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MESSENGER ST. MICHAEL’S BY-THE-SEA

Ancient Faith Issue SPRING 2018


O R T H O D OX Y In a recent interview, music legend Quincy Jones spoke candidly about a wide-range of topics, including what he sees as “the problem with modern pop.” When asked why he thinks songs are not as good as they used to be, Jones replied, “Producers now are ignoring all the musical principles of the previous generations . . . That’s not the way it works: You’re supposed to use everything from the past. If you know where you come from, it’s easier to get where you’re going.” (Marchese, Vulture) To my mind, Quincy Jones’ musical insight can double as an unwitting description of the orthodox Christian faith. A standard definition of the word orthodox is, “conforming to what is generally or traditionally accepted as right or true; established and approved.” The word itself derives from the Greek: orthos which translates as “right, true, straight”, and doxa which translates as “opinion, praise”. Together they form the religious context of the word orthodox: “right belief” or “right worship”. For added context, juxtaposed to the word orthodox are the Greek words heterodox and heresy. The former means “of another or different opinion”, and the latter “a taking or choosing for oneself doctrine or opinion at variance with established standards.” At the heart of Christian orthodoxy is the nature of the Holy Trinity and the identity of Our Lord Jesus Christ as both God and man. This is the faith revealed by the Holy Spirit to the apostles, and passed down through every generation of the church to this day. Author Frederica Matthewes-Green writes, “Orthodox believers are right, left, and center on many issues. But where Scripture and the witness of the early Church guide us, there is no controversy. We uphold and obey God’s will.” The orthodox Christian faith is not something that can be recreated, modified, or even destroyed. It can be rejected or it can be received in humility, celebrated, treasured, guarded, preserved, and handed down to the next generation. The temptation of the church today is similar to that of the 21st century music makers - indiscriminately ignoring the principles of former faithful generations. While orthodox Christian belief is filled with many rich mysteries, there is no mystery as to its composition. It is there in plain view, to be known. Rather than abandon the ancient faith, the perennial challenge of the church is one of translation: how can the church translate the immutable substance of the faith within a rapidly changing culture? May God in His grace aid us in a deeper understanding of where we have come from, that the road ahead may remain clear. In Christ,

Fr. Doran+


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28 Cover Art: Mosaic of Christ Pantocrator from the Hagia Sophia in Instanbul. It is the central figure of the Deësis mosaic from the 13th Century; taken by Dianelos Georgoudis, via Wikimedia Commons.

CONTENTS

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IN THE IMAGE OF GOD HE CREATED THEM Fr. Doran Stambaugh

WINTER EVENTS CALENDAR SENIOR WARDEN’S REPORT Tony Vanaria

ANCIENT ANGLICANISM Ben Conarroe

HERITAGE

Becky Gleason

ORTHODOXY

Russ Hollingsworth

FAITH DELIVERED TO THE SAINTS Fr. Ivor Kraft


IN THE IMAGE OF GOD He Created Them FR. DORAN STAMBAUGH

Then God said, “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness . . . so God created man in his own image, in the image of God he created him; male and female he created them. A Creative God It is a fundamental tenet of the Christian faith that human beings are created in the image of God. What this “image” means, what it looks like, how it is manifested in humans . . . well this has been the subject of much discussion throughout the ages. What part or parts of our human nature - male and female - reflect God’s image? Where is the imprint of Almighty God revealed in our beings? This is a rich, theological question. Indeed, it is a question with multiple answers. If we were to think of a physical image of ourselves — in a portrait or reflection — and describe what we saw, we would no doubt arrive at a variety of answers. For example, if I were to undertake this exercise, observations might include: middle-aged man, tired-looking, lots of gray in the beard, needs a nap?

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Genesis 1.27 says that we were created in the image of God. To discover what this “image of God” looks like in us, it makes good sense to start with what we can “know” about this God in whose image we are made. And if we really want to be literal, we could begin by asking what it is that we can know about God from the first 26 verses. A plain reading reveals that at the very least, this God creates a lot of stuff! God said, “Let their be light,” and there was light. God speaks . . . and the heavens and earth come into being! The early verses of Genesis reveal that God, in His very nature and being, is creative. It makes sense then, that one of the many marks of the image of God within humanity is . . . creativity. A Triune God There are innumerable attributes of God that we could list in an effort to further explore the image of God

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imprinted in our nature. Christians believe that God is good, gracious, long-suffering and abounding in mercy. God is just. God is light. God is truth. God is love. When and as these attributes reveal themselves in men and women, the Christian should rightly rejoice at these glimpses of the image of God in human nature. But there is something wildly unique and outrageously profound about the God that Christians believe in and worship; something about His nature that is found in no other religion. It is the belief that God is One God in Three distinct Persons. This belief in a Triune God sets the Christian Faith apart from all other religions. Christians are monotheists; that is, they believe in One God. They do not believe in three gods, but in One, Living and True God. And yet, Christians believe this God has revealed Himself to to be Three distinct Persons; the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. Mind-blowing? Yes. Beyond our comprehension? Yes. An optional or dispensable belief for the Christian? No.

In an effort to articulate the boundaries within which the Holy Trinity can be described, and beyond which the Christian ought not venture, Christians refer to the following formula. The Father is God. The Son is God. And the Holy Spirit is God. Yet, the Father is not the Son. The Son is not the Holy Spirit. And the Holy Spirit is not the Father. These Three Persons are One, sharing the very same nature as God: They are united in their Being. They co-operate with distinct and complimentary roles. We are all free to believe in the god or gods of our choosing. No one is obligated to believe in the Holy Trinity. But this is who Christians believe God was, and is, and ever shall be. Belief in the Most Holy Trinity completely revolutionizes the Christian understanding of human nature. Why? Because the Christian does not merely ponder the mystery of being made in the image of God, but the mystery of being made in the image of the Triune God.

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If you read the Genesis text carefully, you will notice that God refers to Himself in the first person plural, “Let us make man in our image.” Many a Rabbi has puzzled over this strange plural self-reference. The Christian merely rejoices! What a wonderful allusion to the Holy Trinity in the first book of the Hebrew Scriptures! Christians believe that God the Father is the Creator of heaven and earth. That it is through God the Son that all things are made. And God the Holy Spirit is the Lord and giver of life. All creation comes into being not just through God, but through the Triune God. Christians see this mystery revealed in Genesis. God the Father speaks. The Word that the Father speaks is none other than His Son, the Word of God. The breath of God the Father which carries the Word of God is the Holy Spirit. God the Holy Spirit proceeds from the Father and animates the Word spoken. In the simple action of speaking creation 6

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into being, the Most Holy Trinity is revealed.

nature, so do men and women share the very same human nature.

How is it then, that the image of this Triune God is imprinted in human beings? Here again, the answers are rich and varied, wonderfully complex and beautiful.

And yet, men and women are distinct in their identity as male and female. So in the same way that the Father is not the Son, the Son is not the Holy Spirit, and the Holy Spirit is not the Father, so to is the male not female, and the female not a male. Created in the image of the Holy Trinity, male and female were designed to co-operate with distinct and complimentary roles.

A Unified Community The Most Holy Trinity by nature is a unified community of affection and love. Created in the image of the Triune God, human beings were not created to be isolated and alone, but to live in unified community with God and one another. This purpose is especially revealed in our nature as male and female. Notice the Scriptures do not say, “In the image of God He created them, human beings He created them,” but rather, “in the image of God He created them, male and female He created them.” There is something in our identity as male and female that reflects the Holy Trinity in human nature. The Holy Trinity is the interpretive key by which we can not only understand, but embrace and celebrate, the uniqueness of our identities as male and female. The Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit all share the very same nature as One God. To say the Three Persons of the Trinity are equal would be a radical understatement, they are unified in their very nature as One and the Same God. They literally share the same being! So it is for the male and female. Just as the Father is God, the Son is God, and the Holy Spirit is God. So it is that the male is human and the female is human. To say that males and females are equal in their humanity is a radical understatement. Just as the Holy Trinity shares the very same divine

Toward an Alternative Lifestyle In our secular age, few people see human beings as created in the image of God. Fewer still believe humans are created in the image of a Triune God. Because our worldview affects how we understand ourselves, it is not surprising that there are so many competing views regarding the value and purpose of human beings. This is increasingly the case as it regards our identity as male and female.

or lesser than the other when they share the same substance as God? So it is with men and women. We share the same substance as human beings. We literally share the same nature. Because Christians believe we are made in the image of the Triune God then, the difference between men and women is not a cause for anxiety or competition, but rather for marveling, rejoicing, and celebrating!

Cover Photo: Michelangelo’s fresco Creation of Adam on the Sistine Chapel ceiling, 1508–1512; via Wikimedia Commons. Photo Current Page: Holy Trinity Shield in stained glass at Saint Brigid Church (Dublin, OH); taken by Nheyob via Wikimedia Commons.

For the Christian, the belief that human beings are created in the image of a Triune God offers freedom, foundation, and clarity for how we understand our difference as male and female. Christians celebrate the one and equal glory of the Holy Trinity, whose distinct Persons cooperate beautifully out of love for each other and the whole of creation. The Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit have very different roles and responsibilities. For the Christian, the inherit difference between men and women is a reflection of the different Persons of the Holy Trinity. These differences are not to be compared in terms of cosmic worth or moral value; as if the Father has more value than the Son, or the Son than the Spirit. How could one be somehow greater ST. M I C H A E L ’ S BY-T H E - S E A

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ST. M IC HAE L’S BY-T H E- SEA MARCH 1 2 2 3 4 7 8 9 9 9 10 11 13 13 13

CHOIR REHEARSAL 7:00 - 9:00 pm / Church

BIBLE 101 10:15 - 11:45 am / Parish Library

STATIONS OF THE CROSS 5:30 - 6:00 pm / Church

CONFESSIONS 4:00 - 5:00 pm / Chapel

HEALING PRAYER SESSIONS After Mass - 9:00 & 11:00 am / Chapel

CATECHUMENATE COURSE 6:30 - 8:30 pm / Parish Library

CHOIR REHEARSAL

CHOIR REHEARSAL 7:00 - 9:00 pm / Church

BIBLE 101 10:15 - 11:45 am / Parish Library

STATIONS OF THE CROSS 5:30 - 6:00 pm / Church

PARISH LENTEN QUIET DAY 8:45 am - 12:00 pm / Parish Hall

CONFESSIONS

BIBLE 101 10:15 - 11:45 am / Parish Library

STATIONS OF THE CROSS 5:30 - 6:00 pm / Church

FR. KRAFT’S FILM FORUM 6:00 - 10:00 pm / Parish Hall

CONFESSIONS 4:00 - 5:00 pm / Chapel

EASTER LILY SALE 8:45 - 11:30 am / Gazebo

DOK BUSINESS MEETING 6:30 - 7:00 pm / Saint John Room

WOMEN’S BIBLE STUDY 7:00 - 8:30 pm / Saint John Room

MEN’S BIBLE STUDY & FELLOWSHIP MEETING CATECHUMENATE COURSE 6:30 - 8:30 pm / Parish Library

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MAUNDY THURSDAY 8:30 am & 6:00 pm / Church

WATCH AT THE ALTAR OF REPOSE 7:30 pm - 12:00 pm / Chapel

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GOOD FRIDAY 12:00 pm & 6:00 pm / Church

EASTER VIGIL 7:30 pm / Church

4:00 - 5:00 pm / Chapel

EASTER LILY SALE

APRIL

8:45 - 11:30 am / Gazebo

HEALING PRAYER SESSIONS After Mass - 9:00 & 11:00 am / Chapel

PALM CROSS MAKING PARTY 9:15 - 10:00 am / Parish Hall

7:00 - 9:00 pm / Church

7:00 - 8:30 pm / Saint Mark Room

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VESTRY MEETING 6:30 - 8:30 pm / Parish Library

CHOIR REHEARSAL 7:00 - 9:00 pm / Church

BIBLE 101 10:15 - 11:45 am / Parish Library

STATIONS OF THE CROSS 5:30 - 6:00 pm / Church

CONFESSIONS 4:00 - 5:00 pm / Chapel

PALM SUNDAY VIGIL 5:30 - 6:30 pm / Chapel

PALM SUNDAY 8:00 am & 10:00 am / Church

EASTER LILY PICK-UP 8:45 - 11:30 am / Gazebo

YOUTH SUNDAY

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7:00 - 8:30 pm / Saint Mark Room

8:00 am & 10:00 am / Church

HEALING PRAYER SESSIONS After Mass - 9:00 & 11:00 am / Chapel

EASTER EGG HUNT 9:30 - 10:00 am / Parish Campus

CATECHUMENATE 6:30 - 8:30 pm / Parish Library

CHOIR REHEARSAL 7:00 - 9:00 pm / Church

BIBLE 101 10:15 - 11:45 am / Parish Library

FLOWERING OF THE CROSS 9:15 - 10:00 am / Rose Garden

DOK BUSINESS MEETING 6:30 - 7:00 pm / Saint John Room

WOMEN’S BIBLE STUDY 7:00 - 8:30 pm / Saint John Room

MEN’S BIBLE STUDY & FELLOWSHIP MEETING 7:00 - 8:30 pm / Saint Mark Room

10:00 - 11:00 am / Church

MEN’S BIBLE STUDY & FELLOWSHIP MEETING

EASTER

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CATECHUMENATE 6:30 - 8:30 pm / Parish Library


S PR I N G EV EN TS CALE N DAR 12 13 15 18 19 20 21 22 22 24

CHOIR REHEARSAL BIBLE 101 10:15 - 11:45 am / Parish Library

HEALING PRAYER SESSIONS After Mass - 9:00 & 11:00 am / Chapel

VESTRY MEETING 6:30 - 8:30 pm / Parish Library

CHOIR REHEARSAL 7:00 - 9:00 pm / Church

BIBLE 101 10:15 - 11:45 am / Parish Library

VIDA JOVEN TRIP All Day Event / Vida Joven de México

YOUTH SUNDAY 10:00 - 11:00 am / Church

EARTH DAY PICNIC 11:30 am - 2:00 pm / Parish Green

MEN’S BIBLE STUDY & FELLOWSHIP MEETING 7:00 - 8:30 pm / Saint Mark Room

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MAY

7:00 - 9:00 pm / Church

CATECHUMENATE 6:30 - 8:30 pm / Parish Library

2 2 3 4 6 6 6 8 8 8

BIBLE 101 10:15 - 11:45 am / Parish Library

BROTHERHOOD EXPEDITION 9:15 am - 1:00 pm / Camp Pendleton

FHC CLASSES 9:15 -9:45 am / Parish Library

5:00 - 7:00 pm / Parish Hall

CATECHUMENATE 6:30 - 8:30 pm / Parish Library

CHOIR REHEARSAL 7:00 - 9:00 pm / Church

BIBLE 101 CARLSBAD STREET FAIRE All Day Event / Carlsbad Village

HEALING PRAYER SESSIONS After Mass - 9:00 & 11:00 am / Chapel

FHC CLASSES 9:15 -9:45 am / Parish Library

DOK BUSINESS MEETING 6:30 - 7:00 pm / Saint John Room

WOMEN’S BIBLE STUDY 7:00 - 8:30 pm / Saint John Room

MEN’S BIBLE STUDY & FELLOWSHIP MEETING

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CATECHUMENATE 6:30 - 8:30 pm / Parish Library

CHOIR REHEARSAL

BIBLE 101 10:15 - 11:45 am / Parish Library

PENTECOST PARTY 9:15 - 10:00 am / Parish Hall

FHC CLASSES 9:15 -9:45 am / Parish Library

HEALING PRAYER SESSIONS After Mass - 9:00 & 11:00 am / Chapel

MEN’S BIBLE STUDY & FELLOWSHIP MEETING 7:00 - 8:30 pm / Saint Mark Room

10:15 - 11:45 am / Parish Library

7:00 - 8:30 pm / Saint Mark Room

CHOIR REHEARSAL 7:00 - 9:00 pm / Church

H2O LABELS/PIZZA PARTY

18 20 20 20 22 23 24 25 26 27 27 30 31

CATECHUMENATE 6:30 - 8:30 pm / Parish Library

CHOIR REHEARSAL 7:00 - 9:00 pm / Church

BIBLE 101 10:15 - 11:45 am / Parish Library

FHC RETREAT 9:00 am - 3:00 pm / Saint John Room

FIRST HOLY COMMUNION 10:00 - 11:00 am / Church

YOUTH SUNDAY 10:00 - 11:00 am / Church

CATECHUMENATE 6:30 - 8:30 pm / Parish Library

CHOIR REHEARSAL 7:00 - 9:00 pm / Church

7:00 - 9:00 pm / Church

BIBLE 101 10:15 - 11:45 am / Parish Library

FHC CLASSES 9:15 -10:00 am / Parish Library

VESTRY MEETING 6:30 - 8:30 pm / Parish Library

CHOIR REHEARSAL 7:00 - 9:00 pm / Church

Schedule is subject to change. For current listings visit stmbts.org or contact the Parish Office at 760-729-8901.


SENIOR WARDEN’S REPORT TONY VANARIA

In keeping with the theme of “Ancient Faith” for the Spring Messenger, I would like to relate to you what St. Michael’s means to my family and me as our spiritual home as well as reflect on the season upon us. My family and I have been parishioners at St. Michael’s since we moved to Carlsbad in July 1993. Immediately upon attending Mass here for the very first time, we were struck by the orthodox practice of our faith that St. Michael’s offered. Unlike other churches we tried, where Linda and I commented that “it is all about feeling good,” we came away from St. Michael’s “feeling good,” but for a very different reason.

The orthodox practice of faith at St. Michael’s made us then, and continues to make us today, “feel good,” because we focus on the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, in a manner in which we are tied to the practices of early Christianity. These practices and sacraments form the core of our faith heritage, and through them we are linked directly to the earliest disciples of our Lord. Although Our Lord’s Passion happened 2,000+ years ago, St. Michael’s observes Lent, Holy Week, and Easter as if these events are unfolding in real time. I am convinced that Our Lord’s death and resurrection feels near to me by virtue of our ties to the ancient church and the verity of our orthodox beliefs. I am sure that many of you share, or will soon share, in these same thoughts!

Photo: Ash Wednesday in the Church, taken by parishioner Anthony Parisi.

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HOME NEW TO ST. MICHAEL’S? INTERESTED IN BECOMING A MEMBER? Exploring the Sacraments of BAPTISM, MARRIAGE, or FIRST HOLY COMMUNION?

LET’S TALK ABOUT IT! stmbts.org/membership

DEATHS

WEDDINGS

CLIFF LEIGHTON

BRENT STORRS & NAIENA KAMARUDIN

AUGUST 2, 1929 – DECEMBER 14, 2017

JOE HUNTER

SEPTEMBER 16, 2017

DECEMBER 31, 1927 – DECEMBER 31, 2017

JAMES DEAN MITROFF & DIANE ELIZABETH DEKKER

GRACE ANN GARTLAND MARCH 1, 1930 – JANUARY 21, 2018

JAMES “RIP” HARPER MAY 1, 1917 – FEBRUARY 14, 2018

BAPTISMS GEORGE ELIOT MARTIN JANUARY 7, 2018

NOVEMBER 18, 2017

HEIDI ANN CRAMER & RICHARD WILLIAM LANG III JANUARY 6, 2018

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ANCIENT ANGLICANISM BEN CONARROE

The common understanding of when Anglicanism began is when Henry VIII sought a divorce from his first wife, Catherine of Aragon, and Pope Clement VII would not give his consent. It is true that this disagreement resulted in the forming of the Church of England, with Henry as her head. But in reality, Christianity came to England very early in Church history (44 AD). England was the first country to nationalize Christianity. The first church built above ground was at Glastonbury, England (now famous for a modern music festival similar to our Carlsbad Music Festival, but on a much larger scale). It is believed that St. Joseph of Arimathea, who owned the tomb where our Lord’s body was placed, was the missionary founder of the Church in England. One of our stained glass windows in the church portrays Joseph. When Joseph brought Christianity to Glastonbury, none of the New Testament had been written. The earliest book written in our New Testament is assumed to be the letter of James, written around 50 AD. Such an early missionary—evidently with personal contact with our Lord before His crucifixion—would have brought a simple but clear presentation of the Gospel. This was the very end of the Iron Age, and the tribes living in the area had Celtic culture and language. Imagine yourself a resident of Glastonbury in the fifth decade of the first century. Here arrives a Jewish missionary, most likely accompanied by Roman soldiers (Rome would invade the area in 47 AD and remain in control until 409 AD). You have never heard of Judaism, let alone a Messiah who promised salvation. You have never heard of God the Creator. The Celts, like the Greeks and Romans, had a pantheon of gods—one for every occasion. The Celtic religious leaders were known as the Druids, but little else is known

about them. Evangelizing the Celtic people would have been a lot like evangelizing the Romans and the Greeks. Think of St. Paul’s speech on Mars Hill in Athens, where he talks about their monument “to the unknown God”: What therefore you worship as unknown, this I proclaim to you. The God who made the world and everything in it, being Lord of heaven and earth, does not live in shrines made by man, nor is he served by human hands, as though he needed anything, since he himself gives to all men life and breath and everything. Acts 17:23b-25 Perhaps our brother Joseph of Arimathea stood on Glastonbury Tor, which rises above the surrounding Somerset Levels, preaching a similar message. In Athens, “Some mocked; but others said, ‘We will hear you again about this.’ But some men joined him and believed, among them Dionysius the Areopagite and a woman named Damaris and others with them” (Acts 17:32b, 34). How might you have responded? There are ancient ruins at Glastonbury supporting its rich spiritual history. An Abbey was founded by the Britons there in the 7th Century, and the earliest timber church, dedicated to our patron St. Michael, was built in the 11th or 12th Century. The church was built atop Glastonbury Tor. All but its tower was destroyed in 1539 when English Monasteries were dissolved by Henry VIII in order to appropriate their income and assets. The last Abbot, Richard Whiting, was executed atop the Tor that year as a traitor. As offensive as this sounds to our modern ears, Henry’s break with Rome was not theological. It was ecclesiastical. He believed the teachings of the Church and wanted “nothing new” in the life of the local parishes.

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One could argue that Henry’s Christianity was more like those who mocked St. Paul on Mars Hill than it was like Dionysius and Damaris. Hindsight reveals that Henry began something which inspired revival of the ancient faith brought to Glastonbury by St. Joseph, leading to conversions in the Americas, Africa, India, and Asia. As “the sun never set on the British Empire,” the Brits had brought the ancient faith with them, just as Joseph of Arimathea had. That same ancient faith continues to be believed and celebrated every day at St. Michael’s by-the-Sea!

Cover Photo: St. Michael’s Tower on Glastonbury Tor, taken by Rodw via Wikimedia Commons. Photo Current Page: Stained glass window of Joseph of Arimathea, located on the north wall of St. Michael's church.

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PALM SUNDAY 8:00 am

&

10:00 am

Maundy ThursDAY 8:30 am

6:00 pm

&

good friday

12:00 pm

&

6:00 pm

easter vigil 7:30 pm

easter day

8:00 am

&

10:00 am


ST. MICHAEL’S BY-THE-SEA

C H I L D R E N ’ S M I N I S T RY

Dwe ll i n g i n Hi s L ove . S e r v i n g i n Hi s C hu rc h .

KIDMIN SPRING SCHEDULE 3/11 3/18 9:15 am 3/25 10:00 am

Easter Lily Sale (3 consecutive Sundays) Palm Cross Making Party * Youth Sunday

4/01 9:30 am 4/08 9:15 am 4/15 9:15 am 4/22 10:00 am

Easter Egg Hunt Flowering of the Cross First Holy Communion Classes Begin (6 consecutive Sundays) Youth Sunday

5/20 9:15 am 5/26 9 am - 3 pm 5/27 10:00 am 10:00 am

Pentecost Party * First Holy Communion Retreat First Holy Communion Youth Sunday

* Denotes Intergenerational Christian Formation in Parish Hall. Intentional togetherness in mutual sharing, serving, and learning!

VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL

JUNE 19TH - 23RD / 9

AM - 12 PM REGISTRATION OPENS EASTER


COMMUNITY EASTER EGG HUNT Sunday, April 1st 9:30am ALL ARE WELCOME! stmbts.com/eggseaster


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HERITAGE BECKY GLEASON

My dad’s family has a book that chronicles our family history from the 1600s. It is pretty amazing to look through, seeing the names of people who lived hundreds of years ago. I love looking through this book and realizing that I am somehow connected to each person represented―to thousands of people! This is my family; it is my heritage. There is something special about knowing where you come from. It helps us understand ourselves somehow or see how we fit into the bigger picture.The same is true of our faith life. We don’t live in isolation: we came from somewhere and we belong to something. At St. Michael’s, we often refer to our “church family.” That can be taken to mean that the church is like an extended family, or a type of support system. But adoption into the church is bigger than that. God is our Father, we are his sons and daughters, which in turn makes us all brothers and sisters. These relationships provide support as we navigate our faith journeys, and they remind us that we belong to something bigger than ourselves. We are members of one giant Christian family. And if we have a family, we have ancestors. This is what it means to belong to an ancient faith. In the Bible, we have a transcendent genealogy book. Here, we see how our ancestors in the faith waited on God to answer prayers. The Israelites endured slavery. Mary Magdalene received healing. Stephen became the first martyr. Time and time again, we see our people triumph over evil and stand for the faith. This is our heritage! However, just like any family system, it is not all positive and uplifting. Our ancestors did not always live up to their calling as followers of God. Cain murdered his own brother. Jacob tricked his father into giving him his

brother Esau’s birthright. King David took Bathsheba for himself and had her husband killed. Even the heroes of the Bible had their issues. And this, too, is our heritage. For better or worse, broken people have always been a part of our heritage. In a way, it can be a great comfort to see how God continued to work through His people, even when they did not quite measure up – because we know that we don’t measure up either. God reveals His redemption through our lineage of brokenness. Our faith tradition remembers and celebrates many stories of faith. We learn about the Church Fathers – those who lived just after Jesus. We learn about the saints who came before us, some long ago and others in this present generation. We celebrate our brothers and sisters who are living out their faith all over the world. If we pay close attention, we can glimpse the interconnectedness. Our heritage does not end in the Bible’s final verses. It continues even now! It is a blessing to be a part of this eternal family, and it is a blessing to teach the next generation about it. For children and adults alike, the knowledge of where we come from blesses us with a deep unshakeable identity in the faith we see demonstrated in the Bible and throughout the ages. Let us bring this into the present by sharing in the living narrative of God today. May we find strength and comfort in the ancient faith that runs through our veins!

Photo: Hortus Deliciarum, Der Stammbaum Christi (Tree of Jesse illustration) by Herrad of Landsberg, circa 1180; via Wikimedia Commons

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SUPPORT THE CHILDREN’S MINISTRY $12 FOR A 6” POT

Purchase Online STMBTS.COM/EASTERLILYSALE PICK-UP MARCH 25TH


Lenten

QUIET

DAY Saturday, March 17th 8:45 am - 12:00 pm A Quiet Day is a retreat designed with periods of teaching and prayerful reflection. At this All Parish Quiet Day, facilitator Becky Gleason will share thoughts on Prayer, Service, andEvangelism. A special St. Patty’s breakfast will be served!

RSVP to reserve a seat stmbts.com/lent-qd This event is sponsored by the St. Michael’s Daughters of the King Chapter.


ORTHODOXY RUSS HOLLINGSWORTH

There are thousands upon thousands of books that could fill libraries about orthodoxy. But what do we think of when we hear the term orthodox? Men with big beard bigs and black hats? (no I wasn’t thinking of Father Doran or Father Kraft). The word orthodox for this discussion, refers to the doctrines set down through creeds that were believed by the Christians of the first centuries of the church. Both the Western and Eastern churches considered themselves orthodox (lowercase ‘o’), and catholic (lowercase ‘c’), until the schism of 1054. The Western Church assumed the Catholic label (uppercase ‘C’), and the Eastern Church the Orthodox label (uppercase ‘O’). In this article we will be talking about orthodox, lowercase ‘o’. Orthodoxy comes from the Greek word orthodoxia, which could be translated as “right or correct opinion”. In this circumstance, it means believing and professing the accepted creeds of the early Christian church. The first of these creeds is the Apostles’ Creed. It is called the Apostles’ Creed not because it was necessarily produced by the apostles themselves, (although some traditions believe each of the twelve contributed their part), but because it contains a brief summary of their teachings. Most importantly, it is firmly Trinitarian in its structure, affirming belief in God the Father, His Son Jesus the Christ, and the Holy Spirit. It sets forth the Apostles’ doctrine, “In sublime simplicity, in unsurpassable brevity, in beautiful order, and with liturgical solemnity”. I believe in God, the Father almighty, maker of heaven and earth. And in Jesus Christ, his only Son, our Lord;

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who was conceived by the Holy Ghost, born of the Virgin Mary, suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, dead, and buried. He descended to hell. The third day he rose again from the dead. He ascended into heaven, and sitteth on the right hand of God the Father almighty. From thence he shall come to judge the quick and the dead. I believe in the Holy Ghost, the holy catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen. - Book of Common Prayer Then heresies started popping up like whack-a-moles, so in response and to further explain orthodox doctrine, the church fathers introduced the Nicene Creed, which was an attempt to address the Arian heresy. Arius, a priest in Baucalis in Alexandria, Egypt in the 3rd century, taught that there was a time when only God the Father existed, before God the Son, and emphasized the Father’s divinity over the Son. The Nicene Creed was created to counter the adoption of this swiftly spreading heresy in order to clarify the key tenets of the Christian faith. It was during the Second Ecumenical Council held in Constantinople in 381AD that the original Nicene Creed of 325 AD was modified to the form we use today. It is the only authoritative ecumenical statement of the Christian faith accepted by Anglicans, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Roman Catholic,

and the majority of Protestant denominations. The Nicene Creed of 325 AD explicitly affirmed the co-essential divinity of the Son and applies to him the term consubstantial. The version from the Second Ecumenical Council in 381 AD goes further to show that the Holy Spirit is worshipped and glorified with the Father and the Son. I believe in one God, the Father Almighty, maker of heaven and earth, and of all things visible and invisible; And in one Lord Jesus Christ, the only-begotten Son of God, begotten of his Father before all worlds, God of God, Light of Light, very God of very God, begotten, not made, being of one substance with the Father, by whom all things were made; who for us men, and for our salvation came down from heaven, and was incarnate by the Holy Ghost of the Virgin Mary, and was made man; and was crucified also for us under Pontius Pilate; he suffered and was buried; and the third day he rose again according to the Scriptures, and ascended into heaven, and sitteth on the right hand of the Father; and he shall come again, with glory, to judge both the quick and the dead; whose kingdom shall have no end. And I believe in the Holy Ghost the Lord and Giver of Life, who proceedeth from the Father; who with the Father and the Son together is worshipped and glorified; who spake by the Prophets. And I believe one holy Catholic and Apostolic Church; ST. M I C H A E L ’ S BY-T H E - S E A

I acknowledge one Baptism for the remission of sins; and I look for the resurrection of the dead, and the life of the world to come. Amen. - Book of Common Prayer Unfortunately the Arians just wouldn’t quit, so a clear need for a confession against Arianism arose in western Europe, especially when the Ostrogoths and Visigoths, who professed Arian beliefs, invaded Europe at the beginning of the fifth century. So once again the church fathers gathered, issuing forth the Athanasian Creed. The Athanasian Creed reflects the teaching of the First Council of Ephesus in 431 AD, and the Council of Chalcedon in 451 AD. This creed is attributed to Athanasius, the fourth century bishop of Alexandria who was the strongest defender of the doctrines of the Trinity and the divinity of Christ. This creed has been used by Christian churches since the sixth century and is the first creed in which the equality of the three persons of the Trinity is explicitly and concisely stated. Whosoever will be saved, before all things it is necessary that he hold the Catholic Faith. Which Faith except everyone do keep whole and undefiled, without doubt he shall perish everlastingly. And the Catholic Faith is this: That we worship one God in Trinity, and Trinity in Unity, neither confounding the Persons, nor dividing the Substance. For there is one Person of the Father, another of the Son, and another of the Holy Ghost. But the Godhead of the Father, of the Son, and of the

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Holy Ghost, is all one, the Glory equal, the Majesty co-eternal. Such as the Father is, such is the Son, and such is the Holy Ghost. The Father uncreated, the Son uncreated, and the Holy Ghost uncreate. The Father incomprehensible, the Son incomprehensible, and the Holy Ghost incomprehensible. The Father eternal, the Son eternal, and the Holy Ghost eternal. And yet they are not three eternals, but one eternal. As also there are not three incomprehensibles, nor three uncreated, but one uncreated, and one incomprehensible. So likewise the Father is Almighty, the Son Almighty, and the Holy Ghost Almighty. And yet they are not three Almighties, but one Almighty. So the Father is God, the Son is God, and the Holy Ghost is God. And yet they are not three Gods, but one God. So likewise the Father is Lord, the Son Lord, and the Holy Ghost Lord. And yet not three Lords, but one Lord. For as we are compelled by the Christian verity to acknowledge each Person by himself to be both God and Lord, so we are also forbidden by the Catholic Religion to say that there are three Gods or three Lords. The Father is made of none, neither created, nor begotten. The Son is of the Father alone, not made, nor created, but begotten. The Holy Ghost is of the Father and of the Son, neither made, nor created, nor begotten, but proceeding.

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So there is one Father, not three Fathers; one Son, not three Sons; one Holy Ghost, not three Holy Ghosts. And in the Trinity none is before or after another; none is greater or less than another, but all three Persons are co-eternal together and co-equal. So that in all things, as is aforesaid, the Unity in Trinity and the Trinity in Unity is to be worshipped. He therefore that will be saved must think thus of the Trinity. Furthermore, it is necessary to everlasting salvation that he also believe rightly the Incarnation of our Lord Jesus Christ. For the right Faith is, that we believe and confess, that our Lord Jesus Christ, the Son of God, is God and Man; God, of the Substance of the Father, begotten before the worlds; and Man of the Substance of his Mother, born in the world; Perfect God and perfect Man, of a rational soul and human flesh subsisting. Equal to the Father, as touching his Godhead; and inferior to the Father, as touching His Manhood; Who, although He is God and Man, yet he is not two, but one Christ; One, not by conversion of the Godhead into flesh but by taking of the Manhood into God; One altogether; not by confusion of Substance, but by unity of Person. For as the rational soul and flesh is one man, so God and Man is one Christ; who suffered for our salvation, descended into hell, rose again the third day from the dead. He ascended into heaven, he sitteth on the right hand of the Father, God Almighty, from whence he shall come to judge the quick and the dead.

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At whose coming all men shall rise again with their bodies and shall give account for their own works. And they that have done good shall go into life everlasting; and they that have done evil into everlasting fire. This is the Catholic Faith, which except a man believe faithfully, he cannot be saved. - Book of Common Prayer So, orthodoxy (lowercase ‘o’) is defined as believing and professing the accepted creeds of the early Christian church as outlined above, or as the right or correct opinion of the ancient church. Come to think of it, maybe we are talking about Father Doran and Father Kraft, after all!

Photo: Detail of a door at Saint Archangel Michael Orthodox Church in Altea, Spain; taken by Joanbanjo via Wikimedia Commons.


Palm Cross Making Party Sunday, March 18th 9:15 - 10:00 am Parish Hall Intergenerational event in preparation for Palm Sunday! Be part of this inspiring St. Michael’s tradition. No experience is necessary. All ages are welcome!


HAPPY BIRTHDAY MARCH Barbara Klett Sally Vigil Sheila Miller Janette Larson Jacob Spence Madeleine Tober Lisse White-Hunter Bob Kosse Mary Cooper Charlotte Larson Gregory Fahey Mary Mills Jane Gerhardt Anika Larson Natalie Schmutzer Robert Salter Donna Reihs Adam Belt Jennifer Linley Bud DeMaris Tim Brookhart

MAY

APRIL 1 2 2 6 6 7 8 8 16 16 17 17 18 19 19 22 24 26 29 31 31

Shelia Calleia James Curran Meghan Young Matthew Mahaffey Chris Smith Len Smith Cheryl McKean Karl Pieper Luca Cuscino Valerie Cumming Kyle Martin Gerald Jones Max Jara Eva Kear Eden Stambaugh Ginny Quarfoot Jon Jameson Craig Klampe Lynn Behymer Bob Eikel Arthur McLean Russell Hollingsworth Diana Bennett Barbara Jensen Mike Baxter Anthony Parisi Bukkie Ogunnaike Jim Stambaugh Ben Conarroe Curt Cuscino Phllyis Zeigler Hank Blacic Olivia Cuscino April Vanaria Chris Craig-Jones Gordon Klett Jane Craig-Jones Nolan Harr Pat Jefferys

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Carl Miller Joanna Bravender Josephine Huckabay Franki Giles Chuck Grabowsky Brian Reihs Carolyn Rodosta Jennifer Lucas Ben Quarfoot Lillian Eppes Dennis Huckabay Jack Brockmeier Erica Martin Val Forster Phil Gilbert Elizabeth Young Richard Stinson Carla Evenden Karen Louvier Sydnie Leigh John Hutton Alison Groves

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CLERGY

MINISTRY STAFF

ADMIN STAFF

OFFICE HOURS

RECTOR

ORGANIST/CHOIRMASTER

PARISH ADMINISTRATOR

TUESDAY - FRIDAY

The Rev. Doran Stambaugh, SSC frdoran@stmbts.org

Richard Lane dick@stmbts.org

Linda Mumford linda@stmbts.org

9:00 - 2:00 pm

ASSOCIATE PRIEST

CHILDREN’S MINISTER

PARISH RECORDS

The Rev. H. Ivor Kraft frkraft@stmbts.org

Becky Gleason becky@stmbts.org

Ginny Unanue ginny@stmbts.org

PASTORAL EMERGENCIES

ASSISTANT FOR PASTORAL CARE

SOUL YOUTH MINISTER

COMMUNICATIONS COORDINATOR

Dial 760.729.8901

Chris Craig-Jones chris@stmbts.org

Adeline McKinley adeline@stmbts.org

Megan Stanton megan@stmbts.org


Sunday, April 22nd 11:30 am - 2:00 pm Celebrate Earth Day with neighbors from Carlsbad By The Sea. Enjoy entertainment, a catered lunch, and activities for all ages!

RSVP to reserve a seat stmbts.com/earthday


K

RAFT’S CORNER

FAITH DELIVERED TO THE SAINTS FR. IVOR KRAFT

During the past thirteen years I’ve served as a full-time staff member, part-time staff member, and retired associate priest. However, my coveted title has been “Priest Not In Charge”. In fact, I now like to think of myself as “Priest Not In Charge Emeritus”. But regardless of title or status, I’ve been blessed beyond words during the past thirteen years in my ministry among you. I have the joy of offering the Eucharistic sacrifice, preaching and teaching, consoling the troubled, absolving the penitent, and enjoying the fellowship of our wonderful parish community without ever having to worry about the budget, a leaking roof, or malfunctioning restrooms. No “buck” stops with me. Praise God! And along with all of this, Dorothy and I have found kindness, warmth, hospitality, generosity, and the priceless gift of friendship. We’ve found a spiritual family and a home at St. Michael’s and it is joy for us. We came to St. Michael’s and remain at St. Michael’s because it is a place where the “faith which was once and for all delivered to the saints” is celebrated and lived (Jude 1:3). We know that we will not be subjected to heresy proclaimed from the pulpit or affirmed in any other venue. We will not be told that the eternal order of God given by Christ, nor the moral truths declared by the Lord God, are no longer valid and can be ignored or mocked because the church and the world have “moved on”. In short, St. Michael’s is a place where the ancient and eternal faith of Christ and the Apostles is preached, taught, and celebrated. It is a place where Mass is celebrated with reverence and solemnity, and the Bible is understood to be the inspired written word of God―through which the incarnate Word of God, Jesus, speaks to us yesterday, today and forever. It is a place where the Creeds are understood to proclaim the identity of the Triune God (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit), apart from whom there is no Other, and are recognized as the means by which we profess our faith in Him alone. We love St. Michael’s because Jesus Christ―the Head and most important member of the Church―is present, and that whatever unity St. Michael’s possesses is found in, with, and through him. When I arrive at St. Michael’s, I always hope and pray I’ll see you so that we can enter into the joy of the Lord together. There’s nothing on earth like it. Photo: Fr. Kraft and Fr. Doran during Holy Cross Mass; taken by Salt Light Avo Photography. 28

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FIRST HOLY COMMUNION Children 2nd grade and older invited to participate!

Preparation Classes Parish Library 9:15 - 9:45 am 5 Consecutive Sundays: 4/15, 4/22, 4/29, 5/6, 5/13, 5/20

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Communion Retreat Saint John Room 9:00 am - 3:00 pm Saturday, May 26th

First Holy Communion Church 10:00 am (Reception to follow) Sunday, May 27th

Register at stmbts.com/stm-fhc ST. M I C H A E L ’ S BY-T H E - S E A

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Flowering of the Cross Sunday, April 8th 9:15 - 10:15 am Parish Hall

Return Lenten “Mite Can” off erings for Vida Joven. Children will adorn a living cross during Christian Formation at 9:15 am. At the 10:00 am Mass, offerings will be blessed at the front of the flowered cross.


CARLSBAD STREET FAIRE Interested in a local outreach opportunity? Distribute complimentary water bottles, courtesy of St. Michael’s, at the Carlsbad Village Faire!

Sunday, May 6th

Sign up for a shift or donate water! stmbts.org/events/faire

Wednesday, May 2nd 5:00 - 8:00 pm / parish hall

Help the Brotherhood of St. Andrew and Daughters of the King label water bottles for the Carlsbad Village Faire! At 7:00 pm the volunteer group will enjoy a pizza party! RSVP at stmbts.com/labelparty


ST. MICHAEL’S BY-THE-SEA EPISCOPAL CHURCH 2775 Carlsbad Blvd., Carlsbad, CA 92008 760.729.8901 www.stmbts.org

info@stmbts.org

Nonprofit U.S. Postage Paid PERMIT NO. 97 CARLSBAD, CA

RETURN SERVICE REQUESTED

Messenger - Spring 2018  
Messenger - Spring 2018  
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