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2018-2019

M O O R I N G S PA R I S H & F L E U R D E L I S S C H O O L P U B L I C AT I O N ST M A RYS A N N A P O L I S . O R G

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St. Mary’s Parish & School 5

Pastor’s Letter

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Pastoral Council

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Sacramental Data

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St. Mary’s — Grandmother of Churches

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Warm Welcomes

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Updates and Renovations

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Saints Making a Difference

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Exemplifying Excellence

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Athletics

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Learning Beyond the Classroom

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Class of 2019

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Service Academy Saints

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Called to Serve - The Booth Family

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Saints Walk

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Winter White

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Tee It Up

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Alumni Board

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Alumni Weekend

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Parish Picnic

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Service Awards

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St. Mary’s Parish Financials

2018-2019

COVER The historic Charles Carroll House and St. Mary’s Roman Catholic Church on Spa Creek in Annapolis, MD

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A Redemptorist Parish Since 1853 St. Mary’s Parish, a sacramental Roman Catholic community united in Jesus Christ our Redeemer, proclaims God’s love, serves the needs of others, educates in the faith, and joyfully celebrates God’s presence and promises as we seek the Kingdom of Heaven. St. Mary’s Parish, a Catholic congregation served by the Redemptorist Order, includes St. Mary’s Church and St. John Neumann Mission Church. St. Mary’s Elementary and High School, located in downtown Annapolis, Maryland, serves students in grades Pre-Kindergarten through 12. Anchored in faith, rooted in tradition, and committed to excellence, our programs build lifelong learners who are servant leaders.

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Pastor’s Letter

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ARRIVED HERE AT ST. MARY’S PARISH as pastor in late August of 2019. Although I had celebrated weekend Masses in the past, and visited Annapolis quite often, I was now entering into being a St. Mary’s Saint and Annapolitan. In many ways, everything was new to me. Full disclosure: I was a bit overwhelmed by the size of the parish: two churches, a grade school and a high school, a large staff, more than seventy parish ministries, eight priests, three deacons, and thousands of active and committed parishioners. When I first arrived I heard a variety of greetings: Welcome to St. Mary’s, Father, we are happy to have you as a pastor; a second common greeting had a nautical taste to it: Welcome Aboard. I liked both of these greetings. The third one scared me a bit: Good Luck Father, you’re gonna need it! Well, although I suspect, I will never completely grasp all the many aspects of St. Mary’s Parish, each day makes me come to love the parish and its people more and more. Only the Lord himself knows all the good work and graces that flow from his hands and his dear Mother Mary to so many people in a year. I delight in our rich history, the beautiful churches, our School, the devotion to the Blessed Sacrament and Our Lady of Perpetual Help, our Saints John Neumann and Blessed Francis Seelos, the work of the St. Vincent de Paul Society, the Pro-Life ministries, the growing Hispanic community, our dedicated and talented staff, the generosity of the parishioners to the mission of the parish, and the number of people serving in so many outstanding ministries to the parish and to those in need. We have an amazing litany of grace to celebrate here. The first issue of the Moorings / Fleur De Lis publication I read was last year as I vacationed in the Outer Banks before my arrival here. It gave me a beautiful glimpse of what was to come for me as a member of this parish family. While I will confess to not knowing the difference between the port and starboard side of a boat, I do love the word moorings. I looked it up in the dictionary and here is what it said: The ropes, chains, or anchors by or to which a boat, ship, or buoy is moored. I believe that including the word moorings is very well-chosen for the title of this publication. What holds us, what connects us, what keeps us out of harm’s way is our faith in God revealed to us through Jesus Christ in the power of the Holy Spirit. Moorings is the story of the parishioners of St. Mary’s being anchored to God. I love the words of the simple Breton Fisherman’s Prayer: ‘Oh God thy sea is so great and my boat is so small.’ We thank God for all that moors us to Him.

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Pastoral Council

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he Pastoral Council members are humbled and honored to serve the parish and our pastor in 2019-2020 and to be a small part of the success of this faith filled and multicultural community of St. Mary’s. Our objective is serving our parishioners and pastor and to carry forward the mission and ministry of Christ and His Church in the parish community. We are a consultative body that makes recommendations to the pastor regarding the life and mission of the parish. As such, it encourages a network of communication within the parish and surrounding community and serves as a forum for dialogue among the parishioners, the pastor, the clergy, and the staff. We are very fluid in our goals and objectives and are currently focused on: communication improvement within all aspects of the parish; safety and security of all facilities; focusing on the needs of young families of St. Mary’s, our youth and how we can connect and stay connected with them; and fostering awareness and interaction with our many parish ministries. The Council is made up of volunteers of a varied cross section of our parish who all serve with one goal in mind. Our members are selected from among many applicants each year when current members’ terms end with recommendations made by a selection committee of current Pastoral Council members to the pastor for final approval. Members serve a minimum term of three years and can elect to serve a second term of three years. In addition, we solicit parishioner discernment for new members every year via the bulletin and parish website, typically in May. This past year, as is the case every year, we had hard working and valuable members’ terms end and we thank those who served with us and before us, setting the stage for our successes as a Pastoral Council and parish community. They are: Pam Bukowski, Courtney Spangler, and Vice President Matt Lafranchise. We also welcome aboard with open arms and are very excited to have join us in 2019: Mary Ann Davies, Michele Deckman, Caroline Ewing, Stacie Gormley, and Carla Wilcox. We want to serve all parishioners and welcome your comments, concerns, suggestions and solutions to make our parish and this community of Christ for Christ the best it can be! The Council looks forward to working with our new pastor, Fr. Patrick Woods, and in continuing to foster the growth of our faith and community here at St. Mary’s. Kathi Armiger President, Pastoral Council

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St. Mary’s Pastoral Council 2019-2020 Kathi Armiger President

Brian Madden

Vice President

Dave Waugh Secretary

Phil Ashford Mary Ann Davies Sam Davies Michele Deckman Caroline Ewing Stacie Gormley Silvia Peart Michael Pontillo Betty Rivera Hector Sibrian Chris Sterritt Joseph Stewart Carla Wilcox


SACRAMENTAL DATA (2018-2019)

236

235

316

BAPTISMS

FIRST RECONCILIATION & FIRST EUCHARIST

CONFIRMATIONS

81

148

MARRIAGES

FUNERALS

27,28,19 ADULTS, CHILDREN, TEENS - RCIA

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St. Mary’s Grandmother of Churches Redemportorist Map WRITTEN BY ROBERT L. WORDEN

| PARISH ARCHIVIST

GRAPHICS BY CHRIS ROBINSON

“let the church always be a place of mercy and hope, where everyone is welcomed, loved and forgiven.” — Pope Francis

The Catholic community of Annapolis was served as a Jesuit mission station starting in 1694. The first Catholic church in Annapolis was built as a mission station in 1821–22. The Jesuits left in 1853 when the Redemptorists arrived to establish St. Mary’s as a permanent Catholic parish, the only one in Anne Arundel County. The priests soon began to minister to Naval Academy midshipmen and staff and traveled into the county to celebrate Mass in private homes. In time, they established mission stations throughout the county and beyond to the Eastern Shore and further south. Some mission activities were brief, measured in months until diocesan priests took charge. Others were longer term and eventually became independent parishes; others were closed as automobiles became more prevalent and roads to Annapolis improved. And, some of those new parishes eventually had missions of their own, making St. Mary’s the “Grandmother of Churches.” In 2018 Father Tizio asked me to produce a map showing the extent of the St. Mary’s Redemptorist mission activities. Utilizing research and photographs, graphic artist Christopher Robinson developed the map shown here, demonstrating the extent of St. Mary’s Redemptorist mission activities.

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They truly will be missed

This summer, we said goodbye to some very special members of the St. Mary’s community. After eight years serving as pastor, Father John Tizio, C.Ss.R. was assigned as associate pastor at St. James Catholic Church in Lititz, Pennsylvania. After serving St. Mary’s for 17 years, Father Andrew Costello was transferred to San Alfonso Retreat House in Long Branch, New Jersey. Father Charles Hergenroeder was assigned to Our Lady of Perpetual Help in Boston, Massachusetts.

Warm welcomes At the same time, we also welcomed several new members to our St. Mary’s community. Our Pastor, Very Rev. Pat Woods, C.Ss.R. Father Patrick Woods is a native of Brooklyn, New York, raised in the parish of the Basilica of Our Lady of Perpetual Help. After making his first vows as a Redemptorist in 1968, Father Woods attended St. Alphonsus College in Suffield, Connecticut, majoring in philosophy, and received his final four years of seminary training at Mount Saint Alphonsus Seminary in Esopus, New York, where he received a Master of Divinity and a Master of Religious Education. Father Woods was ordained as a priest in June 1975 and then, after earning a master’s degree in English at Fordham University, taught for ten years at the very high school seminary he had attended near Erie, Pennsylvania. During his time teaching, Father Woods also earned a Master of Science in Guidance and Counseling from Gannon University. Father Woods previously served as the Director of Formation at Holy Redeemer College in Washington, D.C. and was elected Provincial Vicar of the Baltimore Province, a position he held for twelve years before serving as Provincial Superior for six years. Father Woods served as pastor at St. Martin of Tours in Bethpage, New York, for eight years before coming to St. Mary’s. 10

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Rev. John McKenna, C.Ss.R. Father John McKenna, a native of Brooklyn, New York, professed his first Redemptorist Vows in 1970 after studying for the Priesthood at St. Mary’s Seminary in North East Pennsylvania and St. Mary’s College in Ellicott City, Maryland. Father McKenna holds a Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy from Saint Alphonsus College as well as a master’s degree in Religious Education and Master of Divinity from Mount Saint Alphonsus. He was officially ordained as a priest in 1977 by Cardinal Terrance Cooke and assigned by the Baltimore Province of the Redemptorists to work in the Vice Province of San Juan, Puerto Rico in 1978. While in Puerto Rico, Father McKenna served in many Redemptorist parishes including in Mayaguez, Caguas, Guayama and San Lorenzo before returning to the United States and taking a sabbatical at the Catholic Theological Union in Chicago in 1999. Father McKenna has previously served at Parish of Immaculate Conception in the Bronx, New York; Parish of St. Martin of Tours in Bethpage, New York; Parish of Our Lady of Lourdes in Seaford Delaware as pastor; and most recently, at the Parish of the Basilica of Our Lady of Perpetual Help in Brooklyn, New York. Rev. Clement Vadakkedath, C.Ss.R. Fr. Clement Vadakkedath, C.Ss.R., was born in Kerala, India. He grew up in a devout Catholic family of seven children (five boys and two girls) and joined the Redemptorists as a teenager and graduated from the Jesuit College in Bangalore, India. He was professed a Redemptorist on June 27, 1982, the feast of Our Mother of Perpetual Help. Fr. Clement was ordained a priest on April 19, 1990 and was attached to a Redemptorist parish in Mumbai, then moved back to Kerala to join the mission band which gave him a wide experience of preaching missions and evangelizing people from different walks of life. In 1996, he was appointed as the formator of Redemptorist minor seminarians while serving as consultor on the provincial team. Fr. Clement obtained his licentiate in Moral theology in 2000 and Doctorate in 2004 from the Alphonsian Institute of Higher Studies, Rome. On his return from Rome, he began teaching moral theology in the Redemptorist Major Seminary where he studied and also served as a member of the board of trustees of the Alphonsian Academy in Rome. In the following year, he was elected Provincial of the Liguori Province of the Redemptorists in India. On completion of his term as Provincial in 2011, he chose to work together with the Baltimore Province of the Redemptorists and was assigned as pastor of Fatima Parish in Dominica of the English speaking Caribbean islands. He moved to Our Lady of Lourdes, Seaford, Delaware in 2015 as pastor and when the Redemptorists handed over the care of the parish to the Diocese of Wilmington. In 2019, he was asked to join the parish pastoral team at St. Mary’s.

Deacon Tony Norcio, JCL Deacon Norcio was ordained in 1996 by William Cardinal Keeler. Deacon Norcio is a canon lawyer and is a judge on the Metropolitan Tribunal of the Archdiocese of Baltimore. He served as the Assistant Director of Clergy Personnel for Deacon Formation for 22 years and has served as a Master of Ceremonies at Archdiocesan liturgies. He was previously assigned to St. Mary’s for 16 years and for seven years at St. Andrew by the Bay. He has a PhD, a Licentiate in Canon Law (JCL), and a MA in Systematic Theology as well as Graduate Certificates in Biblical Studies and Advanced Biblical Studies. He is a Professor Emeritus of Information Systems at UMBC. His family has been in St. Mary’s parish since 1979. His wife, Ellie, retired from St. Mary’s Elementary School after 22 years. He has two daughters, who attended St. Mary’s School, and four grandchildren. Rev. Peter Vang Cong Tran, C.Ss.R. Father Vang entered the Redemptorist seminary in Vietnam in 1962. At the fall of Saigon in 1975, as a Redemptorist novice, he left Vietnam by helicopter during the last evacuation and settled down in Jacksonville, Florida. In 1976 he entered the Noviciate in Oconomowoc, Wisconsin as a member of the Vice Province of Richmond. Father Vang attended St. Alphonsus College in Suffield, Connecticut from 1977 to 1979 and then moved on to Mount Saint Alphonsus Seminary in Esopus, New York from 1979 to 1983, where he received a Master of Theology and Religious Education. In 1983, Father Vang was ordained a priest in Esopus, New York, and stationed at his first assignment at Our Lady of Perpetual Help church in Opa-Locka, Florida, where he founded the Vietnamese community. He was transferred to Concord, North Carolina, in 1989 where he helped start the first Vietnamese community. In 1997, Father Vang served as Chaplain in the detention centers for the boat people of Hong Kong. In 1998, after the camps were closed, he returned to the United States and began preaching parish missions to Vietnamese and Americans throughout the country while based in Hampton, Virginia. In 2009, Father Vang was transferred to North Carolina, helping out at the parishes of Saint James the Greater and St. Joseph Catholic Church, and ministering to the Montagnards in Raleigh and the Karenni (Myanmar) in Winston Salem. On August 1, 2019, he was transferred to St. Mary’s to serve as a missionary for the Vietnamese ministry. He also started a Redemptorist mission to the Montagnards in the Highlands of Vietnam in 1998, which remains his primary ministry to this day. Father Vang started a non-profit organization to serve the Montagnards named the Viet Toc Foundation (www.viettoc.org). STMARYSANNAPOLIS.ORG

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Updates & Renovations

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his past spring, the Charles Carroll House officially became home to St. Mary’s Parish administrative offices and meeting spaces, allowing for the expansion and development of several key school initiatives, including the addition of a Pre-Kindergarten (Pre-K4) class which started this fall. In 2017, the management team of the Charles Carroll House, owned by the Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer (Redemptorists,) was transitioned from the Charles Carroll House Board of Trustees to St. Mary’s Parish. The Office of Parish Advancement, Business Office and Facilities Office all moved from Notre Dame Hall to the second and third

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floors of the Charles Carroll House in April. The new office space also includes designated volunteer work and meeting space. In addition, the parish continues to work closely with partners at the Maryland Historic Trust and the Annapolis Historic Preservation Commission to maintain the heritage of this iconic local site. Public access to the house continues through tours and rentals managed by The Davis Group. The expansion into the Carroll House provided the opportunity to re-purpose existing spaces into new facilities and accommodated for exciting new programs including the addition of our Pre-K4 classroom. For the very first time, St. Mary’s Elementary School now offers a full-day class for 4-yearolds. The 20-student class is led by


one head teacher, Theresa Mingus, and two instructional assistants and follows the Archdiocese of Baltimore Curriculum standards in alignment with Maryland State Curriculum standards. The former Elementary School STEM Lab was relocated and the space renovated and outfitted with appropriate furniture and fixtures to accommodate the needs of our Pre-K4 students. In coordination, the STEM Lab was moved to the location of a nearby Elementary School math classroom, and the math classroom was moved into a large, bright, central location in Notre Dame Hall. The newly vacant space in Notre Dame Hall was transitioned into a new space for the High School Guidance Department. This shift allowed for

the introduction of a brand new High School band program and dedicated band room this fall. The new space includes practice areas, a music library and office space and is outfitted with its own sound system, Apple TV and sound damping to support and enhance the students’ learning experiences. In addition, St. Mary’s Facility Department recently renovated space in St. Mary’s rectory for a new meeting room and two new parlors, and installed new boilers at St. John Neumann. Over the past year, a lot has happened over on Bestgate Road as well. The turf field was replaced just in time for the fall athletics season and a new Fleur brick inlay was installed in front of the Team House to honor Kevin E. Reichardt.

“Whatever good things we build end up building us.” — Jim Rohn

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APRIL 2019 FOOD DRIVE - 742 BAGS OF FOOD

EASTER BASKETS FOR THE CHILDREN AT THE LIGHT HOUSE

saints making a difference During the course of this school year St. Mary’s students each had an opportunity to serve at the Light House Homeless Prevention Support Center. They packed grocery bags that were provided to men and women in need, stocked pantry shelves, prepared bag lunches for distribution and served hot lunches to anyone in need.

St. Mary’s Elementary School students prepared and delivered 4,872 bag lunches to the Light House Center. Through the April 2019 Food Drive, parishioners donated 743 bags of food and $475 for the Light House Center. St. Mary’s has three teams of volunteers whose members come together on the third Tuesday of each month to prepare dinner for the residents of the Light House homeless facility. Last year, our teams fed close to 600 residents through these monthly meals. St. Mary’s welcomed 25 homeless guests January 28, 2019 through February 4, 2019 as part of the Winter Relief Program, which provides a warm, welcoming environment and hot meals to Annapolis area residents in need. More than 200 parishioners directly participated by staffing evening and overnight shifts, preparing food, donating supplies and distributing and washing linens and more. 14

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KAITLYN MARSH. PHOTO CREDIT: KEVIN PARKS, CATHOLIC REVIEW.

Exemplifying Excellence 2019 Archdiocesan High School Teacher of the Year: Kaitlyn Marsh Kaitlyn Marsh, High School AP & Honors Global Geography, Honors U.S. History teacher and varsity field hockey coach, was chosen by the Archdiocese of Baltimore’s Teacher of the Year Committee, which included Department of Catholic Schools staff and Archdiocese of Baltimore School Board representatives. The committee selected Ms. Marsh from the Archdiocesan high school Teacher of the Year nominees, all of whom were the recipients of their school’s 2019 Teacher of the Year award. The decision was based on each nominee’s demonstration of Catholic identity, innovative instruction, professionalism, and leadership, as well as classroom observations, and interviews.

2019 Teacher of the Year for Independent Schools in Anne Arundel County Finalist: Señora Ellen Smith IAAM Athletic Director of the Year: Allison Fondale SEÑORA ELLEN SMITH TEACHES (TOP); ALLISON FONDALE.

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Saints team Comprised of over 300 athletes, 80 coaches, 14 different sports and 36 athletic teams, St. Mary’s Athletics had yet another impressive year. The 2018-2019 season added a record seven new championship titles to our Athletic Department’s impressive history. Fall Championships Girls Cross Country: 2018 Football: 2018 (Second Consecutive Year) Field Hockey: 2018 JV Boys Cross Country : 2018 Winter Championships Boys Swimming: 2019 (Fifth Consecutive Year) Wrestling: 2019 (Second Consecutive Year) Spring Championships Sailing: Phoebe King 2019 2019 College Commitments Brooke Albert — Lacrosse, Florida Tech Whitney Albert — Lacrosse, University of Florida Garrett Atkins — Football (Manager), University of Alabama Maggie Aumiller — Lacrosse, U.S. Naval Academy Claire Bowser — Swimming, Loyola University Maryland Trevor Brooks — Football, Bridgewater College BJ Burlace — Lacrosse, Yale University Patrick Devitt — Basketball, Washington College Dominic Donahue — Football, Marist College Brock Goodwin — Baseball, Monmouth University Lindsey Grady — Soccer, University of Lynchburg Cal Hadley — Lacrosse, Virginia Military Institute Andrew Hood — Baseball, Salisbury University Jacob Hussey — Cabrini University Ryan Jones — Lacrosse, Drexel University Jack Kerr — Lacrosse, Furman University Ian Krampf — Lacrosse, Johns Hopkins University Logan Lamon — Lacrosse, Lynchburg University Marcus Marshall — Football, Ursinus College Molly McAteer — Field Hockey, University of New Hampshire Garrett Nilsen — Lacrosse, Ohio State University Bryce Pfundstein — Lacrosse, Johns Hopkins University Sean Streyle — Swimming, Clarion University of PA Jacob Tribull — Football, Catholic University Ethan Yorio — Lacrosse, Lynn University 16

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Learning Beyond the Classroom In April, a group of twenty St. Mary’s High School students and three teachers embarked on what many described as a “once-in-a-lifetime” experience— a two week trip to Europe as part of the 2019 Spanish Exchange Program.

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n April, a group of twenty St. Mary’s High School students and three teachers embarked on what many described as a “once-in-alifetime” experience--a two week trip to Europe as part of the 2019 Spanish Exchange Program. St. Mary’s is one of four institutions that partner with the Paz de Ziganda Charter School in Pamplona, Spain, providing the opportunity for students at both schools to travel and experience the culture of their student counterparts. The program, brought to St. Mary’s through a relationship with Bishop McNamara High School in 2017, is a way to not only provide a unique, outof-the-classroom learning experience for students taking Spanish, but also a way for our students to better understand a different culture and gain an appreciation for travel and the world around them. Ellen Smith has been with St. Mary’s High School for ten years and has served as the Foreign Language Department Chair and Spanish Exchange Program Coordinator in addition to teaching Spanish. “Learning beyond the walls of the classroom is important. We focus a lot on learning culture, but it’s hard to learn culture without experiencing it,” said Smith. “By taking them somewhere they get to experience the culture and lifestyle and recognize our commonalities and differences.” Kathleen Norwood, who has served St. Mary’s for sixteen years as a Spanish teacher, said on this trip, the students mastering more of the language is actually secondary to learning about the Spanish culture and most importantly, learning about themselves and their place in the world. “I always hope they come out of it understanding a little bit more about who they are and who their peers are in the world,” Norwood said. At the start of the 2018-2019 school year, fifteen of the twenty students involved with the program served as hosts to students from the Paz de Ziganda School. The students and their families opened their homes to their exchange students for two weeks,

introducing them to America and the St. Mary’s community. Our students then had the opportunity to travel to Spain in the spring. The two-week trip included a week-long stay in Pamplona, where all students stayed with their corresponding host families, before traveling to other exciting locations during the second week of the trip including the French Basque region, the medieval town of Alcañiz and Barcelona. “I think an important part about this is that this isn’t just a trip, it’s a homestay,” said Smith. She also noted that staying with another family in a different culture can be an “uncomfortable situation” but that it is a great way for the students to learn to overcome something that they’re afraid of doing and gain confidence. Senior Nick Obert noted that the most memorable component of his entire experience through the program was spending time with his host family, saying, “I got really lucky and had an amazing exchange family. Martin, my exchange student, and his family are friends for life.” He also explained that by staying with his host family, he was able to experience the city of Pamplona and the Spanish culture more fully and authentically. “They showed me the real Spain, not just what you typically see on postcards or tours,” he said. The timing of the trip had the students in Spain over Easter, providing a unique view into how the holiday is recognized and how religion plays a key role in the lives of those they visited. Senior Maggie Kennedy noted, “I really liked going to all the different churches and cathedrals, especially Montserrat. The Easter processions were really interesting to watch--we don’t really have anything like that here where there’s a big procession throughout the entire city. How they celebrate their religion is almost like celebrating their history.” The students were able to fully immerse themselves into the culture with the help of their host families, partaking in unique activities with people who know the area best. From hiking trips and attending soccer

“Learning beyond the walls of the classroom is important. We focus a lot on learning culture, but it’s hard to learn culture without experiencing it.”

games to visiting off-the-beaten-path attractions and landmarks, the Spanish host families provided our students with a multitude of opportunities to take in the sights, sounds and ways of their culture. “As a teacher, I’m especially grateful for the opportunity to get to know my students in a way that you don’t experience standing in the front of the classroom every day,” said Mathematics teacher Kyle Hewitt, who joined the trip having never been to Europe before. “I can think of at least one interaction with each student where I got to see what an amazing person each student is that I never would have had the chance to experience without this trip.” Norwood also added, “It truly was, for us, life affirming, life changing and professionally rewarding. I was so impressed with our students and how completely involved they were with everything they did, with what was around them and each other. It was very good to see that everything was worth it. The kids took advantage of every opportunity to grow and be a part of something different. They’re a pretty remarkable group of students.” STMARYSANNAPOLIS.ORG

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CLASS OF 2019 The 2018-2019 school year was a historic one as the Class of 2019 was celebrated as the 70th graduating class from St. Mary’s High School. This important milestone marks 70 years of a unique, morally focused, strong academic experience in a warm, loving Catholic environment for our students and their families.

Rosemary Prophet Gies ‘49, a member of the first graduating class, attended the 2019 Baccalaureate Mass and Commencement Ceremony to celebrate the occasion and was joined by members of the Class of 1959.

The Class of 2019: •

100 percent of the Class of 2019 accepted to a university or college.

Graduates of the Class of 2019 were accepted for admission to 188 colleges and universities.

The Class of 2019 earned over $11 million in academic scholarships.

22 students will be attending a Catholic university.

The Class of 2019 will attend colleges and universities in 22 different states and the District of Columbia.

24 students will play a sport at the collegiate level.

20 students will enter honors programs.

Valedictorian: Aidan Doud Salutatorian: Rylei Smith

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University Acceptances Albright College American University Anne Arundel Community College Arcadia University Arizona State University Auburn University Bates College Baylor University Belmont University Bethany College Boston College Boston University Brandeis University Bridgewater College Bucknell University Cabrini University California University of Pennsylvania Carleton College Carnegie Mellon University Chatham University Chesapeake College Christopher Newport University Clarion University of Pennsylvania Clemson University Coastal Carolina University Coker College Colgate University College of Charleston College of Southern Maryland College of William & Mary Davidson College Delaware State University Denison University DePaul University Dixie State University Drew University Drexel University East Carolina University Eckerd College Edinboro University of Pennsylvania Elon University Emory University Fairfield University Ferrum College Flagler College Florida Institute of Technology Florida State University Fordham University Franklin & Marshall College

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Frostburg State University Furman University George Mason University Georgia Institute of Technology Gettysburg College Goucher College Grinnell College Grove City College Gwynedd Mercy University Ithaca College Jacksonville University James Madison University Johns Hopkins University Juniata College Kenyon College King’s College La Salle College Lake Forest College Le Moyne College Lebanon Valley College Lehigh University Lenoir-Rhyne University Liberty University Louisiana State University Loyola University Chicago Loyola University Maryland Lycoming College Lynn University Manhattan College Marist College Marquette University Marymount University McDaniel College Merrimack College Messiah College Miami University, Oxford Middle Tennessee State University Millersville University of Pennsylvania Misericordia University Mississippi State University Monmouth College Mount Saint Mary College Mount St. Mary’s University — Maryland Muhlenberg College Old Dominion University Palm Beach Atlantic University Pennsylvania State University Providence College Purdue University Radford University

Randolph-Macon College Regent University Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Roanoke College Rollins College Rowan University Rutgers University — New Brunswick Saint Joseph’s University Saint Leo University Saint Vincent College Salem International University Salisbury University Savannah College of Art and Design Seton Hall University Shenandoah University Shepherd University Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania Simmons University St. John’s College St. Mary’s College of Maryland Stetson University Stevenson University Stockton University Suffolk University Syracuse University Temple University Tennessee State University The Catholic University of America The College of New Jersey The George Washington University The Ohio State University The University of Alabama The University of Arizona The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill The University of Tampa Towson University Tulane University United States Coast Guard Academy United States Merchant Marine Academy United States Naval Academy University of Central Florida University of Colorado at Boulder University of Dayton University of Delaware University of Florida University of Georgia University of Kentucky

University of Louisville University of Lynchburg University of Maine at Farmington University of Mary Washington University of Maryland University College University of Maryland — Baltimore County University of Maryland — College Park University of Miami University of Michigan University of Mississippi University of New Hampshire at Durham University of New Hampshire at Manchester University of New Haven University of North Carolina at Charlotte University of North Carolina at Wilmington University of North Dakota University of Notre Dame University of Pittsburgh University of Rhode Island University of Richmond University of Rochester University of South Carolina University of Tennessee, Knoxville University of Vermont University of Virginia Ursinus College Villanova University Virginia Commonwealth University Virginia Military Institute Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Wake Forest University Washington and Jefferson College Washington and Lee University Washington College Wesley College West Chester University of Pennsylvania West Virginia University West Virginia Wesleyan College Westminster College Widener University Xavier University Yale University York College of Pennsylvania


Service Academy Saints Several members of the Class of 2019 followed a special calling after graduating in the spring— to serve their country.

Six dedicated students moved on to attend service academies after graduating from St. Mary’s High School—two to the U.S. Naval Academy and four received ROTC scholarships. In addition, a member of the Class of 2018 also joined fellow classmates at the U.S. Naval Academy this fall. These Saints truly embody St. Mary’s High School’s values of faith, tradition and excellence. Maggie Aumiller U.S. Naval Academy Callum Hadley Virginia Military Institute — Army ROTC Raymond Healy University of Maryland — Army ROTC Cole Randolph U.S. Naval Academy Claire Richardson Villanova University — Navy ROTC Robert Wilson University of Maryland — Army ROTC Gerard Berzins ‘18 U.S. Naval Academy STMARYSANNAPOLIS.ORG

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Called to Serve— The Booth Family Robert and Gwen Booth and their children have been members of St. Mary’s Parish & School since 2014 when they relocated here from Minot, North Dakota. Ever since then, the Booths have not only seen an impact on their family by being part of the St. Mary’s community, but have also given back in momentous ways to those in need locally and abroad—Haiti to be specific.

T

he Booth family includes five children, all of which have attended or are currently attending St. Mary’s School. As part of a military family, Emily and Brandon, Robert and Gwen’s biological children, attended seven different schools in different states during their first twelve years of education before attending St. Mary’s. Emily completed her senior year at St. Mary’s High School and Brandon completed his junior and senior year at the High School. “As you

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can imagine, it isn’t particularly easy for a junior and senior in high school to start over again,” said Gwen. “Not only was St. Mary’s welcoming, but they had a profound effect on their college prep activities, giving them opportunities that we do not think they would have had at another school.” Joshue Servin (Paco) officially became part of the Booth family mid first semester of his junior year. “From the time he was eight until his freshman year in high school, he resided in a boys group home in northern California.

We met him when we were stationed there from 2010-2012,” said Gwen. Before attending St. Mary’s, Paco had been moved to six different foster care homes and several different schools, putting him behind academically. “After just a few months of being part of St. Mary’s, we went to the high school administration,” said Gwen. The Booths asked if Paco could be admitted midsemester. “Not only did they agree, but they went miles and miles above and beyond to make him feel loved, appreciated and valued,” said Gwen.


Paco was officially the first foster child to graduate from St. Mary’s and is now on track to graduate from college with a bachelor’s degree in sociology. “I would not be where I am today without St. Mary’s,” explained Paco. “Less than fifty percent of foster kids graduate from high school and only three percent go to college. Thanks to my teachers, I am an exception!” After the Booth family had made several trips to Haiti, and around the same time the family joined the St. Mary’s community, they felt a calling to act to help others in need. “Haiti is the third poorest country in the world,” said Gwen. “There are over 400,000 children without parents and one in five children die before the age of six. Fewer than thirty percent of students reach sixth grade and roughly three-quarters of Haitians are unemployed and live in abject poverty.” So, in 2014, the Booths formed The Welcome House, a transitional home for boys in Port-auPrince, Haiti. The goal of The Welcome House is to assist vulnerable children who have become poverty orphans to develop the skills necessary to transition back to their core family and contribute to society. “The Welcome House provides the basic necessities that all children should have,” said Gwen. “We rented a house, hired staff to care for the boys and enrolled them all in school.” The Booths worked through a 501c group, Haiti and Africa Relief Team (H.A.R.T.), that provided medical mission work to St. Jude’s Catholic Parish to start the organization. In working with H.A.R.T., The Welcome House started a mission to fund school lunches for the parish school, which has over 600 students. “In almost all cases, it may be the only meal they eat that day,” said Gwen. Two years ago, through their work with The Welcome House, the Booths were approached by a priest in Haiti to consider adding a fourth member to their family on an F1 visa—MaryAnn Leriche (Annie.) The Booths again approached the administration of St. Mary’s High School and the school worked with the Archdiocese to apply for their first F1 visa. When Annie arrived at St. Mary’s, she spoke little to no English

and most everything about the school was new to her. “Again, the faculty and students went out of their way to be accommodating to Annie,” said Gwen. Annie, who is now in her junior year at St. Mary’s, helped to coordinate a Lenten fundraiser at the school last spring for The Welcome House’s lunch program which generated nearly $6,000, allowing The Welcome House to feed a great deal of children through the end of the school year.

“Not only was St. Mary’s welcoming, but they had a profound effect on their college prep activities, giving them opportunities that we do not think they would have had at another school.” After the success the Booth family saw with Paco and Annie, they approached St. Mary’s Elementary School with one more student— Louvenson (Louie.) Louie was an orphan who the Booths had met years before while in Haiti and fell in love with. Louie is now in the fourth grade, also on an F1 visa. Through The Welcome House, the Booths also initiated an annual Christmas party in order to provide both the children of The Welcome House and the parish school in Haiti with additional support during the holidays. For the party, The Welcome House asks for donations of both basic items such as socks, underwear and toiletries as well as toys. Gwen explained that this party “in nearly all cases allows children to have a toy for the first time in their lives.” Last year, the Elementary School sponsored a fundraiser for the Christmas party and as a result, The Welcome House was able to distribute gifts and other critical personal items to over 800

children in Haiti. “The faculty, parents and many of the kids of St. Mary’s have donated clothes, toys and money over the past four years, raising thousands of dollars for food and bringing joy to not only the boys in The Welcome House, but also to the village that supports them,” said Gwen. The goal is to expand the mission of The Welcome House to help as many children in need in Haiti as possible. “There are children that need The Welcome House that we cannot accommodate, and our goal is to broaden our support for the people in Haiti,” said Gwen. In order to achieve this, Emily has recently stepped up to broaden the organization’s scope. She has started a 501c titled Project Fleri that will incorporate the current children under the care of The Welcome House and expand to help even more children and their families. The mission of Project Fleri is to continue to invest in the education of all of the children the Booth family and The Welcome House has worked with while making sure they connect with family if at all possible and ensure they have options to consider a long-term career path. “All of these kids have so much potential for success, they just need someone to invest in them,” said Gwen. Another long term goal of the project would be to start a coffee business which would provide job opportunities to teenagers after completing school. “We believe that solutions in Haiti come from supporting families and creating jobs,” explained Gwen. In addition, the Booths hope that at least four new homes can be built each year for those most in need. The expectation for The Welcome House, now called Project Fleri Transitional Home, is to continue to take in kids that are in need of basic life necessities, education, love and guidance,” said Gwen. “Our hope is also to bring some economic stability to their families in order to provide a sustainable future and one that is not strictly reliant on donations.” TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE WELCOME HOUSE, NOW PROJECT FLERI, VISIT WWW.PROJECTFLERI.COM OR EMAIL EMILYBOOTH@PROJECTFLERI.COM STMARYSANNAPOLIS.ORG

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Saints Walk “Once a Saint, Always a Saint” Twenty-five members of the Class of 2019 graduated as members of St. Mary’s 13-Year Club, having started their journey at St. Mary’s in the Elementary School as kindergarteners. Each year, this unique group of seniors dresses in their cap and gown and welcomes the next generation of members—current kindergarteners—before retracing their steps throughout campus.

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Winter White Fleur flakes fell at the St. Mary’s School 33rd Annual Auction, Winter White, held on December 1, 2018. Over 230 people attended this winter wonderland event, raising over $63,000 to support the School Annual Fund, directly impacting our 1,300 students. The gracious generosity and partnership of parents, alumni, parishioners and friends in the community make it possible for St. Mary’s to continue to provide a unique, morally focused, strong academic experience in a warm, loving environment for our families and students in the finest Catholic tradition. A special thank you to our dedicated team of volunteers who make this annual event a success each and every year. 2018 Auction Chairs: Emily Herman, Julie Donnelly, Leah Caputo, Kate McNealy, Monique Kelso, Maggie Cowdrey, Jennifer Dieux, Erica Snyder, Tiffany Kupstas, Cathy Shaw, Chyrell Cardillo and Laura Cylc. STMARYSANNAPOLIS.ORG

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Tee It Up It was a beautiful day for golf at the 28th Annual Tee it Up for St. Mary’s Golf Tournament. Over 150 parents, alumni and parishioners showed off their skills and had a fun day of competition at Renditions Golf Course on Thursday, May 16, 2019 to support the St. Mary’s Tuition Angel Program.

This sold out event raised over $75,000 for the tuition assistance program which provides support for children and families in need who value a Catholic education. Since its inception in 1991, this tournament has provided more than half a million dollars for students and families of St. Mary’s School. Tuition Raffle Winners: The Thalenberg Family A special thank you goes out to our dedicated 2019 “Tee It Up” Golf Committee for making this event such a success: Greg Ostrowski Kevin Stodd Chris LaCroix Deborah Kennedy Lewis Williams Will Sheils Chris Latorre

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James Mackey Kara Lloyd Michael Walden Champe Andrews Michael Kummer Alex Kruthaupt Kenny Barnard

Kevin O’Brien Terry Walden Jean Nutwell Kelly Chesnick Suzanne Crawford


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Alumni Board We asked our Alumni Board a couple questions about their St. Mary’s experiences: 1. What is your favorite memory from your time at St. Mary’s? 2. What excites you about coming back to St. Mary’s today?

President: Kevin Stodd ‘00

Christina Billos ‘12

1. My favorite memory is beating Gilman in lacrosse the first game of my junior year season up in Baltimore. At the time, Gilman was nationally ranked #1 and had several high school and future college All Americans. I will never forget the excitement of that victory.

1. There are many great memories…including performing with the dance team at halftime for football/basketball games, venturing outside of the classroom to complete class projects in the Carroll Gardens, and advancing our leadership/education alongside our faith.

2. The best thing about coming back to St. Mary’s is seeing familiar faces, as many alumni are still involved within the school. St. Mary’s continues to have a strong community and is so unique with its ideal location in historic downtown Annapolis along the waterfront. Vice President: Gregory Ostrowski ‘98 1. The people! We had such a broad group of friends and our class really enjoyed each other. So many of us seem to have met our lifelong friends at St. Mary’s and that seems to be a commonality even amongst other classes. Saints stick together! 2. As part of the Alumni Board, it’s been great to reengage with the school: to learn about new initiatives and advancements while seeing the focus on history and traditions as well. It’s also been great to get to meet so many Saints from other years and time frames and see the same commonalities between us. 30

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2. It’s important for us to engage and reunite the community following graduation. It allows us to continue to build upon the endless opportunities available (networking, careers, tools for education, etc.) for future Saints! Samantha (Magnolia) Bistany ‘07 1. There are too many favorite memories of my time at St. Mary’s to pick one. However, I will always remember the comradery and family aspect of St. Mary’s. From the priests, staff and students I always felt that I was surrounded with love and support. 2. Being on the Alumni Board excites me most about coming back to St. Mary’s. I love to be involved with the school and be a part of organizing events where we can be together as alumni and reminisce on our years at St. Mary’s. I thank St. Mary’s for my long-life friends. I am so proud to be a Saint.


Lauren Bettis ‘01 1. The memories made with amazing friends by being part of the basketball and soccer programs. 2. Coming back to an institution that made such a meaningful impact on my life and having the opportunity to be involved in its continued growth. Margo Ambrosetti Cook ‘02 1. My favorite memory is Spirit Week senior year and the pirate ship pep rally stomp routine. We had a really fun time putting that together with a bunch of people participating. 2. I love seeing the kids rush out after the bell rings to head to their sports practices, laughing with their friends. Those were the best of times! James Ellis ‘80 1. The Penny Sale, playing Iddy Biddy Basketball for the Cowboys for Mr. Klose, the homemade rolls from the cafeteria, Mrs. Bembe, meeting such wonderful Redemptorist priests and being named after one in Father James O’Malley, making lifelong friends, meeting such wonderful teachers throughout the 12 years I was in school, playing on the 1980 undefeated and #1 nationally ranked lacrosse team, watching St. Mary’s grow over those years. 2. Well I have never left. After graduating from St. Mary’s and Maryland my wife and I have resided in Annapolis and had two wonderful sons, Jake ‘14 and Luke ‘18. Just seeing St. Mary’s grow. I have been part of some great organizations at school— the President of the Athletic Association and a Board member of The Royal Blue Club. Being able to raise monies for our new field and Team House was tremendous. A long way from Weems Whelan. I am excited to be part of the Alumni Board now and make sure we keep bringing back more alumni to be more involved in our great school through tailgates, happy hours, golf tournaments and many more events. I look forward to continuing this for as long as I am allowed to.

Molly Hauck ‘96 1. My favorite memories from my time at St. Mary’s are Spirit Weeks, Homecoming and Prom, and attending football and lacrosse games. These were fun each year from freshman to senior year. Senior year, our Spirit Week was talked about years after we were gone so that one is probably my most favorite. 2. The community. Connecting with everyone I met during my time at St. Mary’s and everyone I’ve met from being a part of St. Mary’s. We’re lucky to have such a special, unique community. David Jones ‘91 1. My favorite memory from my time at St. Mary’s is being with my best friends from first grade to twelfth grade. The bond that we formed taking classes together, roaming the halls together, having recess together, playing sports together- it was a very special time in my life and St. Mary’s played a major role in who I am today. 2. Luckily I get to go back to St. Mary’s quite often with all three of my kids currently attending the Elementary School. It’s very exciting and special to see my kids walk the same halls and sit in the same classrooms that I did almost 30 years ago. Janie (Hare) Kramer ‘62 1. I have many great memories of my days at St. Mary’s High School. I was a junior varsity and varsity cheerleader so I guess some of my favorite memories are cheering at the football, basketball and lacrosse games. Our class of 1962 was very close and we are still very close. We have had great reunions and we get together at least twice a year for lunch. Some come from as far away as Pennsylvania and North Carolina for our lunches. 2. I serve on the Alumni Board to keep the family spirit alive for the students at St. Mary’s so they can carry that spirit of family and friendship through the rest of their lives.

Kevin Gattie ‘94

Michael Bass ‘07

1. Winning the MSA lacrosse championship.

1. Spirit week.

2. Great seeing old classmates and teachers.

2. Hearing what is going on with the school and the progress and updates being made.

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MARGO COOK

Alumni Weekend We celebrated Alumni Weekend April 11-14 this year with events including the Generation of Saints Breakfast, Alumni Lacrosse Tailgate and the Distinguished Alumni Dinner. Thank you to all who came out to celebrate and support St. Mary’s! 2019 Distinguished Alumni Service Award: Kevin Shanley ‘85 Achievement: Nancy Duden ‘79 Young Alumni: Amelia Jernigan ‘01 Alumni Notes: Mark (‘97) and Becky Maloney welcomed Henry Morrison Maloney on 1/8/2019. Dominic J. Souza, Esq.’93, recipient of the Distinguished Young Alumni Award in 2013, will soon be celebrating his 20th wedding anniversary with his wife Hillary. Dominic has five sons: Gabriel, Nicholas, Nathaniel, Vincent and Thomas and is a board member of St. Mary’s Royal Blue Club. Dominic is the Managing Principal at Souza LLC / Attorneys in Annapolis. Margo Cook was honored by the YWCA of Annapolis as a TWIN (Tribute to Women & Industry) award winner. The award recognizes the exceptional vision, contributions and accomplishments of women in both the workplace and community. Margo is a financial adviser at 1 North Wealth Services. Dominic Lamolinara (‘10) joined St. Mary’s staff as Director of Admissions. He also serves as an assistant coach for the Boys Varsity Lacrosse team. Brian Kingsbury ‘97, head men’s lacrosse coach at Lynn University, was named Sunshine State Conference Coach of the Year for the second time in his six seasons at the university.

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DOMINIC SOUZA AND FAMILY


BRIAN KINGSBURY

DOMINIC LAMOLINARA

AMELIA JERNIGAN

NANCY DUDEN

MARK & HENRY MORRISON MALONEY

KEVIN SHANLEY AND FAMILY

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Parish Picnic Gentle breezes and sunny skies, car races and funnel cakes, cheeseburgers and ice cream, singing and fellowship. These are just a few things that made our 2019 Annual Parish Picnic such a memorable event. The landscape of the Carroll Gardens provided the picturesque setting for the nearly 500 parishioners, young and old, who gathered for this traditional day of comradery. The day was filled with smiling faces, welcome wishes, easy conversations and even a few words from our new pastor, Father Pat. A special thank you goes out to the St. Mary’s Athletic Association, Venturing Crew 422 (a coed unit of the Boy Scouts of America,) Pastoral Council and all of our additional dedicated volunteers for making this year’s event such a success!

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2018-2019 Service Awards Thank you to our Parish & School staff members for their many years of dedicated service.

5 Years of Service Jamie Kupstas Kate McNealy Pamela Clark Claire Dillion Allison Fondale Mindi Imes Thomas Kettmer Bethany Love Kaitlyn Marsh Melissa Nisbett Carey Ross 10 Years of Service Vernon Crawford Julie O’Malley Anna O’Day Ellen Smith 15 Years of Service Robin Barbrick Jose Marquina Gail Hocking Kathleen Norwood Paul O’Hearn 20 Years of Service John Buzzelli Jennifer Feeney Mary Morgan Laraine Olechowski 25 Years of Service Barbara Moulden Heidi Willet 30 Years of Service John “Christopher” Morgan 36

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School Sisters of Notre Dame Award: Suzanne Golini (Elementary School) Claire Dillion (High School) School Board Award: Elizabeth Wilson (Elementary School) Maureen Howard (High School)


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St. Mary’s parish Financials July 1, 2018—June 30, 2019 Consolidated Financial Report

Revenues, Gains & Other Support

2018-2019

2017-2018

Tuition & Fees 14,683,269 14,375,977 Offertory & Collections* 2,850,213 2,970,481 Contributions & Fundraising 2,195,452 2,237,636 Endowment Income and Gains 736,522 725,867 Other Income 657,323 623,094 Loss on Disposal of PP&E (178,161) (60,765) Total Revenues, Gains & Other Support

$20,944,618

$20,872,290

*Restoration and Maintenance not included as it cannot be used for operational expenses

Expenses Instructional 9,734,881 9,889,862 Tuition Assistance & Scholarships 1,592,540 1,370,221 Ministries & Other Programs 2,484,220 2,508,069 Athletics & Student Activities 1,301,459 1,004,008 Diocesan Assessment 657,610 684,212 Technology 368,153 388,726 General & Administrative 2,568,390 2,498,455 Development 690,087 750,660 Loss on Uncollectible Pledges Total Expenses $19,397,340 $19,094,213 Net Income $1,547,278 $1,778,077

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Trends in Offertory $3.0M $2.9M $2.8M $2.7M $2.6M 6/30/11

6/30/13

6/30/15

6/30/17

6/30/19

Investments - Endowment 2018-2019 2017-2018 Catholic Community Foundation 3,001,039 2,944,317 Common Fund 5,989,993 5,394,478 Total Endowment $8,991,032 $8,338,795

Restoration and Maintenance Funds Collected 692,708 667,836 Funds Expended 654,044 634,311 Net Placed in Reserve for Future Use

$38,664

$33,525

Projects completed in 2018-2019 Replaced rectory elevator Repaired rectory kitchen Upgraded security cameras throughout campus Moved support staff to Carroll House Repaired ceiling at St. John Neumann Replaced flooring in the Fine Arts Gym Increased security of classroom doors Replaced the chiller for Notre Dame Hall HVAC

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Your support allows St. Mary’s Parish and School to excel! There are many ways to give back to the St. Mary’s community. Please reach out to the Advancement Office at (410) 268-3467 or Advancement@stmarysannapolis.org for more information on how you can support St. Mary’s Parish & School and for details on gift designation. For online recurring giving, visit faithdirect.net and to gift a one-time online donation, visit www.stmarysannapolis.org/give. St. Mary’s Admissions Directors: St. Mary’s High School Admissions Director Dominic Lamolinara (410) 990-4236 dlamolinara@stmarysannapolis.org St. Mary’s Elementary School Admissions Director Marybeth Holzer (410) 990-4135 mholzer@stmarysannapolis.org Office of Parish Advancement: Director of Development, Jill Rowlett Communications & Marketing Director, Lauren Hartman Events & Alumni Director, Jennifer Holland

Design & Production by MH Media Strategies Printing by Tray, Inc. STMARYSANNAPOLIS.ORG

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“Let us run to Mary, and, as her little children, cast ourselves into her arms with a perfect CONFIDENCE.� - Saint Francis de Sales

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Saint Mary's Moorings Parish & Fleur De Lis School Publication  

Saint Mary's Moorings Parish & Fleur De Lis School Publication