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stone advisory magazine september/october 2012

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contents

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featured 04 Restore, Don't Replace 10 Designing With It: Put Some Fire In Your Life 14 I'm Sorry... I Think You Mythunderstood Me 17 Shopping for Natural Stone Countertops (including TakeWith-You Shopping Guide) 20 How To Manage Stains

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regular

From the Editor The Stone Detective Ask Dr. Fred Take Away: Countertop Shopping Tips Kids' Page Coming Next Issue

03 08 16 19 23 07

the case of

the fungus among us


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stone advisory magazine september/october 2012

from the editor

thanks, guys! you really rock!

W

elcome to the premiere issue of Stone Advisory Magazine. Consider the magazine your source for information, design inspiration, as well as entertaining articles all pertaining to natural stone, tile & grout and decorative concrete, especially as it relates to proper selection and care. A new issue will be published every other month. Be sure to subscribe so you can be notified every time a new issue is available. It is with great pride that I introduce the magazine to you and and thank those that have contributed so much to making this magazine a reality. I would be remiss if I didn't introduce our Chief Technical Director, Dr. Fred (aka Fred Hueston, PhD) to you and tell you a little about him. If you don't know Dr. Fred, let me tell you a little about him, so you know what good hands you are in.... [info from cv... this old house... other known names] Thank you, Fred, for everything and for never ceasing to surprise me with the depth of your expertise.

st one

ADVISORY

This issue in our Designing With It section we are introducing Design Studio 15. Design Studio 15 is a high end design firm in the Orlando area, but they service clients from all over. When I met with them at their showroom some time ago to discuss the possibilities of their contributing design tips, articles, ideas etc. for Stone Advisory Magazine, I was immediately captivated by a fire feature they had on display. So much so, that at one point it became a focal point of our discussion.... It was in this conversation that we all agreed how perfect it would be to highlight fire features in our inaugural issue, publishing at the beginning of the Fall season. Design Studio 15, we so look forward to everything you will contribute. I can't wait to see what's next. To our Creative Director, Ashley Harper who saw my vision and executed it brilliantly, I bow to your creative genius. To all the others that have contributed, and will continue to do so, my deepest and sincerest thanks. Deborah Shaw Editor, Stone Advisory Magazine

Publisher Id Est Productions EDITORIAL Editor: Deborah Shaw Email: dshaw@idestproductions.com REGULAR CONTRIBUTORS Fred Hueston, PhD Design Studio 15 Brian Kornet John Freitag Stone & Tile PRO Partners ADVERTISING Sales and Marketing: Toll Free: 877.213.4680 Email: advertise@idestproductions.com DESIGN Creative Director: Ashley J. Harper PHOTOGRAPHY AMPS Media Group GENERAL INQUIRIES Id Est Productions Phone: 877.213.4680 Email: info@idestproductions.com Website: www.idestproductions.com SUBSCRIPTIONS Don't miss out on a single issue! To be notified via email when a new issue is available, please contact: Phone: 877.213.4680 Email: subscribe@idestproductions.com COPYRIGHT All material appearing in Stone Advisory Magazine is copyright unless otherwise stated or it may rest with the provider of the supplied material. Stone Advisory Magazine takes all care to ensure information is correct at time of printing, but the publisher accepts no responsibility or liability for the accuracy of any information contained in the text or advertisements. Views expressed are not necessarily endorsed by the publisher or editor.


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stone advisory magazine september/october 2012

restore �

don't replace!

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orem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nam libero neque, ultrices placerat venenatis nec, blandit non turpis. Phasellus quis scelerisque nunc. Sed orci tellus, suscipit vitae euismod vel, egestas suscipit tortor. Quisque egestas varius tortor non egestas. Quisque non urna diam, ut volutpat magna. Nam pellentesque ornare sollicitudin. Vestibulum blandit, diam ut pharetra dictum, enim metus dictum felis, vitae aliquet ante dui vel justo. Morbi interdum mattis purus ac malesuada. Fusce turpis ipsum, tempus quis interdum ac, vehicula vitae tellus. Donec sed nunc justo, non vulputate elit. Sed nec justo quis lectus accumsan blandit. In a imperdiet felis. Maecenas diam felis, aliquet quis feugiat quis, volutpat ut ligula. Vivamus dapibus dignissim venenatis. Donec dignissim iaculis tortor, sit amet volutpat diam hendrerit vel. Ut sodales, sapien nec vulputate commodo, dolor nunc blandit lectus, at euismod odio ante quis augue. Nullam ac libero id purus tempor dapibus. Vestibulum rhoncus tincidunt urna sit amet mattis. Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Maecenas euismod ultricies mi, et convallis erat luctus id. In at erat sapien. Mauris risus est, ultricies ut adipiscing sit amet, malesuada ac dui. Aenean

molestie justo eu leo mollis nec ultricies elit gravida. Aliquam rutrum, arcu vitae consequat malesuada, sapien augue consectetur massa, quis sagittis tellus ipsum ut nulla. Pellentesque faucibus auctor volutpat. Nullam ut purus dui, nec pellentesque turpis. Sed ac vehicula tortor. Vestibulum lorem metus, placerat a imperdiet at, suscipit id neque.

‘‘This is an example of a pullquote that creates a border on top and bottom’’

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uis vehicula erat vel purus blandit vulputate. Praesent quis metus urna, at sagittis leo. Vivamus ac sapien a libero hendrerit varius. Vivamus vitae urna mauris, dignissim malesuada est. In dapibus congue elit non rutrum. In in odio vel risus ullamcorper posuere. Suspendisse potenti. Proin nulla sem, sodales id tincidunt pharetra, vehicula nec quam. Donec sed lacinia lorem. Morbi dapibus velit sed urna tempor pharetra. Phasellus mattis eros ac lorem dignissim dictum. Etiam varius molestie nisi, ut posuere libero facilisis non. Ut adipiscing venenatis erat, eget varius ipsum tincidunt eu. Nam convallis ultricies mauris, sit amet egestas ante pellentesque quis. Curabitur


stone advisory magazine september/october 2012

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Donec dignissim iaculis tortor, sit amet volutpat diam hendrerit vel. Ut sodales, sapien nec vulputate commodo, dolor nunc blandit lectus, at euismod odio ante quis augue. Nullam ac libero id purus tempor dapibus. Vestibulum rhoncus tincidunt urna sit amet mattis.

ac sem facilisis tellus cursus rhoncus nec a lectus. Fusce condimentum bibendum felis eget viverra. Quisque at nisl nisl. Fusce molestie mattis tellus, at iaculis sem varius in. In sollicitudin diam nec lacus bibendum tristique. Nullam tempor scelerisque sem et luctus. Quisque et risus eros. Donec interdum iaculis nisi, mattis congue velit lobortis non. Sed at lorem nibh, ut feugiat orci. Sed sit amet nisl augue, eget porttitor enim. Duis ut lorem nulla. Aliquam erat volutpat. Sed porta tempus luctus. Pellentesque lacus arcu, sodales eu ornare at, volutpat sed magna. Proin in molestie metus.

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ed id dui ut urna porta suscipit ut et arcu. Etiam mattis placerat aliquam. Ut lectus lacus, varius sit amet condimentum vel, congue sit amet neque. Integer pharetra risus a odio interdum imperdiet. Integer facilisis tincidunt blandit. Donec vel nunc magna. Duis convallis venenatis lacus, eu vulputate eros vestibulum ac. Mauris ornare vehicula odio, ut ultrices odio viverra et. Aliquam vitae augue elit, non iaculis erat. Nunc nunc dolor, placerat ac rhoncus hendrerit, porta et justo. Pellentesque adipiscing auctor sagittis. Aenean pretium fringilla diam vel dignissim. Sed viverra, nunc in tincidunt sollicitudin, enim purus ullamcorper risus, vitae convallis justo sem ac leo.

Nam faucibus nibh enim, quis dapibus turpis. Curabitur tempor hendrerit placerat. Aliquam erat volutpat. Nam malesuada eleifend enim, ut imperdiet odio euismod a. Quisque vel sollicitudin nulla. Ut massa dui, ultricies faucibus ornare scelerisque, fringilla at ante. Praesent tortor justo, facilisis nec viverra vel, rhoncus non nisi. Donec et libero libero. Maecenas porta posuere egestas. Nam nisi nunc, gravida eu vehicula nec, ultrices quis sem. Pellentesque auctor imperdiet tortor, a suscipit magna molestie vitae. Donec pellentesque adipiscing orci, id iaculis dui viverra sed. Ut tincidunt pharetra justo, et tempor velit ultricies sed. Integer euismod accumsan est, vitae fermentum ipsum lobortis ac. In venenatis tincidunt justo sit amet varius. Maecenas tempus mattis odio, ac posuere arcu auctor eget.

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ed a odio ac est mollis dignissim eget ut elit. Nunc sit amet auctor tellus. Etiam dolor lacus, viverra ac dictum eu, gravida sodales metus. Nam adipiscing dolor non purus ullamcorper in fringilla tortor aliquet. Donec eget blandit diam. Vestibulum tincidunt nisi non quam faucibus non vehicula.

Name Surname Senior Editor and Publisher

IMGŠ Name Surname


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stone advisory magazine september/october 2012

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orem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nam libero neque, ultrices placerat venenatis nec, blandit non turpis. Phasellus quis scelerisque nunc. Sed orci tellus, suscipit vitae euismod vel, egestas suscipit tortor. Quisque egestas varius tortor non egestas. Quisque non urna diam, ut volutpat magna. Nam pellentesque ornare sollicitudin. Vestibulum blandit, diam ut pharetra dictum, enim metus dictum felis, vitae aliquet ante dui vel justo. Morbi interdum mattis purus ac malesuada. Fusce turpis ipsum, tempus quis interdum ac, vehicula vitae tellus. Donec sed nunc justo, non vulputate elit. Sed nec justo quis lectus accumsan blandit. In a imperdiet felis. Maecenas diam felis, aliquet quis feugiat quis, volutpat ut ligula. Vivamus dapibus dignissim venenatis. Donec dignissim iaculis tortor, sit amet volutpat diam hendrerit vel. Ut sodales, sapien nec vulputate commodo, dolor nunc blandit lectus, at euismod odio ante quis augue. Nullam ac libero id purus tempor dapibus. Vestibulum rhoncus tincidunt urna sit amet mattis. Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Maecenas euismod ultricies mi, et convallis erat luctus id. In at erat sapien. Mauris risus est, ultricies ut adipiscing sit amet, malesuada ac dui. Aenean molestie justo eu leo mollis nec ultricies elit gravida. Aliquam rutrum, arcu vitae consequat malesuada, sapien augue consectetur massa, quis sagittis tellus ipsum ut nulla. Pellentesque faucibus auctor volutpat. Nullam ut purus dui, nec pellentesque turpis. Sed ac vehicula tortor. Vestibulum lorem metus, placerat a imperdiet at, suscipit id neque.

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uis vehicula erat vel purus blandit vulputate. Praesent quis metus urna, at sagittis leo. Vivamus ac sapien a libero hendrerit varius. Vivamus vitae urna mauris, dignissim malesuada est. In dapibus congue elit non rutrum. In in odio vel risus ullamcorper posuere. Suspendisse potenti. Proin nulla sem, sodales id tincidunt pharetra, vehicula nec quam. Donec sed lacinia lorem. Morbi dapibus velit sed urna tempor pharetra. Phasellus mattis eros ac lorem dignissim dictum. Etiam varius molestie nisi, ut posuere libero facilisis non. Ut adipiscing venenatis erat, eget varius ipsum tincidunt eu. Nam convallis ultricies mauris, sit amet egestas ante pellentesque quis. Curabitur ac sem facilisis tellus cursus rhoncus nec a lectus. Fusce condimentum bibendum felis eget viverra. Quisque at nisl nisl.


stone advisory magazine september/october 2012

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Donec dignissim iaculis tortor, sit amet volutpat diam hendrerit vel. Ut sodales, sapien nec vulputate commodo, dolor nunc blandit lectus, at euismod odio ante quis augue. Nullam ac libero id purus tempor dapibus. Vestibulum rhoncus tincidunt urna sit amet mattis.

Fusce molestie mattis tellus, at iaculis sem varius in. In sollicitudin diam nec lacus bibendum tristique. Nullam tempor scelerisque sem et luctus. Quisque et risus eros. Donec interdum iaculis nisi, mattis congue velit lobortis non. Sed at lorem nibh, ut feugiat orci. Sed sit amet nisl augue, eget porttitor enim. Duis ut lorem nulla. Aliquam erat volutpat. Sed porta tempus luctus. Pellentesque lacus arcu, sodales eu ornare at, volutpat sed magna. Proin in molestie metus.

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ed id dui ut urna porta suscipit ut et arcu. Etiam mattis placerat aliquam. Ut lectus lacus, varius sit amet

condimentum vel, congue sit amet neque. Integer pharetra risus a odio interdum imperdiet. Integer facilisis tincidunt blandit. Donec vel nunc magna. Duis convallis venenatis lacus, eu vulputate eros vestibulum ac. Mauris ornare vehicula odio, ut ultrices odio viverra et. Aliquam vitae augue elit, non iaculis erat. Nunc nunc dolor, placerat ac rhoncus hendrerit, porta et justo. Pellentesque adipiscing auctor sagittis. Aenean pretium fringilla diam vel dignissim. Sed viverra, nunc in tincidunt sollicitudin, enim purus ullamcorper risus, vitae convallis justo sem ac leo. Nam faucibus nibh enim, quis dapibus turpis. Curabitur tempor hendrerit placerat.

IMGŠ Name Surname


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stone advisory magazine september/october 2012

the case of the

fungus among us frederick m. hueston, phd stone forensics engineer

I

t was one of those wonderful spring mornings. I woke up to birds singing and the sun just peeking through the clouds. I got up out of bed, opened the window and thought what a great day it was going to be. At my age, I thought I had seen everything, at least as far as the stone industry was concerned…and then the phone rang. “Stone Detective, here,” I said in a half-awake voice. The caller had a scratchy voice and sounded desperate. He told me he was a stone mason and was working on a limestone wall at a large estate of someone really famous. He said he had a problem with mold and moss on the wall and was wondering if I could come by and take a look. My first reaction was just to tell him how to remove it. I have done it many times, but something in my gut was telling me to go over there and take a look. Well, I was in a good mood and told him I could swing by later that morning. I got dressed and headed out the door for my morning ritual of a cup of joe and the morning newspaper at the local greasy spoon. After several cups and some really intelligent conversation with the locals–not–I hopped in the Woody and headed over to the jobsite where the stone mason was working. I pulled up to this elaborate gate with the initials BW on it. I’ll let you guess what famous person this was. There was a long limestone wall that had to be over a hundred years old. It was very difficult to see the wall since it was caked with green moss and other biological growth. I started to come up with a plan in my head of how to remove it, and then I spotted the stone mason working on a new wall. I pulled the ole Woody off to the side and he came running over to me. He shook my hand and started rambling on and on about the new limestone wall. I looked over at what he had constructed and it was a great job.

I told him it looked great and that I could see the problem with the old wall. He looked at me as if I had stepped off the Starship Enterprise and said, “What problem?” I pointed over at the old wall and said, “The moss and all that growth.” “Oh,” he said, “no, that’s not the problem at all. The problem is with the new wall.” Now I was getting confused. I thought he had called me about a moss issue, so I asked him, “Didn’t you tell me on the phone that you had a moss problem?” “Yes,” he said, and then he said the following which totally floored me. “I need to figure out a way to get moss and all those fungi to grow on the new wall, and quickly.” Now I have heard everything. Apparently, the owner wanted the new wall to look like the old wall. So, I scratched my head and just stood there like a deer caught in headlights. I didn’t know what to say and I couldn’t think of an easy answer. I told him I would get back to him later that afternoon after I did a little research. I headed back to my office with the question of how you grow moss really fast on a limestone wall. I pulled up to the office and it was about lunch time, so I walked across the street to the local pub to grab a ruben and maybe a beer. I walked in and noticed that stale beer smell. It was like someone had spilled a beer on the floor and no one had cleaned it up. Little did


stone advisory magazine september/october 2012

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AD for Stone Detective Book with 10 never-before-published stories

”At my age, I thought I had seen everything, as far as the stone industry was concerned, and then the phone rang...”

I know, that the smell of beer would be the answer to my moss problem. I finished my sandwich and several beers, and headed back to my office for some research. I got on the computer and typed in “Growing Moss” and couldn’t find a darn thing. Now I was getting frustrated. I started staring at the wall across from my desk and noticed an old photo I had of my college roommates. I looked at the photo and realized that my best friend in college was now a professor at the local university and his specialty was fungus. So, I picked up the phone and gave him a call. After over a half an hour of reminiscing about the good ole days, I got to my problem. He laughed and said, “Well, that’s easy.” “For you, maybe,” I said. He told me all I

needed was some yeast, yogurt and stale beer. I started laughing then, and told him he was out of his mind. He told me that moss and fungi needed not only a moist environment but they needed a food source as well. He said to mix the yogurt, yeast and beer into a paste and paint it on the wall. Next, take some of the moss off the old wall and put it on the new wall. He said that in next to no time, the moss will start growing on the new wall. Well, this old man learned something new, and, hopefully, so did you. I have to admit that I never saw that one coming! The Stone Detective is a fictional character created by Fred Hueston, written to be entertaining and educational


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contemporary stone advisory magazine magazine month september/october 20XX 2012

Put some fire in your life! W

ith fall upon us we begin to foster thoughts of perfect weather & beautiful colors outside, with our windows open, yet warmth in our homes The fall trend of incorporating natural elements into your home is now upon us and we have the perfect solution. Not only are these solutions gorgeous they are also low maintenance, environmentally responsible options. Stonewall cladding is an excellent way to add texture and interest instantly to a space. Embody ambience and bring the room to new heights by combining strong elements of earth and fire with the clad stone and a sleek and sexy fire feature. This feature can be added to any room fairly simply with the right designer and craftsmen. The shape of the box to house the fire element would need to be built out by a carpenter. The fire feature is typically a drop in and secure install and the cladding is applied typically by an integrated mesh system for a no fuss install. The featured stone cladding in the

home design (page 13) is up cycled from over 80% of reclaimed drops from other products in the manufacturing facility. The studio application (shown here) is 100% stone quartz. The Eco smart fires require no gas line, but does offer models with them if you prefer this option. There are sizes

‘‘Praesent quis metus urna, at sagittis leo. Vivamus ac sapien a libero hendrerit varius. Vivamus vitae urna mauris, dignissim.’’

and shapes to accommodate any room or application. The clean burning fuel for the fire is bioethanol, which comes in easy to store and dispense containers. Together the stone cladding and beautiful fire feature add ambiance, warmth, interest and beauty to any room indoors or out.


stoneadvisory contemporary magazine september/october magazine month 20XX 2012

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D

esign Studio 15 founded in 2006 by Shanna Bender principle & owner, leading with the desire to create unique, diverse, and classic spaces that are functional, efficient, and dramatically aesthetic. Bender’s designs are bold, ground breaking, and inspirational, with a strong artistic influence. Design Studio 15 specializes in residential, hospitality & commercial interior design, offering a wide array of professional services for private and vacation properties.

Their services include interior design, architectural detailing, turnkey furnishing packages, construction specifications, and remodeling. Affluent in working with clients throughout the world, serving more than one hundred international clients on over four hundred projects. Design Studio 15 has developed a unique understanding to accommodate the overseas clientele needs. Located in Winter Park, Florida; Design Studio 15 is now showcasing a furnishing gallery and offering a boutique design experience. The firm’s sustained growth over the years is a testament to the enduring design concepts that permeate every completed project. The Corner stone of Design Studio 15’s success is their passion for excellence in design, business partnerships and customer service. Contact Design Studio 15 today! Images provided by Design Studio 15

www.DESIGNSTUDIO15.com • 407.960.5943 info@designstudio15.com


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Stone advisory magazine september/october 2012


stone advisory magazine september/october 2012

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Donec dignissim iaculis tortor, sit amet volutpat diam hendrerit vel. Ut sodales, sapien nec vulputate commodo, dolor nunc blandit lectus, at euismod odio ante quis augue. Nullam ac libero id purus t

after

Images provided by Design Studio 15

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orem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nam libero neque, ultrices placerat venenatis nec, blandit non turpis. Phasellus quis scelerisque nunc. Sed orci tellus, suscipit vitae euismod vel, egestas suscipit tortor. Quisque egestas varius tortor non egestas. Quisque non urna diam, ut volutpat magna. Nam pellentesque ornare sollicitudin. Vestibulum blandit, diam ut pharetra dictum, enim metus dictum felis, vitae aliquet ante dui vel justo. Morbi interdum mattis purus ac malesuada. Fusce turpis ipsum, tempus quis interdum ac, vehicula vitae tellus. Donec sed nunc justo, non vulputate elit. Sed nec justo quis lectus accumsan blandit. In a imperdiet felis. Maecenas diam felis, aliquet quis feugiat quis, volutpat ut ligula. Vivamus dapibus dignissim venenatis.

before

fames ac turpis egestas. Maecenas euismod ultricies mi, et convallis erat luctus id. In at erat sapien. Mauris risus est, ultricies ut adipiscing sit amet, malesuada ac dui. Aenean molestie justo eu leo mollis nec ultricies elit gravida. Aliquam rutrum, arcu vitae consequat malesuada, sapien augue consectetur massa, quis sagittis tellus ipsum ut nulla. Pellentesque faucibus

‘‘This is an example of a pullquote that creates a border on top and bottom’’

“Best possible diamond for the dollar...”

IGS Diamonds

Hundreds of customers will attest to it and the prestigious Washingtonian Magazine Nobody does diamonds better... listed us among the "The Best of WashingG.I.A. graded diamonds GIA Certified Diamonds | Custom Design | Rolex w ton.specifications. " ww.igsdiamonds.com of superlative quality

We beat ‘NY wholesale prices’


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contemporary stone advisory magazine magazine month september/orctober 20XX 2012

I'm sorry... I think you

O

ver the past sevearal years, we have heard many stories about the reasons stone will fail, turn color, fade, and so on...

It’s amazing what people who should know better will say about common stone failures or issues...

M

any are funny and most are just plain false. Here's a sampling you may enjoy...

A Warped Sense of Humor Many seasoned installers who have tried to install green marble tiles with ordinary thin set or other water-based setting materials have experienced warping problems. Here are two ways we've heard them explained.

1

Myth: ”Green Marble will

warp because it contains living plant material. As water is added to the marble, the plants start to grow and this makes the marble warp.” We nearly fell over laughing, but he wasn't kidding. He really thought this was the reason.

2

Myth: ”Green Marble will

curl on the edges because the installer did not put enough setting mortar on the edges. The green marble will have a tendency to lift off the floor where there is no mortar and hence will curl." While not quite as outrageous as the first explaination, it is still just as wrong.

Truth: The real reason green

marble warps is a condition known as hysterisis. Green marble is very sensitive to moisture. When water enters the stone, it causes the marble to release any internal stress, thus causing it to warp.

Home Sweet What?

3

Myth: ”Your stone floor needs to be homed!"

Truth: No, this is not a spelling

mistake - the word used was "homed." We have run into several sales people who have called the honing process "homing." Maybe they also worked with pigeons, but we've never heard of homing a floor. The proper term, of course, is "HONE," which means to abrade a stone.


stone advisory contemporary magazine september/october magazine month 20XX 2012

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mythunderstood me "Plop, Plop, Fizz, Fizz..."

4 problem."

Myth: ”Your stone floor has an effervescence

generally the most susceptible, but some granites will also be damaged by vinegar.

Truth:

The key word here is "effervescence." Let's clear this up right now. Efflorescence is the deposit of soluble salts on the surface of the stone that is caused by water that carries the salts from the setting bed of the stone to the surface; it is often deposited as a white powerder-like residue on the surface of the stone. Effervescence is what happens when something fizzes. A good example is when you drop a tablet of Alka-Seltzer into a glass of water. The fizzing is referred to as "effervescence." We've never seen a stone effervesce unless someone was pouring acid on it!

5

Myth: ”Sealing your

stone will help with your efflorescence problem."

Truth: We've heard so-called experts

instruct people with an efflorescence problem to seal the stone as a remedy. This is wrong. Sealing will only block or reduce the pore size of the stone, which will not only cause more efflorescence, but could also cause spalling, which is where the stone flakes at the surface.

Are You Cracked?

6

Myth: ”That's not a crack, it's a fissure!"

Truth: Many fabricators will try

and blame cracks that occur in stone installations on natural fissures that occur in the stone. Sometimes they are right and sometimes they are wrong. If you look up the word "fissure" in the dictionary, guess what? A fissure is a crack. The distinction they are trying to make is between fissures which

Stones Can Be So Vein!

are naturally occuring as part of the formation of the stonem and cracks (more appropriately called "breaks") caused by external forces on the stone. Of course, the most likely place for a break to occur is on a natural fissure. Consequently, definitions need to be clarified and the stone needs to be examined carefully to determine if natural fissures are at risk of becoming breaks during normal usage.

Would You Like Some Salad With That?

7

Myth: ”To remove oil

from stone, saturating it with water will force the oil out."

Truth: Since it is true that oil floats

on water, you would think this makes sense. But trust us, it doesn't work. The oil is trapped in the pores of the stone and no amount of water is going to force it out. The best way to remove oil from stone is with a poultice and a degreasing chemical. For specifics and poulticing instructions, see stoneandtilepros.com/ stain-removal-application/.

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Myth: ”Just use some

vinegar and water to clean your marble or limestone."

Truth: Generally folks in the

stone business know better, but this is often recommended by tile installers. Don't do it! Vinegar is an acid and will etch calcium based stone. Marble and limestone are

9

Myth: ”If it's got veins, it's marble."

Truth: This is a fib we hear all the

time. Many people in the industry believe that if a stone has veins, it must be marble. This is totally false. Veins can also be found in granite and limestone.

You Make Me Sick!

10

Myth: ”Granite

countertops harbor bacteria and emit harmful radon gas."

Truth: This is absolutely FALSE!

NIOSH and the CDC have no reports of granite or any other stone used as a countertop being unsafe. If stone was unsafe or unsanitary, why would it be used in food laboratories or sold as cutting boards? There has been no know proof of any illness caused by using stone as a countertop. And as for the rumors that granite contains harmful radon gas - there is so little radon in granite that you would have to live to be 10,000 years old for it to have an ill effect on you. There is likely more radon coming from the ground and the concrete that your house is built on.


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stone advisory magazine september/october 2012

Ask Dr. Fred T

F

o give you a little background, in addition to being our answer guy, Dr. Fred is the Chief Technical Director at Stone & Tile PROS, a nationally known consultant, and the founder of Stone Forensics (www.stoneforensics.com) where he and his colleagues provide specification consultation, failure analysis, and expert witness services.

red

M. Hueston

(aka Dr. Fred) brings a wealth of experience and expertise to Stone Advisory Magazine.

H

e has hosted radio shows and written over 30 books o stone and tile installations, fabrication and restoration.

Do you have a question for Dr. Fred? Email us at admin@stoneandtilepros.com and you may be featured in the next issue of Stone Advisory Magazine!

Did You Know ? At least two applications of sealer are recommended for granites which require sealing. Very porous granites may require three or more applications. The stone is adequately sealed when the sealer can no longer be asbosrbed by the stone.

Q>

Can steam be used to clean stone surfaces? We have silicone caulking on a granite floor and steam from a hotsy machine is the only method that will take it off.

A<

Steam can be used effectively on granite surfaces, but be careful if you use any chemicals, such as alkalies. Rinse the surface thoroughly if using alkaline cleaners.

TIP: Another good method for removing caulking, tar or chewing gum from granite surfaces is to freeze the caulking with dry ice, or you can purchase a product called gum freeze. Once the caulking is frozen it can be easily pried from the surface of the stone.

Q> A<

Is granite more porous than marble?

Yes, granite is more porous than marble. The pores in granite are generally much larger than marble and therefore will absorb more water. For this reason, it is absolutely necessary to apply an impregnating sealer to granite.

FYI: Most people consider granite to be a very strong and chemically resistant stone. This is true, but do not confuse acid resistance with absorbency. Granite is generally much more absorbent than marble.


stone advisory magazine september/october 2012

17

Image provided by Artistic Stone Design

Image provided by Maldonado Tile and Marble

‘‘Donec dignissim iaculis tortor, sit amet volutpat diam hendrerit vel. Ut sodales, sapien nec.’’

Image provided by Southeast Stone

shopping for

Image provided by Big Horn Granite & Marble, Inc.

natural stone countertops Nec justo quis lectus accumsan blandit. In a imperdiet felis. Maecenas diam felis, aliquet quis feugiat quis, volutpat ut .

D

onec dignissim iaculis tortor, sit amet volutpat diam hendrerit vel. Ut sodales, sapien nec vulputate commodo, dolor nunc blandit lectus, at euismod odio ante quis augue. Nullam ac libero id purus tempor dapibus. Vestibulum rhoncus tincidunt urna sit

amet mattis. Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Maecenas euismod ultricies mi, et convallis erat luctus id. In at erat sapien. Mauris risus est, ultricies ut adipiscing sit amet, malesuada ac dui. Aenean molestie justo eu leo mollis nec ultricies elit gravida. Aliquam rutrum, arcu vitae consequat malesuada, sapien augue consectetur. Quisque egestas varius tortor non egestas. Quisque non urna diam, ut volutpat magna. Nam pellentesque ornare sollicitudin. Vestibulum blandit, diam ut pharetra dictum,


18

Stone advisory magazine september/october 2012

â&#x2C6;&#x161;Donec dignissim iaculis tortor, sit amet volutpat diam hendrerit vel. Ut sodales, sapien nec vulputate commodo, dolor nunc blandit lectus, at euismod odio ante quis augue. Nullam ac libero id purus tempor dapibus. Vestibulum rhoncus tincidunt urna sit amet mattis. Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Maecenas euismod ultricies mi, et convallis erat luctus id. In at erat sapien. Mauris risus est, ultricies ut adipiscing sit amet, malesuada ac dui. Aenean molestie justo eu leo mollis nec ultricies elit gravida. Aliquam rutrum, arcu vitae consequat malesuada, sapien augue consectetur. Quisque egestas varius tortor non egestas. Quisque non urna diam, ut volutpat magna. Nam pellentesque ornare sollicitudin. Vestibulum blandit, diam ut pharetra dictum, Donec dignissim iaculis tortor, sit amet volutpat diam hendrerit vel. Ut sodales, sapien nec vulputate commodo, dolor nunc blandit lectus, at euismod odio ante quis augue. Nullam ac libero id purus tempor dapibus. Vestibulum rhoncus tincidunt urna sit amet mattis. Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Maecenas euismod ultricies mi, et convallis erat luctus id. In at erat sapien. Mauris risus est, ultricies ut adipiscing sit amet, malesuada ac dui. Aenean molestie justo eu leo mollis nec ultricies elit gravida. Aliquam rutrum, arcu vitae consequat malesuada, sapien augue consectetur.

kohler or cabinetry or sinks

Quisque egestas varius tortor non egestas. Quisque non urna diam, ut volutpat magna. Nam pellentesque ornare sollicitudin. Vestibulum blandit, diam ut pharetra dictum, Donec dignissim iaculis tortor, sit amet volutpat diam hendrerit vel. Ut sodales, sapien nec vulputate commodo, dolor nunc blandit lectus, at euismod odio ante quis augue. Nullam ac libero id purus tempor dapibus. Vestibulum rhoncus tincidunt urna sit amet mattis. Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Maecenas euismod ultricies mi, et convallis erat luctus id. In at erat sapien. Mauris risus est, ultricies ut adipiscing sit amet, malesuada ac dui. Aenean molestie justo eu leo mollis nec ultricies elit gravida. Aliquam rutrum, arcu vitae consequat malesuada, sapien augue consectetur. Quisque egestas varius tortor non egestas. Quisque non urna diam, ut volutpat magna. Nam pellentesque ornare sollicitudin. Vestibulum blandit, diam ut pharetra dictum, Donec dignissim iaculis tortor, sit amet volutpat diam hmi, et convallis erat luctus id. In at erat sapien. Mauris risus est, ultricies ut adipiscing sit amet, malesuada ac dui. Aenean molestie justo eu leo mollis nec ultricies elit gravida. Aliquam rutrum, arcu vitae consequat malesuada, sapien augue consectetur. Quisque egestas varius tortor non egestas. Quisque non urna diam, ut volutpat magna. Nam pellentesque ornare sollicitudin. Vestibulum blandit, diam ut pharetra dictum,


stone advisory contemporary magazine septmember/october magazine month 20XX 2012

19

Natural Stone Countertops

Take With You Shopping Guide "Plop, Plop, Fizz, Fizz..."

4 problem."

Myth: ”Your stone floor has an effervescence

Truth:

The key word here is "effervescence." Let's clear this up right now. Efflorescence is the deposit of soluble salts on the surface of the stone that is caused by water that carries the salts from the setting bed of the stone to the surface; it is often deposited as a white powerder-like residue on the surface of the stone. Effervescence is what happens when something fizzes. A good example is when you drop a tablet of Alka-Seltzer into a glass of water. The fizzing is referred to as "effervescence." We've never seen a stone effervesce unless someone was pouring acid on it!

5

Myth: ”Sealing your

stone will help with your efflorescence problem."

Truth: We've heard so-called experts

instruct people with an efflorescence problem to seal the stone as a remedy. This is wrong. Sealing will only block or reduce the pore size of the stone, which will not only cause more efflorescence, but could also cause spalling, which is where the stone flakes at the surface.

Are You Cracked?

6

Myth: ”That's not a crack, it's a fissure!"

Truth: Many fabricators will try

and blame cracks that occur in stone installations on natural fissures that occur in the stone. Sometimes they are right and sometimes they are wrong. If you look up the word "fissure" in the dictionary, guess what? A fissure is a crack. The distinction they are trying to make is between fissures which

are naturally occuring as part of the formation of the stonem and cracks (more appropriately called "breaks") caused by external forces on the stone. Of course, the most likely place for a break to occur is on a natural fissure. Consequently, definitions need to be clarified and the stone needs to be examined carefully to determine if natural fissures are at risk of becoming breaks during normal usage.

Would You Like Some Salad With That?

7

Myth: ”To remove oil

from stone, saturating it with water will force the oil out."

Truth: Since it is true that oil floats

on water, you would think this makes sense. But trust us, it doesn't work. The oil is trapped in the pores of the stone and no amount of water is going to force it out. The best way to remove oil from stone is with a poultice and a degreasing chemical. For specifics and poulticing instructions, see stoneandtilepros.com/ stain-removal-application/.

8

Myth: ”Just use some

vinegar and water to clean your marble or limestone."

Truth: Generally folks in the

stone business know better, but this is often recommended by tile installers. Don't do it! Vinegar is an acid and will etch calcium based stone. Marble and limestone are

generally the most susceptible, but some granites will also be damaged by vinegar.

Stones Can Be So Vein!

9

Myth: ”If it's got veins, it's marble."

Truth: This is a fib we hear all the

time. Many people in the industry believe that if a stone has veins, it must be marble. This is totally false. Veins can also be found in granite and limestone.

You Make Me Sick!

10

Myth: ”Granite

countertops harbor bacteria and emit harmful radon gas."

Truth: This is absolutely FALSE!

NIOSH and the CDC have no reports of granite or any other stone used as a countertop being unsafe. If stone was unsafe or unsanitary, why would it be used in food laboratories or sold as cutting boards? There has been no know proof of any illness caused by using stone as a countertop. And as for the rumors that granite contains harmful radon gas - there is so little radon in granite that you would have to live to be 10,000 years old for it to have an ill effect on you. There is likely more radon coming from the ground and the concrete that your house is built on.


20

contemporary stone advisory magazine magazine month september/october 20XX 2012

How To

Manage Stains B

ecause marble and other natural stones are somewhat porous, some more than others, spills, especially those that are not cleaned up immediately, can result in stains. Fortunately, most stains can be easily removed with the right know-how. But not all "stains" are necessarily "stains". A true stain is always darker than the stained material. If it appears as a lighter color it is not a stain, but either a mark of corrosion (etching) made by an acid, or a caustic mark (bleaching) made by a strong base (alkali). In other words, a lighter color ”stain” is always surface damage and has no relation whatsoever with the absorbency rate of the damaged material—stone or otherwise. There is not a single exception to this rule.

a video how-to and interactive guide for identifying and treating true stains, and a how-to video for removing light etching can be found at stoneandtilepros.com/how-to-center A stain is a discoloration of the stone produced by a staining agent that was actually absorbed by the stone. Other ”discolorations” have nothing to do with the porosity (absorbency) of the stone, but rather are a result of damage to the stone surface. All those ”stains” that look like ”water spots” or ”water rings” are actually marks of corrosion (etches) created by some chemically active liquid (mostly—but not necessarily limited to—acids), which had a chance to come in contact with the stone. Knowing whether your "stain" is truly a stain is, of course, only the first step. If it is a true stain, you must next determine what kind of stain it is, in order to treat it effectively. A handy application to assist with this can be found at stoneandtilepros.com/stain-removal-application. A "stain" which is actually due to etching or bleaching will have to be addressed differently, and may require the assistance of a professional depending on the type and extent of the damage.

Did You Know ? Using detergent and water on a stain caused by red wine may actually SET the stain more permanently instead? A light stain may be removed using acetone and a clean white cloth. For more stubborn stains, the use of a poultice may be a better option. Poulticing instructions for red wine and other stains can be found at stoneandtilepros.com/ stain-removal-application


stone advisory magazine september/october 2012

full page scc

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contemporary magazine month 20XX


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contemporary magazine month 20XX stone advisory contemporary magazine september/october magazine month 20XX 2012

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kid's page There are many stone types but all natural stone falls into one of three categories:

Sedimentary metamorphic igneous Sedimentary Sedimentary stone came from organic elements such as glaciers, rivers, wind, oceans, and plants. Tiny sedimentary pieces broke off from these elements and accumulated to form rock beds. They were bonded through millions of years of heat and pressure. Metamorphic Metamorphic stone originates from a natural change from one type of stone to another type through the mixture of heat, pressure and minerals. The change may be a development of a crystalline formation, a texture change, or a color change. Igneous Igneous stones are mainly formed through volcanic material such as magma. (The word igneous is derived from the Latin word igneus, meaning "of fire.") Underneath the Earth's surface, liquid magma cooled and solidified. Mineral gases and liquids penetrated into the stone and created new crystalline formations with various colors.

What gives stone its color?

The color in all stone is derived from the minerals and organic matter they contain. For example, red marbles are red due to the presence of iron. Green marble gets its color from a mineral called serpentine and so forth. There are several excellent books and websites on rocks and minerals which will help you identify the various minerals within a stone.

Word Search

Can you find all of the words in the puzzle below? They can be found horizontally, vertically or diagonally. Good Luck! Rock tile stone grout iron marble limestone serpentine granite quartz sedimentary metamorphic igneous

learn a new geology word

sed-i-ment noun -- solid fragmented material, such as as silt, sand, gravel, chemical precipitates, and fossil fragments, that is transported and deposited by water, ice or wind, or that accumulates through chemical precipitation or secretion by organisms, and that forms layers on the Earth's surface. Sedimentary rocks consist of consolidated sediment. [Latin: sedimentum, the act of settling, from sedre, to sit, settle; see sed- in Indo-European roots.]


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contemporary magazine month 20XX

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interested in advertising with us? PLEASE CALL US AT (555) 555-5555 or visit our media page at www.media. stoneadvisorymagazine.com


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contemporary magazine month 20XX

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Stone Advisory Magazine  

The magazine dedicated to natural stone, tile and concrete design, care, and resources

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