Join us for an informative talk and learn how the forests years as a result of climate change and human activities. Dr. McLeman is an associate professor in Geography and

Environmental Sciences at Sir Wilfrid Laurier University and a highly respected researcher on climate change. Time: 8 pm Location: Amphitheatre

Thursday August 15 - Speaking of Wildlife Live Demonstration

Do you like birds, turtles, and other wildlife? Join staff from the

Speaking of Wildlife for a close encounter with some animals native to the Bon Echo area. Bring your family and friends to this one hour presentation to learn some amazing things about Ontario wildlife and increase your appreciation for the wildlife around you.

TH

family toe-tapping. Join us a for a BBQ and an evening of great music. Time: 4:30—7 pm. Location: Amphitheatre

Date to be confirmed - Kevin Callan Canoeist, Outdoorsman Attention avid canoeists and campers! The renowned author and blogger will be speaking about experiencing the outdoors. Kevin will share photos and stories about some of the places he has camped and canoed. Date: To be announced Location: Amphitheatre

Time: 1 pm Location: Amphitheatre

Check website for date and time. www.BonEchoFriends.ca

BERN IE’S

Keep It Simple

AL U N FIDDLE & GUITAR CAM P AN 10

National award winning White Pine will keep the whole

FIDDLE CONCERT Featuring Gordon Stobbe

Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013 9:30 - 5:00 Tamworth Elementary School

Adults $55 Age 18 or under $30

GORDON STOBBE SHERRYL FITZPATRICK (Fiddle) Gordon Stobbe KEITH GLASS (Guitar) STEPHANIE LEPINE (Fiddle)

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2013 6:30pm Tamworth Legion

Admission: Adults $12 Teens $6

Children Under 12 FREE

FULL DAY FIDDLE AND GUITAR WORKSHOPS  Guitar-accompanying fiddle tunes (space limited)  Small group workshops  Lunch provided  Question and Answer period with instructors

CAMP INSTRUCTORS’ AT THE LEGION SPONSORED BY THE BCONCERT ERNIE JAFFE M USIC FUND SATURDAY EVENING 6:30 PM

For more info contact: Sponsored by the Bernie Jaffe Music Fund faun.fiddlecamp@gmail.com or 613.379.2469 Contact: faun.fiddlecamp@gmail.com or 613.379.2469

Come celebrate the life and music of Bernie Jaffe

Sherryl Fitzpatrick

Keith Glass

Stephanie Lepine

REMEMBERING BERNIE Proceeds will benefit Bernie’sBERNIE Fiddle REMEMBERING & Guitar Camp Proceeds will benefit Bernie’s Fiddle and Guitar Camp Info: faun.fiddlecamp@gmail.com Info: faun.fiddlecamp@gmail.com or 613-379-2469 or 613.379.2469 AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2013 • THE SCOOP

25


KIDS & PaReNTS

County of Lennox & Addington

Public Library Children’s Programs NAPANEE BRANCH

AMHERSTVIEW BRANCH

Board games: Mondays 3-4 p.m. Lego Club: Tuesdays 2-3 p.m. & 3-4 p.m. (registration is required) GO! Summer Reading Program: Wednesdays 3-4 p.m. Movie & snack: Thursdays 3-4 p.m. Lego Club: Fridays 11 a.m. (registration is required) Book Club 1: 1st Wednesday of every month Book Club 2: 3rd Tuesday of every month Writer’s Club: Every other Tuesday

AUGUST 2013 Lego Club: Mondays 2 p.m. & 3 p.m. Summer Reading Club Story Time: Tuesdays 3-4 p.m. Preschool Story Time: Wednesdays 10:15 a.m. Board Games: Wednesdays 3-4 p.m. Wii Play: Thursdays 3-4 p.m. Lego Club: Thursday August 1st 6:307:30 p.m. & Saturday August 3rd 2-3 p.m. Registration is required. End of Summer Reading Club Party: Tuesday August 27th 3-5 p.m.

TAMWORTH BRANCH Children’s Programs: Wednesdays 3-4 p.m. Aug. 7: Crafts Aug. 14: Games Aug. 21: Movie & Pizza 2-4 p.m. Registration appreciated 379-3082 or email tambrch@lennox-addington.on.ca

CAMDEN EAST BRANCH Toddler Tales: Mondays 10:15-11 a.m. (ongoing) Storytime: Wednesdays 3:00–3:45 p.m. during the month of August

SEPTEMBER 2013 Preschool Story Time: Wednesday 10:15 a.m. Tot Tales: Fridays 11:15 a.m. Lego Club: Thursday September 5th 6:30-7:30 p.m. & Saturday September 7th 2-3 p.m. Registration is required. Avid Readers Book Club resumes Thursday September 19th. Call 613-3896006 for more information.

ODESSA BRANCH

Car Seat Clinic     September 28, 2013         9am –12 pm        Napanee Fire Hall        66 Advance Ave    S.E.A.T.S will be hos�ng a car seat clinic on a rst come rst   serve basis between the hours of 9‐12, on Sept. 28, 2013   The car seat technicians will be happy to assist you in pu�ng  in your car seat or adjus�ng it so it ts properly.    Dona�ons are greatly appreciated  as S.E.A.T.S Kingston  is a              volunteer run organiza�on   For more information on this car seat clinic please call Jennie Hill at LARC . 613-354-6318 ext. 23

Storytime (ages 4 +) 3:15–4 p.m. Tuesdays during the month of August 6:00-6:45 p.m. Thursdays during the month of August

Admission is FREE to this event, but we are taking donations for our local SPCA like: IAMS food ,Bleach, Dish soap, XL garbage bags, Non latex gloves, Paper towels , Cash donations are also accepted.

August 20th, 2013 10-10:45 am Strathcona Paper Centre — Napanee This event is in “Partnership with the Town of Napanee”

For more information please call the Early Years Centre At 613‐354‐6318

26

THE SCOOP • AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2013


FRee ClaSSIFIeDS Free to private individuals or not-forprofit community groups. To place an ad: 613-379-5369 or stonemills.scoop@gmail.com.

Noah’s Ark Tupperware toy. 613-4844922.

FOR SALE: Two girls bicycles (suitable for teenagers). Excellent shape, fairly new. Phone 379-5244.

WANTED: Studebaker memorabilia. Items such as manuals, brochures, old dealer calendars, pens, pencils, lighters, watches, etc. Norm 613-9684400.

WANTED: Old rotten bales of hay to be used as garden mulch. Call Cam 613-539-2831.

WANTED: Looking for 2 sets of old stairs (to use outdoors). Susan or Steven: 613-379-5958.

FOR HIRE: Small Kubota tractor which comes with an operator. Perfect for landscaping, drainage and clearing. Let us know your needs and we will fulfill them. Steve @ Dynamic Digging: 613-539-8015

OFFERED: Exercise classes, Barrie township hall (Cloyne). Mondays and Thursdays at 6 p.m. Everyone welcome! Tabatas, pump, and latin dancing (zumba). Cost: $8 a class or $45 per month. More info: Terrilynn Storms 613 847-6666 or 613-4784720

WANTED: Looking for a new or used

Verona Cattail Festival By Debbie Lingen

T

his August 10 and 11, the village of Verona will host the 18th annual Verona Cattail Festival. The festival is a busy two days packed with activities, music, entertainment, and lots to eat. Starting with the Saturday morning parade, the weekend continues with two days of outstanding music on stage, the Classic Cars Show, Red Green Duct Tape Boat Races, Soap Box Derby, Marketplace vendors, Kids Crafts Table, Hands On learning activities, and much more. This year’s Verona Cattail Festival promises something for everyone. Two days of live stage entertainment will cover a wide range of tastesfrom Country to Rock and Roll, from Celtic music to Gospel. For the full entertainment program visit the Festival website.

Everyone in the family will have something to do. The festival provides lots of fun and excitement for the children. Crafts to do all day, petting zoo, maze, train rides, an air castle, 9-hole mini putt golf. They can watch or participate in the Red Green Duct Tape Races and the Soapbox Derby. New this year - Morphy the Caterpillar, a fun crawlzone with slide!! Price of admission for single day admission to the Festival is only $5, children under 12 are free. Parking is free and is on site. For a complete schedule of what is going on each day, visit the website www.veronafestival.com. Bring the whole family to the Verona Cattail Festival for an experience you will always remember. August 10 and 11.

Sharbot Lake Farmers Market Thrives By Anne Marie Young

I

f you visit Oso Beach in Sharbot Lake on any given Saturday morning during the summer, you will find a vibrant and bustling marketplace filled with fresh locally grown foods, hand-made artisan products and homemade preserves, all from within a 100 kilometre radius. The lakeside location provides a beautiful setting for the Farmers Market, with a pavilion at the hub and a large children’s play structure in the park. Patrons to the market can enjoy shopping, have a place to meet friends, enjoy live cooking demos and on warm days, can even take a dip in the refreshing lake. The thriving Farmers Market is just three years old, having opened in the spring of 2011 with just seven vendors. At that time, the park’s play area wasn’t deemed safe enough for children, and more signage was needed. The Sharbot Lake Farmers Market Committee (a committee of the Council of Central Frontenac Township) began searching for funding opportunities that would assist it to revitalize the space. Hearing about the County of Frontenac’s Small Scale Community Sustainability Initiatives (SSS CSI) Program, committee members began applying for funding to upgrade and beautify the Farmers Market. Working through the program with the help of County staff, the Committee was awarded funding for three small projects. One assisted with the cost for signage, another helped finance the live on-site cooking demos, and a third helped to upgrade the playground and landscaping and will also help to upgrade the washroom facilities. Through the efforts of the Committee

working with the vendors, the Township and the County, the market has grown exponentially, to include 21 local vendors and has hosted up to 400 patrons per day. The Farmers Market has become a space that nurtures local business and has the potential to reward multiple generations through economic opportunities, lifestyle choices and community engagement. The economic impact of the improvements on local businesses is amazing. Participation in the Farmers Market helps local farmers and artisans put their products directly into the hands of consumers and provide an ideal setting to build and strengthen relationships. Area residents are benefitting from having a new place to shop and meet friends, and are able to support their neighbours. All of these factors have contributed to building a stronger sense of community in Sharbot Lake. The Farmers Market has even become a tourist destination, attracting visitors to the Sharbot Lake area from as far as 100 kilometres away. The County’s SSS CSI program falls under the Integrated Community Sustainability Plan (ICSP) developed by the community. It supports community capacity building under all four pillars of sustainability: social, cultural, economic, and environmental. If you would like more information on eligibility requirements, and how to apply for funding through the SSS CSI, please visit the County of Frontenac website at www.frontenaccounty.ca or contact Anne Marie Young, Manager of Economic Sustainability at ayoung@ frontenaccounty.ca.

Answers to the crossword on the Puzzle Page (page 28):

W&S ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES Approved by the Ministry of the Environment

• Grass cutting • Seniors receive 10% discount • Large items pickup • Garbage pickup & recyclables

Phone: 613-379-5872 Cell: 613-483-8441 sadie40039@hotmail.com

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2013 • THE SCOOP

27


Puzzle Page New York Times Crossword

Summer Vacation Word Search

by Curtis Yee / Will Shortz ŠThe New York Times Across

1

1. Prison division

14

5. Prevalent

2

3

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21

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35

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39

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61. Nintendo's ___ Bros. 62. One way to jump in a pool

family

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journey

pack

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Back to School Word Search

40. Asian holiday 41. Defeats at the ballot box 46. Yang's counterpart 48. Al of "Insomnia," 2002 50. Sorts (through) 52. Like Beethoven's "Pastoral" Symphony 53. Dirty reading 54. Surveillance evidence

Help the teacher find her way through the maze to the desk.

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THE SCOOP • AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2013

Daily Sudoku: Wed 31-Jul-2013

(c) Daily Sudoku Ltd 2013. All rights reserved.

2 8


A Canada Day Thank You By Angela Weese

T

he five members of the Tamworth Canada Day committee: Jennifer Coutts, Jill Burns, Shari Milligan, Stacey Gillan and Angela Weese, feel

extremely blessed to be part of such a wonderful community. This year’s Canada Day would not have been possible without the outpour of donations and

support from the community. Not to mention the guidance from the retired Canada Day committee members and all the back up support from the Stone

Mills Fire Department. This year’s event was wonderful and we cannot wait to see what next year’s brings!

13 years experience

Off-Grid Living Solutions Solar systems Propane appliances Wood & gas heating Canada Day 2013.

‘Tis The Season Order Yours Today!

WOOD PELLETS

“Early Booking Prices Available Now”

TROPHY ROCK SALE $14.95 REG $16.95

DEER MINERALS, FLAVOURED SALTS AND LICKS

613-583-0139 NEW SHOWROOM 670 Fortune Cres, Unit 5, Kingston by appointment AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2013 • THE SCOOP

29


MO’S RESTAURANT Authentic Indo-Canadian Cuisine Pakora, Samosa, Chicken Tikka, Korma Chicken, Butter Chicken, Kebab, Soups, Sandwiches, Fish & Chips (Stop In for Our Full Menu)

ation 450 CENTRE ST. N. (NAPANEE MALL) New Loc

Square Boy Pizza 613•354•9111

Mo’s Restaurant 613•354•1113

Sunday - Thursday 10am-9pm, Friday - Saturday 10am-11pm (Times are subject to change)

Open for Lunch and Dinner! Eat In - TakeAway - Delivery 30

THE SCOOP • AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2013


Yoko Dogs

H

ere we are beyond hip-hop with the Yoko Dogs, four very rad’ poets from “all over Canada” who sprang their randomly connected postmodern snippets upon

AUGUST HOURS:

an appreciative (and bemused) audience alfresco at Tamworth’s famous little book store this June during a gracious afternoon hosted by the Wright family. Goldenboughmedia

SEPTEMBER HOURS:

7 days a week 8-8

AUGUST THEME WEEKENDS: 9, 10, 11: Greek 16, 17, 18: Staff pick 23, 24, 25: Cajun 30, 31, Sep. 1: Seafood

Monday 11-7 Tuesday CLOSED Wednesday 11-7 Thursday 11-7 Friday & Saturday 8-8 Sunday 8-7

Reservations recommended Come enjoy a meal in my dining room... You’ll be glad you did See you soon, Melissa Evans Proprietor

Alfresco. Photo credit goldenboughmedia.

Lennox & Addington Financial Centre Inc. Tim Reynolds, CHS, CFP

Bob Vrooman, CFP, CLU, CH.F.C.

Dianne Dowling, CHS

Ph 613•354•2726 109 John St., Napanee, ON “Compassionate, personalized care by Dr. Julie Amey and her team in a warm, welcoming environment!”

KIM, Veterinary Assistant

PHOEBE

DR. JULIE AMEY

STEPHANIE, RVT

MADISON, Student

TOBY

BRIDGE WEST ANIMAL HOSPITAL 311 Bridge Street West, Napanee 613-409-PETS (7387) bridgewest@kingston.net www.bridgewestanimalhospital.ca

Your Pets...... Our Privilege

LANE Veterinary Services

Since 1983

Serving Pets & Farm Animals Mon, Tues, Thurs: 8:30am-5pm 211 McQuay St. off Cty. Rd. #6 Wed: 8:30am-7pm (between Colebrook & Moscow) Fri: 8:30am-4pm RR#3 Yarker, ON K0K 3N0 Sat: 10am-1pm Emergency Service By Appointment

www.lanevetservices.ca www.lanevetservices.ca info@lanevetservices.ca

(613) 358-2833 or 1-888-832-1904 “Prevention is the Best Medicine” AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2013 • THE SCOOP

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Sunday August 18, 2013 - 9:15 a.m. L O C AT IO N: Start and finish at the Municipal Works Facility, Stella 40 Foot Road, Amherst Island R E G IS T RAT ION: Online registration via www.eventsonline.ca – look for the “Wooly Bully Races” in their events calendar. On the event page, look at the “Race Day Information” link on the registration page. ALSO – Just Added – 1K F U N R U N for youth, aged 5-12 years. To start right after the 5/10K races - No charge, sign up on race day or email Joe Du Vall. C O N TA C T INF OR MATION: Joe Du Vall - joeduvall@rogers.com (if you must, call 613-292-7102 evenings only please) Carol Sinclair - carolasinclair@rogers.com

PROCEEDS FROM THIS EVENT WILL BE DIRECTED TO AMHERST ISLAND PUBLIC SCHOOL

“SUPPORTED BY THE AMHERST ISLAND RECREATION ASSOCIATION AND THE ISLAND SCHOOL LIAISON ENTHUSIASTS”

32

THE SCOOP • AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2013

Profile for The SCOOP

The Scoop // August/September 2013  

The Scoop is a quality newsmagazine that has been celebrating rural life in the Ontario communities north of the 401 and south of Hwy 7, sin...

The Scoop // August/September 2013  

The Scoop is a quality newsmagazine that has been celebrating rural life in the Ontario communities north of the 401 and south of Hwy 7, sin...

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