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Adapt Operate Message Executive Director And Thrive

2020 ANNUAL REPOR T

ST LUCIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

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ANNUAL REPORT 2020


ST LUCIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

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ANNUAL REPORT 2020


ST LUCIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

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Members 2019/2020

123 Digital Ltd 1st National Bank St Lucia Ltd. Accela Marketing Ltd Admac Ltd. Allweld Incorporated Amarna Consult Ltd Atwell Dalgliesh St Lucia Ltd. Automotive Art (St. Lucia) Ltd. Axcel Finance (St. Lucia) Ltd. Barbay Ltd. Baron Foods Ltd. Basic Blue Ltd. BDO Eastern Caribbean Beachcomber Ltd. BOSLIL Bank Cable & Wireless (St. Lucia) Ltd Capita Financial Services Inc Carasco & Son Ltd. Caribbean Electric Utility Services Corporation Caribbean Grains Saint Lucia Caribbean LED Lighting (St. Lucia) Inc Caribbean Metals Ltd. Celestial Self Development Corporation CGM Gallagher CIBC First Caribbean International Bank Coco Resorts Inc Colombian Emeralds International Computer and Business Services Ltd Cox & Company Ltd. CPJ St. Lucia Ltd Digicel (St. Lucia) Ltd Dilly’s Ltd. Duty Free Caribbean Holdings Ltd. East Caribbean Financial Holding Co. Ltd. Eastern Caribbean Collective Organisation for Music Rights (ECCO) Inc. Ernst & Young Services Essential Hardware Ltd. Eudovic’s Art Studio Export Saint Lucia Fast Cash St. Lucia Ltd. FDL Consult Inc FDL Pest Control Solutions ST LUCIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Federal Express Ferrands Food Products Ltd. Financial Centre Corporation Financial Investment and Consultancy Services Ltd. First Citizens Investment Services Limited Foster & Ince Cruise Services (St. Lucia) Ltd. Frank B Armstrong St. Lucia Ltd. G4S Security Services Ltd. Goddard Catering Group (St. Lucia) Ltd. Golden Eggs Farms Ltd. Grant Thornton GTM Group of Insurance Companies Guardsman (St. Lucia) Ltd Hebah Ltd. Invest St. Lucia IBS Inc Solutions J Q Charles Ltd. Johnson’s Hardware Ltd. KMA Consulting Ltd Laboratory Services & Consultation Ltd Lewis Industries Ltd Massy Distribution St. Lucia Massy Stores (SLU) Ltd Mediazone Productions Ltd Minvielle & Chastanet Ltd Nagico St. Lucia Limited National Research & Development Foundation North American Assemblies Ltd Pan American Life Insurance Company Ltd Peter & Company Distribution PricewaterhouseCoopers East Caribbean RBC Royal Bank of Canada Real Foods Inc Renee’s Construction Renwick and Company Ltd Republic Bank (EC) Ltd Royalton Saint Lucia Resort & Spa Sagicor Life Inc. Saint Lu Woodworking Ltd Saint Lucia Distillers Group of Companies Saint Lucia Insurances Sandals Grande St. Lucian 4

ANNUAL REPORT 2020


Sandals Halcyon Beach SMJ Beverages St. Lucia Ltd SOL EC Ltd. Spice Travel St. Lucia Cold Storage St. Lucia Development Bank St. Lucia Electricity Services Ltd Sterling Insurance Services St. Lucia Ltd Sun General Insurance Inc The Beacon Insurance Company Ltd Tri-Finity & Associates Tropical Shipping St. Lucia Ltd Ultra Mart Inc Unicomer St. Lucia Ltd Union Automotive Ltd/M Motors Union Vale Estate

Valley Cold Storage Water and Sewerage Company Inc West Technology Group Windward & Leeward Brewery Ltd Windward Island Gases Yello Media Group

New Members 2019/2020

Bumper Plus International CMS Construction Services Hewannora Air Cargo Services Km² Solutions St. Lucia Medical Air Services Association of St. Lucia Inc. Right Production Management Top Stone Fabrication Ltd. Tropix Trading Limited Vision Express West Technology Group Sol-lucian Inc

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ANNUAL REPORT 2020


Mission Vision, Values OUR MISSION

To foster sustainable business growth and development of our members through strong leadership, strategic advocacy and innovative services while enabling them to positively impact their communities

OUR VISION

We are the driving force for sustainable business and community prosperity in St. Lucia

CORE VALUES • Results Oriented • Accountability • Inclusiveness • Integrity • Member - Oriented

ST LUCIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

The St. Lucia Chamber of Commerce, Industry and Agriculture Orange Park Commercial Centre Bois D’Orange, Gros Islet P.O. Box 482, Castries, St Lucia T. 758 452 3165 E. info@stluciachamber.org SLCOCIA W. www.stluciachamber.org 6

ANNUAL REPORT 2020


SLCCIA Strategic Map

OUTCOME SLCCIA Long-Term Value

SLCCIA Value Proposition

Enhanced Value for Members

Strategic Advocacy & Pro Business Policy

Business Development & Education

IMPACT Enhanced Value for Economy & Society

Networking & Communication

Member Engagement

Brand Value & Members Recognition

OUTPUTS

Operational Excellence

SLCCIA Sustainability a Model Oranization

INPUTS Financial Sustainability

Organizational Capacity & Leadership


Contents

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13

15

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Networking & Communication

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Adding Value to members through partnerships & networking

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Member Engagement

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Chamber at a Glance

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Event Partners

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Chamber by Numbers

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Chamber’s Response to COVID-19

COVID-19 Impact Survey (Take 2) Summary

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Message From The Minister

Business Development & Education

Brand Value and Member Recognition

Chamber At Work

The Chamber Southern Member Program 2020

Message From The President

10th Annual St. Lucia Business Awards

ST LUCIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Executive Director’s Overview

Looking Ahead

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Strategic Advocacy

Financial Inclusion of MSME

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Chamber Planning for and Building a Better Future

ANNUAL REPORT 2020


NUTURING EMERGING

Executives PROGRAMME

Train your promising young executives to be well-rounded, highly skilled & informed. Executives will be given the opportunities to attend business lectures, workshops, netwroking events & training opportunities.

Orange Park Commercial Centre, Bois D’Orange, Gros Islet P.O. Box 482, Castries, St Lucia T. 758 452 3165 | E. info@stluciachamber.org www.stluciachamber.org

MEMBER VALUE PROGRAM BENEFITS TO BECOMING A MEMBER:

• Discounts and special offer on valuable goods & services sold by other Chamber Members • Access to similar discounts and value from other participating Regional Members • Chamber Multi-Firm Pension Plan

BECOME A MEMBER TODAY!

ST LUCIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Orange Park Commercial Centre, Bois D’Orange, Gros Islet P.O. Box 482, Castries, St Lucia T. 758 452 3165 | E. info@stluciachamber.org www.stluciachamber.org

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ANNUAL REPORT 2020


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Message From The Minister

s Minister with responsibility for Commerce, International Trade, Investment, Enterprise Development and Consumer Affairs, it is my pleasure to provide these brief remarks for the 2020 Annual Report of the St. Lucia Chamber of Commerce, Industry and Agriculture. Considering how 2020 unfolded and the impact that the global pandemic has had on our business sector and our economy as a whole, I am indeed thankful for the continued tenacity and resilience of the Chamber and its membership, in helping our economy rebound from this global COVID-19 pandemic. While we are still in recovery mode, I must acknowledge and express my immense thanks and appreciation for the work being done by the Executive of the Chamber of Commerce, in helping our businesses become even more creative, innovative, progressive and robust while operating in a COVID-19 environment. Having said this, I want to extend my very best to the membership; with hopes for the continued success and drive of the St. Lucia Chamber of Commerce, Industry and Agriculture in building a better, more sustainable private sector, as you celebrate yet another year of excellence and notable successes. Formally established in 1884, I note that the year 2020 marks your 136th year in existence, serving as further testament of the excellent leadership, resilience and progressive nature of the Chamber. This milestone has further highlighted the strengths and commitment of the institution as a key partner to the Government in the development of our economy. This year as you all know, has brought about new and unexpected challenges that would have had near crippling effects on industry, and would have resulted in a zero to negative growth in the bottom lines of most within your membership, as it has done with our country’s own Gross Domestic Product. Few would argue that 2020 has perhaps been one of the most difficult within the Chamber’s 136 years of existence as we all continue to grapple with an assailing health pandemic, one that threatens to bring the global economy to its knees, while already undoing years of developmental gains within societies, both wealthy and impoverished. With so much having already been said and written about the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic however, I will

opt here to refrain from further iteration, only to say that we may have been knocked down, but we certainly have not, and will not be knocked out. How easy it would be during this difficult period, to close shop and hold steadfastly to your few reserves amidst all this economic uncertainty? After all, it is only human nature to seek shelter during times of storm, and one can forgive those who do just that. But rather, I say to you within the business community, that “Fortune Favors the Brave”, and it is within these times of uncertainty that opportunity certainly exists. My message to you is thus - Go boldly and take full advantage of the opportunities that are presented; the opportunity to review, re-imagine and reposition yourselves on the domestic and international markets; the opportunity to capitalize on the evolving world of electronic commerce and online presence; the opportunity to strengthen your internal processes and procedures as you seek to enhance efficiencies and effectiveness in responding to your customer’s needs; the opportunity to pivot your operations in pursuit of new markets and new product lines that will serve as the foundation for future successes and long term

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growth; the opportunity to collaborate across multiple sectors and multiple disciplines, forming new alliances that will serve you in effectively achieving your shared objectives. For our part, I want to assure you that my team and I within the Ministry of Commerce, are quite mindful of the tenuous circumstances under which you operate presently and are working assiduously towards easing some of these burdens while also proactively seeking new opportunities for trade, collaboration and growth. Our phased interventions form part of a wider program of support across the Government of Saint Lucia, as outlined in the Honorable Prime Minister’s previous announcements on the Economic Recovery and Resilience Plan. Already, we have moved towards enhancing our own Government Procurement policies that would serve to better direct the consumption power of Government towards local businesses and in particular our Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises (MSMEs). This enhancement of procurement policies would not only be beneficial to our St. Lucian manufacturers and service providers, but will also provide gains to MSMEs within our retail and distributive sector in sourcing product lines that are not manufactured locally. Further, we are at an advanced stage in the process of amending our Fiscal Incentives legislation in order to expedite the process and better serve our qualifying manufacturers and service providers. From a trade facilitation perspective, Saint Lucia continues with its efforts at implementing the provisions of the World Trade Organization Trade Facilitation Agreement (TFA) in order to realize its intended objective of expediting the movement, release and clearance of goods, including goods in transit. To this end, this Ministry is avidly pursuing the implementation of the Single Window provision. More specifically, we are currently reviewing project proposals from some of the most reputable Electronic Single Window providers to make a determination of which system would best meet the needs of Saint Lucia’s business eco-system. Moreover, plans are at an advanced stage for the much-needed upgrade of ASYCUDA World. It is anticipated that this upgrade will further increase efficiency in the customs clearance process, improve revenue control, lower trade costs, and substantially reduce the administrative burden on the trading community. These trade facilitation initiatives can also be linked to our efforts with regards to the Ease of Doing Business in Saint Lucia, whereby the Ministry of Commerce has now implemented an online platform for Trade License applications. This platform will offer applicants noted ANNUAL REPORT 2020

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improvements in efficiency, convenience, accuracy, and response time. In addition, I am pleased to note that we are at an advanced stage of issuance of a revised Trade License Bill. The Trade License Act, Cap 13.04 which was enacted to police the entry of foreign corporate entities in areas deemed sensitive enough to require protection, has been the subject of extensive review for the last 2 years. This review was spurred on by the realization that the current regime no longer adequately and efficiently serves its mandate. By the end of 2020, this act will be replaced with a more robust regime to ensure adequate protection for investors and nationals alike. Another key initiative that I would like to bring to your attention at this point, is that of the ‘Love Saint Lucia Campaign’ which was launched in July of 2020, with our efforts continuing across all Departments of the Government of Saint Lucia. The Campaign considers the situational context whereby the economy’s external earnings through tourism and goods exports have staggered under the current economic crisis, and seeks to promote domestic economic activity over the short to medium term as a means of maintaining economic stability. In principle, we believe that by guiding the combined consumption power of our Public sector, Private sector and Civil society towards increased support for local industry, we can further relieve some of the current economic strain while also providing a foundation for the emergence of a new and more prosperous Saint Lucia. Other ongoing initiatives worth noting here include the implementation of Article 164 of the Revised Treaty of Chaguaramas titled, “Promotion of Industrial Development.” The Article 164 Regime covers 15 product groups across 36 tariff lines and seeks to promote industrial development among the Less Developed Countries (LDCs) of CARICOM such as Saint Lucia. The Regime provides that LDCs may, if necessary, and as a temporary measure, suspend community origin treatment on imports of a specified list of goods, imported from the More Developed Countries (MDCs) of CARICOM and from third countries. Implemented in Saint Lucia as of January 2020, the objective of the regime is to increase the participation of LDCs in intra-regional trade, in particular their levels of exports to the region, thereby increasing the level of equity in the distribution of the benefits from the CARICOM Single Market and Economy (CSME). The regime seeks to achieve its objectives through two approaches, namely, through the provision of tariff protection to the specified list of Article 164 products and secondly through the implementation of accompanying or support measures for the Article 164 industries to help build their competitiveness. In essence, the regime is a CARICOM-wide initiative aimed at promoting industrial development of infant

ST. LUCIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INDUSTRY AND AGRICULTURE


and sensitive industries in the Less Developed Countries of CARICOM. The Ministry anticipates that our manufacturing sector will increase their production capacity and export competitiveness as a result of this regime, while benefitting from enhanced intra-regional trade. In this regard, we are also cognizant of the perceived negative impact that the implementation of the Article 164 regime may have on the Retail and Distributive sector in the short term, and will continue to work closely with that sector to find pliable solutions and decisive interventions to mitigate these factors, while keeping a focused eye on the long term benefits of Article 164 for the overall economy. Of course, I could go further in detailing these and some of the many additional initiatives already underway throughout the various departments under my Ministry’s purview, including the upcoming Business Incubator Program being spearheaded by Invest Saint Lucia, our handholding efforts aimed at Micro and Small Enterprises under the tutelage of SEDU and the tremendous strides being made through Export Saint Lucia and the Saint Lucia Bureau of Standards within

their respective mandates. However, I will instead choose to end here, leaving you with hope for a brighter New Year and greater things to look forward to in 2021. You can have every assurance that the Ministry of Commerce, International Trade, Investment, Enterprise Development and Consumer Affairs, and the wider Government of Saint Lucia are doing all in our power towards developing a robust and diverse Saint Lucian economy. In this regard, we look forward to the continued support of the St. Lucia Chamber of Commerce, Industry and Agriculture and its entire membership as we, the Government of Saint Lucia, remain resolute in our support to all of you. I thank you and once again congratulate you on the occasion of your 136th Anniversary. Hon. Bradly Felix Minister of Commerce, International Trade, Investment, Enterprise Development & Consumer Affairs

always there when you need us most

We've been here since 1964, working long and hard... through Saint Lucia's successes... through the challenges... we've been powering lives, dreams and communities.

That's the Power of Caring!

Sans Souci | P. O. Box 230 | Castries | Saint Lucia. T: 758-457-4400 | F: 758-457-4409 | E: connected@lucelec.com f thepowerofcaring |u powerofcaring | W: www.lucelec.com ST. LUCIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INDUSTRY AND AGRICULTURE

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ANNUAL REPORT 2020


Message From The President

S

erving as the President of the oldest and most important private sector organization in St. Lucia has honestly been a real privilege for me, especially as the Chamber is in its one hundred and thirty sixth year. The year was tumultuous to say the least. The unexpected challenge of the COVID-19 Global Pandemic has upended all of our lives, forcing upon us once inconceivable ways of living and doing business. I trust that, nonetheless, we have all learned much from this experience about ourselves and our businesses. I for one, have learned quite a bit from this experience. As St. Lucians we have had the opportunity to develop a stronger sense of community, of shared interests and responsibility. We have no doubt developed a greater appreciation for those who work on the front line, both in the public and private sector. I am certain that all of us have developed a heightened awareness of the more vulnerable in our society. There is thus a clear need for us to help empower, each and every one, citizens, companies and communities to be “more responsible, resilient, and committed to their own recovery, growth and prosperity”. The reality of living in a small very open country has revealed, glaringly, that we are in a global interdependent world, connected not just by ITC and mobile devices, but by goods, services and diseases. We are no longer insulated from the global realities, it is just a matter of time before the global wave reaches our shores. We thus must think differently about business continuity, risk, value and supply chains. We must make a greater effort to live and operate by the maxims of our elders “don’t’ put all your eggs in the same basket”. Now, more than ever, the idea of diversification must move from a development concept to concrete action through decisive steps by our country at all levels. I call on all, to play your part in meeting this new challenge. I firmly believe that our Chamber has stood out as a key and critical national institution in helping and supporting the national COVID-19 Pandemic response. Moreover, it is our belief that we did a great job in assisting our members in particular. While we may not have delivered fully on our planned 2019/2020 agenda, we were able to pivot and respond to the

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emerging needs of members. We continued to deliver on our membership promises and value proposition. Through the provision of strategic, vital and timely delivered webinars, meetings, engagements and e-training we endeavored to help members adapt and operate through this pandemic. We collaborated with other private sector partners and agencies as well as government to ensure that the collective interest of members, wider business community, citizens and nation were taken account of and guarded. Our Chamber continues to evolve and is primed to help members, the wider business community and our nation “Adapt, Operate and Thrive!” in this new emerging, yet uncertain economic environment. Our Chamber has been the most important and influential voice of the business community. We have been, by design, deliberate, measured, and calm and composed as uncertainty ruled the day. We identified and recommended solutions while others pointed out our problems, we adapted and found paths of collaboration to help our nation, instead of engaging in less productive public criticism. As we have often said, “our voices are not often shouted, our sword is not often drawn, we labour long and hard, let no one doubt our resolve”.

ST. LUCIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INDUSTRY AND AGRICULTURE


As our nation continues this journey into uncharted territory, the Chamber will undoubtedly continue to be relevant and will play its part. Our Board of Directors, the Chamber Executive Director, Brian Louisy, and his team at the Secretariat will continue to translate program ideas into action and serve you our members. I can assure you that if any organization is well positioned to assist members adapt, operate and chart a course to thriving in the next few years, it is the St. Lucia Chamber of Commerce, Industry and Agriculture. Yet, as you know, we can only do so with the continued support of you our members. Only as the President of the Chamber, have I had the privilege to fully understand the breadth and depth of the Chamber’s reach. There is an incredible (sometimes unrealistic) expectation of the St. Lucia Chamber of Commerce, from members, future members, public agencies, public officers, the donor community, government, political parties, citizens, civil society and international development agencies. Our advocacy agenda is long and ever changing, the services we

offered was limited by capacity constraints, while representation and speaking on issues from social to political is par for the course. I am therefore more convinced that we, the business community and individuals must continue and in fact, increase our support to the Chamber as its work is crucial at this time and it has and continues to play a greater role in our businesses survival than we take time to assess and admit. This is the time when the mutual need (Chamber and Members) is clear and required. Support and get more involved in the Chamber. I wish to thank the Board of Directors for their support over the years as they spared no time to ensure the Chamber remained on course. It was truly a collective effort and an absolute pleasure serving. My gratitude also goes out to the Chamber Secretariat, our Executive Director Brian Louisy and his team, many thanks for a job well done. Thank you all for the support you have given the Board over the years, executing our initiatives. Thank you for the opportunity to serve, it has been an education and a worthwhile challenge.

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Executive Director’s Overview

he Chamber, during the last year, continued to be guided by the plans mapped out for Year 2 of the Second Cycle (2019-2021) of the Strategic Transformation Process. As could be expected this was severely affected by the onset of the COVID-19 Pandemic and the ensuing scale back of non-essential commercial and social activity to facilitate the slowing of the spread of the virus on island, to allow Government to prepare health and other national facilities. This led to the Secretariat pivoting to work from home to continue to meet the urgent needs of the membership and play its definitive role as the voice of the St. Lucia Private Sector. The Chamber’s Value Proposition remains; (1) Advocacy and Pro Business Policy, (2) Business Development and Education, (3) Networking and Communication, (4) Member Engagement, and Brand Value and Member Recognition. These are the pillars upon which the Chamber operates off of, all proved themselves to be relevant. We thus only changed the specific actions that had initially been proposed: Our work pivoted to focus on responding to members pandemic induced needs, while keeping our eyes on those critical issues that transcend the pandemic, such as “making it easier to do business” and advancing modernization and transformation of our economy. The pandemic in our view has justified our call for Public Sector Reform, the development of a Port Community Single Window, Customs Reform, Education Reform, and economic restructuring to a more diversified economy. The Secretariat, had earlier in the year, invested in technology to permit greater use of ITC in delivering its services. Our Training Facility had been upgraded through support from the Savings Bank Foundation for International Cooperation. We also invested in a membership management software, ‘Wild Apricot’ to improve tracking and Zoom to help in communicating with members. Throughout the year we engaged the public sector regularly and assertively to ensure members were properly informed and their concerns and interests taken account of. We held numerous, engagements with agencies like, the Department of Labour, the Inland Revenue Department, the Customs and Excise Department, Department of Finance and Economic Development, as well as Physical Planning, the ANNUAL REPORT 2020

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Department of Infrastructure, Ministry of Commerce, WASCO, NEMO, Ministry of Health, the Royal St. Lucia Police Force, Ministry of Agriculture, Ministry of Education and Department of the Environment all in our effort to keep members informed and their interest safe guarded. Many seminars had to be put off in light of the pandemic, while our Business Training and Education took a different focus using primarily e-technology approaches. These focused on finance, business continuity planning, labour relations, leadership and human relations skills. We continued to use our website and digital media to engage with members and expect to intensify this as we move forward. A communications strategy has been commissioned to guide this effort. Our Finances have been affected by the pandemic as many events have had to be cancelled. We also anticipate some fallout in membership subscription due to the impact the pandemic has had and continues to have on members’ finances. Yet, we remain confident that members will continue to value the services and work of the Chamber and continue to support us. The Secretariat Team looks forward and remains prepared to serve in the upcoming year and beyond. Brian Louisy Executive Director Saint Lucia Chamber of Commerce Industry vand Agriculture

ST. LUCIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INDUSTRY AND AGRICULTURE


Strategic Advocacy

Budget Monitor

Engage and Involve Members to ensure they are informed and inform our approach

Engaging Public Sector Agencies

Strategic Advocacy & Pro Business Policy

Getting Down to Business Series

Addressing Current and Trending Issues

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Engagement System

PLAN APPROACH

SEEK MEMBERS VIEWS & INTEREST ON SUBJECT

BUILD MEMBERS KNOWLEDGE & AWARENESS ON THE ISSUE

ATTEMPT TO ARRIVE AT A CHAMBER POSITION OR APPROACH

AGREE ON OBJECTIVES TO BE ACHIEVED

IDENTIFY LEAD ADVOCATE AT LEAST TWO MEMBERS OF ADVOCACY COMMITTEE REQUIRED

REPORT TO BOARD & MEMBERS

AFTER EVENT EVALUATE ACHIEVEMENT

LEAD ADVOCATE SECURES INPUT FROM OTHER MEMBERS

PLAN MEETING OR ENGAGEMENT EVENT

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DETERMINE WHAT SUCCESS LOOKS LIKE

ST. LUCIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INDUSTRY AND AGRICULTURE


Budget Monitor Model ISSUE Law and Order

CHAMBER OBJECTIVE

UPDATE

St. Lucia’s Development of a National Crime Fighting Strategy

Plan to combat crime developed with some clear KPIs

To Monitor Progress on Government Efforts in Fighting Crime

Chamber receives regular updates from RSLPF and Delivery Unit of PM’s Office

To monitor and make input into the process of developing and enacting legislation of Importance to the Business Community.

Consultation and involvement on identified pieces legislation.

To ensure involvement in development and drafting of key pieces of Legislation: Monitoring Progress on Foreclosure, Insolvency and Credit Reporting Legislation

Slow progress on Insolvency and Credit Bureau Legislation, but delays expected to Foreclosure.

Promotion and Increased Support to Local Investment

Development of Specific Regimes and Programs for Local Investors

The Chamber hosted an IPO workshop with the Eastern Caribbean Securities Exchange, to share with members the requirements for listing on the Eastern Caribbean Securities Exchange. Chamber continued to lobby for policy to be more supportive of Local Investors.

Prioritize Agricultural Sector

Raise the Priority Given to Investment in Agriculture to attract and support Youth In Agriculture

Chamber continued to work through the BIT and support the provision of support to the sector. No specific program held in the year.

Trade Facilitation

Implement Port Community Single Window.

That this project has been delayed for over ten years and GOSL. After two cabinet decisions agreeing on action, progress has reversed and a new memorandum to Cabinet and Progress has gone back to the start.

Making it Easier To Do Business

Chamber has argued that Customs should not change the Container Examination Fee to a Processing without implementing reforms that benefit customers by the Agency.

Legislative Agenda

Camber hosted an Executive Luncheon on a “New Paradigm on Imports Exports; St. Kitts & Nevis a Case Study. Chamber also hosted Seminar with Customs & Excise on “Improving the Duty Free System & Technology in St. Lucia.” Manage the Cost of the Public Service

Find creative ways to lower wage bill and increase productivity of the Public Service

Meet and received regular updates from the Public Sector Modernization and assist in progression when necessary. Held “Encounter” on GOSL e-Government agenda, to keep members informed on the Modernization strategy of the Public Service so they can take advantage of the online offerings.

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ISSUE Tax Reform

CHAMBER OBJECTIVE

UPDATE

Remove disincentives to investment in productivity and competitiveness enhancement measures etc.

Chamber continued to call for a tax system that does not create distortions in the economy and is fair, encouraging business to succeed while giving Government resources needed to provide public services. Continued to call for VAT reform, in the apportionment rule and dealing with used goods and in real estate. Engaged IRD on increasing members understanding in how to address payment of quarterly tax installments in light of drastic reduction in income due to COVID. Convened an engagement with the IRD and Members. Continues to dialogue with the IRD on the proposed incentive proposed by Government to firms who maintained high employment levels during COVID-19 Pandemic.

Education & Skills

Debt Management

Reform Education to improve quality of Human Resources available in the private sector

Chamber Representative appointed to the EQUIP Project Steering Committee

A plan for the management of national debt which examines all options for averting crisis.

Chamber continues to monitor the situation and is paying attention to the issue in light of the COVID-19 Crisis.

Chamber has engaged SALCC to discuss preparing the workforce for Next Normal.

Getting Down To Business ISSUE Duty-free

CHAMBER OBJECTIVE

UPDATE

Improve the Operation of and Management of the Duty Free Regime

The Chamber continues to engage the Customs & Excise Department on this issue and hosted a Seminar with Customs & Excise on “Improving the Duty Free System & Technology in St. Lucia.”

Minimize the Leakage of Duty Free Liquor Sold into Local Market, which Government Revenue from Liquor Sales duty Price Control Regime

Review Operational Efficiency and Effectiveness of the Price Control Regime as well as assess the appropriateness of the Margins, and the actual items on the Price Control List

A revised list has been developed but not implemented. The Chamber’s position that the there was no need for price control as a consequence of COVID-19, was endorsed and carried by Government.

Revise the Price Control List Import License Regime

Review the operations and the list of items under the Import License Regime with a view to enhance

There has been no progress on this matter. Ministry of Commerce has in fact declined to remove Article 164 Items from the list of items needing Licenses.

Review the List of items under import License

Chamber has argued that this is double jeopardy, as Article 164 tariff were meant to Replace Licenses.

Assess the need or usefulness of Tarification rather than licenses.

The Chamber will be renewing its work on this as the pandemic demonstrates the value of removing licenses and employing greater trade facilitation.

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ST. LUCIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INDUSTRY AND AGRICULTURE


Current &Trending Issues ISSUE Article 164

Customs Processing Fee Proposal

CHAMBER OBJECTIVE

UPDATE

Insufficient Consultation with all Interested Parties prior to Enactment

Chamber wrote detailed letter Commerce expressing concern.

to

Ministry

of

Not enough focus from the Public Sector on the need for implementation of all the provisions of Article 164.

Chamber convened meeting to advance that full provisions of Article 164 needs to be implemented to ensure the producers get agreed financial and technical support.

Interest only in imposing of Tariffs. Not enough attention and drive for the supporting measures.

Urged the GOSL to aggressively design program of support to producers and approach CDF and CARICOM to fund this obligation.

Significant Price Increase will occur. Public may not understand the reason and may accuse retailers of unfair practices.

Alerted that prices of goods will rise due to Article 164. Pointed out errors in the Statutory Instrument as goods that were not targeted were impacted resulting in higher prices to consumers. (Aerated beverages and non-white flour)

Producers will only receive short term market price differential with tarification. They will not get the substantive support to improve their structural competitiveness.

Convened Meeting to urge GOSL to amend the Statutory Instrument. (done for waters not flour as yet)

At end of period LDC producers will be seeking continued extension of Article and MDC’s will argue that Article I64 does not work and call for its end and LDC producer may be out of business.

Requested that impact on goods be monitored to assess the impact of the Article 164.

That Customs is seeking to change the method of charging for clearing containers to private sector after working hours. Customs and Excise are not showing sufficient interest in addressing operational inefficiencies.

Met with Customs & Excise Department to understand proposal. Wrote to Comptroller disagreeing with proposal and made suggestions that a broader look be taken rather than just increasing costs to importer Hosted a Luncheon on A New Paradigm for Import & Export: St. Kitts & Nevis A Case Study” To demonstrate the possibilities to St. Lucian Businesses.

Greater Acceptance More wide spread use of of e-documents e-documents. /Copies

Chamber engaged the Customs & Excise Department on this matter and progress is being made.

Waiving of Storage Fees caused by National Lockdown

Engaged with SLASPA on the matter. Chamber requested the waiver which was approved by SLASPA.

During the National Lockdown, firms not classified as “essential” could not conduct business and so incurred storage fees at the Ports

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ISSUE

CHAMBER OBJECTIVE

UPDATE

Labour Code

The impact of Covid-19 on companies and how employers should treat with the shutdown period, requesting staff to proceed on vacation and employing lay off provisions.

Engaged and convened a dialogue with the Labour Commissioner. The matter was discussed and members got insight into their options and rights.

Labour Code Amendment

The layoff period and the need to amend the law to extend it in light of the pandemic.

Chamber engaged the Minister of Labour and the Department on the matter. Chamber participated in consultations with Unions, and other private sector players and the Department on how the amendment should be implemented. Agreement arrived at and Layoff was extended for an additional 12 weeks.

National Health Insurance

Chamber required more clarity on the subject and how it would operate.

Chamber wrote to Ministry of Health. Chamber raised the matter with Minister of Commerce. Was informed that a white paper was being developed and that World Bank had agreed to fund the review of an approach to the NHI. GOSL has informed that the NHI will be administered through the NIC.

VAT Reform

Chamber remains concerned over VAT apportionment Rule and the VAT on real estate services.

Chamber wrote to the Ministry of Commerce on the matter after discussing and explaining the issue, but GOSL has not moved on this matter.

Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Control Board

New Board had been appointed and they are seeking to rationalize and improve the processes.

Chamber representative discussed member’s concerns with Chamber ED and has conveyed these to the Board. Meeting between Board and ED has been held and an action plan is being developed.

Solid Waste Management

Concern over the management of the landfills and the closure of the Vieux Fort Landfill as well as the plans for the sector.

Chamber convened meetings with the General Manager and Chamber Members so members could be updated and understand the plans. SWMA is to provide updates and plans so member may be able to synchronize their own plans with the Authority.

St. Lucia Bureau of Standards

The standards for repackaged food.

Chamber engaged the Bureau and hosted a series of dialogues with members so they could better understand the standard and the process expected of them.

labelling

Standards issues affecting the private sector Members were concerned with the enforcement and implications of these standards on operations. Front of Label Packaging

The Standard being proposed by CARICOM Health Ministers would affect members negatively since the proposed labelling is not used by members major trading partners, (UK and USA).

Agreed to work together and through the Chamber to address related issues.

Raised the Matter with the St. Lucia Bureau of Standards. Got advice from other Chambers’ such as Trinidad and Tobago and Jamaica and used the CARICHAM Network to craft a similar position paper to each Standards Bureau. St. Lucia Standards Bureau has shared the concern at the Regional Level St. Lucia Chamber is being represented on a Regional Private Sector Technical Committee on Front of Label Packaging by Board Member Dr. Alison Gadajhar

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ST. LUCIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INDUSTRY AND AGRICULTURE


Business Development & Education Chamber Training Programs Chamber Encounter Series

Seminars & Symposia

Executive Luncheons

Chamber Update

ED’s Perspective

ST. LUCIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INDUSTRY AND AGRICULTURE

HR Connect

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ANNUAL REPORT 2020


Networking & Communication Chamber Press Releases

HR Fora

Chamber Luncheons

Encounter Series

QGMS

Direct Email

WEBSITE

Power Breakfast

Annual Reports

Seminars & Symposia

Business Mixers Chamber Update

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Webinars

ST. LUCIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INDUSTRY AND AGRICULTURE


ST. LUCIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INDUSTRY AND AGRICULTURE

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ANNUAL REPORT 2020


Adding Value to members through partnerships & networking ECCB CEDEMA

SBFIC Dale Carnegie Institute

CIF Stakeholder Advisory Network

World Chambers of Commerce

International Chambers of Commerce

CHAMBER LINKED TO THE REST OF THE WORLD

Caribbean Development Bank (CDB)

AMCHAM TT

CARICHAM

ARISE UNITE Caribbean

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UNDRR

ST. LUCIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INDUSTRY AND AGRICULTURE


Member Engagement Membership Visits

Feedback Surveys

Quarterly General Meetings

Membership Surveys

Direct Phone Communication

Engagement

Executive Luncheons

Encounter Series

Subject Specific Meetings

Brand Value and Member Recognition

International Recognition

Letters of Introduction and Reference

Designated Development Agency by Statute

St. Lucia Business Awards

Member of the Caribbean Network of Chambers (CARICHAM)

Junior Achievement St. Lucia

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ANNUAL REPORT 2020


Chamber at a Glance

Delivering Value Through Purposely Designed Events

TRAINING COURSES Business Continuity Planning (Southern Edition) Number of Participating Firms 8 | Number of Participants 10

Finance for Non-Financial Members Number of Participating Firms 6 | Number of Participants 9

Finance for Non-Financial Members (Southern Edition) Number of Participating Firms 10 | Number of Participants 13

Know Your Labour Act Number of Participating Firms 19 | Number of Participants 31

Know Your Labour Act - Covid-19 Edition Number of Participating Firms 28 | Number of Participants 48

Understanding Financial Statements Session I Number of Participating Firms 11 |

Number of Participants 17

Understanding Financial Statements Session II Number of Participating Firms 26 | Number of Participants 46

Dale Carnegie - Skills for Success Program Number of Participating Firms 16 |

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Number of Participants 26

ST. LUCIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INDUSTRY AND AGRICULTURE


ENCOUNTER SERIES Government of St. Lucia’s E-Government Agenda Number of Participating Firms 11 |

Number of Participants 14

Operating a Multi-Use Port - Port Castries Beyond 2020 Number of Participating Firms 17 |

Number of Participants 27

*To Open or Not To Open Number of Participating Firms - |

Number of Participants 55

EXECUTIVE LUNCHEONS Introduction of Republic Bank Limited to St. Lucia Number of Participating Firms 40 | Number of Participants 76

A New Paradigm for Import & Export: St. Kitts & Nevis Case Study Number of Participating Firms 30 | Number of Participants 37

Conversation on Public Services to the South of the Island Number of Participating Firms 41 | Number of Participants 47

HR CONNECT HR Forum - A Dialogue on Covid-19 FIRST STEPS Number of Participating Firms 28 | Number of Participants 35

Dialogue with NIC on Change to Payment Method for Short Term Benefits Number of Participating Firms 26 | Number of Participants 53 *Dialogue with Labour Commissioner on Treatment of Non-work During Lockdown & Scale Back of Non-Essential Commercial Activity

Number of Participating Firms - |

Number of Participants -

*Dialogue with Labour Department on the Layoff Provisions in the Labour Act Number of Participating Firms - |

Number of Participants -

* Number Not Available ST. LUCIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INDUSTRY AND AGRICULTURE

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ANNUAL REPORT 2020


SEMINARS & SYMPOSIA

Ensuring Health & Safety in the Covid-19 Work Place Number of Participating Firms 16 | Number of Participants 23

IPO Workshop for Caribbean Enterprises Number of Participating Firms 18 | Number of Participants 30

Preparing Your Business to Survive Covid-19 (Department of Health) Number of Participating Firms 36 | Number of Participants 69

Preparing Your Business to Survive Covid-19 (Southern Edition) Number of Participating Firms 18 | Number of Participants 31

*Managing Mental Health & Wellness Webinar (AMCHAM Trinidad & Tobago) Number of Participating Firms - |

Number of Participants -

*Navigating the Pandemic Building Organizational Resilience (AMCHAM Trinidad & Tobago)

Number of Participating Firms - |

Number of Participants -

*Handling Stress & Supporting Resilience in Times of Crisis (Dale Carnegie) Number of Participating Firms - |

Number of Participants -

*Approach to Quarterly Payments to NIC Number of Participating Firms - |

Number of Participants -

*Leading Change in a VUCA World - A Dale Carnegie Webinar Number of Participating Firms - |

Number of Participants -

* Number Not Available ANNUAL REPORT 2020

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ST. LUCIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INDUSTRY AND AGRICULTURE


Event Partners

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Financial Inclusion of MSME

Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises in the Eastern Caribbean Currency Union

A

project now in its fourth year that seeks to strengthen the financial sector and improve access to financial services in the ECCU for MSMEs. The project looks to focus on both the supply and demand side.

A training fund was established to help finance various training seminars run by the Chamber and its affiliate organizations, i.e. SLYBT and Junior Achievement. The SLYBT/JA team hosted one Micro Business game during the year.

Chamber’s Role

Financial Support was received from the Savings Bank Foundation for International Cooperation to support the retrofitting of the Chamber Board Room as a training facility with, drop down projector screen, 75 inch television, ceiling projector, lapel microphones and speakers. Also tables were refurbished and room enclosed. The idea was that more training would be hosted in house.

The Chamber’s role in this partnership is within the demand side. Strengthening business literacy, financial education and improving the financial management skills of small business owners. The Chamber also is an integral part of bringing the different partners together to discuss the progress of the project, lessons learnt, identify best practice and build synergies and encourage the leveraging of each other strengths and capacities in support of MSMEs. The last Partners meeting was held August 17th 2020.

Activities & Support Financial Literacy Training

The SBFIC supported multiple training seminars. SBFIC helped develop material for three programs, which the Chamber has run so far. In the last financial year September 2019 to August 2020) the following courses we hosted by the Chamber

Finance for Non-Financial Managers.

Two Sessions were held one in the north and one in the south of the island. SBFIC visiting Expert served as the Facilitator for both Sessions

Understanding Financial Statements Two Session were also delivered of this Workshop.

The first was delivered as part of Global Entrepreneurship Week in November 2019 by the SBFIC Project Manager Uwe Pfeffer. The second was delivered in August 2020 as part of the Chamber business advice and support to members due to the COVID-19 Pandemic, (45 participants) using a virtual platform and was delivered by Ms. Andrea St. Rose President of the St. Lucia Institute of Chartered Accountants.

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ST. LUCIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INDUSTRY AND AGRICULTURE


Chamber at Work

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ANNUAL REPORT 2020


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ST. LUCIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INDUSTRY AND AGRICULTURE


Chamber By Numbers SECTOR DISTRIBUTION

MEMBERS BY CLASSIFICATION

AGRICULTURE 1%

45%

CONSTRUCTION 2%

BANKING & FINANCE 14%

40% TOURISM 6%

35%

RETAIL & DISTRIBUTION 31%

30% MANUFACTURING 8%

25%

SECTOR DISTRIBUTION

20% INSURANCE 7%

15% 10% 5%

OTHER SERVICES

0%

32%

1-9

10-19

20-34

35-49

50 & Over

SOURCES OF INCOME 2019/2020

CHAMBER INCOME & EXPENDITURE 1.2M

8% 51%

TRAINING SUBSCRIPTION

41%

OTHER INCOME

1M 800k 600k 400k

EXPENSES 2019/2020

200k 0

19%

39% 42%

2017/2018

OVERHEADS CHAMBER ACTIVITIES

2018/2019 EXPENSES

INCOME

SALARIES & BENEFITS

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ANNUAL REPORT 2020

2019/2020


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ST. LUCIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INDUSTRY AND AGRICULTURE


The Chamber Response to COvid-19

The Chamber’s Role in the COVID-19 Pandemic Response

A

s the voice of the private sector in St. Lucia since 1884, we made a deliberate decision to play a definitive role in the dialogue for slowing the spread of COVID-19, ensuring people came first. Initiation of an information dissemination event regarding the COVID-19, and hosting membership engagements with the Ministry of Health in Vieux Fort and Castries. Working with the Private Sector Council to agree on a private sector approach to supporting and participating in the fight against the spread of the Virus. Championing the approach that the social and economic welfare of the people should be number one, two and three in the national strategy. Endorsement and support of the GOSL COVID-19 Strategy, to slow the entry of the virus into Saint Lucia, “flatten the curve”; give St. Lucia time to prepare its primary and secondary care facilities and bolster national capacity to manage any in country spread.

Initiation of the early introduction of a partial scale back of non-essential commercial and social activities response by the country. The call for national engagement of all stakeholders and political parties in the national fight against the virus. The Facilitation of access for more than 75 Members to their businesses during the national lockdown and curfew, who needed to institute proper shutdown procedures and measures during the initial days of the 24 Hour Curfew. Chamber was consulted and advised Government on the phased re-opening of critical sectors and business. Hosting two engagements with HR Managers focused on COVID-19 and Labour Code matters, one among Chamber HR Managers and One with the Acting Labour Commissioner. Creation of a Members COVID– 19 Update Page on its Website to provide regular updates and copies of official documents.

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Chamber acted as the interlocutor between the Government and the private sector particularly the members so that a relatively smooth reopening of business could take place. Hosting of dialogue between members and the Inland Revenue Department to resolve Tax Related matters and clarify related issues with participation from over 57 members. Facilitation of webinars for members using both the international and regional network of Chamber and Partners such a Dale Carnegie and CARICHAM at no cost to members and the business community. The Chamber actively and proactively lobbied Government for an amendment to the Labour Act; that extended the layoff rule, permitting employees and employers to adjust to the impact of COVID-19 without being compelled to move to a situation of redundancy. The Chamber (represented by Board directors) sat on the Multi -Stakeholder Committee on Economic Recovery. The Chamber played a lead role in getting members to support the National Telethon in support of the Covid-19 fight.

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Galvanized the support of its members for the National Meals Program demonstrating that Chamber Members remain the leaders Corporate Social Responsibility. Conducted two COVID– 19 Impact Surveys among members to remain informed on the impact of the Virus on business and to inform Chamber when dialoging with Government. Hosted a Dialogue with the Ministry of Tourism and the Ministry of Health on the reopening of the country to Tourism so members concerns could be addressed, interests made know and questions answered. Provided members with some critical business education and training needed as a direct result of COVID-19: Ensuring Health and Safety in the ‘New’ Workplace; Understanding Financial Statements and Know Your Labour Code; COVID Edition. The Chamber continues its policy of working within a single coordinated national framework as much as possible to ensure our nation emerges from the pandemic with minimal negative impact as possible. The Chamber continues to urge members to cooperate with the Government, protocols and measures aimed at protecting lives, livelihoods, business and the economy.

ST. LUCIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INDUSTRY AND AGRICULTURE


T

COVID - 19 Impact Survey (Take 2) Summary

he Chamber has disaggregated the data coming out of the COVID-19 Impact Survey (Take 2) conducted in September 2020. Deliberately, we do not seek to give any specific interpretation to the data, as we are not convinced that we have a large enough pool of respondents that permits a fair assessment and reasonably assured interpretations to be made.

View by Sector Layoffs

The greatest disparity in responses pertains to level of lay-off. The Tourism Sector, as expected, reported the highest levels of layoffs. The Banking and Finance Sector reported zero lay-offs.

COVID IMPACT SURVEY TAKE 2 SUMMARY NO LAYOFFS

1% - 20% LAYOFFS

20% - 50% LAYOFFS

25%

0%

50% - 100% LAYOFFS

12%

63%

TOURISM 0%

20%

80%

0%

MANUFACTURING 25%

0%

12%

63%

RETAIL & DISTRIBUTION 0%

0%

0%

100%

BANKING & FINANCE 0%

33%

58%

8%

OTHER SERVICES ST. LUCIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INDUSTRY AND AGRICULTURE

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ANNUAL REPORT 2020


0% No Change

-20% to -50%

-50% to 100%

Increase

Don’t Know

Increase

Don’t Know

BANKING & FINANCE

Trading status

T

80%

he Tourism Sector was the only sector where respondents indicated ‘other’ circumstance as well reported having permanently stopped operating. Meanwhile the Banking & Finance Sector had the highest response rate indicating that operations never ceased. TRADING STATUS

60% 40% 20% 0% No Change

-1% to -20%

-20% to -50%

-50% to 100%

OTHER SERVICES

Revenues

80% 60% 40% 20% 0% Manufacturing

Tourism

Retail & Distribution

Banking & Finance

Other Services

Tourism is the sector worst impacted with 63% of respondents indicating a decrease in revenue of between 50% and 100%. Both Manufacturing and Retail & Distribution respondents (50%) reported decrease in revenue of between 1% to 20%.

Sales

NO. OPERATIONS HAVE NEVER STOPPED

Tourism again reported the worst impact on Sales with 63% of respondents indicating a decrease of between 50% and 100%. On the other hand, 60% of respondents from Manufacturing reported a decrease in sales of between 1% to 20%.

YES TEMPORARILY STOPPED BUT WILL BE BACK BY JULY 2020 YES TEMPORARILY STOPPED BUT CURRENTLY RUNNING AGAIN YES PERMANENTLY STOPPED OTHER

Workforce

Impact on Operations

IMPACT IMPACT ONON OPERATIONS OPERATIONS

The Banking and Finance Sector had the highest percentage of respondents 80% indicating there was no change to their workforce.

REVENUES REVENUES SALES SALESWORKFORCE WORKFORCE

80%

-1% to -20%

80%

60% 60% 40% 40% 20%

20%

0%

0% to -20%-20% to -20% to -50% -50% to 100% Increase Increase Don’t Know Don’t Know No Change No Change -1% to -1% -20% -50% -50% to 100%

TOURISM TOURISM 80%

80%

VIEW BY SIZE OF BUSIN

60% 60%

Small Firms employ between 1 to 19 persons. Medium Firms employ between 20 to 49 persons. Large Firms employ 50 persons and over.

40% 40% 20%

20%

0%

0%

View by Size of business

to -20%-20% to -20% to -50% -50% to 100% Increase Increase Don’t Know Don’t Know No Change No Change -1% to -1% -20% -50% -50% to 100%

MANUFACTURING MANUFACTURING 80%

28%

80%

SM

60% 60%

38%

40% 40% 20%

20%

0%

0%

VIEW BY SIZE OF BUSINESS

to -20%-20% to -20% to -50% -50% to 100% Increase Increase Don’t Know Don’t Know No Change No Change -1% to -1% -20% -50% -50% to 100%

RETAIL RETAIL & DISTRIBUTION & DISTRIBUTION 80%

80%

60% 60%

28%

40% 40% 20%

20%

0%

0%

SMALL 38%

to -20%-20% to -20% to -50% -50% to 100% Increase Increase Don’t Know Don’t Know No Change No Change -1% to -1% -20% -50% -50% to 100%

LARGE

33%

BANKING BANKING & FINANCE & FINANCE 80%

MEDIUM

80%

60% 60% 40% 40% 20%

20%

0%

0%

LA

33%

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ST. LUCIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INDUSTRY AND AGRICULTURE

ME


Layoffs

LAYOFFS NO LAYOFFS

23%

1% - 20% LAYOFFS

20% - 50% LAYOFFS

50% - 100% LAYOFFS

8%

31%

38%

SMALL FIRMS 23%

9%

64%

9%

MEDIUM FIRMS 20%

7%

67%

7%

LARGE FIRMS

TRADING STATUS

80%

60%

The 67% of respondents classified as Large indicated that they had no lay-offs while only 38% of40% those classified as Small, informed that there were no lay-offs. 20%

TradingTRADING status TRADING STATUS TRADING TRADING STATUS STATUS STATUS 0%

Tourism

Manufacturing

80%

80%

60%

60%

YES TEMPORARILY STOPPED BUT WILL BE BACK BY JULY 2020

40%

40%

YES TEMPORARILY STOPPED BUT CURRENTLY RUNNING AGAIN

20%

20%

0%

0%

NO. OPERATIONS HAVE NEVER STOPPED

YES PERMANENTLY STOPPED

m

Tourism

OTHER

Manufacturing Manufacturing Retail & Retail & Retail & Retail & Tourism TourismManufacturing Manufacturing Distribution Distribution Distribution Distribution

PERATIONSNO. HAVE OPERATIONS NEVERNO. STOPPED HAVE OPERATIONS NO. NEVER OPERATIONS STOPPED HAVE NEVER HAVESTOPPED NEVER STOPPED

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MPORARILY YES STOPPED TEMPORARILY BUT YESWILL TEMPORARILY STOPPED YES BE BACK TEMPORARILY BUT BY STOPPED WILL JULYBE 2020 STOPPED BACK BUT WILL BY BUT JULY BE BACK WILL 2020BE BYBACK JULY BY 2020 JULY 2020

ANNUAL REPORT 2020

Retail & Distribution


Revenues

Small firms were the only respondents to indicate that they have permanently ceased operations, not surprisingly these all came are from the Tourism sector. 64% of Medium Sized firms indicated that they temporarily stopped operations but have recommenced.

46% of Small respondents reported impacted decreases in revenues between 50% and 100%.

Sales

50% of small respondents indicated a decrease of between 50% and 100%.

Workforce

In every size distribution 50% or more indicated that there was no change in their workforce.

Impact on Operations

IMPACT ON OPERATIONS REVENUES

SALES

WORKFORCE

80% 60% 40% 20% 0% No Change

-1% to -20%

-20% to -50%

-50% to 100%

Increase

Don’t Know

Increase

Don’t Know

Increase

Don’t Know

SMALL FIRMS 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% No Change

-1% to -20%

-20% to -50%

-50% to 100%

MEDIUM FIRMS 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% No Change

-1% to -20%

-20% to -50%

-50% to 100%

LARGE FIRMS ANNUAL REPORT 2020

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ANNUAL REPORT 2020


T

The Chamber Southern Member Program 2020

he Chamber’s pledge to address the need of all its members in its business development and advocacy agenda has led to the establishment of a program specifically designed to meet the needs of the Members located in the Southern parts of the island; the Southern Membership Program. This program seeks to enhance the Chamber’s relationships with members in that community, while deepening the relationships between members of that community. Based on the outcomes of Southern Members Business Forum, a draft calendar of activities was agreed upon and there was clear consensus for additional fora to permit deeper exploration of ideas, to strengthen business and the business environment in that part of the island.

• 5th and 6th February 2020 Training – Finance for Non-Financial Managers – Southern Edition

• 5 March 2020 Executive Luncheon - Improving Public Services to the South

Utilizing the Chamber “What Keeps You up at Night Approach” shared concerns and interest were identified. The proposed calendar included: Training Programs Networking Events Information Sharing Notwithstanding the onset of the Covid-19 crisis and the interruption that ensued, the Chamber was able to deliver on a number of the agreed engagements:

• 12 March 2020 Training - Business Continuity Planning WorkshopSouthern Edition Preparing Your Business to Survive Covid-19; Southern Edition (NEMO)

• 15 January 2020 Southern 2020 Program Endorsement

•26th August 2020 Dialogue - Engaging the South in the New Normal The Chamber has remained in dialogue with members to ensure the comprehensive understanding of emerging issues and exploration of possible solutions.

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ST. LUCIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INDUSTRY AND AGRICULTURE


ST. LUCIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INDUSTRY AND AGRICULTURE

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ST. LUCIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INDUSTRY AND AGRICULTURE


10th Annual St.Lucia Business Awards

T

he Saint Lucia Business Awards 2019 Ceremony brought together the full spectrum of corporate St. Lucia, from veteran business person to the emerging business class creating a remarkable celebratory business concoction at the Events Auditorium at the Ramp Rodney Bay! Arriving Guests were greeted at the St. Lucia Distillers Welcome Cocktail Lounge before they glided onto the Unicomer Red Carpet with the usual glamour, glitter and flashing lights of the cameras which started the evening’s festivities. The St. Lucia Distillers Welcome Cocktail party maintained the festive mode as guests entered the pre awards function room, with special brews from this award-winning company. A snazzy smooth ceremony ensued with excellent entertainment pieces interspacing the made for television awards ceremony. On every table were three choices of wine all from the BARBAY’s wine cellar accompanied by exquisite hors d oeuvres Flavored By Baron’s. This Tenth Edition of the St. Lucia Business Awards – in its current format provided full corporate seating for all patrons. The Awards Ceremony was brought to a grand finale by the popular and versatile DYP who transitioned the evening with great aplomb into the now famous and popular Peter and Company Distribution “After Party” that went on well into the early morning. Other Nominees include: Coconut Bay Beach Resort And Spa Saint Lucia Development Bank Agga Architectural Design Studio Saint Lucia Diabetes & Hypertension Association Anse Chastanet Jade Mountain Resort H&L Environmental Services Ltd

ST LUCIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Amarna Consult Limited Automotive Art (St Lucia) Ltd. Bel Jou Hotel Penny Pinch Inc.

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ANNUAL REPORT 2020


Coconut Bay Beach Resort & Spa Massy Stores New Business of the Year

1st National Bank St. Lucia Limited

Unicomer Saint Lucia

Faces of Cancer St. Lucia

Award for Corporate Social Responsibility

Non Profit or Association of the Year

M&C Group of Companies Award for Service Excellence

Invest St. Lucia Entrepreneur of the Year Award

Shop D Caribbean

St. Lucia Distillers Limited

The Independent Film Company

Dr. Charmaine Gardner

Unicomer Saint Lucia

Bay Gardens Resorts

Abby’s Exotic Blends Ltd

Digicel People’s Choice Award

LUCELEC Award for Environmental Stewardship

Lifetime Achievement Award

Business of the Year (Small)

Export Achievement of the Year

WLBL Employer of the Year

InVictus

Prime Minister’s Award for Innovation

1st National Bank St. Lucia Limited Business of the Year (Large)

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ST. 47 LUCIA CHAMBER COMMERCE ANNUALOF REPORT 2020 INDUSTRY AND AGRICULTURE


Looking Ahead Nurturing Emerging Executives Project

The delivery of these programs for the period 2019 -2020 have been delayed by the Covid pandemic. The Chamber however remains optimistic as we use this situation as an opportunity to modify the program to suit the needs of members within this new era.

Goal

To ensure that quality, highly skilled, well rounded and informed Executives are available to member Companies.

• To provide opportunities for Young Executives to get exposure to the Macro-Economic and Business Environment Issues • To assist Members in developing their promising Young Executives through business Lectures, Workshops, Networking Events and Training Opportunities. • To build a Competency Bank which the Chamber can tap into as “subject leads” that will facilitate Chamber representation and member participation in Strategic Business Advocacy.

Activities

• • • •

Objectives

• Seminars • Business Mixers • Roster of Chamber Competence • Programs/Luncheons/Encounters

Programme Sponsors Business Mixer Hosts Registration free Secretariat and Committee Effort

ST. LUCIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INDUSTRY AND AGRICULTURE

Required Inputs

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ANNUAL REPORT 2020


Member Value Member Value Program

Program

4 GOAL

1

2

3

To give added value and benefits to being a Chamber Member

OBJECTIVES

• Discounts & Special Offers to other Chamber Members & their Staff • Chamber Members & their Staff receive discounts on valuable goods & services • Chamber Members & their Staff have access to similar discounts and value from other regional Chambers • Special Benefits & Programs to member companies to enhance Chamber Membership value to member firms

ELEMENTS OF PROGRAM

• Chamber Multi-firm Pension Plan • Membership Discounts

• Specials & Special programs designed for Chamber Members only • Access to Membership Value Discounts & services in 16 other Caribbean Countries through the Caribbean Chamber Network (CARIHAM)

TO BECOME A PARTNER

All members are invited to become partners. Simply identify what special offers your establishment wishes to make available to Chamber Members and provide the terms and conditions. The Chamber will promote, advertise and provide the Member Value Cards!

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ST. LUCIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INDUSTRY AND AGRICULTURE


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2 0 1 9 - 2 0 2 0 A N N UA L R E P O R T ANNUAL REPORT 2020

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ST. LUCIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INDUSTRY AND AGRICULTURE


St. Lucia Youth Business Trust MISSION

To foster development, growth and innovation in our economy by enabling young entrepreneurs to realise their dreams, hopes and aspirations.

Vision

To groom the next generation entrepreneurs in St. Lucia

of

thriving

T

he St. Lucia Youth Business Trust (SLYBT) is a stimulating project undertaken by the St. Lucia Chamber of Commerce, Industry and Agriculture. It was launched in November 2011 as a non-profit organization aiming to foster the concept of self-employment and the spirit of enterprise among the youth ages 18 – 35 in St. Lucia. SLYBT offers a coordinated, comprehensive program to assist young entrepreneurs develop the skills and attitudes which they need to become successful entrepreneurs. The St. Lucia Youth Business Trust provides access to start-up capital, business mentoring, networking, business plan development, training, advisory and marketing support and has a network comprising some of the best and brightest minds in a wide cross section of business fields ready to assist young entrepreneurs and startups. With a focus on overall entrepreneurial development for the youth, the mentoring component serves as the key ingredient which allows the Trust to stand out from other national organizations.

.

Entrepreneurship Development Programme

St Lucia Youth Business Trust continues to provide training opportunities to young entrepreneurs and startups. In collaboration with the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB), the Trust successfully hosted a series of in house and Community Based Trainings from September 2019. The CDB-Supported Regional pilot venture entitled, “Strengthening the Entrepreneurial Spirit of Caribbean Youth” provides training and mentorship support to young entrepreneurs between the ages of 18 -35 and startups. The initial phase of the CDB-Supported project in house training was provided to the first cohort of 20 participants in the Castries area during the month of September 2019.

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The first cohort of Community Based training began on March 2nd 2020 at the ICT Centre in the town of Vieux Fort with approximately 24 participants. While the second cohort of Community Based training took place at the Innovation and Career Development Centre in Micoud in August 2020 with 10 participants.

launch start-ups and bring ideas to life, drive economic growth and expand human welfare. During one (1) week each November, people are inspired by local, regional and international entrepreneurial activities designed to assist them in exploring their potential as self-starters and innovators. GEW 2019 was observed from November 18th to 24th and celebrated under the theme #GEWinclusion which was unanimously chosen by partners from among the options presented by GEW International. GEW Inclusion celebrated diversity in all forms and included in a large part, entrepreneurship. A series of activities including workshops, forums, expos and discussions were held which focused on the obstacles often faced by entrepreneurs and discovering solutions through access to success stories, training, capital and mentorship.

Access To Finance Series

The St. Lucia Youth Business Trust collaborated with the St. Lucia Chamber of Commerce, Industry and Agriculture to host the “Access to Finance” Series which ran from August 2019 to December 2019. The series took the form of several training seminars and other business functions that covered Small Business Finance and included Costing & Pricing, Debt Management and Understanding Financial Statements.

The Beacon events for the celebration of GEW2019 were the RBC Entrepreneurs Speed Networking Forum, DECA Idea Challenge, Get In The Ring, Fashiontrepreneur Competition and Advisory Committee Panel Discussion.

Entrepreneurs benefited from the vast knowledge and expertise of facilitators who employed case-studies and practical exercises built around their individual businesses and markets. The collaboration of the St. Lucia Chamber of Commerce and the St. Lucia Youth Business Trust in this program intended to catalyze the improvement of the financial and entrepreneurial consciousness of the small entrepreneur.

Global Entrepreneurship Week

Global Entrepreneurship Week (GEW) is the world’s largest celebration of innovators and job creators who

Get In The Ring

Get In The Ring is a global startup pitch competition which brings the world’s most promising entrepreneurs together with those who can best help them succeed – and to inspire others to kick off their entrepreneurial journeys. Locally, the competition aims to build on the entrepreneurial ecosystem and foster a culture of investments among the audience and participants. Get In The Ring also serves as a platform for networking and idea sharing among entrepreneurs and business professionals. Join 600 startups, corporates and investors in solving 21st century societal challenges. The Get In The Ring Global Meetup will be held in Montreal, Canada from 2nd—4th February 2021! St. Lucia will be represented on the Global Stage by Ms. Laura Jn. Pierre of InVictus.

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2019-2020 ANNUAL REPORT

“I AM A JA VOLUNTEER AND I SPEAK FROM EXPERIENCE AND THAT’S POWERFUL”

Shanelle Mc Vane Fulgence, JA Alumna & Director Marketing Executive

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JUNIOR ACHIEVEMENT THE KEY TO UNLOCKING THE FUTURE

O

ur future is bright because the youth are passionate, driven and hungry for success. At Junior Achievement, we are fortunate to meet and interact with those outstanding youth each day and are truly inspired by their dedication and accomplishments. They are our next generation of leaders and Junior Achievement program equip them with the knowledge and confidence they need to define their personal success, learn financial responsibility which will contribute to them making sound financial decisions in the years to come. Entrepreneurship, financial literacy and work readiness skills are key to our youth’s future success. Last year, Junior Achievement St Lucia reached 2500 young St Lucians in schools and within the community. These talented Achievers experienced a Junior Achievement program delivered by dedicated volunteers but this is only the start. We will ensure each and every student across St Lucia has access to a Junior Achievement program and will continue to work with partners and all stakeholders to achieve this goal. We have launched innovative new programs, extended existing programs and introduced community based programs to ensure that we offer a curriculum second to none. With your support, we will continue to grow and reach even more future leaders. In closing, I would like to thank all donors, volunteers and fellow Directors for their continued support and commitment to developing St Lucia’s next generation of leaders. Thank you!!!

23 Years

47,000 Impact

400 Volunteers

WHO INSPIRES OUR FUTURE LEADERS?..... Volunteers

Thanks to the dedication and commitment of our volunteers, Junior Achievement continues to provide programs to youth in communities across the country. Each year, JA network of dedicated volunteers bring their professional experiences which help students connect program concepts with real-life situations.

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Through their commitment we are able to reach and prepare youth to succeed by navigating and understanding the global challenges we face everyday. Mr Kirt Hosam - Board Chair

ST. LUCIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INDUSTRY AND AGRICULTURE


HOW DOWE WE SUPPORTOUR OUR STUDENTS? HOW HOW DO DO WE SUPPORT SUPPORT OUR STUDENTS? STUDENTS? Junior Achievement’s unique programs allow students to experience and understand business while encouraging Junior unique allow students understand Junior Achievement’s Achievement’s unique programs programs allow students to to experience experience and and understand business business while while encouraging encouraging HOW WE SUPPORT STUDENTS? them to do more with theirDO lives. Aligned with our three pillars:OUR work readiness, entrepreneurship and financial liter-

J

them themto todo domore morewith withtheir theirlives. lives.Aligned Alignedwith withour ourthree threepillars: pillars:work workreadiness, readiness,entrepreneurship entrepreneurshipand andfinancial financialliterliteracy, JA programs provide students with skills andallow knowledge on topics such as money management, the role ofspa busicertificates of participation, trophies, dinners, unior Achievement’s unique programs acy, JA provide students with skills and knowledge on topics such as money management, the role of busiacy,students JAprograms programs provide students with skills and knowledge on topics such as money management, the role of busiand gift vouchers experience and business ness, careertooptions, impact of understand technology and innovation,treatments running a business and more. Even for in theoutstanding midst of the ness, career options, technology innovation, running Even inin the of the ness, career options, impact impact ofto technology and innovation, running aa business business and more. more. Even the midst midst ofwas the achievements andand service at the ceremony which while encouraging themof do moreand with their COVID 19 pandemic, the Chamber’s flagship program Junior Achievement is continuing its work with 2500 students held on Thursday September 26th 2019. Patron of Junior lives. Aligned with our three pillars: work readiness, COVID 19 pandemic, the Chamber’s flagship program Junior Achievement is continuing its work with 2500 students COVID 19 pandemic, the Chamber’s flagship program Junior Achievement is continuing its work with 2500 students benefitting from and the following Achievement, Her Excellency, Dame Pearlette Louisy, entrepreneurship financial programs: literacy, JA programs benefitting benefittingfrom fromthe thefollowing followingprograms: programs: Acting Prime Minister Hon Guy Joseph and Minister of provide with skills andCeremony knowledge on topics Juniorstudents Achievement Award Junior Achievement Award Equity Hon Lenard Montoute, Consular at the Embassy such as money management, the role of business, Junior Achievement AwardCeremony Ceremony JA participants are recognized at the awards ceremony at the of theteachers, fiscal year. In 2019, outstanding Achievers of end Taiwan, corporate partners, Achievers well wishers career options, impact of technology and innovation, JA participants are recognized at the awards ceremony at the end of the fiscal year. In 2019, outstanding JA participants are recognized at the awards ceremony at the end of the fiscal year. In 2019, outstanding Achievers accompanied by teacher advisors received certificates of participation, trophies, dinners, spa treatments and gift in were among 250 guests, partners and volunteers running a business and more. Even in the midst of the accompanied by teacher advisors received certificates of participation, trophies, dinners, spa treatments and th accompanied teacher received certificates participation, trophies, treatments andgift gift attendance. COVID 19 pandemic, the advisors Chamber’s flagship program vouchers forby outstanding achievements and service atofthe ceremony which wasdinners, held on spa Thursday September 26 thth vouchers for achievements and service at which was held September 26 vouchers foroutstanding outstanding achievements andExcellency, service atthe theceremony ceremony was heldon onThursday Thursday September Junior is continuing its Her work with 2500 2019.Achievement Patron of Junior Achievement, Dame Pearlettewhich Louisy, Acting Prime Minister Hon Guy 26 Joseph 2019. Patron of Junior Achievement, Her Excellency, Dame Pearlette Louisy, Acting Prime Minister Hon Guy Joseph Five time Groovy Monarch of St. Lucia, CEO and students benefitting from the following programs: 2019. Patron of Junior Achievement, Her Excellency, Dame Pearlette Louisy, Acting Prime Minister Hon Guy Joseph and Minister of Equity Hon Lenard Montoute, Consular at the Embassy of Taiwan, teachers, corporate partners, Sole welland Minister of Lenard Consular at Embassy teachers, corporate partners, wellofTaiwan, Major Records SLU, Mr Elijah Arthur Allain was and Minister ofEquity EquityHon Hon LenardMontoute, Montoute, Consular atthe the Embassyof of Taiwan, teachers, corporate partners, wellwishers were among 250 guests, partners and volunteers inProprietor attendance. the featured guest speaker. Mr Allain urged students to Junior Achievement Award Ceremony wishers among partners and wisherswere were among250 250guests, guests, partners andvolunteers volunteersininattendance. attendance. capitalize on the opportunities being afforded them JA participants are recognized at the awards ceremony Five-time Groovy Monarch of St.InLucia, CEO and Sole Proprietor of Major Records SLU, Mr Elijah ArthurThe Allain was the through theRecords Junior Achievement Program. following at the end of the fiscal year. 2019, outstanding Five-time Groovy Monarch of St. Lucia, CEO and Sole Proprietor of Major SLU, Mr Elijah Arthur Allain was the Five-time Groovy Monarch of St. Lucia, CEO and Sole Proprietor of Major Records SLU, Mr Elijah Arthur Allain was the featured guest speaker. Mr Allain urged students to capitalize on the opportunities being afforded them through the are list of Award presented: Achievers accompanied by teacher advisors received

featured guest Mr urged students to capitalize on the featured guestspeaker. speaker. MrAllain Allain urged students theopportunities opportunitiesbeing beingafforded affordedthem themthrough throughthe the Junior Achievement Program. The following are to listcapitalize of Awardon presented: Junior JuniorAchievement AchievementProgram. Program.The Thefollowing followingare arelist listof ofAward Awardpresented: presented:

Company ofthe the year2020 2020 Company Company of of the year year 2020 1st Place st stPlace 1 1 Place Clay Treasures Clay ClayTreasures Treasures Choiseul Secondary School Choiseul ChoiseulSecondary SecondarySchool School

2nd Place 22ndndBPlace Place Sharpz BBSharpz Sharpz Secondary School Vieux Fort Comprehensive Vieux VieuxFort FortComprehensive ComprehensiveSecondary SecondarySchool School

3rd Place rd rdPlace 3 3 Place Gentle Aromas Gentle Aromas Gentle Aromas School Entrepot Secondary Entrepot EntrepotSecondary SecondarySchool School

National Achieverofofthe the year2020 2020 National National Achiever Achiever of the year year 2020 1st Place st stPlace 1Frayne 1 Place Peter Frayne Peter Frayne Peter Clay Treasures Clay ClayTreasures Treasures Choiseul Secondary School Choiseul ChoiseulSecondary SecondarySchool School

Patron’s Award for Patron’s Award for Patron’s for and Innovation,Award Originality Innovation, Originality Innovation, Originalityand and Creativity Creativity Creativity B Sharpz BBSharpz Sharpz Vieux Fort Comprehensive Vieux Fort Comprehensive Vieux Secondary Fort Comprehensive School Secondary Secondary School School

Highest Return Highest Return Highest Return on Investment on Investment on Investment

Clay Treasures Clay ClayTreasures Treasures School Choiseul Secondary Choiseul ChoiseulSecondary Secondary School School

DECA Idea Challenge 2019 DECA Idea 2019 DECA IdeaChallenge Challenge 2019 (Elementary Category (Elementary Category (Elementary Category Happy Solvers Happy HappySolvers Solvers School Gros-Islet Primary Gros-Islet Primary Gros-Islet PrimarySchool School

2nd Place 22ndndPlace Place Jenna Christophe Jenna Christophe Jenna Christophe Gentle Aroma Gentle Aroma Gentle Aroma School Entrepot Secondary Entrepot EntrepotSecondary SecondarySchool School

“Most Improved” “Most Improved” “Most In Improved” Honor Of In Honor Of In Honor Mrs. PatriciaOfBrown Mrs. Mrs.Patricia PatriciaBrown Brown

B Sharpz BBSharpz Sharpz Vieux Fort Comprehensive Vieux Comprehensive VieuxFort Fort Comprehensive Secondary School Secondary Secondary School School

Best Records Best BestRecords Records Clay Treasures Clay ClayTreasures Treasures School Choiseul Secondary Choiseul ChoiseulSecondary Secondary School School

DECA Idea Challenge 2019 DECA Idea Challenge 2019 DECA IdeaSchool Challenge 2019 (High Category (High (HighSchool SchoolCategory Category Laces for Cases Laces for Cases Laces for Cases Vieux Fort Comprehensive Vieux Fort Comprehensive Vieux Secondary Fort Comprehensive School Secondary Secondary School School

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3rd Place rd rdPlace 3 3 Place Raphael Mohara Raphael Raphael Mohara PrintMohara Express Print PrintExpress Express School Sir Ira Simmons Secondary Sir SirIra IraSimmons SimmonsSecondary SecondarySchool School

Spirit of Junior Achievement Spirit Achievement Spiritof ofJunior Junior Achievement In Honor Of In Honor Of In Honor Of Mr. Christian Husbands Mr. Mr.Christian ChristianHusbands Husbands Gentle Aromas Gentle Aromas Gentle Aromas School Entrepot Secondary Entrepot Secondary Entrepot SecondarySchool School

National Champion National Champion National Champion Innovation Camp Innovation InnovationCamp Camp

Clay Treasures Clay ClayTreasures Treasures School Choiseul Secondary Choiseul ChoiseulSecondary Secondary School School

DECA Idea Challenge 2019 DECA 2019 DECAIdea IdeaChallenge Challenge 2019 (College Category (College Category (College Category Eco-Catch Eco-Catch Eco-Catch Vieux Fort Secondary Vieux Secondary VieuxFort Fort Secondary A Level Dept. AALevel LevelDept. Dept.

ANNUAL REPORT 2020


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n collaboration with the Chamber of Commerce and the Ministry of Equity, JA launched the “Urban Adventures Summer Camp” in the Gros Islet community of Caye Mange/La Fieulle. Like all JA Programs participants are taught life skills and economic literacy. The three week program covered a broad range of topics including Agriculture, arts and craft, physical education, crime prevention, banking, finance as well as a know your community component. The “know your community” component included an educational tour within the community, namely, the main attraction Daren Sammy Cricket Stadium, Shangrila Estate and the extremely popular community bakery, famous for its local creole bread. A number of residents from the community lent support sharing their knowledge, skills and experience in the areas of health, crime prevention, physical fitness and sports, gardening, banking and finance. This community based program was welcomed by residents who cherished the opportunity as busy professionals to give back and support the community in which they reside. JA staff and trained Volunteers were on hand to deliver the curriculum to a total of twenty (20) registered students ages 8 – 14. COVID-19 health and safety protocols were in full effect. The feedback and support from community members was overwhelming. Commitment for the 2020 program has been made by community members and the Ministry of Equity. Partners included Ministry of Equity, Social Justice, Empowerment and Human Services, Ministry of Home Affairs, Justice and National Security, the Parliamentary Representative, Hon Lenard Montoute, Social Transformation Officer - Mr David Moise, Retirees - Angel and Leilan, Juliana’s Community Mart, Shangrila Estate, Massy Stores, Windward & Leeward Brewery, Officer Zacharry Aimable, Real Foods and Lucian Bags.

Innovation Camp

We continue to provide platform for students to unleash their creativity and imagination. On March 12th 2020, Choiseul Secondary school emerged winners of the Annual Innovation Camp with their CH.S.S Planet Savers. The Innovation Camp offered an experiential learning environment for students based on reallife business situations. The Camp cames at a time when innovation is driving the world; enabling the youth to understand the importance of applying the design thinking process to solve problems. Forty Nine (49) students from Stanley Jon Odlum Memorial, St Joseph’s Convent, Choiseul, Castries Comprehensive, Beanfield and Vieux Fort Comprehensive Secondary Schools respectively were engaged in six (6) intense hours of team work, networking and discussions to find a solution to the ANNUAL REPORT 2020

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challenge presented by DASH Colour Run Inc. and to pitch before a 3 member panel of adjudicators.

ANNUAL POWER REAKFAST

Beacon Insurance Ltd partnered with Junior Achievement St Lucia for the 7th Annual Power Breakfast which was held at the Bay Gardens Resort on Tuesday 4th February 2020. The aim of the Power Breakfast was to share the achievements and goals of the organization with potential partners to allow them to experience firsthand the value proposition for supporting the mission. A total of 40 guests, volunteers, alumni, directors and executives for the Coporate sector were in attendance. Title Sponsor for the Junior Achievement 2020 Innovation Camp, DASH Colour Run Directors were also in at- tendance and has identified Junior Achievement as the beneficiary of the proceed of the Dash Colour Fun Run event taking place on March 1st 2020. JA Alumni and Host, Ms. Isa Lewis, shared her own experience as a teacher and encouraged guests to commit their time and resources to this greet cause which directly contrib- utes to the development of young. Guest Speaker, Ms. Kizzia Preville, CEO of Advizz, JA Alumni, mentor and volunteer, expressed gratitude to Junior Achievement for honing her skills as an entrepreneur during her high school days at the Castries Comprehensive Secondary school where she was the President of the student led Junior Achievement

Company Program.

The motivating and inspiring remarks by Teachers, ongoing sponsors, board members, students and host sparked the interest of the guests in attendance which included Unicomer, Automotive Arts, Dr Madgerie Jameson Charles, Entrepot Secondary School, Island Tek to name a few.

DASH Colour Run

Subsequent to serving as a volunteer and teaching the Junior Achievement Global Marketplace Program at the Grande Riviere Combined School, Director of Dash Color Run, Mrs. Dionne Marshall expressed her appreciation for the program citing the relevance and bene- fits to the youth and volunteers and identified JA as the recipient of the proceeds of the annual Dash Colour Run event in March 2020 as the JA mandate aligned with their organization’s pillars. The DASH Colour Run was established in 2015, providing a healthy fun run activity which encourages healthy lifestyle living for everyone but specifically among the nation’s youth. Over the last five years all proceeds of this event are donated to a nonprofit organization. DASH Colour Run is also the title sponsor for the 2019/ 2020 Innovation Camp which targets Forms 3 & 4 students.

ST. LUCIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INDUSTRY AND AGRICULTURE


which targets Forms 3 & 4 students. which targets Forms 3 & 4 students.

2019 / 2020 Partnerships Forged 2019 / 2020 Partnerships Forged

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Valued Partners

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Board Of Director’s

Karen Peter President

General Manager Caribbean Metals Limited

Brian Louisy

Executive Director

Siobhan James -Alexander Director

CEO Digicel (St. Lucia)

Jonathan Johannes

1st Vice President

Jason King

Martin Dorville

2nd Vice President

Immediate Past President

Managing Director 1st National Bank St. Lucia Limited

Chief Financial Officer and Company Secretary St. Lucia Distillers Group of Companies

Trevor Louisy

Cheryl Renwick

Ross Gardner

Managing Director St. Lucia Electricity Services Limited.

Managing Director Renwick & Company Ltd

Managing Director Carasco & Son Ltd.

Dr. Alison Gajadhar

Donna Hinkson

Bruno Didier

Head of Sale Sagicor Life (EC) Inc St. Lucia

Corporate & Commercial Banking Head Republic Bank (SLU) Ltd

Director

Director

Managing Director KMA Consulting Ltd.

ST. LUCIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INDUSTRY AND AGRICULTURE

Managing Director Massy Stores (SLU) Ltd

Director

Director

Director

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Director

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Chamber Secretariat

Sumitra Jagroop-Leo

Stacy Maurille

Cyrillia lucien

Mishma Anderson

Program Officer

Membership Development Officer

Office Assistant

Saint Luica Youth Business Trust Program Officer

Odilia Pierre Administrative Assistant

Agnella Joseph

Junior Achievement Executive Director

Samantha Augustin

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Notes

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