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St Mary’s

Messenger for Stoke Bishop

Beyond 150 pages 7-10

Spring 09

Easter Services

Warden of Wills

page 13

page 15

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Helping Hand Pre-School St Mary’s Play Group and Nursery Class Parish Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . 968 7449 Village Hall Play Group Mrs H Cato . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 968 2180 Westbury-on-Trym Baptist Church Pre-School Church Office . . . . . . . . . . . . 962 9990 Trinity College Day Nursery Helen O’Neill . . . . . . . . . . . . . 968 4493

Primary Schools Stoke Bishop (Cedar Park) Head Teacher Mrs P Hepworth . . . . . . . . . . 377 2173 Elmlea Infant Head Teacher Mrs I Fey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 377 2352 Junior Head Teacher Miss C Galliers . . . . . . . . . . . 377 2266

Doctors Helios Medical Centre (Stoke Hill) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 962 6060 Sea Mills Surgery . . . . . . . . 968 1182 Sneyd Park Surgery . . . . . . . 968 3284 Westbury-on-Trym Primary Care Centre . . . . . . 962 3406

Libraries

Westbury-on-Trym . . . . . . . . . 903 8552 Sea Mills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 903 8555 Henleaze . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 903 8541 Central . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 903 7200 Mobile Library . . . . . . . . . . . 903 8531 Runs on Tuesdays Times Cedar Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.30pm Stoke Hill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.00pm Julian Road . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.35pm Sea Walls Road . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.10pm Arbutus Road . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.10pm Glenavon Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.55pm Roman Way . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.25pm

Cinemas

GP Care Pharmacy Druid Hill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 968 8530 Ideal Chemists Ltd Shirehampton Road . . . . . . . 968 1272 Lloyds Pharmacy Stoke Lane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 962 8986 Westbury-on-Trym . . . . . . . . . 950 5808 Buxton & Grant Pharmacy Blackboy Hill . . . . . . . . . . . . . 973 5025 North View Pharmacy . . . . . . 973 3140

Hospitals BRI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 923 0000 St Michael’s . . . . . . . . . . . . 921 5414 Children’s Hospital . . . . . . . 927 6998 Southmead . . . . . . . . . . . . . 950 5050 Frenchay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 970 1212 General Hospital . . . . . . . . . 926 5001 Spire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 973 2562 St Mary’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 987 2727

Police Central number for all police stations . . . 0845 456 7000 (do not ring local stations) Community Policeman . . . . . 945 4431 (Answerphone)

For Dentists, Opticians and other medical services consult www.nhs.uk

Sea Mills Post Office

160 Shirehampton Road . . . . . . 909 5237

Buses 41 via Parry’s Lane to Centre. 40/40A Links Broadmead to the Mall via village and Sneyd Park. Portway Park & Ride Service to Centre stops at Roman Way (No official parking)

www.firstcityline.co.uk For information about bus & coach travel in UK contact Traveline: 0870 608 2608 www.traveline.org.uk

Trains

Severn Beach Railway Temple Meads to Severn Beach via Sea Mills (No official parking)

Orpheus Henleaze . . . . 0845 166 2381 www.reeltime-cinemas.co.uk/bristol.php Vue Cribbs Causeway . . 08712 240 240 www.myvue.com

Bristol City Council www.bristol-city.gov.uk Switchboard . . . . . . . . . . . 922 2000 (inc. refuse, streets, litter etc)

Chemists

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Stephen Williams is MP for Bristol West. Tel 942 3494 E-mail: williamssr@parliament.uk

Emergency . . . . . . . . . . . . 922 2050 Stoke Bishop Councillors Peter Abraham . . . . . . . . . 922 2227 John Goulandris . . . . . . . . 922 2227

National Rail Enquiries . 08457 484950 www.nationalrail.co.uk

Airport

Bristol Airport . . . . . . . . 0870 121 2747 www.bristolairport.co.uk

Helping Hand

has been compiled by Keith Sheather. If you have changes, additions or updates to suggest please contact him on 968 2170 or e-mail: sheather@blueyonder.co.uk

Spreading the Net Usually in this spot we aim to give practical help, but this time we would like you to help us. Over the years many people have passed through St Mary’s and have fond memories of the Church and their time spent in Stoke Bishop. We are anxious to contact them and tell them about the Beyond 150 project. A special team, composed of David and Carol Speedyman and Jenny Baker. Jenny Baker and David and Carol Speedyman, has been set up and the three will be compiling a database of all who have had contact with St Mary’s in the past, whether they worshipped here, got married here or were baptised here. They need names and addresses, so if you are still in touch with past members or anyone who has lived in Stoke Bishop, please let them know. For example: it may be your children got married here and have moved away or you have longstanding friends whom you still write to. The team can be contacted through Beyond 150, St Mary’s Church Office, Mariners Drive, Stoke Bishop, Bristol BS9 1QJ (0117 968 7449).


Community Matters

Memoirs in the Service of Youth 1969-1989 By a retired member of St Mary’s congregation Continuing his exploits, having left the RAF, our writer retells his experiences from the summer of 1969. Towards the summer of 1969, Father Bill said he was going to remove my ‘other blinker’ and promptly sent me to Harlow in Essex. My place of work was the YMCA. It was a big mixed youth centre that catered for all sorts of young people; the skin heads, bovver boys, teddy boys, mods and rockers and of course the Hell’s Angels. Get among them We were open every night of the week. The Warden Leader was a diminutive charming young woman of about 25 – 30 ish. She gave me the same instruction that I had heard before – “Get among them”. The bovver boys’ favourite exercise was to smash their fists against the wall to see how many bones they could break and how much pain they could endure without any grimacing. After about a week of this self-inflicted torture, I had a phone call one day from the senior medical officer, informing me that if any more of my club members went to the hospital for such treatment his staff would refuse to treat them! Saturday night was Disco Night. The music was deafening, the lights were low and hundreds were packed into the hall. No one ever danced or pranced about. On my second Saturday there, Sandra the Warden said this was my chance to prove myself – she went off saying “See you on Monday”!

At home I was there for eight weeks. Fortunately my Aunt and Uncle lived in the old village of Harlow and so my rare off duty times were spent in their home. I knew both of my blinkers had been removed before I was awarded a diploma for youth work and youth counselling. I applied for three positions in Bristol and at the third, I was asked to leave the room while all 20 members of the committee decided my future. The County Youth Officer accompanied me outside and said to me, “They will be bloody mad if they don’t appoint you!” I was appointed and started work immediately. The members were on summer holidays so I only had the secretarial and cleaning staff to meet during the day. They all said the same thing, “You’re a bit old for this line of work aren’t you”? A year later I was promoted to be the District Youth Worker for South Gloucestershire. Reflections Reflecting upon all of this, I realized that I was very much guided and protected during this time by my Guardian Angel. In our next issue – more exploits from our writer including dramatic dealings with the Hell’s Angels.

Waiting for a signal Saturday Disco started and within 30 minutes there were several groups, all standing in their own territory, swinging clubs and bicycle chains, knives and choppers. They were obviously waiting for a signal of some kind. The adult voluntary workers (my helpers) scarpered very quickly. I was all alone! I rang the Police and asked if a ‘Bobby’ would look in at the Centre and I described the scene. 90 seconds later there were half a dozen Police vans outside. Dog handlers with ferocious looking, barking dogs, even police on horse back. The chief Policeman came up to me. “I only asked for a policeman to look in!” I said. He sneered at my remark and said “You’ve not been here very long in Harlow ‘ave yer”! He said: “Go and turn the noise off, put all the lights on and open up all the windows.” The dogs were sent in and in a very few minutes the place was empty except for the Chief of Police and myself. “Lock up and go home” he said. Shaking with fright, I went and got drunk! Angel friends The easiest group that I quickly made friends with were the Hell’s Angels. So well that whenever I walked around the town during the day I noticed that there were always two Angels within a hundred yards of me! The next time I saw “Slug” their President I questioned him about this. “Yes”, he said “we had a meeting last week and we agreed that you were alright – so the boys have set up your bodyguard and they won’t take no for an answer.” He went on: “You are a bit old to be walking around town by yourself.”

You 2 Deli Visit us at 1 Druid Hill Stoke Bishop, BRISTOL BS9 1EW

Telephone : 0117 968 8846

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Global Matters

A light in the dark By Sheila Brown Millions watch Bible Celebration

A political activist changes course

Dark media images of appalling violence in Gaza have been dominating the news as I write in January. This issue of the Messenger will be read as we head towards Easter. Many Christians will remember how there was darkness in the Holy Land for the last three hours of Jesus’ physical life on earth, and for the inhabitants of Gaza this is a very dark period. However, it is encouraging and surprising to learn that nearby in Egypt, on December 3rd 2008, 6000 people were present in St Mark’s Coptic Cathedral in Cairo to celebrate the 125th anniversary of the Bible Society’s work in that country. Those present included leaders in the Orthodox, Catholic and Protestant communities in Egypt, allowed to speak from a Coptic pulpit for the first time.

Living in the West Bank, Jack Sara had taken part from early youth in struggles (intifada) to protest about the hard lives of fellow Palestinians, and was repeatedly jailed. One day in prison he remembered a Christian neighbour who seemed to have inner peace. He got in touch and was visited by him and by a Pastor – both answered his questions. He then began to read the Bible, and as he learned about Jesus, who struggled against the authorities of his time, and received his message of living hope, Jack found the peace he sought and realised he could help his people in other non-political ways. Real Peace He joined a Church on his release and continued studying the Bible. Now aged 24, he teaches part-time at Bethlehem Bible College, and as an assistant Pastor helps others to know more of Jesus’ love and reality. “This is a spiritual battle for the hearts of the people: I want to bring them to the Lord because only salvation can bring them real peace,” he says. Peace is not easily found by those living in the politically volatile situation in Israel, the West Bank and Gaza, but Jack found inner peace through God’s Word (these stories and more on www.biblesociety.org). The Bible Society

St Mark’s Coptic Cathedral, Cairo

Egyptian Broadcast This Cathedral was a well chosen venue, for a new law there, as in other Muslim countries, forbids Christians to gather for worship in non-registered premises. The timing on a Wednesday evening was also good, for Coptic Pope Shenouda III is strongly committed to working for Christian unity, and is such a popular speaker that his Wednesday evening Bible studies are regularly watched by a worldwide audience of millions! On this occasion three Egyptian Christian satellite channels co-operated to broadcast the event live.

These two true stories from the Middle East are only some of the many accounts of change resulting from the work of 154 branches of the Bible Society in 200 countries. The secular press will probably not tell you that Christmas Day was an official holiday in Nepal in 2008 for the first time ever, and that the Bible in Nepali and Tibetan Common Language is available in that country, where some have received healing through prayer in Jesus’ name. Even in Zimbabwe Mr. Chinyati, who has led the local branch since October, is excited about new possibilities despite appalling economic conditions. A powerful chief asked him to preach and give the Shona Bible to village heads, who oversee court proceedings locally. 40,000 Bibles arrived in Harare in time for Christmas, and there are plans to help and teach street children. People there are keen to find comfort in God’s word at this extremely difficult time. It is to be hoped that many in this country will also discover hope and faith, joining other Christians in working towards their nation’s recovery from a dark period.

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Community Matters

“Cherry ripe, cherry ripe, ripe I cry” in January? By Eileen Stonebridge

On a very cold day in January I noticed cherries for sale in a local super market. This set me on a train of thought about seasonality and food supply. To me, cherries are associated with warm summer days, not with shivering in winter. I reflected how the availability of food has changed, owing almost entirely to cheap fuel and a massive increase in transport facilities. Now, we can expect almost any fruit at any season. Gone is the anticipation of each seasonal fruit, luscious English strawberries in June, apricots in July, plums in August and the succession of different varieties of apples during the autumn. We have been conditioned by the supermarkets to think of apples as hard green things called Granny Smith, chiefly from Australia or Golden Delicious, best from USA... both keep well and have a long season. How has this come about? The answer lies chiefly through bulk buying and contracts to get the cheapest available. The effect of this change in producerconsumer relationships has had dramatic side effects, particularly on farming in this country, for example acres of orchards have gone in Kent. We now only produce 5% of our fruit, yet we

have ideal growing conditions for apples, pears and the soft fruits. The vast movement of food across the globe has been termed food miles by Tim Lang, professor of food policy at The City University. Apart from producing food, the side effects of the food industry are a plethora of environmental, social and public health problems across the globe. Not least pollution and traffic congestion in this country. 25% of HGV mileage is for food transport. Tim Lang argues that we should buy seasonal local food and that radical changes are needed in our food and farming industry as currently “we are sleepwalking towards a crisis as a result of rising oil prices, climate change and rising costs of food.” A director of Sainsbury’s claimed that it is protectionism to buy local produce as it is to the detriment of Third World farmers. This problem can be mitigated if we seek out Fair Trade goods, as the income goes directly to the producer, rather than as in many cases to the multinationals, who take land from native farmers but benefit them very little afterwards. The food farming

industry is a very complex issue which currently is governed by the policies of the supermarkets. It is very strange, that in a country which is blessed with excellent soils and climate for growing food, we import more than 50% and that much of our best arable land is used for growing cattle fodder, whilst our hill farms, where cattle should be kept, are struggling to survive and the farmers are being given grants to keep the landscape in order, whereas the cattle would do it for them. The problems facing our farming, food industry and diet were the subject of a Cabinet Office paper last June, “Food Matters. Towards a Strategy for the 21st Century”. There are moves to bring about change and many individuals are seeking better quality, locally produced food. As individuals we can do our bit by buying food produced as near to home as possible.

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BEYOND 150 New worship & community centre for Stoke Bishop What we are planning…

Church Interior • Flexible space • Comfortable Chairs • Tiled Floor • Underfloor Heating • Enlarged Podium • Improved Lighting • New Audio Visual System • Stage Lighting • Disabled Toilet • Servery

Church Rooms • New Two Storey Building • Road Level Entrance • Friendly Reception Area • Welcome Desk • Two large Halls • Lift & Stairs to upper floor • More Toilets (inc disabled)

“ Upper Floor • Direct access to Church • Catering Equipped Kitchen • Large Promenade & Lounge area • Coffee & Tea Servery • Audio Visual Facilities in Upper Hall • Meeting Rooms Lower Floor • Small Kitchen for Lower Hall • Audio Visual Facilities in Lower Hall • Separate Entrance to Lower Hall • Offices & Meeting Rooms • Dedicated Youth Area

I cannot but think that your project will put the Church right at the centre of the community, because you will have the resources to make that happen. It is striking, in fact, how Stoke Bishop needs it.

A project like Beyond 150 will deepen faith and lead many to maturity in Christ because faith will be stretched. Indeed, make no mistake about it, your faith will be tested. Projects of this nature are never easy.

Lord Carey

Former Archbishop of Canterbury and patron of Beyond 150.

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BEYOND 150

www.stmarysb.org.uk

Beyond 150

By The Rev. David Ritchie BA, DipTh, LTCL Three years ago, I was given a birds eye view of Stoke Bishop; a cherry picker had been placed at our disposal for the day in order that loose tiles on the spire be replaced. Spectacular Their work completed, the builders asked whether I would like to see what the Church was like from above. It was an invitation I could not resist. However,

a handful – who had a vision of building a Church in the community. As with any lasting work of God, the whole project was demanding and challenging, and actually took years to complete.

Aerial view of new development at St Mary’s

Confused and Bewildered Today the population of Stoke Bishop is not 600; it is nearer 8000, and we live in a different world from our predecessors – a world where the pace of life is accelerating all the time – a world in which many are left confused and bewildered by the postmodern culture of our day. What has ‘the Church’ to offer in such a setting? Sadly, the Church conjures up pictures of ancient and decaying buildings inhabited by elderly congregations and demoralised clergy – in other words a time capsule detached from the ordinary everyday lives in which most of us live. Is that true of St Mary’s? I hope not. However, as we look ‘Beyond 150 years’ we cannot afford to stand still. A Church building that is used only one day in seven and Church rooms that are often overstretched beyond capacity no longer make sense.

will be with us for that weekend when Lord Carey will be our guest preacher. Adventure We face enormous challenges (as did our predecessors all those years ago) indeed it has been said that in any lasting work of God there are three stages: Impossible – Difficult – Done. It may take a long time for the vision to become a reality. However, I do hope that you will join us in what promises to be an exciting, if at times daunting, adventure as we look ‘Beyond 150’.

Dream, Dream St Mary’s looking down from the cherry picker

as the lifting gear went up 200 feet into the air while I hung on for dear life, I did wonder if I had been too hasty in my acceptance. But the view from above was spectacular; I guess it was an experience not shared by any of my nine predecessors – certainly not the first vicar, David Wright, who moved into the parish and began his work at St Mary’s on the 13th March 1860 – almost 150 years ago. In those days there were about 600 people living in Stoke Bishop. The area consisted of a number of large houses, scattered farms and cottages. There were a few people – and they were only

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So it was three years ago (about the same time as my journey above the spire) that a small group of people first met together to dream dreams – and ask ourselves how our buildings can best serve the needs of the community here in Stoke Bishop, dare I say it, for the next 150 years. The exciting plans for a re-ordered Church and new Church rooms are the result and will be on display over the weekend of March 28th-29th at the public launch of ‘Beyond 150’. We are greatly privileged to have Lord Carey, the former Archbishop of Canterbury, as patron of ‘Beyond 150’. He, together with his wife Eileen, are old friends of St Mary’s and we are so glad that they

Letters to The Messenger If you have an interesting story to share, an event to publicise or you would like to comment upon anything you have read in The Messenger, please get in touch. You can email the editor at sam.kirby@partners-in.com or send a letter to Sam Kirby, St Mary Magdalene Church, Mariners Drive, Stoke Bishop, Bristol BS9 1QJ. Electronic copies of The Messenger are available to read on our website at www.stmarysb.org.uk


www.stmarysb.org.uk

BEYOND 150

EVENTS LAUNCH Open Weekend

BLUE NOTES JAZZ BAND Saturday 25 April • 7.30pm

Saturday 28 March 10.00-16.00 Exhibition in Church with coffee, tea & biscuits 14.30

An evening with FRED WEDLOCK

Bell Ringers attempt quarter peal

16.00-17.00 Meet the Architect (in Church) 17.00-18.00 Press Reception (with Lord Carey of Clifton, former Archbishop of Canterbury) 18.00-19.00 Reception & Light Supper (meet Lord Carey) 19.30 Concert with mezzo soprano Norma Minors and organist and pianist Andy Dewar (musical director Clifton College) 20.15-20.45 Interval with wine & nibbles

Friday 22 May • 7.30pm

Treasure Hunt & BBQ Saturday 27 June • 2pm

20.45-21.15 Concert

Sunday 29 March Don’t forget the clock change!

08.00 Holy Communion with George Carey 09.00 Parish Breakfast with George Carey 10.30 Service for everyone (preacher George Carey)

Summer Fete at Red Maids School July 18th 2009 • 2-4pm Lots of stalls, sideshows, grand raffle and more. Contact Yvonne Penn 908 2153

Saturday 28 March - will you be joining us? To help us with catering would you kindly let us know if you plan to attend the reception on Saturday 28th March at 18.00 and/or the concert at 19.30. You can tear off this slip and post it to the Church office or you can telephone the Church office. Alternatively, if you have access to a computer you can email us… Beyond 150, St Mary Magdalene Mariners Drive, Stoke Bishop, Bristol, BS9 1QJ Tel: 0117 968 7449 Email: jgornall@btconnect.com

Please tick…

I/we will be attending the 18.00 Reception & Light Supper I/we will be attending the 19.30 Concert I/we will be attending the 09.00 Parish Breakfast Your name Contact phone Number of people in your party?

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BEYOND 150

Using The New Development By Keith Sheather

When the dust from the building works has settled and we have before us a re-ordered Church and new Church rooms, how will we be using the new facilities? Perhaps this is the moment to dream dreams.

Stoke Bishop needs more community facilities and the new building will give much needed space crossing the boundaries, as George Carey says, ‘between the sacred and the secular’:

Re-Ordered Church

• Two halls will let Pre-School operate fully for five days a week, while allowing other organisations to have morning activities

Picture the Nave with its new tiled floor, underfloor heating, comfortable chairs, enlarged podium and lighting that shows off the beauty of the architecture and then imagine the many ways this flexible space could be used: • Cross Roads Services that bring the children into the body of the Church • Harvest Supper which can cater for as many as want to come • From Erica Bebb, a dance drama that uses the full length of the Nave to show off the beauty of dance in worship • Concerts which allow the performers space and a chance to utilise to the full the fine acoustics of the Church • A Crib Service filling the Nave with prams and buggies • A Christian Rock Concert that exploits the newly installed audio visual facilities and the theatrical lighting • Winter Warmer with no more squeezing between the pews The opportunities are endless…

New Church Rooms This is our outreach to the community of Stoke Bishop. The new two storey building has been designed as a statement of welcome. It says a Church building is not just for Sundays, but for everyone at any time. With its ground level entrance, large windows, complete accessibility and seamless passage into the Church, it proclaims ‘come in, you are welcome.’

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• The large promenade area will give the Sunday congregations a chance to mingle over coffee, read the notice boards, peruse the book stall and purchase their Traidcraft goods in a light room with fine views • During the week the promenade area becomes a drop in centre, with the chance to meet friends, have a coffee, do business or just read the paper • Young people will have their own dedicated rooms – their space to chill out, play pool and to read the Bible together • A fully equipped kitchen will allow the rooms to be let for functions with outside caterers eg annual meetings, parties and conferences • The upper floor will make an attractive Wedding Reception venue offering St Mary’s as a one stop wedding location • Many organisations use St Mary’s (Pilates, Pre-natal, University of the Third Age), but with greater flexibility more can be attracted The opportunities are endless…


Local Events

Community Diary Women’s Spring 2009

Breakfast s Saturday Mornings at 8am finishing at 9am May 9th June 27th September 12th November 14th

Friends of Old Sneed Park Nature Reserve

Working Parties Saturdays: 14 March, 4 April 10am - 12 noon (coffee & biscuits 11am) Meet at Glenavon Park entrance with gloves, loppers and secateurs. Wildlife of the Severn Estuary by Rupert Higgins Thursday 12 March 8.00pm Hulbert Room St Mary’s

Stoke Bishop & Sneyd Park Local History Group

Women’s Breakfasts at St Mary’s take place six times a year and women of all ages are very welcome. Please join us at 8am for a delicious breakfast of fresh coffee, croissants, fruit and yogurt and an opportunity to meet up with other women of all ages. Breakfast is followed by a presentation from an interesting speaker, closing at 9am. Breakfast is free of charge; donations gratefully received on the day. For further information please contact Ruth Boxall on 968 1400 or check our website.

Sneed Park Nature Reserve Friday 17 April 7.30pm Stoke Bishop Village Hall Lottery funding and work progress by Eileen Stonebridge Visit to the Botanic Gardens Tuesday 16 June 6.30pm £3.50

University Botanic Garden

Winter Opening Hours: Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 10am - 4pm Special Sunday Opening: 29 March 10.30am - 4pm Summer Opening: from Good Friday 10 April, every Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Sunday 10.30am - 4pm

Stoke Lodge Adult Learning Centre

Open Day and Summer Exhibition Friday 24 & Saturday 25 July 11am - 5pm

B R I GH T SPA R K S For families and carers with babies and toddlers Play, craft, storytime, song time, drinks and biscuits 1.30 to 3.15 in the Church rooms

Every Monday in term-time Warm welcome for all newcomers

Film Focus Enjoy a film, tea, discussion and a time of worship

5 April

A Man Called Peter U Christian film for Palm Sunday

Sunday at 3pm in the Church Rooms

Did you know? if you are feeling lonely or you need cheering up or you just want a change You can pop into St Mary Magdalene Church, Mariners Drive, for a cup of tea or coffee and a chat, any weekday morning between 10am and 12noon

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Advertising

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Easter

Easter Service details: Maundy Thursday 9th April 8.00am Holy Communion

Good Friday 10th April

11.00am Open Air Easter Songs – outside Stoke Bishop Spa. All Welcome. 12noon-3.00pm Three Hours at the Cross

Easter Sunday 12th April

9.00am Holy Communion 10.30am Crossroads All Age Service 6.30pm Easter Evening Praise

Matthew 27:50-53

John 11:25-26

And when Jesus had cried out again in a loud voice, he gave up his spirit. At that moment the curtain of the temple was torn in two from top to bottom. The earth shook and the rocks split. The tombs broke open and the bodies of many holy people who had died were raised to life. They came out of the tombs, and after Jesus’ resurrection they went into the holy city and appeared to many people. (NIV)

1 Peter 1:3

Jesus said to her, “I am the resurrection and the life. He who believes in me will live, even though he dies; and whoever lives and believes in me will never die. (NIV) Praise be to the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ! In his great mercy he has given us new birth into a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead...

Easter Reflections With OUR EYES we see The beauty of Easter as the earth awakens once more... With OUR EARS we hear The birds sing sweetly to tell us Spring again is here... With OUR HANDS we pick the golden daffodils and the fragrant hyacinths...

But only with OUR HEARTS can we feel the MIRACLE of GOD’S LOVE which redeems all men... And only with OUR SOUL can we make our ‘pilgrimage to God’ and inherit His Easter Gift of ETERNAL LIFE. By Helen Steiner Rice

From the Church Registers Baptisms 15th November 2008 Benjamin George Hokulani Shuttleworth 7th December 2008 Samuel Stuart Richardson 4th January 2009 Emelie Clara Blake William Francis Forrest Brown 1st February 2009 William Elliott Woodfield Annabel Holly Warr Saskia Grace Gliddon Smith

Marriages 13th December 2008 Michael Alberto Rocha to Kathryn Ruth Allen

Funerals Kenneth F Boucher 9th January 2009 Harold Frederick Rogers 30th January 2009 John N Mostyn 11th February 2009 Emily Marjorie Gillespie 13th February 2009

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Our Church

St Mary Magdalene, Stoke Bishop Mariners Drive, Stoke Bishop, Bristol, BS9 1QJ Tel /Fax: 0117 968 7449 • Email: jgornall@btconnect.com www.stmarysb.org.uk

Contacts and other information Vicar The Rev. David Ritchie BA, DipTh, LTCL . . . . . . . . 968 1858 Assistant Curate The Rev. Anne Farmer B.Ed, DipTh . . . . . . . . . . . . 949 2407 Lay Ministers Angela Cattell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 968 3069 Hazel Trapnell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 968 7190 Jennifer Hall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 968 5959 Church Wardens Jason Parker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 968 6863 Lucy Swithinbank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 968 4400 Parish Office Open 9am until 1pm Mon – Fri, 2pm until 4pm Mon & Thurs For further details of services or Church personnel, please contact the office on 968 7449 or visit our website.

Church Services Sunday 9.00am Holy Communion (2nd Sunday Morning Prayer) 10.30am Crossroads All Age Worship (2nd Sunday Holy Communion) 6.30pm Evening services vary and may be Choral Evensong, said Evening Prayer, Holy Communion with Ministry of Healing, informal praise and prayer, or Film Focus (which starts at 3.00pm). For details of times please check Church News in the Church entrance, contact the office or log onto our website www.stmarysb.org.uk Thursday 11.30am Holy Communion

Mothers & Toddlers Caroline Simpson . . . . . . . . . 968 2775 Playgroup & Nursery Parish Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . 968 7449 Creche (0-3) Susan Fairbairn . . . . . . . . . . 968 1200 Seekers (3-4) Ann Thomas . . . . . . . . . . . . . 968 5195 Discoverers (4-6) Ann Thomas . . . . . . . . . . . . . 968 5195 Mariners (6-11) Nick Powlesland . . . . . . . . . . 968 3845 Kidz Klub (7-11) Nick Powlesland . . . . . . . . . . 968 3845 Focus (Year 7+) Rob Smith . . . . . . . . . . 0786 8027 209 Youth Cell (11-14) Rob Smith . . . . . . . . . . 0786 8027 209 Pathfinders (11-14) Rob Smith . . . . . . . . . . 0786 8027 209 Contact (14-18) Rob Smith . . . . . . . . . . 0786 8027 209 Group Scout Leader Su Barwell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 962 1984 Enrolment Therese Millar . . . . . . . . . . . 909 2014 Scouts Chris Meadows . . . . . . . 07734 151 055 Cub Scouts Therese Millar . . . . . . . . . . . 909 2014 2014Beavers Caroline Owen . . . . . . . . . . . 968 4646 Guide District Commissioner Pam Edwards . . . . . . . . . . . . 940 0190 9th Guides Lara Kirby . . . . . . . . . . 07764 585 057 9th Brownies Brown Owl Wendy Hughes . . 962 4580 Waiting List Alison Bryant . . . 968 1819 199th Brownies Suzanne Evans . . . . . . . . . . . 968 2569

Adult Organisations

The Messenger Team Editorial Editor:

Sam Kirby . . . . . . . . . 959 1591

Features Editors Helping Hand: Community Matters: Global Matters: Christian Perspective:

Keith Sheather . . . . . . 968 2170 Judith Sheather . . . . . 968 2170 Sheila Brown . . . . . . . 377 6543 Hazel Trapnell . . . . . . 968 7190

Distribution Co-ordinator: John Hill . . . . . . . . . . 949 2717 Advertising Manager: Sam Kirby . . . . . . . . . 959 1591

Copy Date for Next Issue: 19th April If possible, please use email to the editor: sam.kirby@partners-in.com

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Activities for Young People

Wednesday Circle Shirley Wotton . . . . . . . . . . . 968 4296 Friday Badminton Liz Floyd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 968 1759 Book Club Mary Michaels . . . . . . . . . . . 968 2723 Road Reps Judith Sheather . . . . . . . . . . 968 2170 Alpha Sheila Brown . . . . . . . . . . . . 377 6543 House Groups David Baker . . . . . . . . . . . . . 968 3227 Women’s B’fasts Ruth Boxall . . . . . . . . . . . . . 968 1400 Men’s B’fasts Paul Richardson . . . . . . . . . . 968 4572 Traidcraft Albert & Pauline Pearson . . . 968 6822 A Traidcraft stall is held in the Church Rooms after morning services on the 3rd Sunday of the month.

Parish Lunch

Lunch is served in the Church Rooms each Thursday at 12.15pm (except in August). All are welcome.


Community Matters

Warden of Wills By Judith Sheather It is hard to believe that between Parry’s Lane and Stoke Hill there are about 2000 students living in six University halls of residence. The oldest hall, built in 1929 around an Oxbridge style quad, is Wills Hall and Donald Shell is warden, living in Downside, the original Victorian Gothic house. Positive Pastoral Care ‘Over 300 of our 335 residents are first years, away from home for the first time. There are 13,000 undergraduates at Bristol and, in their first year, their contact with academic staff can be quite limited. I see my role as enabling the community of young people here to feel happy, relaxed and supported. They need to know that there are friendly older adults looking out for them,’ says Donald. ‘My focus is helping and guiding the students in positive pastoral care. As leader of the community I ensure the nature of the Hall is one of consideration and care. Discipline is a tiny fraction of my job but ultimately it is the warden who has to uphold the rules. 98% are hard working, courteous, gifted young people but 2-3 a year need a firm hand so that their lifestyle does not impact inappropriately on those around. Litter patrol at 8 am can be a wake-up call! The Hall is typically the place where students make their first friends. It mirrors the social composition of the University. 30% are from well-off backgrounds and privately educated, others are very different. I tell the students, ‘You will probably never have such an opportunity to get to know people so different from yourself – take advantage of that!’’

other tutors or 2nd year students to lead. There are about 20 in the congregation. Half are definite Christians; half are intermittent worshippers. Afterwards there is always a Sunday roast provided in hall. I asked whether St Mary’s could offer more to interest students in Stoke Bishop. ‘Today’s students go for ‘style’ of worship and are drawn towards the city,’ commented Donald. ‘Christ Church and Woodlands attract large numbers. St Mary’s is in the ‘wrong’ direction, away from the centre, and I fear that, whatever is offered, the response is likely to be small.’

New Role Donald is a senior lecturer in Politics. There are over 600 students studying degrees with some element of Politics in them and, for many years, Donald had looked after the first years. He had also been Chairman of governors at Cotham Grammar where he had enjoyed working with a varied community of staff. In 1997 his own children were in their 20s: his daughter at home, his son elsewhere in Bristol. He felt it was an easier time to take on a new role, warden of Wills. In the early 1990s Donald was licensed as a lay minister and when he arrived at Wills and found that the chapel was not in regular use, he decided to take action. Wills Hall is the only hall of residence to have its own chapel, the Monica Wills Chapel. Donald felt it was part of his calling to ensure that it was used for Christian worship and not just as a social space. Working with the University chaplain, he has made possible the provision of services at 11.15 am every Sunday in term-time. Donald organises and invites speakers, and either leads services himself or has

Donald Shell.

Centenary Plans 2009 is the University’s centenary with an appeal target of £100 million by 2015. Independent of any centenary plans there has been thought about redevelopment of the ageing 1960s accommodation on the Stoke Bishop campus. ‘Nowadays there is demand for internet workstations in every room and that is easier to provide in new buildings. The idea is that the University should retain control of the site and build for the 21st century. Nothing has been put to planning yet, and there will be full local consultation.’ Above Donald’s fireplace are photographs of all 335 members of Wills Hall. As I left, he was about to meet the Hall Bursar for one of their almost daily sessions on the practical side of catering for students. It is good to know that they are made to feel so at home in Stoke Bishop.

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