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1 9 th E D I T I O N

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ALGOOD • BAXTER • MONTEREY

THE SOURCEBOOK

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CONTENTS 8 Where Adventure Awaits George Halford welcomes you to Cookeville.

12 Quick Facts 16 State of the Art(s) Tour Brad Sells’ woodworking studio and the thriving arts and music scene of Cookeville.

24 Quite Hospitable With care like this at home, why go anywhere else?

28 Head of the Class When it comes to education, Putnam makes the grade.

32 Do Unto Others Linda Westin talks about the community’s big heart.

38 Sweet Smell of Success Ralph’s Donut Shop shows how even small businesses can leave a national footprint.

46 Shop Around the Corner Kellie Fitzpatrick’s Caravan is just one of many terrific boutique shops in Cookeville.

54 The Beard of Beer Visit Father Tom’s pub to hear John “Beard” Darrow tell of his variety of drinking and dining options.

62 Stay Tuned See Desirée Duncan in action while she represents Cookeville’s media outlets.

68 I’d Rather Be Rich “Fittest Man” Rich Froning shows what it means to live an active life in Cookeville.

72 Take It Outside Eric Jackson kayaks his way through the Highlands.

78 Captains of Industry Jimmy and Bob Mackie of iWC describe the benefits of housing their headquarters in Cookeville.

84 The Host with the Most Ottis Phillips knows how capable Cookeville-Putnam County is as host of large events.

90 For the Family Play smart at Kristea Cancel’s Smart Play and discover more fun activities for your family.

Lucky Seven Series THE S O U RC E BO O K + No . 1 9 Sponsored by the Cookeville-Putnam County Chamber of Commerce To correct, delete or add information, please contact the Chamber. One West First Street + Cookeville, TN 38501 931-526-2211 + Fax 931-526-4023 + 800-264-5541 info@cookevillechamber.com + cookevillechamber.com

19 TH ED. SOURCEBOOK

4



Claims to Fame, 15



Local Music Acts, 22



Retirement Enticements, 27



‘To Die For’ Desserts, 43



Local Outdoor Bistros, 58



Tastes of the World, 66



Views You Shouldn’t Miss, 77



Campout Must-Haves, 94


SOURCEBOOK STAFF Editor Roman Stone

Designer Meredith Purcell

Writer Margaret LeFevre

Contributing Writers Lisa Brooksbank Lori Shull

Photographers Cody Bryant Ben Corda Ron Baker

Data Chamber of Commerce Cookeville Regional Medical Center Putnam County School System Tennessee Tech University

Sales Director Heather Thomas

Accounting Adrienne Stone

Customer Service Michelle Herron

Printing Anderson Printing Solutions

Distribution Chamber of Commerce

Design/Production WDStone & Associates

114 N. Washington Ave. Cookeville, TN 38501 Phone 931.525.6020 Fax 931.525.6550 sourcebook@wdstone.com yoursourcebook.com wdstone.com contact@wdstone.com The Sourcebook © WDStone & Associates, Inc.

GO NUTS FOR DONUTS

Thomas Rodriguez of Ralph’s Donut Shop in Cookeville prepares dough in the kitchen. The staff at Ralph’s arrives in the wee hours each morning to bake donuts, fritters, muffins and more for the day’s customers.

5

COOKEVILLE-PUTNAM COUNTY CHAMBER


Education that matters...

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Attorney-at-Law 931.526.6131 • Fax 931.372.0150 24 North Jefferson Avenue • P.O. Box 715 Cookeville, Tennessee 38503

E-mail: legal@dledbetter.com


Where Adventure Awaits CHAMBER PRESIDENT GEORGE HALFORD AND AN INTRODUCTION TO COOKEVILLE

S

ince its founding more than a century ago,

“I love watching a community grow and evolve,

Cookeville has been a sleepy town in the country

watching a community stretch itself and think more

surrounded by beautiful hills, rivers and waterfalls. It

of itself than maybe it would have before,” said George

has always been a place of quiet charm, where people

Halford, president and CEO of the Cookeville-Putnam

greet each other on the sidewalks and no one stays a

County Chamber of Commerce. “It’s the people, the

stranger for long.

region, the culture, the high quality of life but low cost, Tennessee Tech University (TTU). There’s a

In more recent years, this charming small town has begun to wake up and is even being recognized as the largest micropolitan area in Tennessee.

genuineness and a civility. It’s just the culture here.”


GETTING US ON THE MAP

George Halford, Cookeville-Putnam County Chamber of Commerce president and CEO, talks about all that makes Cookeville grand.


The chamber boasts between 850 and 900 members, and member businesses employ 16,000 people. New businesses are opening, others are moving or expanding, and Cookeville is seeing an increase in new, large industries expressing an interest or signing deals to come to the Highlands Business Park, currently in development.

Serving as home of Tennessee Tech University, the city has grown as the university has grown and has developed an appreciation for the arts, music and education. It is, more often than ever before, becoming a travel destination, a new home or a place to start or relocate a business. Cookeville is the seat of Putnam County and the center of the 14-county Upper Cumberland region of Tennessee. Putnam County is in the top 20 of the state’s 95 counties in terms of population, but its central position in the Upper Cumberland means many from outside the county come here often to eat, shop and play. “It’s easy to be regional when you’re the capital of the region,” Halford said. “People are going to come here to eat. They’re going to come here to shop. They’re going to come here for an education.”

TTI Floor Care, which manufactures Dirt Devil, Hoover, Oreck and Royal vacuum cleaners, announced an expansion to its Cookeville plant that is forecast to create more than 200 jobs. Academy Sports + Outdoors also announced that it will locate its southeastern distribution hub — which will be the largest distribution center under one roof in Tennessee — to Cookeville, creating more than 700 jobs in the course of the next eight to 10 years.

PEOPLE ARE GOING TO COME HERE TO EAT. THEY’RE GOING TO COME HERE TO SHOP. THEY’RE GOING TO COME HERE FOR AN EDUCATION.”

The Cookeville-Putnam County Chamber of Commerce is the driver or partner of many of the region’s economic development efforts, and several years ago it commissioned an economic opportunity study. Since then, the Convention & Visitors Bureau and its partners have been working to spread the word about the area’s world-class music and craft, its scenic landscapes and outdoor adventure spots, and TTU.

“If one enjoys a lot of the attributes of living in a micropolitan environment, we’re it,” Halford said. “If one enjoys a more outdoors, rural environment, that’s who we are. We’re a small community, but we play more like a town of 75,000 to 100,000 people.” Part of that is keeping people healthy. Cookeville, with Cookeville Regional Medical Center, is the center for the region’s health care. There are more than 200 physicians in Cookeville, and the hospital has leading facilities for open-heart and beating-heart surgeries and cancer therapy. A variety of gyms, ranging from the YMCA to CrossFit, and dance studios, combined with plentiful opportunities and venues for outdoor recreation, means that it is easier to stay healthy and fit in Cookeville, despite our hopping food scene.

“A recent community incubator study says, if you will ever learn to play it and market it, you could be ‘Asheville West.’ These aren’t things you see in every town,” Halford said. “We’re the only nonmetropolitan area of Tennessee with a professional symphony orchestra, with its own PBS station, with a world-class arts culture. The crown jewel is TTU.” In addition to housing the Bryan Symphony Orchestra and hosting dozens of cultural and community events every year, TTU is doing its part to help the region grow and thrive economically. It houses a variety of entrepreneur-focused centers, which are growing quickly and adding to the dynamism of Cookeville.

19 TH ED. SOURCEBOOK

Cookeville is a vibrant place to live and do business and has attractions, events and a community feel that appeal to all ages.

“We feel our hospitality is key. Thirty years ago, it was just a place you passed through unless you lived here, and then it was the best place to be,” Halford said. “Visitors and business people ask all the time, ‘Are people here always this nice?’ Well yes, we are.”

10


A community like no other! A beautiful, thriving community in the heart of the Upper Cumberland, Cookeville is ideally situated between three major Tennessee cities. Located just a short drive from several state parks and two major lakes, this expanding community is also home to 10 city parks and lots of other natural beauty that is characteristic of Middle Tennessee. The city’s flourishing community of artists celebrates everything from culinary flare to the performing arts. With a business community continually strengthened by patrons from within Putnam and surrounding counties, Cookeville is the hub of activity for the region. Learn more about Cookeville by visiting ww www.cookeville-tn.org.


Quick Facts CITY OF ALGOOD

CITY OF MONTEREY

Algood was first settled in 1820 and was incorporated in 1901. Until rails reached the area around 1891, Algood was farmland — much of it owned by Joel Algood, and known as “Algood Oldfields.” The Nashville and Knoxville Railroad bought land from him for a depot and called it “Algood,” thus naming the community that grew up around the station.

Monterey was once the pioneer settlement “Standing Stone,” so named for a large boulder on the historic Walton Road nearby. After the railroad reached Standing Stone in 1893, officers and stockholders of the Cumberland Mountain Coal Company founded a new town and named it “Monterey,” which is Spanish for “mountain of the king.”

80 miles east of Nashville 100 miles west of Knoxville On Highways 111 and 42

92 miles east of Nashville 85 miles west of Knoxville On Interstate 40

3,563

2,858

1115’ above sea level

1875’ above sea level

4 square miles

3 square miles

Government

Mayor, (931) 537-9545 Ext. 2360 Five-member city council City administrator, (931) 537-9545 Ext. 2060

Mayor, (931) 839-3770 Eight aldermen

Public Safety

Fire Dept.: (931) 537-6357 Police Dept.: (931) 537-6830

Fire Dept.: (931) 839-2323 Police Dept.: (931) 839-2323

Water: Town of Algood Water, Sewer and Sanitation Dept., (931) 537-9545 Electric: City of Cookeville, (931) 520-5214 Gas: City of Cookeville, (931) 520-5214

Water: City of Monterey, (931) 839-3339 Electric: Volunteer Energy Cooperative,

History COUNTY C L I M AT E

Avg. Annual Temperature

56.7ºF

January Avg.

Location

46ºF high 26ºF low July Avg.

87ºF high 65ºF low Avg. Annual Precipitation

56”

Avg. Annual Snowfall

Population Elevation Area

7”

Prevailing Winds

SE

Mean Length of Freeze-Free Period

211 days

Avg. Relative Humidity

79% midnight 85% 6 a.m. 48% noon 62% 6 p.m.

Utilities

(931) 839-2217 Gas: Middle Tennessee Natural Gas Utility District, (931) 836-2825

Property Management & Real Estate Consulting (931) 528-2158 (931) 372-9983 430 N. Washington Ave., Suite B Cookeville, TN 38501 P.

F.

falconrealtycookeville.com

19 TH ED. SOURCEBOOK

12


CITY OF COOKEVILLE

CITY OF BAXTER

PUTNAM COUNTY

Chosen for its springs and central spot, Cookeville was incorporated in 1856 as the county seat and named for Richard Fielding Cooke, a state senator. The Nashville and Knoxville Railroad (the Tennessee Central) ran through Cookeville in 1890. Construction of Highway 70 in the 1930s, Interstate 40 in the 1960s, and Highway 111 in the 1990s helped make the town a commercial center.

Baxter has borne various names. Before the railroad, a post office there was called “Ai,” a name borrowed from a biblical city of Canaanites. When the Nashville and Knoxville Railroad built a depot there, it was called “Mine Lick.” To avoid confusion, in 1902, the community, post office and depot were named “Baxter” in honor of Jere Baxter, president of the Tennessee Central.

Putnam County was created in 1842 from parts of White, Overton, Jackson and Fentress counties and was named in honor of General Israel Putnam of the Revolutionary War. In 1844, a court injunction charged that the county was improperly established. But in 1854, the county was reestablished by the court, and Cookeville was named the county seat.

79 miles east of Nashville 101 miles west of Knoxville At intersection of I-40 and Highway 111

69 miles east of Nashville 109 miles west of Knoxville On Interstate 40

31,135

1,391

1133’ above sea level

1031’ above sea level

33 square miles

1.5 square miles

401 square miles

Mayor, (931) 520-1500 Five-member city council City manager, (931) 520-5240

Mayor, (931) 858-4111 Four aldermen

County executive, (931) 526-2161 24-member commission

Fire Dept.: (931) 520-5255 Police Dept.: (931) 526-2125

Fire Dept.: (931) 858-2621 Police Dept.: (931) 858-4111 Ext. 2

Volunteer Fire Dept.: (931) 528-1200 Sheriff’s Dept.: (931) 528-8484

Water: City of Cookeville, (931) 520-5214 Electric: City of Cookeville, (931) 520-5214 Gas: City of Cookeville, (931) 520-5214

Water: City of Baxter, (931) 858-4142 Electric: Upper Cumberland Electric

74,165

Membership Corp., (931) 528-5449, and City of Cookeville, (931) 520-5214 Gas: Middle Tennessee Natural Gas Utility District, (931) 836-2825

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COOKEVILLE-PUTNAM COUNTY CHAMBER


Quick Facts

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CONNECT

Telephone

Charter Communications, (888) 438-2427 Frontier Communications, (931) 528-0709 Twin Lakes Telephone Cooperative Corporation, (931) 858-2151

Newspaper/ Publishers

The Herald-Citizen (931) 526-9715 Upper Cumberland Business Journal (931) 528-8852

Radio

WATX-AM (1600) WBXE-FM (93.7) WGSQ-FM (94.7) WHRS-FM (91.7) WHUB-AM (1400) WJNU-FM (96.9) WKSW-FM (98.5) WKXD-FM (106.9) WLIV-FM (104.7) WLQK-FM (95.9) WPTN-AM (780) WTTU-FM (88.5) WWOG-FM (90.9)

Television

WKRN (ABC) WTVF (CBS) WSMV (NBC) WZTV (FOX) WCTE-TV (PBS)

H E A LT H

Hospital

Cookeville Regional Medical Center, (931) 528-2541

TRANSIT

Highways

Interstate 40, East/West State Highway 111 U.S. 70 State Highways 42, 135, 136 and 290

Air

Upper Cumberland Regional Airport, (931) 739-7000 Livingston Municipal Airport, (931) 823-3671

Bus

The Cookeville Area Transportation System, (931) 372-8000

Rail

The Nashville & Eastern Railroad (Putnam County) Caney Fork & Western Railroad (White County)

For more facts and figures about Cookeville and Putnam County, visit CookevilleChamber.com.

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LUCKY SEVEN

7 Claims to Fame

COOKEVILLE HOLDS SEVERAL DISTINCTIONS BOTH REGIONALLY AND NATIONALLY

No. 1

No. 2

No. 3

MO’ MONEY Low Cost of Living

UP-AND-COMERS Claiming the Spotlight

Cookeville is rated as

Judah & the Lion, whose

I SAW THE SIGN Cream City is a National Neon Delight

having the seventh

lead singer, Judah Akers, was

The iconic Cream City

least expensive cost

born and raised in Cookeville,

sign was chosen and

of living in the nation

has had a hit CMT video

featured in American

by The Council for

and has played on the Late

Road Magazine as one

Community and

Show with David Letterman.

of the top 100 Favorite

Economic Research

Their debut album, “Kids

Neon Signs in the

Cost of Living Index.

These Days,” has broken into

country.

the Billboard Top 20 in two categories and counting.

No. 4

DOWN BY THE SWIMMING HOLE Cummins Falls Cummins Falls, located

GOING PUBLIC WCTE-TV

on the border of Putnam and Jackson counties, was

Cookeville is also one

listed as one of the 12 top

of the smallest cities

“secret swimming holes”

in the nation to have

in North America by USA

its own PBS station,

Today. In addition, it scored

WCTE-TV, which has

Travel + Leisure magazine’s

produced nationally

list of 20 “America’s Best

distributed shows,

Swimming Holes,” made The

including “Jammin

Adrenalist’s list of the “Best

at Hippie Jack’s,” “Tree Safari” and the Emmy Awardwinning “Bluegrass

N 5 o.

N 7

World” and was named by Fox News among the “13 Beautiful Natural Swimming Holes Around the U.S.”

Underground.”

o.

Wild Swimming Holes in the

No. 6 SURVIVAL OF ‘THE FITTEST’ Rich Froning, CrossFit Champion

WINNER, WINNER Watson and Mack Brown

Cookeville is home to Rich Froning, four-time Reebok CrossFit “Fittest Man on

In 2013, with 372 victories and counting, brothers and Cookeville natives Watson

Earth.” Recognized across the globe, Froning continues to put Cookeville on the

and Mack Brown surpassed Vince and Bill Dooley as the brothers with the most

map as a sports and fitness destination.

victories in major college football.

15

COOKEVILLE-PUTNAM COUNTY CHAMBER


INTO THE WOODS

Artist Brad Sells discusses wood, art and life in his workshop at Bark Studio.


State of the Art(s) COOKEVILLE NATIVE BRAD SELLS AND HIS NATIONALLY ACCLAIMED ARTWORK

C

ookeville artist Brad Sells has searched the world over for hard-

woods, garnering worldwide acclaim for coaxing this brittle, rigid medium into forms that call to mind much more fluid things, such as dancing flames, flowing water or draped fabric. Among other exotic woods, Sells has breathed new life into koa and kiawe from Hawaii, red ivory from Africa, chocolate acacia, green-streaked olive, white cat’s whiskers, Cuban mahogany and sapodilla, which he says is “really pink and pretty to carve and has a nice, sweet smell to it.” Yes, Sells’ love for his art is even apparent in the way he names the species he’s worked, describing them as if recalling old friends.


He’s traveled far and wide to round up these friends,

Elementary in Cookeville, he used a large oak tree that

venturing to Africa and Hawaii and someday, he hopes,

was removed from the grounds when the new wing

to South America. Two of his treks to “wood destina-

was being built.

tions,” as he describes these hardwood harvesting sites abroad, have been captured by filmmaker Todd

As Sells’ reputation has grown, his work has been

Jarrell in “Tree Safari,” a documentary series that has

featured in increasingly impressive venues. His pieces

aired nationally on PBS stations.

are held in the permanent collections of 11 national and regional museums, galleries and collections, includ-

Domestic specimens call out to Sells as well, especially

ing the Smithsonian’s Renwick Gallery in Washington,

those with some sentimental value, and as he walks

D.C.; the Fuller Craft Museum in Brockton, Massachu-

you through his shop beneath his home at Bark Studio

setts; the Detroit Institute of Arts; the Museum of Arts

on Maple Avenue in Cookeville, you quickly learn that

and Design in New York; the Neiman Marcus Home

every chunk of wood has a story.

Collection; the Tennessee State Museum in Nashville; and many others.

“This is the burl from the big tree outside the university center at Tennessee Tech,” said Sells. “I had been eyeing it since I was a student there, and I’d like for this one to stay in Cookeville. The one that’s kind of up at the top there is redbud from a friend of mine’s front yard. It was one of the biggest redbuds I’d seen. It was big and burly.” He tells of a downed tree he passed on Sixth Street as he was driving his daughter home one day. He dropped her off, quickly returned and was

SUPPORTING LOCAL ARTISTS GOES A LONG WAY TOWARD MAKING BETTER COMMUNITIES .”

alarmed to find it gone.

His bowls and sculptures grace the homes of celebrities and have been exhibited in such notable settings as the Architectural Digest Home Design Show in New York City, the Museum of Arts and Design in New York and the American Craft Council show in Maryland. Closer to home, Sells has a large body of work on display in the Blue Spiral 1 gallery in Asheville, North Carolina. Despite his acclaim as one of the top woodworkers in the world, Sells seems to have had no desire to stay gone from his native Cookeville for very long, noting that a number of factors make the

“I took out down the road, hoping I could find it, and

Cookeville area appealing to him and many of the local

I caught them going down Jackson with it and told

artists he knows.

them, ‘I want that tree,’” said Sells. “It had burl around it and was really lumpy. I did the project for the Music

First, there’s Cookeville’s location and low cost of liv-

City Center and a few others out of it. One tree like that

ing, which have helped him professionally.

can keep me busy for a year or more.” “When I was traveling more, it was very central,” said For his large installations, he often uses wood from the

Sells. “It’s a strategic place in that the cost of living isn’t

site where the piece will be placed. He created “Peace,

as bad as some of the bigger areas, and a 12-hour drive

Wellness, Hope and Strength,” a 20-foot figural sculp-

will get you a lot of places, from New York to Kansas

ture for the lobby of the Cookeville Regional Medical

City to Atlanta or Chicago. It’s very doable logistically,

Center North Patient Tower, from a large blue spruce

and for me, flying all this stuff would be extremely

that was removed from the lot during the construction

expensive, so I really need to drive it.”

of the building. For a hanging installation at Capshaw

19 TH ED. SOURCEBOOK

18


A SELLS SAMPLER

Above is “Robin.” Below, from left, are “Raghorn,” “Painted Wavoka” and “Ester.”

19

COOKEVILLE-PUTNAM COUNTY CHAMBER


ARTS +

Then, there’s the lifestyle here, which he and his family enjoy. “It’s a great area to raise a family, and really, that’s

CHECK OUT COOKEVILLE’S AWARD-WINNING ART, DRAMA AND MUSIC COMMUNITY

what’s taking up most of my time. I hope to support them by doing this,” said Sells. “And I think this is just an absolutely beautiful area. We’ve got four seasons,

Appalachian Center for Craft

we’ve got a nice university, and we’ve got good roads we can travel easily.”

The Appalachian Center for Craft is a satellite campus of Tennessee Tech University (TTU) located

Sells especially appreciates the enthusiastic local

on more than 500 wooded acres

clientele that has allowed him to be home with his

overlooking Center Hill Lake.

family more often.

and in TTU’s Wattenbarger Auditorium. It draws professional musicians from all over Middle and East Tennessee.

gallery, workshops, exhibition galleries and a café.

The Cookeville Performing

includes spacious studios, a retail

making better communities, and it makes a differ-

times a year in Dogwood Park

Cookeville Performing Arts Center

The 87,000-square-foot facility

“Supporting local artists goes a long way toward

the orchestra performs several

Arts Center is a 456-seat live

ence when the community that you live in helps

Art on the West Side & Downtown Square

support you,” said Sells. “I’ve been very fortunate to have support and to have been a part of special proj-

A walk on the Historic West Side

ects. Because of that support, I don’t have to travel as

and Downtown Square in Cookeville

Sells says he’s also pleased that Cookeville is home

the Department of Leisure Services.

Cumberland Art Society

of art galleries and unique

Cumberland Art Society is a

boutiques create the most inspiring

to a close-knit and growing arts community. Many

City of Cookeville and operated by

historic venues. A collaboration

offers both contemporary and

much as I did in the past to make a living.”

performance theater owned by the

atmosphere.

of these artists have invested their time and talents

501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that is supported by its members and generous friends of the arts. It

in forming and supporting Art ‘Round Tennessee, an

Art ’Round Tennessee

organization that promotes the arts and local artists

A nonprofit group that organizes

through shows and events such as the annual Art

the Art Prowl, an annual event held

Arts Commission.

of Cookeville, as well as locations in

Joan Derryberry Art Gallery

and around Cookeville.

Located on the first floor of the

in the West Side Cultural District

Prowl.

is funded in part by the Tennessee

“Organizations like this, and the artists who com-

Roaden University Center on

prise them, bring culture, they bring economic

Backdoor Playhouse

growth, and they help Cookeville to be more compet-

Backdoor Playhouse, one of the

itive in bringing in new people,” said Sells. “Because

best-kept secrets on the TTU campus, has been entertaining the

of this, I see Cookeville with potential to really bloom

Upper Cumberland community

and flourish. I think of Chattanooga, Asheville,

with dramatic productions for more

Nashville and Franklin and what’s happened to those

than 50 years.

cities in the last 10 to 15 years, and I see that reaching

TTU’s campus, this ever-changing art gallery is named after Joan Derryberry, TTU’s first lady from 1940-1974.

Upper Cumberland Art Alliance UCAA, an organization that

Cookeville.”

Bryan Symphony Orchestra

To learn more about Sells and his work, visit

Located in the Wattenbarger Auditorium of the Bryan Fine

bradsells.com.

nurtures, celebrates and assists individual artists and other art organizations, was founded in 1989 but was last revitalized in 2005.

Arts Building on the TTU campus, For more information and gallery listings, visit mustseecookeville.com/art.php

19 TH ED. SOURCEBOOK

20


Putnam County N W

Algood

E S

111

Baxter 70

Monterey

Cookeville

40

Cookeville’s Central Location Cookeville is located between three of Tennessee’s four major metropolitan areas — Nashville, Knoxville and Chattanooga — and has excel-

Nashville

lent access to interstate systems, with Interstate 40 run-

Knoxville

ning from east to west through the center of the region and Highway 111 running from north to south. 40

These roadways provide essential access to the majority

111

of the people who live in the Upper Cumberland. Within a day’s drive from 76 percent of the total U.S. population, Cookeville and Putnam County are often

Chattanooga

referred to as the “hub of the Upper Cumberland.”

21

COOKEVILLE-PUTNAM COUNTY CHAMBER


LUCKY SEVEN

7 Local Music Acts

IF YOU’RE A FAN OF LIVE MUSIC OF ANY KIND, COOKEVILLE HAS GOT A MUSIC GROUP FOR YOU

No. 1

No. 2

BRYAN SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

BROTHER RAINS

Cookeville is the only nonmetropolitan

the Upper Cumberland for more than 20 years

area of Tennessee to have a full symphony orchestra — Tennessee Tech University’s Bryan Symphony Orchestra — which performs regularly in TTU’s Wattenbarger Auditorium and at the

and has recently released their debut album, “Live

Dogwood Performance Pavilion.

before a loyal fan following.

Brother Rains has performed in venues throughout

from Melodie’s Bedroom.” Claiming Garth Brooks, Edwin McCain, Kiss, Steve Wariner and Run D.M.C. as influences, this three-man act performs its own songs, including the favorite “One Bullet, Same Last Name,” along with tunes as varied as Prince’s “When Doves Cry” and the Allman Brothers’ “Soulshine,”

No. 3

TENNESSEE TECH TUBA ENSEMBLE Though its members

No. 5

change every year, the Tuba Ensemble has been a staple

THE GILBERT FAMILY

at TTU and in Cookeville

BALLINGER FAMILY BAND

The Gilbert Family is a Southern

for nearly 50 years. Lead

The Ballinger Family Band mixes catchy lyrics and

gospel group composed of husband

by tuba professor R.

tight vocals with a bluegrass sound that ranges

and wife, John and Sandy, their

Winston Morris, the group

from slow ballads to up-tempo, bouncy tunes. Kris

daughter, Faith, and guitarists Seth

has performed eight times

and Dale have performed across the country with

Price and Eric Beaty. The group

at Carnegie Hall and

well-known fiddlers and, as founding members of

gives concerts regularly on

The Cluster Pluckers, recorded five albums. They

campus, including as part

perform with their son, Ethan, who has released

of the annual Octubafest

several of his own albums. His work has been aired

concert series.

nationally on PBS stations.

travels throughout the Upper Cumberland to perform, including at the Peachtree Learning Center,

N 4 o.

where Eric is a guitar instructor.

No. 6

No. 7

SPOONFUL

SHEEP TRICK

Billing themselves as “a little blues band from Cookeville,”

Sheep Trick has been around Cookeville for several

the trio that makes up Spoonful has quite the following around their hometown. They play almost every month at Crawdaddys, where they fill the West Side of town with music when they’re outside on the stone patio.

19 TH ED. SOURCEBOOK

22

years and, like many other local bands, performs regularly at outdoor festivals around town. A blend of covers and original songs feature a wide variety of instruments in beats that are easy to dance to.


Office HOurs: Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Closed saturday

PHOne: 931-516-0060 fax: 931-526-5615

www.willowparktn.com


Quite Hospitable WITH CARE LIKE THIS AT HOME, WHY GO ANYWHERE ELSE?

C

ookeville Regional Medical Center (CRMC) quite literally adds to the quality of life in Cookeville and the Upper Cumberland. CRMC is an award-winning, 247-bed regional medical center that serves the entire 14-county Upper Cumberland region and

employs a staff of more than 2,000, with more than 200 physicians and other providers on its medical staff representing 40 medical and surgical specialties.

This level of care brings people to

done, he did it, and I’ve had great results,”

Cookeville from surrounding counties

she said. “I’m straight, I’m fused and I’m

and even neighboring states. In fact,

healed.”

PATIENT PROFILE

having such a quality facility is often a deciding factor for those who are choosing

Mills, who had had a prior back surgery

where to retire.

in Nashville, says she was much happier with her experience at Cookeville

That was the case for Karen Mills, who

Regional.

KAREN MILLS Surgery/Surgeon Lumbar Vertebrae Fusion

retired to Cookeville from Florida. When

by Dr. Leonardo Rodriguez-Cruz

searching for an ideal retirement loca-

“There’s no comparison,” she said. “Here

tion, she had requested information from

at Cookeville Regional, they treat you

Outcome

the Convention & Visitors Bureau and

as if you’re part of the family. Also, my

“I’m straight, I’m fused and I’m healed.”

found that Cookeville met her criteria,

husband was very pleased to not have to

especially where medical care was con-

drive back and forth to Nashville.”

cerned. It’s those kinds of results and that kind “Of course, we had prerequisites, and one

of care that have placed CRMC among

of them was that we have a good hospital

America’s 100 Best Hospitals in three

and that it was growing,” said Mills. “That

categories, in the Top 5% in one category

was a big part of why we decided to retire

and in the Top 10% in five categories, with

here, because at our age, we definitely

Excellence Awards in four categories in

need to have good doctors and a good

2015, according to Healthgrades®.

hospital.”

“I would definitely recommend this hos-

That decision paid off just a couple of

pital to anybody, and I have,” said Mills.

years later. When severe lower back

“We can’t say enough good things about

problems started interfering with Mills’

Cookeville Regional.”

ability to get around, some friends recommended she see Dr. Leonardo Rodriguez-Cruz. She followed their advice, and

For more information about CRMC, visit crmchealth.org.

after meeting with Dr. Cruz to discuss her options, they scheduled surgery to fuse together four of her lumbar vertebrae. “He told me exactly what I needed to have

19 TH ED. SOURCEBOOK

24


ACCOLADES + America’s 100 Best Hospitals 

One of Healthgrades America’s 100 Best Hospitals for Cardiac Care™ (2013-2015)



One of Healthgrades America’s 100 Best Hospitals for Coronary Intervention™ (2012-2015)



One of Healthgrades America’s 100 Best Hospitals for Orthopedic Surgery™ (2012-2015)

Cardiac Care 

Recipient of the Healthgrades Cardiac Care Excellence Award™ (2012-2015)



Recipient of the Healthgrades Coronary Intervention Excellence Award™ (2011-2015)

Orthopedic Care 

Recipient of the Healthgrades Orthopedic Surgery Excellence Award™ (2009-2015)



Named among the Top 10% in the Nation for Overall Orthopedic Services (2009-2015)

Pulmonary Care 

Recipient of the Healthgrades Pulmonary Care Excellence Award™ (2014-2015)



Named among the Top 10% in the Nation for Overall Pulmonary Services (2014-2015)

Critical Care 

Five-Star Recipient for Treatment of Pulmonary Embolism (2015)



Five-Star Recipient for Treatment of Respiratory Failure (2013-2015)



Five-Star Recipient for Treatment of Diabetic Emergencies (2015)

cookevilleregionalcharity.org

(931) 783-2003

COOKEVILLE-PUTNAM COUNTY CHAMBER


THERE’S ONLY ONE.

JUST LIKE THERE’S ONLY ONE YOU, there’s only one hospital in the Upper Cumberland* to receive the Healthgrades® 2014 America’s 100 Best for Cardiac Surgery™ designation.

Consistent, competent, compassionate and more than capable: Cookeville Regional. Right here in Cookeville – the Upper Cumberland’s only full-service heart and vascular center and one of only two hospitals in Tennessee to receive the America’s 100 Best for Cardiac Surgery™ in 2014.

931-528-2541 • crmchealth.org * Includes the following counties in Tennessee: Cannon, Clay, Cumberland, DeKalb, Fentress, Jackson, Macon, Overton, Pickett, Putnam, Smith, Van Buren, Warren and White.


LUCKY SEVEN

7 Retirement Enticements IF YOU’RE APPROACHING RETIREMENT, SEE WHY COOKEVILLE IS THE ULTIMATE DESINATION

No. 1

No. 2

No. 3

AFFORDABLE LIVING Low Cost of Living

IF YOU’VE GOT YOUR HEALTH, YOU’VE GOT EVERYTHING State-of-the-Art Medical Care

GET UP, GET OUT Abundant Fitness Opportunities

Housing prices are low, with a median

Cookeville has a great health care system anchored by Cookeville Regional Medical Center,

You’ll find an endless variety of ways to get moving,

home cost of $135,100 in Putnam

which has been recognized nationally for excellence in many different categories. In 2015,

from our YMCA to multiple gyms and training

County and $158,600 in the city of

Healthgrades® ranked Cookeville Regional among America’s 100 Best Hospitals in three

studios. In addition, Cookeville’s Department of

Cookeville, according to the most recent

specialties, placed them in the Top 5% in one category and in the Top 10% in five categories,

Leisure Services offers a wide range of affordable

data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Plus,

and granted CRMC Excellence Awards in four categories, among a long list of other honors.

fitness classes and programs for the community,

the property taxes are low, and there is

And Becker’s Hospital Review named Cookeville Regional one of its “100 Great Community

and Cookeville has earned the No. 4 spot on Walk

no state income tax.

Hospitals” in 2014.

Score’s® “Most Walkable Cities in Tennessee” list.

CULTURE TO SPARE Arts, Music, Theater and Museums Cookeville is the only nonmetropolitan area of Tennessee with its own symphony, Tennessee Tech University’s Bryan Symphony Orchestra, and is also home to the world-famous Tennessee Tech Tuba Ensemble, a frequent Carnegie Hall performer. Several of this area’s numerous visual artists have received national and worldwide acclaim, and TTU’s Appalachian Center for Craft is located just down the road. Cookeville Performing Arts Center,

N 4 o.

a 456-seat live performance theater, produces the state, regional and national award-winning Backstage at CPAC series, an annual rotation of contemporary plays. And history buffs are sure to love the Cookeville History Museum and the Cookeville Depot Museum, one of three depot museums in Putnam County.

No. 6

No. 7

No. 5

A LOT OF HEART Outstanding Heart Care

HIGH APPROVAL RATINGS Retirement Accolades

A NATURAL FIT Outdoor Fun for Everyone

Cookeville reportedly has more automated external defibrillators (AEDs) than any other

Putnam County is one of 16 counties

If you love nature, Cookeville is the place to be. With

community in the nation, thanks to our very active Mended Hearts organization. Hundreds

that is a certified Retire Tennessee

four distinct seasons, 14 well-tended local parks,

of our citizens are trained to use the lifesaving medical devices and administer CPR. Also,

community, and we’re also an American

plus multiple nearby state parks, rivers, creeks,

Cookeville Regional Medical Center has implemented the Code STEMI protocol, which has

Association of Retirement Communities

streams and lakes, you’re guaranteed to find the

helped them attain a record-breaking average of 43 minutes for treating heart attacks, beating

Seal of Approval community. Where to

right environment to lift your mood and brighten

the 90-minute national standard by 47 minutes.

Retire magazine named us one of the

your ‘tude.

nation’s best retirement communities, with Rand McNally ranking us No. 9 in the U.S.

27

COOKEVILLE-PUTNAM COUNTY CHAMBER


Head of the Class

WHEN IT COMES TO EDUCATION, PUTNAM MAKES THE GRADE

PURPLE, GOLD AND PROUD Tennessee Tech University Enrollment • 11, 300 Degrees • 40+ undergraduate; 20+ graduate

A

n educational hub for the region, Cookeville is home to Tennessee Tech University (TTU), which has garnered international acclaim and is con-

PEOPLE ARE MOVING TO THIS REGION, AND ONE OF THE THINGS THAT ATTRACTS THEM TO PUTNAM COUNTY AND TO THE UPPER CUMBERLAND IS THE SCHOOL SYSTEM.” JERRY BOYD Putnam County Director of Schools

sistently ranked among the best universities in academics and value. Tennessee Tech University is one of the best public universities in the South, according to a variety of reports and rankings organizations. PAYSCALE.COM

THE PRINCETON REVIEW





Based on total cost and alumni earnings, TTU provides students with the highest return on

2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012,

investment for any public university in the state,

2013, 2014.

and TTU ranks third overall among all universities in Tennessee: 2014. 

TTU is among the best in the Southeast: 2005,

TTU graduates have the highest mid-career salary potential of any public university graduates in



The College of Business is among the best 301 business schools: 2012.



TTU is a best value college: 2007, 2008, 2010.

Tennessee: 2014.

G.I. JOBS MAGAZINE U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT 



TTU was included on the list of military-friendly universities: 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015.

TTU is one of the top public universities: 2002, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010,



2011, 2012, 2014.

GETEDUCATED.COM

TTU is among the top regional universities in the



South: 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015. 

TTU graduates leave with the least debt in the South: 2011, 2015.



The College of Business is among the best and most affordable AACSB-accredited online MBA programs: 2014. TTU was among the top 15 universities on the list and the top school in Tennessee.

TTU is among the top 10 universities in the South

DR. KATHLEEN AIRHART Deputy Commissioner for the Tennessee Department of Education

for veterans: 2015.

WASHINGTON MONTHLY 

I CERTAINLY FELT A SENSE OF COLLABORATION IN THE DISTRICT, AND AS I HAVE HAD OPPORTUNITY TO TRAVEL THE STATE AND VISIT WITH OTHER DISTRICTS, I REALIZED HOW SPECIAL PUTNAM COUNTY REALLY WAS WITH ITS EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM.”

TTU is among the universities that provide the best bang for your buck: 2013, 2014. In 2014, TTU was top in the state.

19 TH ED. SOURCEBOOK

28


GETTING SCHOOLED Putnam County Schools (PreK-12)



Enrollment • 11, 250 Schools • 10 pre-K-Grade 4; 4 Grades 5-8; 3 High Schools; 3 Nontraditional Schools (adult high school, alternative school, VITAL school)



Has a 96-98 percent success rate and an overall average



grade of 85 with all components counted

In the spring of 2011, Avery Trace Middle School (ATMS) made the decision to pursue IB World School authorization as an International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme

Includes a personal finance class offered to all high school

(MYP). Avery Trace hopes to become an authorized IB

students that is a result of a collaborative effort between

World School in 2015.

Dave Ramsey’s Lampo Group, Florida Virtual School and Putnam County Schools

HIGH ACT SCORES DUAL-ENROLLMENT CLASSES 



Composite ACT score of 21.1 in 2012, exceeding the state

Students in Putnam County are able to take college-level

average of 19.6.

classes in high school, receiving both high school and

FOUR STATE REWARD SCHOOLS (schools

college credit for completing those courses.



that perform in the top 5 percent statewide for SCHOOL ADOPTION PROGRAM



Capshaw Elementary (Performance – 2012-2014)





Algood Elementary (Progress - 2014)



Baxter Elementary (Progress - 2012)



Monterey High School (Progress - 2012)

programs in the state. The adopters tend to be very involved in the lives of their schools. It’s not just a monetary donation. It’s volunteer work and providing resources to



Scholarship, which requires a high school grade point average of 3.0 or a 21 Composite on the ACT.

“Putnam has one of the most incredible school adoption

HIGH GRADUATION RATE 

System for the 2013-2014 school year reached 92.6

Dr. Kathleen Airhart, Deputy Commissioner for the

percent, beating the state graduation rate of 87.2 percent

Tennessee Department of Education

and the national graduation rate of 81 percent.

Started in 1989, the School Adoption Program is the

Early Literacy Grant in conjunction with WCTE-TV



American Graduate Grant (provides resources to make

longest tenured program and is only open to chamber

sure students graduate) in conjunction with WCTE-TV

members.

Cookeville-Putnam County Chamber of Commerce’s

PRO-EDUCATION COMMUNITY LEADERS 

careers)

Partnership, is a partnership between leaders in business,

TENNESSEE PROMISE 

industry, K-12, higher education and chambers of commerce who have forged an alliance to address the

Every student who graduates in 2015 and afterward has

challenges of a 21st century workforce. The group has

the opportunity to attend two years of community college

PATHWAYS TO PROSPERITY 

7-12 education and the next steps in students’ learning and working lives 

the business community in putting children on the pathway to higher education.

ADVANCED ACCREDITATION 

Our entire school district is 100-percent accredited by AdvancED, the parent organization of the Southern

The Upper Cumberland region (in this case, Putnam,

Association of Colleges and Schools - Council on

White, Overton and Jackson counties), was one of only

Accreditation and School Improvement (SACSCASI).

two Tennessee regions involved in the Pathways to Prosperity pilot project, an opportunity made possible

GLOBAL LEARNING CENTER 

The Putnam County School System now offers a Global Learning Center to provide an environment where newcomer students can learn the English language and American culture in an effort to help them succeed in the

Development and Education Committee.

U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT RECOGNITION

Tennessee is one of nine states involved.



by the Highlands Economic Partnership Workforce



worked to create partnerships between school districts and

or technical school tuition free.

A nationwide collaboration sponsored by Harvard University to increase or improve the connection between

The Highlands Workforce Development and Education Committee, part of the four-county Highlands Economic

Perkins Reserve Grant (exposes students to careers and helps them forge academic pathways toward chosen

The graduation rate for the Putnam County School

teachers and to administrators. It’s a real partnership.”





In 2013, 44.3 percent of Putnam County graduates met the requirements to receive the Tennessee HOPE

annual growth or academic achievement)

GRANTS/COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS

Cookeville High School students had an average

American school system and beyond.

Monterey High School recognized as a Bronze School

VITAL E-LEARNING NETWORK

INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE



A statewide, recognized virtual school





Offers dual enrollment and credit advancement



Uses digital integration in the classroom to personalize

that has earned the prestigious designation to grant

learning

International Baccalaureate® (IB) diplomas.

Cookeville High School has been an International Baccalaureate® (IB) World School since 2004. CHS is one of only 23 schools in the state and 1,575 in the nation

29

COOKEVILLE-PUTNAM COUNTY CHAMBER


Northeast Elem. (PreK-4) Dr. Melissa Palk • 526-2978

Algood Elem. (K-4) Ms. Patience Cannon • 303-0362 Algood Middle (PreK & 5-8) Mr. Tim Martin • 537-6141

Park View Elem. (PreK-4) Mr. Bobby Winningham • 526-2516

Avery Trace Middle (5-8) Mr. Michael Meihls • 520-2200

Prescott South Elem. (PreK-4) Ms. Catherine Jones • 526-2275

Baxter Elem. (K-4) Ms. Tammy Hoover • 858-3110

Prescott South Middle (5-8) Mr. Trey Upchurch • 528-3647

Burks Elem. (K-8) Mr. Kevin Maynard • 839-7641

Sycamore Elem. (PreK-4) Ms. Tracy Nabors • 526-9322

Cane Creek Elem. (PreK-4) Ms. Emily Pierce • 520-1173

Upperman High (PreK & 9-12) Ms. Penny Nash • 858-3112

Capshaw Elem. (PreK-4) Dr. Kim Wright • 526-2414

White Plains Academy (K-12) Mr. Joe Matheney • 537-3862

Cookeville High (PreK & 9-12) Mr. Lane Ward • 520-2287

Adult High Ms. Robyn Nabors • 528-8685

Cornerstone Middle (5-8) Mr. Billy Stepp • 858-6601

Adult Education Ms. Lynda Breeden • 528-8685

Jere Whitson Elem. (PreK-4) Dr. Teri Anderson • 526-6575 Monterey High (9-12) Ms. Sonja Farley • 839-2970

1400 East Spring Street • Cookeville, TN 38506 931-526-9777 • Fax 931-528-6942 www.pcsstn.com

Director of Schools Mr. Jerry S. Boyd


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Do Unto Others LINDA WESTIN AND COOKEVILLE’S NEW $2.1 MILLION ANIMAL SHELTER

W

hether it’s an individual in

people of Cookeville repeatedly step up

need, a cancer patient, a wor-

in force, always ready to lend a hand or

thy organization or a homeless pet, the

a dollar to help those in crisis.


IT TAKES A VILLAGE

Linda Westin credits caring volunteers, community members and city and county leaders with making the new animal haven a reality.


Friends of Cookeville/Putnam County Animals

“The Friends of Cookeville/Putnam County Animals

(FCPCA) president Linda Westin has seen this giv-

first had to raise the money to buy the property,

ing spirit overwhelmingly demonstrated in the pro-

and to me that was a real test because it’s a dream,

cess that has led to the opening of the new 10-acre

and you’re asking them to buy into the dream,” said

PET (Pets, Education and Training) Care Campus,

Westin. “But people did, and they did it in all kinds

located adjacent to the Hyder-Burks Agricultural

of ways, from big amounts to a little boy who came

Pavilion on Gainesboro Grade in Cookeville.

into the shelter and gave a dollar toward helping.”

The new, $2.1 million, state-of-the-art facility features

The first of those contributors, the late Gwendolyn

two off-leash dog parks; an education and training

Sawyer, started the fund 15 years ago by donating

center; and an animal shelter that is three times the

her entire estate, valued at around $480,000, to the

size of the former one at 2105 W. Jackson Street.

existing animal shelter. Those funds were set aside for capital improvements to the existing shelter, but

The shelter, designed to hold approximately 100

the funds ended up being held in reserve because

dogs and 50 cats, includes a small animal disaster

the shelter was beyond repair.

rescue facility; a free-play cat and kitten room with a live, streaming “kitty cam”; two-part cat cages with

“It was much too small and didn’t even have a real

separate, vented areas for litter pans; a “Dog of the

ceiling or heat or air conditioning,” said Westin.

Day” room where special dogs will be highlighted;

“There wasn’t any amount of money that could help

dog kennels with outdoor runs, stainless steel grills

that place, so we realized we were going to have to

and gates, windows and lights; a special puppy area;

do something big.”

“matchmaking” rooms where visitors can play with adoptable cats and dogs; a break room, laundry

With that goal in mind, the FCPCA started seeking

and grooming area; a garage where animal control

donations and hosting fund-raising events such as

officers can unload animals; dedicated animal intake

the annual Fur Ball gala, eventually adding more

and holding areas; four major air exchange systems

than $220,000 to Mrs. Sawyer’s contribution for a

to help cut down on disease and odors; and two sep-

total of more than $700,000. Those funds paid for

tic tanks with separate plumbing and drains for each

the land for the new shelter and almost all of the

cage to reduce the spread of disease.

building’s interior items, and donations are continuing to roll in.

“Our goal is to not have to euthanize for lack of space and for this to be a place where it’s a joy to

“We had a fund-raising barn dance recently, and we

come and see the animals, because when you’re

sold, almost instantly, 26 sections of fencing for the

adopting a pet, you’re adopting them for life, and it

dog park and two doggie dorms,” said Westin.

needs to be a happy experience and not just, ‘Oh, I’ll take that one because I don’t want them to be eutha-

Once they secured the land, the FCPCA approached

nized,” said Westin.

the City of Cookeville to help them with the project. Former City Manager Jim Shipley and the

She says that there’s no way a facility like this could

Cookeville City Council created a bond for construc-

have come together without the generosity of the

tion of the shelter, with the FCPCA selling the land

many, many people who helped and are continuing

they had purchased to the city for $1.

to help with the project.

19 TH ED. SOURCEBOOK

34


THE HUMANE HUMANS

Linda Westin, at top, discusses shelter plans with fellow members of the Friends of Cookeville/Putnam County Animals. Below left, the group visits the shelter site during construction. Below right, Westin admires the new PET Care Campus with a furry friend the FCPCA has helped.

35

COOKEVILLE-PUTNAM COUNTY CHAMBER


“Local leaders play a vital role in a project like this,”

And then, of course, there’s the FCPCA board, which is

said Westin. “If not for the city council, the county com-

comprised entirely of volunteers.

missioners, former County Executive Kim Blaylock, and especially Jim Shipley, this wouldn’t have hap-

“This team is the most amazing group of people,” said

pened.”

Westin. “They’re creative and clever, and what I love about them is that each one of them has a great and

As construction began, Westin and the members of the

different set of skills, and if you ask them to do any-

FCPCA board were amazed to see some of the busi-

thing or they say they’re going to do something, they

nesses involved in the project making major donations

not only do it, but they do it better than you imagined

of construction materials. Louisiana-Pacific donated

they would do it.”

the roof sheathing, Cumberland Building Supply donated all of the windows plus stone

Westin herself quickly got busy

to cover the building’s columns

helping when she moved here in

and corner trim, and many others

2002 from Nashville, where she

contributed various materials. Many individuals and organizations in the Cookeville community also pitched in to help, including Debi Smith, event director for the Leslie Town Centre, who donated all of the funds raised from Mistletoe Market, a holiday shopping event held each year at the Town Centre. When the facility was nearly complete, the FCPCA issued a call for volunteers to staff it. This will be the first time the shelter has had volunteers, because the former shelter was too small to allow for

THE VOLUNTEER SPIRIT HAS BEEN AMAZING. FOR ALMOST EVERYTHING THAT OUR GROUP DOES, WE HAVE FOUND WONDERFUL PEOPLE TO HELP.”

them. So far, the response has been

resided briefly after moving to Tennessee from California. When she became acquainted with the Cookeville animal shelter and learned they needed a friends group, she stepped up to the plate with the fund-raising experience she had gained from working on the boards of the Nashville Ballet, the Nashville Opera Association and the Tennessee Repertory Theatre. In 2004, the FCPCA was officially established as a 501c3 and has been working to help Putnam County’s animals ever since. Now 11 years later, Westin says she continues to

tremendous, with the shelter already well on its way

be impressed by the generosity she has seen here.

toward reaching its goal of around 200 volunteers. “It’s been a joy to see how a community will come “They’ve had a lot of great volunteer experience and

together to help,” said Westin. “From my experience

are just really good, solid, giving people,” said Westin.

living elsewhere, this is a very, very giving community,

“The volunteer spirit has been amazing. For almost ev-

and we’ve certainly been blessed.”

erything that our group does, we have found wonderful people to help.”

For more information about the Friends of Cookeville/ Putnam County Animals or the new PET Care Campus, visit friendsofcpcanimals.org.

19 TH ED. SOURCEBOOK

36


Sweet Smell of Success SMALL BUSINESS OWNERS CYNTHIA AND MARK PULLUM AND THE LITTLE DONUT SHOP THAT COULD

R

alph’s Donut Shop is one of the

the owners treating customers like

few things in Cookeville that

family, too.

time hasn’t changed much. Opened by James Ralph and Evelyn Smith in

“When they started the shop, my

1962, the little donut shop on Cedar

mom and dad didn’t realize how many

Avenue has been a local favorite for

hours they’d be working, and she’d

more than five decades now, a haven

cook a pot of beans or soup or some-

for coffee drinkers and stool sitters,

thing,” said their daughter, Cynthia

a place where, for the longtime cast

Pullum. “She got to where she’d invite

of regulars and all who become new

some of the Tech kids to the house if

regulars, everybody really does know

they lived away from here and didn’t

your name.

have any family here. She’d try to take care of them.”

That’s because, from the beginning, Ralph’s has been a family affair, with


GOT MILK? Mark and Cynthia Pullum continue a 50-plus-year family tradition of homemade donutty goodness.


Cynthia and her husband, Mark, took over the busi-

family when she was growing up, and they continue

ness to continue the family tradition after her father’s

to today.

passing in 2010. Cynthia was the perfect candidate to continue the legacy, having started her career at

“They’re like grandparents or uncles and aunts, and

Ralph’s at age 8.

they’ve been here since I was little,” said Cynthia. “I was adopted, and one of our longtime customers, Au-

“I would stand on one of those wooden Coke crates

drey Long, said he remembered the very first day my

and wash dishes,” said Cynthia. “And then, after I’d

mom and dad got me and brought me in here.”

been here for a couple of weeks, my dad let me start pouring coffee for some of the people we knew really

This commitment to treating customers like one of

well, in case I spilled it, but I did okay. And then it just

their own, combined, of course, with stellar donuts,

started from there, and if he ever needed help, I’ve

has gained Ralph’s an ever-wider following.

always been there. I guess I just never thought of it not being in the family.”

“We have one gentlemen who lives here part-time and in Pennsylvania part-time, and he takes 20 to 40

The family tradition extends to employees, as well.

apple fritters about four times a year to a courthouse in

Cynthia’s niece works at the shop on Saturdays, and

Pennsylvania where he used to work,” said Mark.

there are several whose families have worked at the shop for generations.

He says that another customer, who grew up in Cookeville and now lives in Knoxville, comes to the

“Bruiser is my day-shift baker, and his mother

shop two to three times a year to order 16 dozen do-

and brother both worked here before,” said Mark.

nuts to take to coworkers.

“Michelle, who works here as a waitress, her son works here as a cook. Her father used to be a donut

“We’ve talked to parents who’ve said they talked their

man here before he passed away. So we have several

son or daughter into coming to school here just so

generations of family here, and we have one woman

they could come through and get donuts,” said Cyn-

who works here for us, and her niece works here for

thia.

us, too. Then one of my wife’s friend’s kids also works here.”

Mark says the fact that Cookevillians support their local businesses has made a real difference for Ralph’s.

Mark was part of the Ralph’s family, too, even before he married Cynthia, whom he met at a junior high

“People are really supportive of the local establish-

square dance at the Veterans Building.

ments here,” said Mark.

“I was coming in here when I was a little boy,” said

Added Cynthia, “The Convention & Visitors Bureau

Mark. “Ralph and my father used to bird hunt togeth-

also brings people here if they’re showing them

er. They lived up on the same road, and they both

around town, and they tell them about us.”

grew up within just miles of each other. They were friends all their lives.”

She believes the pro-business and tourism focus of the chamber has also played a role in the shop’s

Cynthia says the regulars who came to congregate

longevity.

at Ralph’s each morning felt much like an extended

19 TH ED. SOURCEBOOK

40


ROLLING IT OUT

Alden Carnahan of Ralph’s Donut Shop glazes giant cinnamon rolls as they come out of the oven.

41

COOKEVILLE-PUTNAM COUNTY CHAMBER


“There’s somebody new in here

“We’ve had lots of people come

every day, just travelers off of

because of that show,” said Mark.

I-40,” said Cynthia. “We see inter-

“We had one couple who came

national travelers, too, including

from Virginia. They had seen us

recent visitors from Norway and

on PBS, and they got in the car on

Germany.”

Saturday and decided to drive all the way down here just to have a

Distant customers have repeat-

donut.”

edly begged Mark and Cynthia to offer mail order. While they

However, none of the recent

would love to, there’s no room

acclaim or growing pains have

for expansion in their current

changed the fact that Ralph’s has

building and lot, although they’re

always made, and will continue

considering opening a second

to make, all of their donuts by

location to allow for shipping and

hand.

MEMBERSHIP IN THE COOKEVILLE-PUTNAM COUNTY CHAMBER OFFERS A VARIETY OF BENEFITS DESIGNED TO HELP BUSINESSES BOTH SMALL AND LARGE, INCLUDING:  Advertising and promotional opportunities  Meeting room rental discounts  Networking

for closer proximity to I-40 travelers stopping in Cookeville.

BIZ +

“Unlike most donut shops these days, here there’s no machine

“We really don’t have anywhere

doing anything except mixing the

to set up a shipping area inside

dough,” said Mark. “It’s a dying

the building,” said Mark. “We’re

thing. You look in all these mag-

suffering some growing pains.”

azines, and they have things like the donut robot. Someone just

People are also finding Ralph’s

puts it in a hopper, and it does its

online, especially through Goo-

thing. Instead of going that route,

gle’s Trip Advisor, where they

we went from just me and an-

are currently (as of this printing)

other guy being bakers to having

ranked as the No. 1 restaurant in

five bakers, counting me.”

Cookeville. Ralph’s has recent-

ly been recognized nationally,

In perhaps the greatest testament

as well, with their apple fritter

to the quality of Ralph’s hand-

earning a spot among the top 25

made donuts, Cynthia says she’s

donuts in the nation on culinary

nowhere near being sick of them,

website The Daily Meal.

despite having been surrounded by them for most of her life.

“We couldn’t keep fritters in stock for about a week after that,”

“I still could eat a donut every day,”

said Cynthia.

she said. “In fact, I’d eat two or

 Semiannual small business expos  Access to business resource center  Use of the chamber’s bulk mailing permit  Business advocacy  Preprinted labels from the chamber’s mailing list  Opportunity to advertise in The Sourcebook  Opportunity to showcase business at exclusive business expos  Ribbon cuttings  Business referrals

three if I could get away with it.”

 Certificates of origin

episode of the PBS series “Ninety

For more information about

Miles with Chef Garrett.”

Ralph’s, visit ralphsdonuts.com.

 Seminars, forums and workshops

Ralph’s was also featured in an

19 TH ED. SOURCEBOOK

42


LUCKY SEVEN

7 ‘To Die For’ Desserts

IF YOU’VE GOT A SWEET TOOTH, COOKEVILLE HAS A VARIETY OF SUGARY CONFECTIONS TO OFFER

No. 1

No. 2

CHEESECAKE From Seven Senses Food & Cheer Tucked into a small brick building in the historic West

ICE CREAM From Cream City Ice Cream & Coffee House

Side cultural district, Seven Senses is still one of the

Cream City is one of the most iconic landmarks in Cookeville

newer restaurants in Cookeville. It’s open for lunch and

because of the large sign on top of the building, which lights

dinner, and the homemade cheesecakes are the best in

up the sky over the historic West Side district. Inside the shop,

town. There are usually a few different options, ranging

bright green walls and comfortable couches usher the young

from Reese’s peanut butter to key lime.

and old to the ice cream counter, where dozens of flavors and sundaes await.

No. 3

No. 4

BANANA PUDDING From Bobby Q’s

APPLE FRITTER From Ralph’s Donut Shop

They don’t make it easy, but if you can stop yourself from

Recently listed as one of America’s 25 best donut shops, Ralph’s Donut Shop

filling up on the main course at this nationally renowned

has been a Cookeville favorite since it opened more than 50 years ago. The

barbecue restaurant, the desserts are worth the self-

rankings on The Daily Meal put Ralph’s apple fritter as one of the 25 best donuts

control. The banana pudding’s rich and unexpected caramel

in the country, but buyer beware: this fritter is big enough for two. The plain and

flavor, folded around layers of whipped cream and vanilla

chocolate-covered butter twists are their most popular options, but there’s no

wafers, does a fabulous job at making you forget that all

such thing as a bad donut at Ralph’s.

those bananas, at one time, might have been good for you.

No. 5

No. 6

No. 7

SOPAIPILLA From El Tapatio

CRÈME BRÛLÉE From The Cooke House

An epic south-of-the border treat, the sopaipilla at El

On the square in an old building that once housed Maddux

CANNOLI From World Foods International Grocery & Delicatessen

Tap features a circle of gigantic, deep-fried tortilla wedges

Hardware, the The Cooke House is a popular happy-hour

Walking into World Foods International Grocery & Delicatessen,

sprinkled with sugar and cinnamon, drizzled with honey and

hangout, and many of its guests end up staying for the evening

a tiny shop that is easy to miss, is like walking into another

topped with a giant scoop of vanilla bean ice cream. If it’s

meal. For those who want to satisfy a small sweet tooth, try the

country. Foods and snacks from the northern Mediterranean

your birthday, they’ll let you eat it with a sombrero on, but

crème brûlée. It is served in a thick ceramic spoon and is the

line the display cases. Come for the pizza, stay for the cannoli

unless today is the special day, you won’t want to wait that

perfect size for someone who doesn’t want to spend the next

and say hello to the sweet older couple who run the place and

long to sink a spoon into this crispy confection!

day at the gym.

keep the customers in line, sometimes out the door.

43

COOKEVILLE-PUTNAM COUNTY CHAMBER


Our Story Highlands Residential Services (HRS) began construction on its first housing development in 1957. Today, HRS operates 550 public housing units, 30 Low-Income Housing Tax Credit units, and 80 projectbased Section 8 Housing Assistance Payment units for the elderly and the disabled throughout Algood, Baxter, Celina, Cookeville, Gainesboro and Monterey.

Our Mission Apart from providing safe, decent and affordable housing, HRS hosts a wide variety of programs and services to help residents prosper. Each program is designed to help build a stronger community by creating partnerships and friendships, sharing information and developing a network of support across the region. And we dedicate ourselves to helping residents find the support and services they need to build better futures.

Our Services While our mission has always been to help area residents and families find homes, HRS has grown to offer a variety of community-building services. HRS offers job-training classes, homebuyer classes, after-school activities for teens, mentoring programs for elderly and disabled residents and much more. We believe that the residents in all of our communities deserve the highest level of commitment we can offer, and we’re dedicated to continued growth as we secure the resources needed to do so.

P.O. Box 400 • 235 W. Jackson St. • Cookeville, TN 38503-0400 • Ph. 931.526.9793 • F. 931.526.5841 • HighlandsRS.com

It is the policy of Highlands Residential Services to ensure that no citizen shall, on the grounds of race, color or national origin, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance.


45 years experience serving Middle Tennessee & beyond

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CONTACT CUSTOMER SERVICE

931.839.2227

1027 N. CHESTNUT ST. • MONTEREY, TN 38574

cumberlandcontainer.com


LOAD UP THE ‘VAN

Kellie Fitzpatrick peddles clothing and accessories from funky to fine in her new boutique across from the Cookeville depot.


Shop Around the Corner JEWELRY MOGUL KELLIE FITZPATRICK AND CARAVAN, HER NEW UNIQUE BOUTIQUE

G

rowing up in a small town has never stopped Kellie Fitzpatrick from dreaming big. The mother of three, a

former teacher and photographer, designed a line of jewelry at her kitchen table that is now sold to 2,000 stores worldwide through more than 60 sales reps and wholesale showrooms in Atlanta, Dallas, Los Angeles, Seattle, Denver, New York City and Canada, and she has continued to break sales records each year since she started her business in 2009.


Dubbed Lenny & Eva after two of Fitzpatrick’s

products at her factory and offices in Baxter, located

great-grandmothers, the product line features leath-

in western Putnam County.

er cuffs in a variety of sizes and colors that the wearer can personalize with interchangeable, stamped

“Our offices are here, all of the designing happens

metal plates that express various sentiments to

here, and we have a group of manufacturers – all

reflect her mood. From there, she can add dangles

of whom are located in the USA – that make the

and charms to further embellish the piece to suit her

different components and ship them to us here,” said

style. Since the introduction of the hugely popular

Fitzpatrick. “Then the bracelets are assembled here,

cuffs, Fitzpatrick has expanded the line to include

and everything that ships out to all 2,000 accounts

customizable wrap bracelets and necklaces, as well.

across the world ships out of this location.”

“When I developed this idea, my life had changed

Next door to the factory, she has recently opened

so much, and I thought it would be nice if I could

the Lenny & Eva flagship store in the space where

have a piece of jewelry that I could kind of switch out

she formerly ran the 3 Little Birds coffee shop and

according to whatever inspiration I needed that day,”

clothing boutique.

said Fitzpatrick. “This flagship store was just kind of the next step for Her idea apparently appealed to a need felt by many

us, and I think it’s fascinating to people that Lenny

other women, as well, because Lenny & Eva has de-

& Eva is made in this little small town,” said Fitzpat-

veloped a large following of devoted collectors since

rick. “Also, I think it gives me some insight into how

its founding just six years ago.

our product is performing in stores to have my own store and see that.”

“I think women have definitely connected with Lenny & Eva because of the sentiments and inspir-

She enjoyed selling clothing too much to let 3 Little

ing words, and I think as they continue to grow and

Birds go, though, so she has expanded that boutique,

change from a girl to a woman, or change as a wom-

minus the coffee shop, renamed it Caravan, and

an, that they’ll always be able to find a sentiment that

reopened it at the corner of Cedar Avenue and Broad

speaks to them at whatever point they are in their

Street in Cookeville.

lives,” said Fitzpatrick. “We love the store and the collection of clothing Another way she keeps customers coming back is by

that we have, and the public has really seemed to

keeping the product line fresh, adding new designs

welcome it,” said Fitzpatrick. “I know personally that

and innovations to the catalog each year.

the style of clothing we carry was something I would otherwise have to go to Nashville or shop online to

“We design usually about a year in advance” said

find, so it’s nice to have that Bohemian style in town

Fitzpatrick. “As our line has grown, we are learning

for me for sure.”

more who our customers are and what they like to see.”

She attributes her steady growth and her business success thus far to her determination to grow her

Fitzpatrick still personally designs most of the piec-

company organically, without acquiring debt.

es in her lines, and she and her staff of 11 create the

19 TH ED. SOURCEBOOK

48


AS OUR LINE HAS GROWN, WE ARE LEARNING MORE WHO OUR CUSTOMERS ARE AND WHAT THEY LIKE TO SEE.”


“I’m a huge, huge fan of Dave Ramsey and of letting

Fitzpatrick. “They want to experience what it’s like

things happen at the pace that they’re supposed to

to be in the environment of Lenny & Eva.”

happen, so when we started Lenny & Eva, it was very small,” said Fitzpatrick. “I did all of the work

Although her products are sought after internation-

literally at my kitchen table. As we grew, I had eight

ally, she’s committed to keeping the Lenny & Eva

employees working out of my garage. And then, as

headquarters local.

we were able to afford to, we grew the line.” “I live here, I grew up here, I went to high school Another component in her success has been over-

at Upperman [in Baxter], and I will always be a

whelming local support, especially for her bou-

small-town girl,” said Fitzpatrick. “I love the sense

tiques.

of community and the support that we get from the community, and I love raising my children here and

“At Caravan, it’s great to see people out just walking

having my family in a small town. I wouldn’t want

around in the area and popping in and out, so the

it to be anywhere else, because this is where we

foot traffic there has definitely been great, and I

started.”

think it’s been surprising that there’s such a broad group of shoppers there in terms of the age demo-

She believes that the more successful she can make

graphic,” she said.

her businesses, the more other businesses will also be helped, and vice versa.

In addition to a loyal local following, the Lenny & Eva store, opened in the fall of 2014, is already

“The more reasons there are for people to visit an

beginning to draw tourists, as well.

area, the better business will be for all of the people who are there,” said Fitzpatrick. “I love all the busi-

“We’ve had several visitors who have come from

nesses that are on Cookeville’s West Side, and we

different areas just to visit the flagship store,” said

all just help one another by being there. It would be great if more shops were to pop up here in Baxter, as well.” She also hopes that her success with her jewelry line and her two boutiques will be an encouragement to other local women with big dreams. “I think it’s inspiring to girls and women in small towns to see that you can have a very successful idea and make it happen where you want it to happen,” said Fitzpatrick. “You don’t have to go to a big city to live that out if you don’t want to. Just make it work where you are.” For more information about Lenny & Eva, visit lennyandeva.com. To learn more about Caravan, visit caravancookeville.com.

TRENDSETTERS:

The Lenny & Eva jewelry line, created by Kellie Fitzpatrick, is available locally at the Lenny & Eva flagship store, located at 119 Broad Street in Baxter, and also online at lennyandeva.com. (The pieces are not sold at Fitzpatrick’s other store, Caravan in Cookeville.)

19 TH ED. SOURCEBOOK

50


BOUTIQUES + CHECK OUT THESE BOUTIQUES IN COOKEVILLE AND PUTNAM COUNTY Beauty Queens Boutique

EarthWares

Matilda Jane Clothing

601 Vickers Place, Cookeville (Next to Big Lots)

37 North Cedar Avenue, Cookeville

472 East Spring Street, Cookeville

Phone: (931) 526-6576

Phone: (931) 881-7740

Phone: (931) 265-4772

Hours: Monday-Saturday 10 a.m.-6 p.m.,

Hours: Tuesday-Saturday 11 a.m.-5 p.m.

Hours: Tuesday 8 a.m.-noon and 3-7 p.m.,

Sunday 1 p.m.-5 p.m.

Wednesday 8:30-11 a.m. and 5-7 p.m..

Fringe Salon & Boutique 17 West Second Street, Cookeville

Southern Traditions

560 South Jefferson Avenue, Suite 5, Cookeville

Phone: (931) 854-9394

412 East Spring Street, Cookeville

Phone: (931) 260-9503

Hours: Monday 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Tuesday 9 a.m.-7:30

Phone: (931) 526-5751

Hours: Tuesday-Saturday 11 a.m.-6 p.m.

p.m., Wednesday 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Thursday-Friday

Hours: Monday-Friday 10:30 a.m.-5 p.m.,

9 a.m.-6 p.m., Saturday 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m.

Saturday 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

18 West Broad Street, Cookeville

Hello Honey

Phone: (931) 854-9172

37 West Broad Street, Cookeville

Sweet Pea Boutique/Pink Pea Boutique

Hours: Monday-Friday 10 a.m.-6 p.m.,

Phone: (931) 260-9123

Saturday 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sunday closed

Hours: Tuesday-Friday 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m.

Phone: (931) 526-6668

Bella Boutique

Bless Cookeville

Broadway Boutique Mall

By appointment on Saturday & Sunday

41 West Broad Street, Cookeville

Hours: Monday-Friday 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

107 West Broad Street, Cookeville

Itsy Bitsy Boutique

The Lollipop Shoppe

Phone: (931) 528-1231

416 East Spring Street, Cookeville

Hours: Monday-Saturday 11 a.m.-6 p.m.

47 North Cedar Avenue, Cookeville

Phone: (931) 528-1667

Phone: (931) 372-7767

Caravan 101 West Broad Street, Cookeville

Hours: Monday-Friday 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m.

Hours: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday, 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m.-2 p.m..

Phone: (931) 854-1646

JJ Jax

The Market on the Square

Hours: Monday-Saturday 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

146 South Lowe Avenue, Cookeville

6 North Jefferson Avenue, Cookeville

Phone: (931) 526-6130

Phone: (931) 372-7688

Cigi’s

Hours: Monday-Saturday 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m.

Hours: Monday-Saturday 9 a.m.-7 p.m.

410 East Spring Street, Suite M-2, Cookeville Phone: (931) 528-2444 Hours: Monday-Saturday 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m.

LauRes 430 South Lowe Avenue, Cookeville

The Red Carpet Salon & Boutique

Country Bumpkin Boutique

Phone: (931) 526-3383

773 South Jefferson Avenue, Cookeville

Hours: Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-5 p.m.,

Phone: (931) 525-6805 or (931) 854-9157

303 South Willow Avenue, Cookeville

Saturday 9 a.m.-2 p.m.

Hours: Tuesday-Saturday 9 a.m.-6:15 p.m.

Phone: (931) 372-8590 Hours: Monday-Friday 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sunday 1-5 p.m.

Dog & Company Pet Boutique

Lenny & Eva (Flagship Store) 119 Broad Street, Baxter Phone: (931) 858-1109 Hours: Tuesday-Saturday 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

29 East First Street, Cookeville Phone: (931) 528-2275 Hours: Monday-Friday 7 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Sunday 4-6 p.m.

Luxe Boutique Cookeville 109 West Broad Street, Cookeville Phone: (931) 854-1844 Hours: Monday-Saturday 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sunday 1-4 p.m.

51

COOKEVILLE-PUTNAM COUNTY CHAMBER


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ORDER UP

John “Beard” Darrow slings drinks and lends a listening ear from behind the bar at Father Tom’s.


The Beard of Beer JOHN “BEARD” DARROW AND COOKEVILLE’S CRAFT BEER DESTINATION

M

ost Friday and Saturday nights, a small, unassuming build-

ing on a quiet side street of Cookeville bustles with activity. People trickle in as the hours go by, coming in couples or groups. Laughter and chatter drift off of the small porch on the side of the building, and when the door opens, noise from more conversations wafts into the street. Inside the building are about 20 tables and a long bar made of dark, gleaming wood. The walls are decorated with black and white photos of frequent patrons; a couple of huge paintings by local artists; and cork, in an attempt to absorb some of the laughter and chatter that resonates inside the open space.


Behind the bar, which is outfitted with a standard

of the 14 taps change two or three times a week

collection of liquor bottles and a nonstandard

and provide plenty of options for the clientele, 75 of

collection of beer taps, the bartender and a barback

whom can fit inside at any given time.

sling drinks, wash glasses and make small talk with the dozen or so people sitting at the bar.

“There are quite a few beers that you can’t get anywhere else in town,” said Beard, who also manages

Father Tom’s Pub has only

the front of the house. “Brewery

been open for three years but is

reps come straight to us now,

already a Cookeville landmark. It

rather than going through the

is a popular hangout for professionals, students and visitors who come to unite around a common interest: craft beer. The beers on tap change frequently, and usually at least one or two of the options are unknown to more than a few of the patrons. But there is one part of the bar that is always the same: The bartender, Beard, has been at his station behind it since the day Father Tom’s opened in July 2012. “We have become the craft beer destination in Cookeville,” said Beard, whose real name is John Darrow. “We try to have enough different styles so everyone can find something they like. We have people who only like porters or stouts. We have people who only like IPAs. We have people who want something like Bud Light but not Bud Light.”

WE TRY TO HAVE ENOUGH DIFFERENT STYLES SO EVERYONE CAN FIND SOMETHING THEY LIKE .... WE HAVE PEOPLE WHO ONLY LIKE IPAS. WE HAVE PEOPLE WHO WANT SOMETHING LIKE BUD LIGHT BUT NOT BUD LIGHT.”

distributors. Two or three years ago, I never thought I’d have 10 or 12 brewery reps in my phone.” Beard’s favorite beer, at least for now, is Highland Gaelic Ale out of Asheville, North Carolina. He has been tending bar for nearly 10 years, first at Players, a pool hall across the street from Father Tom’s that markets itself to college students. Beer is his passion, but he takes pride in his Manhattans and Old Fashioneds, which he tries to make the same way people made them 60 and 70 years ago. If someone asks him to surprise them with a mixed drink, he will occasionally make them pick a color and make a drink for them in the same shade. Father Tom’s also carries a wide variety of specialty wines.

But Father Tom’s is more than a place to come for a Father Tom’s focuses on regional breweries from

drink. It has a full menu, ranging from soups, salads

North Carolina, Georgia, Michigan, Missouri,

and burgers to ahi tuna, quesadillas and specials

Nebraska and, of course, Tennessee — especially

that change often.

Calfkiller Brewing Company, the Upper Cumberland’s only microbrewery. The kegs supplying each

19 TH ED. SOURCEBOOK

56


One of Beard’s talents is reading people. Everyone

On the average Friday night, Beard and his well-

who comes in, whether they sit at the bar or at a

trained barback can pour as many as 400 drinks,

table, gets a greeting called out from his station

about 70 percent of which is beer. During the week,

behind the taps. He can help them select a drink or

they will serve a little more than half that amount.

chat with them until they wind down after a day’s

It’s not a bad number for a restaurant that seats

work. How he reads a patron even helps him decide

about 75 people. Beard says it is plenty to keep him

how to introduce himself, as Beard or John.

and his help busy, but not yet busy enough for a second bartender, which seems to suit him just fine.

He prefers to be called Beard, a nickname he’s had since he was 20 years old and there were too many

“You look at all your tickets,” he said. “If you have

people named John in his group of friends. Since he

eight drafts and four mixed drinks and two bottles,

turned 18, he says he has been clean-shaven only for

you get your glasses ready under the taps, then you

a few days. This particular beard is about three years

get the liquor ready and the glasses and just start

old, and he cares for it with shampoo, conditioner

pouring.”

and beard oil. And no, he says, his beard never sheds into anything he makes.

Beyond the usual suspects of Friday and Saturday nights, some evenings are busier than others. Once

Beard says his favorite part of his job is interacting

a month, the bar opens up a keg of a new brew on

with Father Tom’s’ patrons, both the regulars and

the patio to offer to patrons, get their feedback and

those visiting the area who find it through Yelp and

see if the beer is something that should be included

other restaurant review websites. Though he must

as part of the regular rotation. The samples are free

see and hear a lot from behind the bar, he refuses to

and serve as a way for a small-town bar to make sure

share stories, even with names omitted.

its patrons are happy. Whether they like the beer on tap or not, all are happy to give their opinions and

“I can’t tell a story. I don’t hear or see anything be-

always come back, whether it’s later in the week or

hind the bar,” he said. “The running joke is that I’m

not until the next month’s trial run.

better than Vegas.” For more information about Father Tom’s, stop by On almost any night of the week, patrons line the bar

the pub at 32 N. Cedar Avenue in Cookeville, or visit

in couples or by themselves. It is a popular destina-

fathertomspub.com.

tion for those who want to unwind after a day at the office and bump into a friend they haven’t seen for a while. Some folks come specifically to see Beard, and he takes the time to chat with them between making drinks and occasionally serving up a meal. “People come here because they want to relax after work. They’ll come out in groups occasionally. A lot of times, people just want to escape,” Beard said. “We’ve had a lot of people become friends because of this place.”

57

COOKEVILLE-PUTNAM COUNTY CHAMBER


LUCKY SEVEN

7 Local Outdoor Bistros

TAKE IN SOME FRESH AIR AND LOVELY VIEWS WHILE YOU TREAT YOURSELF AT THESE EATERIES

No. 1

No. 2

CRAWDADDYS

MAURICIO’S

53 W. Broad St. | (931) 526-4660

232 N. Peachtree Ave. | (931) 528-2456

Sitting on the shaded, fenced patio of this New

Surrounded by twinkle lights on the porch of

Orleans-inspired restaurant is a favorite pastime

a historic home a few blocks from downtown,

of many Cookevillians. A cornerstone of the

Mauricio’s is the perfect place for a romantic evening

town’s historic West Side, locals love the food, the

or to catch up with friends over Italian margaritas.

ambiance and, of course, the cocktail list. On the

Inside, the rooms of the home have been maintained

weekends, there is often live music starting up as

and decorated with antiques to create an intimate

the stars come out and the fireflies dance, and

and cozy atmosphere. Known for its Italian-style

Crawdaddys brunch is one of the best in town.

dishes, it also has one of the best steaks in town.

No. 3

No. 4

No. 5

No. 6

CHAR

THE LIGHTHOUSE RESTAURANT

SPANKIES

THE GALLEY RESTAURANT AT EDGAR EVINS MARINA

14 S. Washington Ave. (931) 520-2427

203 E. Ninth St. (931) 526-3344

sections indoors and a

13800 Cookeville Boat Dock Road (931) 858-4008

University, Spankies is a

Edgar Evins Marina is home to The

patio that, though not far

Accessible by land or

popular hangout not only

Galley Restaurant, another local

from the sidewalks and

water, the Cookeville

for college students, but

favorite along the 415 miles of Center

several heavily traveled

Boat Dock has a

also for their professors

Hill Lake shore. The restaurant is

streets, feels quiet and

restaurant open

and other professionals.

open seasonally, with indoor and

secluded because of the

seasonally for lunch and

The restaurant offers a

outdoor seating and a menu of steak,

high evergreen shrubs and

dinner and rents boats

wide variety of entrées

seafood, hamburgers, sandwiches and

many strands of twinkle

at its marina on Center

and beverages and has a

locally brewed Calfkiller beer.

lights that surround it.

Hill Lake. The lake is

large tented front porch

Char frequently has live

one of the most popular

from which guests can

bands performing inside,

boating and hiking

enjoy the outside air

especially in the summer,

destinations around, and

without being rained on or

when the garage door

the restaurant’s family-

tousled by the wind.

opens and the sound

friendly atmosphere

carries through the streets.

and down-home style

Just off the square, Char has two fairly large seated

from Tennessee Tech

2100 Edgar Evins State Park Road | (931) 858-5695

Across the railroad tracks

No. 7

79 E. Spring St. | (931) 646-4610 This family-owned restaurant smokes all of its meat on-site, as the massive woodpile can attest. The drive-thru-or-sit-down barbecue

burgers, salads and sweet

spot has a few picnic tables out front and makes some of the most

tea make it a perfect stop

tender, and smokiest, wings and sandwiches in Cookeville.

after a day on the water.

19 TH ED. SOURCEBOOK

MOOGIE’S BBQ

58


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Stay Tuned DESIRÉE DUNCAN AND WCTE’S COVERAGE OF THE UPPER CUMBERLAND UNIQUE

T

he Upper Cumberland has many things that

set it apart from the rest of Tennessee and the rest of the South — the cultural, the beautiful and the quirky. It is the job of the producers, cameramen and interns of Cookeville’s only local television station to find those jewels and tell their stories.


DIRECTOR DUNCAN Director of Content DesirĂŠe Duncan keeps the (now digital) reels rolling at WCTE-TV.


Cookeville is one of the smallest towns in the nation

And the content the station disseminates is anything

to have a public television station, but WCTE’s mis-

but standard. In addition to “Live Green Tennessee,”

sion is anything but small.

which focuses on the past, present and future of the region’s agriculture industry, the station hosts

“WCTE is the pulse of this community,” said De-

shows about bluegrass musicians that have aired

sirée Duncan, the station’s director of content. “This

nationally, as well as programs about TTU athletics,

station opened my eyes to a world I never would

previews for Bryan Symphony Orchestra concerts

have known. It gives you the opportunity to go off

and many others.

the beaten path that you otherwise never would have heard of and to share that with the rest of the

One of the stories that stands out most notably in

community.”

Duncan’s mind is the story she did shortly after she returned about Short Mountain Distillery in the hills

Originally from Nashville, Duncan came to Cooke-

of Woodbury, Tennessee. Duncan was unsure of the

ville about a dozen years ago to study journalism

reception she would get going to cover the distill-

at Tennessee Tech University (TTU). As a student

ery, which uses some traditional methods to make

worker in the TTU Athletics Department, her boss

moonshine. When she got there, she says she was

directed her to WCTE to help her achieve her goal

surprised how different it was from her expecta-

of gaining experience in television. She volunteered

tions.

until shortly before she graduated, when she was hired to work on a show called “TTU Sports Weekly.”

“Hearing the history of the moonshiners in Cannon County and hearing from the people who learned

She left to take a position at a public television

how to make moonshine from their fathers and their

station in Las Vegas and stayed out west for six

grandfathers, that really opened my eyes,” she said.

years. Her former boss and the station’s president

“I realized I needed to explore more.”

and CEO, Becky Magura, contacted Duncan to try to convince her to return to WCTE. It’s been a few years

Exploring is one of the things that WCTE’s staff

now since she came back, and she is confident she

members do best, to bring stories that matter to the

made the right choice, in part because of the impact

community. Because WCTE is the only television

the station has on the community.

station in the region, its staff can be found at many of the annual events that make the Upper Cumber-

“We are sandwiched between Nashville, Knoxville

land special, interviewing and broadcasting to reach

and Chattanooga,” said Duncan. “These stations

those unable to attend. They regularly cover the Put-

don’t cover us. That’s where the local media can

nam County Fair, the Smithville Fiddlers’ Jamboree,

step in and tell the story of all the cool stuff going on

Jammin at Hippie Jack’s, the Cookeville Christmas

here. And, because we’re a PBS station, we can dis-

Parade and the TTU homecoming parade, to name a

seminate this content nationally. People know us all

few, as well as TTU football home games and many

over the world because of the reach of this station.”

of the NCAA Division-I football and men’s and women’s basketball games from the TTU campus.

19 TH ED. SOURCEBOOK

64


MEDIA +

And WCTE’s president and CEO, Becky Magura, regularly hosts an interview show — “One on One with Becky Magura” — where she talks on camera with the movers and shakers of the Upper

COOKEVILLE STAYS CONNECTED

Cumberland. Past “One on One” guests have included TTU’s president; local artists, activists and

News Media

athletes; and nationally known journalists and writers, among many others.



The station also works to organize fun events for



Herald-Citizen (931) 526-9715 Upper Cumberland Business Journal

the community that double as fund-raisers for

(931) 528-8852

the station, including the Great TV Auction, a live auction supported by community donations of

Radio

auction items and time, and Blues & Brews, a fall



WATX-AM (1600)

festival of local craft beers and music.



WBXE-FM (93.7)



WGSQ-FM (94.7)

WCTE staffers do not have typical work sched-



WHRS-FM (91.7)

ules, and there is no such thing as a typical day



WHUB-AM (1400)



WJNU-FM (96.9)



WKSW-FM (98.5)



WKXD-FM (106.9)



WLIV-FM (104.7)



WLQK-FM (95.9)

That variety is part of what makes the job so



WPTN-AM (780)

much fun for Duncan, and the people she has met



WTTU-FM (88.5)

through her job and through events have added to



WWOG-FM (90.9)

or week. Duncan says she might go from an event-planning meeting to covering a story, including dragging camera equipment around and hauling cables, to editing that story to get it ready to air.

her happiness in living here.

Television

“Everyone is so welcoming,” said Duncan. “No



WKRN (ABC)

matter where you go, someone will introduce



WTVF (CBS)

themselves. That is unexpected and cool. You



WSMV (NBC)

could be sitting having dinner next to the mayor



WZTV (FOX)

or TTU’s president or former president, and it’s no



WCTE-TV (PBS)

big deal. Somewhere else, you don’t even know who these people are, and you’ll never see them again.” To learn more about WCTE, visit wcte.org.

65

COOKEVILLE-PUTNAM COUNTY CHAMBER


LUCKY SEVEN

7 Tastes of the World

TREAT YOUR TONGUE TO TASTES FROM AROUND THE GLOBE RIGHT HERE IN COOKEVILLE

No. 1

No. 2

FRENCH-INSPIRED Crawdaddys

ITALIAN Mamma Rosa’s

From New Orlean’s po’boys on Gambino’s French

Owned and operated by the same family for more

bread to etouffee, jambalaya, gumbo, blackened

than 23 years, Mamma Rosa’s chefs serve up freshly

salmon, red beans and rice, and so much more,

prepared, generous portions of authentic Sicilian-style

Crawdaddys is set to fill your every Creole craving.

dishes using top-of-the-line imported ingredients.

Start your meal with gator bites and finish it off

Local favorites include the massive stromboli, the

with their saucy bread pudding while listening to

lasagna, the New York-style hand-tossed pizza and

jazz on the open-air patio. You just might not be

the Sicilian-style thick-crust pizza. Don’t forget the

able to resist letting out an “ahee!”

cheese bread!

53 W. Broad St. / (931) 526-4660

200 S. Lowe Ave. / (931) 372-8694

No. 3 IRISH Father Tom’s

32 N. Cedar Ave. | (931) 854-9484 Father Tom’s is an Irish pub with an awesome selection of local and regional craft beers plus some imports, and the better-than-bar-food menu is fun and

N 4 o.

JAPANESE Taiko Noodle & Sushi Bar 125 W. Broad St. (931) 528-0345

Set in a softly lit, vintage

phenomenal. The Pearl Burger, which comes topped with Brie, bacon, sliced pear, onions and garlic aioli, is a perennial favorite.

No. 5

building with exposed brick walls on Cookeville’s historic West Side, Taiko Noodle & Sushi Bar delights customers with a menu that includes a terrific selection of sushi hand rolls, nigiri and sashimi that a master sushi chef makes by hand while you watch. Taiko specialties include the Trump Roll, the Tennessee Roll, the TTU Roll and the Cookeville Roll, a customer favorite that’s shaped like a giant “C.”

19 TH ED. SOURCEBOOK

No. 6

No. 7

MEXICAN El Tapatio

THAI House of Thai

900 S. Jefferson Ave. (931) 372-0246 190 S. Willow Ave. (931) 520-4393

MEDITERRANEAN World Foods International Grocery & Delicatessen

22 N. Cedar Ave. | (931) 528-5090

208 E. 8th St. (931) 526-2478

House of Thai serves a full slate of authentic Thai specialties, including

A favorite for more than two

pad thai, panang curry, prik pow

This charming little bistro on Cedar Avenue has been a Cookeville

decades, El Tapatio serves up

shrimp and many more in a cozy,

favorite for years, offering outstanding homemade pizza along

plentiful portions of flavorful

warmly lit atmosphere. Many of the

with other Mediterranean and Middle Eastern specialties such as

Mexican staples, including some of

dishes are lightly spiced for more

muffaletta, shawarma, dolma, tabouli, falafel, lahmacun, kefta, cannoli,

the best fajitas around, in a cheerful

tender palates and then served with

baklava, tiramisu and sfogliatelle. For the less culinarily adventurous,

atmosphere where customers marvel

a spice tray for those who want more

they also serve standard sandwich fare as well as the Cheese

as the servers dash about with rows

kick to their Thai.

Pamwich, which contains a blend of provolone cheese and fire-roasted

of hot plates balanced from shoulder

peppers.

to hand.

66


Smart sets us apart.

Bigger isn’t always more knowledgeable.

A

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t Swallows Insurance, we’re smart about the things that matter most to your business - your money and your resources - and we’re eager to protect them from the uncertainties of tomorrow so that they can grow and thrive. We achieve this by putting our decades of experience and training to work for you in a very accessible way. Because we’re not a giant corporation, we can respond to you quickly and can easily flex to meet your needs. We’re only a phone call away, every day, for as long and as much as you need us. That kind of agility is what makes us the smart choice as your trusted insurance partner.

For more information, phone 931-526-4025 or visit www.SwallowsInsurance.com.

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I’d Rather Be Rich CROSSFIT CHAMPION RICH FRONING AND ACTIVE LIVING IN COOKEVILLE, TENNESSEE

N

ear the center of town is a

working on a computer or doing

large, boxy building that,

some of the most extravagant-

except for the necessary doors and

looking sit-ups imaginable.

access ramp, is almost completely featureless. Inside is another decep-

The space is CrossFit Mayhem, and

tively simple space full of what looks

it is Rich Froning’s business and

almost like industrial scaffolding

home away from home.

and more free weights than seem to be entirely necessary. It is decorated

Froning, to those in tune with the

mostly in black, gray, red and blue.

CrossFit world, is no minor celebrity. He is the Fittest Man on Earth™,

A few people, mostly men in work-

four-time winner of the Reebok

out gear, and a handful of dogs roam

CrossFit® Games, a competition for

about the space. The dogs stay

more than 80 of the top CrossFit®

mostly out of the way of the people

adherents in the world.

who are organizing equipment,


4-PEAT

Rich Froning prepares himself and coaches others toward ultimate fitness at his CrossFit gym in Cookeville.


Whether they belong to his gym or not, many of

on two walls. A couple dozen boxes to jump on and

Cookeville’s residents know Froning. He grew up

off of and a collection of “Satan’s tricycles,” which

here, went to school here, earned his degree from

increase resistance the faster they are pedaled, line

Tennessee Tech University (TTU) and now has start-

the third wall. Then there’s a massive touch-screen

ed a business and a family here.

computer for members to track their workouts and progress toward their goals.

“This is where I grew up. I’ve traveled a lot, but I always enjoy coming home a lot more,” he said.

“What’s really cool about CrossFit is that it’s shared

“Cookeville is small, but it’s big enough. It’s got ev-

suffering,” Froning said. “You learn a lot about peo-

erything you need.”

ple. You connect a lot with people you train with and suffer with. It sounds kind of twisted, but it has this

Froning is more than Cookeville’s favorite athlete.

community effect.”

His gym, which has about 150 members, is part of the fabric of the community. CrossFit Mayhem reg-

That companionship, Froning said, is what sets

ularly sponsors and hosts charity events to benefit

CrossFit apart from other workouts and other gyms.

veterans of the U.S. military, local police, fire depart-

Each new member has to take a monthlong introduc-

ments and the Mustard Seed Ranch, a residential

tory course, and trainers are available to keep an eye

program in Cookeville that gives children a second

on progress.

chance and helps them rebuild their lives. Froning discovered CrossFit while he was studying “We know a lot of people at Mustard Seed, and our

exercise science, physical education and wellness at

church is partners with them, so we want to support

TTU.

them,” he said. “I dabbled in CrossFit for a month or two, but when I And Cookeville returns the favor. When Froning re-

went for my certification course, I got hooked,” said

turned from his fourth win at the CrossFit Games in

Froning, who also spent some time working in the

2014, the town threw him a parade to welcome him

TTU Fitness Center.

home. Froning is the only athlete who has ever won the games more than once.

Since then, he’s never looked back. Froning has been doing CrossFit for more than six years, and between

Though he says he will not compete again as an

his corporate sponsors and running CrossFit May-

individual, he is working out and working to build a

hem with his management team, he has more than

team to take to compete in the 2015 team event. The

a full-time job. But it’s a job he loves in a place he is

new father says it will help him learn to be more pa-

proud to call home. Though it will likely be years,

tient and give him another way to challenge himself.

if ever, before Froning stops traveling, either to compete or to coach, Cookeville will be the place he

Challenges in CrossFit Mayhem are not hard to find.

comes back to.

The scaffolding-like contraption is a rig that runs across the width of the gym and allows 12 people to

“Whatever happens,” he said, “I’ll be here.”

do squats, 24 to do chin-ups and others to do muscle-ups all at once on rings suspended between the

For more information about Froning, visit

bars. The facility also has about 50 kettlebells of vari-

games.crossfit.com/athlete/11435.

ous sizes lining one wall and stacks of other weights

19 TH ED. SOURCEBOOK

70


IT’S SHARED SUFFERING .... YOU CONNECT A LOT WITH PEOPLE YOU TRAIN WITH AND SUFFER WITH.”


Take It Outside OLYMPIAN ERIC JACKSON AND KAYAKING THE UPPER CUMBERLAND

E

ric Jackson likes kayaking in

business or training for kayaking.”

the Upper Cumberland region

more than anywhere else in the

Jackson’s love for paddling started

world. And Jackson knows a thing or

when he was a young boy in Penn-

two about kayaking.

sylvania.

A former member of the U.S. Olym-

“My dad and I started together when

pic team, Jackson has won four

I was six. At that time, we did mostly

world championship titles as well as

whitewater canoeing.”

many national championships. Oh, and he’s also the founder and pres-

As Jackson grew, so did his love for

ident of Jackson Kayak, a leading

paddling. In the late ‘90s, Jackson

manufacturer of kayaks, which has

and his wife, Kristine, and their two

distributors all over the world.

young children lived in a motor home for several years, traveling

“I have been on the USA Kayak Team

around the country as Jackson

since 1989, traveling the world com-

continued to train and compete at

peting and training for my sport,”

the highest level as a professional

Jackson said. “I spend most of my

freestyle kayaker.

time with my family, working on my


FREESTYLING When he’s not winning competitions, you can usually find Eric Jackson engaged in any number of outdoor pursuits with family and friends in the Upper Cumberland.


“The cost of living here is very reasonable, and the

In the United States, Jackson says his favorite place to

outdoors are unspoiled for the most part,” said Jackson.

kayak is Rock Island State Park, which straddles the

“This is a wonderful place to hang your hat, and I am so

border between Warren and White counties in Tennes-

very happy I brought my family here in 2002. Of all the

see, followed closely by the Hood River in Oregon and

places in the world, this was our favorite.”

the Gauley River in West Virginia. Internationally, he

enjoys paddling the Zambezi River in Africa every year

During their early years, Jackson’s children, Emily

and has favorite places on the Nile and in Mexico.

and Dane, began to make a name for themselves in the

sport, eventually showing their prowess as chips off the

In the fall of 2014, he competed in the Extreme Kayak

old block. However, despite searching the world over for

World Championship in Austria, where Emily came in

kid-sized kayaks, Jackson came up empty. That’s when

fourth place, Dane fifth, Nick 20th, and Eric placed 21st

inspiration struck, and he and design

out of 150 competitors. He points out that

partner David Knight designed a

in freestyle competitions, they typically

kids’ boat called the “Fun 1” to ac-

get first place.

commodate children as young as 5, along with another freestyle kayak for himself, the “All-Star.” “Since it costs a lot of money to make a plug, mold, and a boat, I couldn’t really afford to do it without selling some to pay for Dane’s boat, Emily’s boat and my boat,” said Jackson. “I

THE CUMBERLAND PLATEAU IS RICH IN EVERYTHING OUTDOORS.”

decided to start Jackson Kayak at that

One of the most well-known names in professional paddling, Jackson continues to compete with much younger athletes and stays very active outside of the competitive arena, as well, often joining family and friends in kayaking; fishing; hiking; jumping on the trampoline; or playing boccie ball, cornhole or ping-pong.

time in 2003. I already had a big following on my blog

and knew I could sell boats.”

His accolades notwithstanding, Jackson seems the most proud of his role as a teacher and trainer. In addition to

Thus Jackson Kayak was born, and Jackson’s dedication

teaching his own children to kayak, he has produced

to his and his children’s “hobby” has clearly paid off.

several instructional books and DVDs over the years. He truly epitomizes a person with tremendous passion for

“Both [Emily and Dane] were on the U.S. team as juniors

his sport and for the great outdoors.

— Dane at 10 and Emily at 13,” Jackson said. “Both are

now multi-world champions.”

“The Cumberland Plateau is rich in everything out-

doors,” Jackson said. “Caving, whitewater, hiking,

Emily’s husband, Nick Troutman, also competes, and

biking, amazing foliage. If you’re an outdoor enthusiast,

Jackson admits with some disappointment that his son-

except for winter sports, this is a great place to be. This

in-law beat him in the 2009 World Championships.

is my favorite place to be in the outdoors.”

Even with that loss, Jackson has some bragging rights

For more information about Rock Island State Park, visit

in the family. He has won more than 100 events, the

tnstateparks.com/parks/about/rock-island.

most of any kayaker in history. He attributes much of

For more information about Jackson Kayak, visit

that to the fact that he has been doing it for so long.

jacksonkayak.com.

19 TH ED. SOURCEBOOK

74


Did You Know?

OUTDOORS

There are over 150 documented

+

waterfalls within a 44-mile radius of downtown Cookeville.

COOKEVILLE AND THE UPPER CUMBERLAND ARE HOME TO WONDERFUL PARKS AND NATURAL AREAS Large Parks and Natural Areas 

scenic overlooks, waterfalls and pools.

Big South Fork National River and

the state’s early hydroelectric plants.

Recreation Area 125,000 acres • 85 miles from Cookeville





11,000 acres • 24 miles from Cookeville

Features an abandoned coal mining town that

Sits on the Cumberland Plateau and takes

was part of the Stearns Coal and Lumber Co.

its name from an 8-foot-tall rock that was

from 1937 to 1962.

reportedly used as a boundary between two Whitaker Park.

200 acres • 11 miles from Cookeville





waterfalls along one-and-a-half-mile trail, the

Noted for its unique geological features,

tallest at 136 feet.

including the 110-foot Virgin Falls, other waterfalls, caves and sinkholes. The Caney

Cummins Falls State Park



wooded natural refuge, which Travel and

City Parks

Leisure magazine named one of the 10 best



Edgar Evins State Park 6,000 acres • 26 miles from Cookeville



Features unique species of wildlife and mixed hardwood forests near the shores of Center Hill Lake. An observation tower at the Visitor







20,000 acres • 43 miles from Cookeville



Miles of waterfalls, streams, gorges and recreation facilities. The park is one of the most popular in the Southeast. At 256 feet,



eastern United States. 



Dominated by the Great Falls of the Caney





Center Hill Lake 29 square miles • 20 miles from Cookeville A 64-mile-long reservoir near Smithville with 415 miles of shoreline and 18,200 acres species of fish. Popular activities include

Cane Creek Park

fishing, hunting, camping, picnicking, boating,

CC Camp Rd. • Cookeville

canoeing and hiking. 

Capshaw Park

City Lake

S. Maple St., Stevens St. and Elm Ave. •

35 acres • in Cookeville

Cookeville

Features a 35-acre natural park with hiking trails, a waterfall overlook and a fishing pier.

Cinderella Park

City Lake Natural Area

Fish include catfish, bass and bream. 

Cordell Hull Lake 19 square miles • 23 miles from Cookeville Flows in and out of the Cumberland River in

Dogwood Park

Smith County with 381 miles of shoreline and

E. Broad St. • Cookeville

22 boat launching ramps.

Ensor Sink Natural Area



Dale Hollow Lake 43 square miles • 32 miles from Cookeville Voted #4 Lake in the Nation to “Float Your

Fantasy Park Main St. • Algood

Rock Island State Park 883 acres • 36 miles from Cookeville

Lakes

of deep, pure water that is home to many

Clover Hill Dr. and Foutch Dr. • Cookeville

Fall Creek Falls is the highest waterfall in the

Whitaker Park E. Commercial Ave. • Monterey

Bridgeway Dr. • Cookeville

Fall Creek Falls State Park

West End Park West End St. • Cookeville

Mitchell Ave. and Cinderella Lane • Cookeville

Center offers a spectacular view of the lake and surrounding hillsides.



and the Caney Fork River 900 feet below.

Home to Tennessee’s eighth-largest waterfall

Walter L. Bilbrey Memorial Park Fourth Ave. • Algood

Fork Overlook provides a view of Scott’s Gulf

211 acres • 9 miles from Cookeville

swimming holes in the U.S.





1,157 acres • 36 miles from Cookeville

Walnut Park S. Walnut Ave. • Cookeville

Virgin Falls Trail

forest and a native butterfly garden. Four

at 75 feet. Fish for bluegill and bass in this



Indian nations. It now stands in Monterey’s

Burgess Falls State Natural Area

Park View Park Scott Ave. • Cookeville

Standing Stone State Park

Miles of scenic gorges and sandstone bluffs.

Features sheer bluffs, narrow ridges, mixed



Features a 19th century textile mill and one of

Franklin Avenue Park

Boat” by USA Today, and boasts 620 miles of shoreline and more than 14 commercial marinas.

Franklin Ave. and Sixth St. • Cookeville

Fork River — a limestone gorge that provides

The State of Tennessee has certified Cookeville as an Adventure Tourism District.

75

COOKEVILLE-PUTNAM COUNTY CHAMBER


Use yoUr knowledge

“My group designed a device to help a special needs infant learn to crawl.” Corbin Paul

Madison, Tennessee Senior, Mechanical Engineering

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LUCKY SEVEN

7 Views You Shouldn’t Miss FROM SCENIC CLIMBS TO WATERFALLS, WE’VE GOT IT ALL

No. 1

No. 2

MILLIKAN’S OVERLOOK

BURGESS FALLS

Three valleys stretch in different

Heading down Burgess Falls State Park’s three-quarter

directions, and the hills of the

mile path, each of the four waterfalls is bigger than the last.

Cumberland Plateau nestle against

An overlook above the falls provides an impressive view of

one another for miles, gently fading

the falls and the steep cliffs that surround them like a deep,

from green to a soft blue. Find this spot

smooth bowl. Even Southern Living took notice, naming the

on the driving loop around Fall Creek

park among their “Five Ways to Stay Cool in Tennessee.”

Falls State Park, about an hour from Cookeville.

No. 3 CUMMINS FALLS Dedicated in 2012, Cummins Falls is one of Tennessee’s newest state parks. Its showpiece, like many of the parks in the Upper Cumberland, is a massive

No. 4

waterfall. Accessible via a two-mile hike, the waterfall is shaped in a shallow U with a variety of levels.

N 6 o.

N 7 o.

CENTER HILL LAKE Center Hill Lake at Edgar Evins hosts a variety of hiking trails and boating opportunities, from kayaks to pontoon

VIRGIN FALLS

BLACK MOUNTAIN

This 110-foot waterfall flows out of an

Just a 15-minute drive from I-40’s

underground stream and then vanishes

Crab Orchard exit, Black Mountain

back into a cave. Geologically, the

— a 10.8-mile loop trail along the

waterfall is one of the only of its kind

Cumberland Trail — is a maze of

in the state. The Caney Fork Overlook

scenic wonders, from towering bluffs

provides a view of Scott’s Gulf and the

to chimney rocks and fluted corridors.

Caney Fork River 900 feet below.

Don’t miss the breathtaking overlook

No. 5

boats. A great place to get a feel for the

ROCK ISLAND STATE PARK

scale of the lake is from an overlook

Rock Island is a perfect spot for a picnic. The rivers that

on state Route 56, about three or four

feed the area have, over the centuries, cut long ledges into

miles from Interstate 40. The view

the rock for children, families and others to scramble across.

changes every season, and it’s a great

Easier to get to than many of the other swimming spots in

place to pull off the road on the way

the area, Rock Island also has one of the most unique rock

to or from the Appalachian Center for

ledge formations around.

Craft and admire the beauty of the Upper Cumberland.

onto scenic Grassy Cove.

77

COOKEVILLE-PUTNAM COUNTY CHAMBER


Captains of Industry iWC’S JIMMY AND BOB MACKIE AND BIG BUSINESS IN THE UPPER CUMBERLAND

W

hile he has turned over the day-to-day operations to his son Bob, Jimmy Mackie, founder

and CEO of Institutional Wholesale Company (iWC), Inc., continues to go to work every day, to the job he’s had for almost 60 years. The 81-year-old Jimmy fondly recollects the details that led to his eventual success in the food distribution business.


FATHER AND SON iWC founder Jimmy Mackie, left, and sons Bob, right, and John, not shown, now run the largest independently owned food service distributor in Tennessee.


In the late 1950s, after graduating with two degrees

Bob, now the company’s president, attributes some of

from Tennessee Tech University (TTU) and spending

iWC’s success to its location.

two years in the U.S. Army, Jimmy had a wife, a child

and no job. And he was unsure what he wanted to do.

“I think there are a lot of pluses to our location in Putnam County,” Bob said.

Then a chance meeting between his dad and a friend

in 1957 set off the chain of events that eventually be-

First, the central location is a plus. Within close

came Jimmy’s profession and a major local business.

driving distance to major Tennessee cities, Cookeville

offers easy access to the major markets, according to

He bought into a small food distribution business that

Bob. With Interstate 40 and Highway 111 intersecting

delivered groceries from a distributor in Knoxville to

close by, it is an ideal location for any distribution

restaurants, schools and hospi-

business.

tals in Putnam County.

“Secondly, the labor pool is very

Business flourished over the

good in the area,” Bob said. Moving

coming years, and iWC joined the Frozen Food Forum, a national food buying cooperative that’s now called Frosty Acres. iWC is now the No. 1 distributor in the Frosty Acres organization. Jimmy’s son Bob joined the business in 1997. He came to the

I THINK THERE ARE A LOT OF PLUSES TO OUR LOCATION IN PUTNAM COUNTY.”

heavy food and other items around in a warehouse and delivering them is hard work, requiring a strong workforce. According to Bob, employees with good work ethics and people who are willing to work hard are invaluable in a business such as iWC, and this area is home to such individuals.

company with an engineering

degree from TTU, an MBA from

Lower expenses are also a plus in

Vanderbilt and 11 years of work

Putnam County. The metro areas

experience. He and his brother, John, who lives and

within a 150-mile radius have higher expenses, ac-

works in Nashville, are now co-owners of the com-

cording to Bob.

pany.

“Expenses in general are better in a rural area,” he

iWC moved into its current warehouse and distribu-

said.

tion facility in 2000, increasing its building size by

more than five times. Eight years later, they added

Bob also cites the local vendors and small community

more square footage and now have 170,000 square

as being a positive for business. It is more efficient to

feet.

buy locally, and vendors are responsive and fair.

With such strong and steady growth over 58 years,

“Everything here is small enough,” Bob said. “You

Jimmy could have headquartered iWC in a more met-

can call someone up, and they know you. The small

ropolitan area if he had wanted to. But that thought

community is good for relationships.”

never crossed his mind.

19 TH ED. SOURCEBOOK

80


INDUSTRY +

The small community also means that local government is helpful and proactive, according to Bob. He attributes the cities of Cookeville and Algood, along with local law enforcement and fire

PUTNAM COUNTY’S LARGEST MANUFACTURERS

department personnel and the Cookeville-Putnam County Chamber of Commerce, with facilitating

Perdue Farms

iWC’s growth and the growth of all business in the

Meat processing

area.

985 employees

And last, but certainly not least, Bob credits the

Cummins Filtration, Inc.

local education system with providing a quality

600 employees

Air, lube and water filters

workforce and contributing in many ways to the

TTI Floor Care (Oreck)

company’s success.

Vacuum cleaners and home care products

330 employees

Now, 58 years after the humble beginnings of what is now iWC, it is the largest independently

Transtar-DACCO

owned food service distributor in Tennessee. Un-

Auto transmission parts

der the leadership of the Mackies, iWC has grown

310 employees

from a few workers and two trucks to about 200

Flowserve

full-time employees and more than 50 distribu-

Three-way valves 310 employees

tion vehicles.

Tutco, Inc.

The senior Mackie credits this growth to a her-

Heating elements for appliances

itage of honesty, trustworthiness, dependability

270 employees

and a great location. His commitment to his com-

Identity Group

pany and to his community continues as iWC gets

Stamps, signs and ink marking devices

closer to celebrating its 60th year in business. A

250 employees

true Cookeville native, he has lived in Cookeville

iWC

all of his life except for a couple of years.

Food distribution

179 employees

Not only is it a great place to raise a family, according to the senior Mackie — it’s also a great place to

ATC Automation

raise a business.

175 employees

Special automated machinery

Aphena Pharma Solutions

For more information about iWC, visit goiwc.com.

Repackaging of pharmaceuticals 150 employees

81

COOKEVILLE-PUTNAM COUNTY CHAMBER


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The Host with the Most ENTHUSIASTIC HOSPITALITY PUTS COOKEVILLE ON THE MAP FOR A GROWING ROSTER OF EVENTS

A

fter spending a few minutes

its volunteers, Phillips believes that

with Cookeville native Ottis

Cookeville is seamlessly using both

Phillips, you know it’s no accident

to make the Upper Cumberland

that he’s drinking coffee from an

area a coveted destination for many

“I j CKVL” mug. It becomes obvious

different types of events.

pretty quickly that this business owner and involved community

And Phillips should know. He has

volunteer truly loves his city.

served the community in many ways and been instrumental in enticing

Raised in a region known for its

some of the city’s most lucrative and

hospitality and a state known for

visible events to town.


AT THE STEERING WHEEL Ottis Phillips, shown here at TTU’s Tucker Stadium, says an army of generous and hospitable people make Cookeville a great place to host an event.


A past chairman of both the Cookeville-Putnam Coun-

As a local business owner and community leader/vol-

ty Chamber of Commerce and the Convention & Vis-

unteer extraordinaire, Phillips has a unique perspec-

itors Bureau, Phillips has also been directly involved

tive on the Cookeville community as a great place to

in two of Cookeville’s most recent event successes.

host events and accommodate groups.

He was the founding steering committee chairman of the Tennessee Secondary School Athletic Association

“It’s like any business,” Phillips said. “The success is

(TSSAA) BlueCross Bowl state high school football

related to the people.”

championship games and a steering committee

member of the Tennessee H.O.G. (Harley Owners

When reflecting on his involvement with the

Group) Rally. Both of these events have enjoyed tre-

BlueCross Bowl, Phillips credits people for the suc-

mendous success, with each returning to Cookeville

cess of the inaugural event in 2009.

again and again.

“If I did anything right, it was picking

“Here’s the thing about

the right people,” Phillips said. “Nobody

Cookeville,” Phillips said. “We’re

was trying to protect their little turf.

unique versus some other

Tech said, ‘What do you need?’ The city

communities because of the willingness to cooperate between government bodies, the City of Cookeville, the county commission, Tennessee Tech and local businesses.” Phillips credits the success of events such as the state football championships and the H.O.G. Rally with the people who live here.

WE HAD 600 VOLUNTEERS IN THE POURING RAIN, SMILING AND WELCOMING FANS TO THE GAMES.”

said, ‘What do you need?’ Everything was taken care of. “Outstanding individuals made it fun and made it a joy to be involved. It’s the best job I ever had. I was surrounded by the most competent people, and I didn’t have to do anything. I almost felt guilty.” Phillips attributes the success not just to the volunteers in charge of the event, but also to all the volunteers who help throughout the three days of the

“We’re so blessed to be in this

games.

community where people have this attitude they have,” he said. “They want visitors to

enjoy being here.”

“We had 600 volunteers in the pouring rain, smil-

ing and welcoming fans to the games,” Phillips said.

A soft-spoken man who’s quick to smile and slow to

“People were blown away by our hospitality.”

talk about himself, Phillips exudes great pride when

he talks about his city and the people in it. After earn-

With an economic impact of more than $2.5 million,

ing two degrees at Tennessee Tech University (TTU)

Phillips realizes the significance of the BlueCross

and working in engineering and business in Ten-

Bowl to this community, and he hopes the event is

nessee, Texas and Colorado, Phillips returned to his

here to stay. With Cookeville volunteers running the

hometown in 1990 and eventually purchased bever-

now well-oiled machine, he is confident the state

age distributor SEC Enterprises. After years of growth

championships have found a home for quite a while.

and a 2013 merger with a Miller/Coors distributor in

Tullahoma, Tennessee, Phillips’ business, Mid-South

Not to sound like a broken record, but Phillips attri-

Distributing, is now geographically one of the largest

butes the success of another local event, the Tennes-

beer wholesalers in Tennessee.

see H.O.G. Rally, with — you guessed it — the people.

19 TH ED. SOURCEBOOK

86


“The key behind the success of the H.O.G. Rally, like

strategy.

all our events, is having the right people,” Phillips said. “We were able to make this a community event because the people of Cookeville are hungry.”

media.

branding.

These people, hungry for successful events, have bragging rights after the 2012 H.O.G. Rally. For the 2012 event, Cookeville, 1) was the smallest metro area to ever host a state rally, 2) was the only city to

print.

host consecutive years, and 3) set a record for firstday attendees. “When the H.O.G. Rally is in a large city like Nashville,” Phillips points out, “no one knows they are there. We do a parade in Cookeville! That’s the kind of hospitality this area shows.” Phillips noted that there is a domino effect that continues to impact the area in a positive way every time an event is well received. “We know for a fact that other groups have come back to Cookeville for weekend motorcycle rides,” Phillips said. “And Tech has gotten a number of students and blue-chip players from the state championships being held here. There’s a ripple effect when you have successful events.” In addition to these two major events, Cookeville plays host to a number of other tournaments and sporting events each year, including baseball, softball, basketball, soccer and youth football.

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While his involvement has been primarily with athletic events, Phillips also sees great opportunities for other regional and national events such as concerts and art exhibits. There is no limit to what Cookeville can offer, and he sees all kinds of events

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on the radar.

A S S O C I A T E S

“We’re blessed to have a great place to live, with a great community spirit,” Phillips said. “It’s a winwin for everybody.” For more information about the H.O.G. Rally and other events, check out visitcookevilletn.com.

COOKEVILLE-PUTNAM COUNTY CHAMBER

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SMART COOKIE Kristea Cancel says Cookeville’s family-friendly environment brought her here and continues to provide just what she and her family need at each stage of development.


For the Family SMART PLAY’S KRISTEA CANCEL AND COOKEVILLE’S FAMILY-FUN OPPORTUNITIES

W

hen Atlanta-raised Kristea

Once they visited Cookeville, a place not

Cancel and her physician hus-

at all on their radar, they never looked

band, St. Louis-raised Quinton Cancel,

back.

were looking for a place to live and raise their young sons, Cookeville won out over

“We fell in love with the place,” Cancel

a number of other options available to

said. “All the other places paled in com-

them.

parison. It wasn’t fast-paced – it wasn’t

slow. It seemed like it was too good to be

“We were looking for smaller family

true!”

towns,” Cancel said, “and we visited a lot of different places.”


Ages 3 and 1 when they relocated from Durham,

The center also offers creative movement, sign lan-

North Carolina, the boys were quickly introduced

guage, cooking, outside play and, of course, good

to all the area had to offer for children, Cancel said,

old-fashioned free playtime.

including story time at the library, the Kiwanis

Cookeville Children’s Museum, CityScape’s Fall

“I totally believe in creative play,” Cancel said. “Let

FunFest and Cane Creek Park.

them be a kid and learn at the same time!” Cancel credits the staff with making Smart Play

“Every single phase we were in with the boys,” Can-

such a great place for children to be. More than

cel said, “all the resources were here.”

80 percent of the staff are Tennessee Tech students, according to Cancel, most of them studying

After living in Cookeville a few years, Cancel began

education, childhood development or other majors

to seriously pursue opening a drop-in child care

pertaining to children.

center. She realized there were a lot of mothers who

had doctor appointments, work conflicts and other

Word of the center has spread after being open for a

situations where they needed care for their chil-

short time, and Cancel hopes to see Smart Play add

dren, but not necessarily on a regular basis.

more children and more activities as it meets the

demands of parents in the community.

“I thought, ‘How many moms are in this situation?’”

Cancel said, and thus began her goal to open Smart

Smart Play is available for times when parents need

Play, Inc. “The whole concept was important to

to be away from their children, Cancel points out,

me. I wanted the children to be somewhere where

but Cookeville is a great place for parents to enjoy

they felt loved, felt valued, where they could learn

with their children, too.

something.”

“Cookeville’s a great place to live – a great place to

And from the looks of things, a child can’t help but

raise your children,” she said. “There’s everything

be genuinely happy while he is learning something

you need here. There’s something to do for every-

at the brightly hued center.

one. If you want to get involved and be active, you

can be.”

From the time you walk through the door of Smart

Play, your senses are gladly overloaded with vivid

The Cancel family now calls Cookeville home and

colors, sparkling playthings and the cheerful

would recommend the area to anyone looking for a

sounds of happy children. There are areas for

family-friendly environment.

dress-up and imaginative play, areas for active

play and areas for art and reading. There’s even a

“I can’t explain it,” Cancel said. “People who

colorful climbing wall, which can be adjusted to the

don’t know Cookeville can’t understand. It was a

needs of the climbers.

no-brainer to decide to move to Cookeville. We love

it here. And we haven’t looked back.”

The center is open Monday through Friday and by reservation on Sunday. Children ages 1 to 12 may

For more information, visit smartplaykidz.com

attend, and the center also offers after-school care, either on a regular or drop-in basis. The regular daily schedule includes everything from Spanish and music to story time and art.

19 TH ED. SOURCEBOOK

92


KID TESTED

Kristea Cancel’s sons, Jackson (on the mat) and Quinton (on the wall), are all too happy to help her test out her ideas and designs for Smart Play and have offered a few ideas of their own.

93

COOKEVILLE-PUTNAM COUNTY CHAMBER


LUCKY SEVEN

7 Campout Must-Haves

COOKEVILLE’S OUTDOORS IS A CAMPER’S DREAM, SO DON’T FORGET TO STOCK UP ON NECESSITIES

No. 1

No. 2

BUG SPRAY

TENT

With all the water around,

Even if you’re the camper kind of person, we recommend that you try a

bugs come with the territory.

tent just once. The Upper Cumberland is full of great places to spend a

Sometimes we wish they didn’t,

night outside with friends or family, especially in one of our many state

but the Upper Cumberland is

parks. Don’t have one? There are several outdoor stores around that

too pretty to let them have all

will rent them out for reasonable day or weekend rates. Some of those

the fun. Get the strong stuff

stores will also help you plan excursions, or plan them for a community

and apply early and often.

group that you can join.

No. 3

No. 4

No. 5

S’MORES

SUNSCREEN

KAYAK

The Upper Cumberland does

The Tennessee sun gets pretty

With all of our wonderful lakes and rivers, no camping trip is complete without some time

not have as much light pollution

hot from May to September,

spent on the water. Around here, we’re partial to kayaks because one of the world’s premier

as other parts of the state, so

so it’s always a good idea to

companies, Jackson Kayak, is just down the road in Sparta. Don’t own one? There are lots

build a campfire for s’mores

have sunscreen stashed away

of places to rent kayaks, canoes and other boats for the day or weekend.

earlier in the evening. As the

somewhere, especially if you’ll

stars come out, lie down on

be spending a lot of time

some blankets and look out for

outside. SPF is not something

the Big and Little Dippers.

to forget!

No. 7

No. 6 FISHING POLE AND EQUIPMENT Lakes and rivers abound in the Upper Cumberland, and there may be no better

CAMERA

19 TH ED. SOURCEBOOK

or the shore, seeing what you can catch.

cell phone camera may not be enough to do justice to the

The waterways of Tennessee are some of

natural beauties of the region. Capture the moment so you’ll

the most diverse in the world, and many a

remember forever the beautiful sights you come across and

championship fisher has spent time here

the silly moments with your friends.

honing his craft.

94

PHOTOS from Amazon.com

way to experience them than from a boat

For those with even a passing interest in photography, your


A WEALTH of EXPERIENCE

to GU DE you Our navigation expertise can point the way to financial security.

David Hatcher FINANCIAL ADVISOR

FINANCIAL PLANNING & ADVISORY SERVICES • • • •

Life & Legacy Planning Risk & Return Analysis College Funding Analysis Retirement Feasibility & Capital Needs Analysis

• • • • •

Portfolio Management Investment Accounts 401(k)/403(b) Rollovers Insurance Real Estate

The journey starts with a call. 931-526-2190 or 888-593-2190

1330 Neal St. | Suite A | Cookeville, TN 38501

www.compassadvisorygrp-cookeville.com Advisory services offered through Compass Advisory Partners, LLC (CAP), a registered investment advisor. Securities offered through FSC Securities Corporation (FSC), member FINRA, SIPC. CAP is independent of FSC.

MIDDLE TENNESSEE NATURAL GAS UTILITY DISTRICT WWW.MTNG.COM

THE NATURAL CHOICE

It is our mission to improve the welfare of the communities we serve by providing quality natural gas service at competitive rates in a safe, environmentally clean and efficient manner. Serving Baxter, Monterey, & North Putnam 606 West Bockman Way. Sparta, TN 38583 Phone: (931) 836-2825 / 800-344-1614 Fax: (931) 836-3435 E-mail: mtng@mtng.com


ADVERTISING INDEX

WE ARE GRATEFUL TO OUR ADVERTISERS. WE INVITE YOUR PATRONAGE OF THEIR PRODUCTS AND SERVICES. Alpine Lodge and Suites, 52

Cumberland Container, 45

Kiwanis Cookeville Children’s Museum, 82

Swallows Insurance, 67

American Bank and Trust, 82

David W. Ledbetter, Attorney at Law, 6

Lakeland Electric, Inc., 45

Tennessee Bible College, 6

American Way Real Estate, 59

DelMonaco Winery and Vineyards, 95

Leslie Town Centre, 37

Anderson Printing Solutions, 61

D. T. McCall and Sons, 45

Luna & Herren Investment, 52

Tennessee College of Applied Technology Livingston, 82

ATC Automation, 89

Express Signs, 6

Middle Tennessee Federal Credit Union, 23

Back to Health Holistic Wellness Center, 82

Fairfield Inn and Suites, 31

Middle Tennessee Natural Gas, 95

Billings Crane, 83

Falcon Realty, 12

Mustard Seed Ranch, 23

Bilyeu CPA Group, 23

Farm Bureau Insurance, 83

Myron B. Stringer, D.D.S., 13

Bradley Furniture Company, 88

First National Bank, 1

Nick’s Restaurant, 88

Carwile Mechanical Contractors, 95

First Realty Company - Susan Johnson, 83

Norrod Builders, 6

Cavender’s, LLC, 12

First United Methodist Church of Cookeville, 60

Northwestern Mutual Financial Network, 31

Chartwells, 6

Habitat for Humanity ReStore, 52

Outdoor Experience, 31

Chick-fil-A Catering, 2

Heart of the Cumberland, 60

Plateau Mental Health, 60

Citizens Bank, 52

Herald-Citizen, 45

PM Environmental, 88

City of Cookeville, 11

Heritage Pointe Senior Living, 67

Putnam County Board of Education, 30

Compass Advisory Group, 95

Highlands Residential Services, 44

Putnam County, Tennessee, 7

Conner Brothers Wood Flooring, 2

Hill Realty, IFC

Reliable Healthcare Clinic, 83

Wilson Bank and Trust, 96

Cookeville Christian Academy, 67

HomeCORR, 53

Cookeville Electric Motor, 60

Home Instead Senior Care, 14

RidgeBrooke Investment and Retirement Planning, 60

IFC - Inside front cover

Cookeville Regional Medical Center, 26

Hooper Huddleston and Horner, 2

Self Stor Solutions, 60

IBC - Inside back cover

Crest Lawn Funeral Home, 60

Irby, 31

Sentry Shred, 83

OBC - Outside back cover

CRMC Charitable Foundation, 25

J&S Construction, 3

Tennessee Tech Athletics, IBC Tennessee Tech University, 76 The Original Gondola Pizza House, 31 The Realty Firm, OBC Twin Lakes, 2 UC Regional Airport, 13 Upper Cumberland Urology, 52 Victory Sports Center, 31 WDStone & Associates, 87 William F. Roberson, Attorney at Law, 31 Williams Wholesale Supply, 31 Willow Park Apartments, 23

Signature Healthcare of Putnam County, 60

Bank On Us Ask about our loans... and financial services to help your business grow and prosper! Kelly Perdue, (NMLS #447452) Business Development Officer (931) 260-4241

Member FDIC

Committed to community banking since 1987. www.wilsonbank.com


TTUSports.com

@TTUGoldenEagles

TTU Sports1

TTU Sports


Sourcebook 19, 2015-2016  

Now in its 19th edition, the Sourcebook is a lush, full-color, magazine-style guide packed with everything anyone might want to know about C...

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