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UNLEASHING “THE

blue wave A Strategy for Dublin GAA 2011-2017


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contents

1. INTRODUCTION

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03 2. looking back

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3. challenges facing dublin GAA

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5. what gets measured gets done

4. Unleashing “the blue wave” our action plan

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appendices

» 6. recommendations to other units

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A Strategy for Dublin GAA 2011-2017

1. INTRODUCTION But the Dublin of old statutes, this arrogant city; Stirs proudly and secretly in my blood The city, they say, is recruited from the country. The blue-clad supporters who spend many summer Sundays with their backs to the Dublin-Sligo train line would demur; Dublin made them, and no little town… The relationship between the Dublin GAA club and the migrating generations who settled in the capital to work has always been reinforcing; the ideal of the GAA club, as a central point of communal empathy, is central to rural, village and provincial town life in Ireland. It is an ideal that continues to be carried by GAA people who settle in Dublin bolstering the existing traditional values. Enshrined in the ethos of the Association, we aspire through our clubs to achieve a strong sense of local identity. However, the ideal is increasingly nuanced in a burgeoning city where a GAA club’s membership can rival the population of a small town. Dublin is a county, governed by four local authorities, where parish boundaries are either antiquated or irrelevant; where the maxim for many could be ‘one life, three clubs.’ Whither the community and whither the intricate challenge facing Dublin’s GAA administrators?

How can local identity be defined when one shares a common environment with a huge population? Is the challenge different across Dublin’s variant socioeconomic demographics? How can we best harness the GAA’s truly classless ethos to unleash the Power of The Blue? The complexities of modern city life in Dublin, of sprawling urban growth, cultural diversity, rapid population increase, spatial restriction and social mobility have forced a fundamental rethink for what the GAA means and where the GAA is going… and not just in Dublin. The economic downturn is also shaping this new approach, centring on the twin challenges of resourcing and emigration, but equally heightening the GAA’s responsibility to help alleviate the adverse consequences of recession. With nearly one in every three children in the 26 counties born to a mother resident in Dublin, the challenge of the county is a challenge for the Association whose future is increasingly linked to urban growth. But if the challenge is obvious why do senior Dublin administrators remain thin on the ground in Croke Park? There is an interdependent relationship between the development of Gaelic games in Dublin and the future

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Increasing and improving access to games for players from all backgrounds and genders is an essential component of any strategic plan.

wellbeing of the GAA. The work of the capital’s administrators is critical to the realisation of the GAA’s national ambition while the Association’s central and provincial hierarchies must recognise that the absence of a permanent Dublin presence at the respective top tables leaves perspectives dangerously incomplete.

Dublin’s hurling revolution, now posing new but welcome challenges for Dublin GAA, is testimony to the value of long-term planning, strategic thinking and passionate ambition. It is also proof that with the courage of conviction, even to the point of positive discrimination, serious obstacles can be overcome.

And although the need for tangible support from the Leinster Council and Croke Park is critical, the challenge of nurturing and safeguarding Dublin’s GAA identity and its growth ambition is a challenge that must be met by people whose vision and passion is, as the American troubadour put it, Tangled up in Blue. Ambition must be sanity checked and guided by the principles of county identity. Our flagship teams – our senior footballers and hurlers – must never be divided.

But all revolutions require momentum and hurling will be sustained longterm by senior county success. While the game is projected to grow faster than football at grassroots level over the next five years, the dream must continue to be nurtured, to ensure that Dublin hurling is equally tangled in blue the dream, our future, must be Blue.

That is not to be insular or ignore the reality and scale of what lies ahead. Nor is it to shirk radical thought and action which may help sustain and develop our national games in the capital. Increasing and improving access to games for players from all backgrounds and genders is an essential component of any strategic plan. The tide has turned in 2011 but Dublin’s relative lack of success at All-Ireland level hitherto is proof enough that a crude numbers game is not enough. Talent must be nurtured, experiences must be positive, opportunity must be widespread, and resources must be allocated. The relationships between all strands have to be managed effectively. The collective goals of club and county cannot be mutually exclusive. County success nurtures the dream, club volunteers nurture the reality. The continued commercial health of the inter-county game remains essential for the wider Association but we need to examine how well we are served by the traditional models of competition. As an important component of that commercial reality, Dublin has a serious role to play in future developments.

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The Blue Jersey is a unique, inclusive brand, uniting Dublin’s dense expanse, blurring the difference in class and possession which became so pointedly manifest during the delusional days of the Celtic Tiger. Dublin’s county teams are of monumental cultural and social importance to the city but, with over a fifth of the country’s population resident here, they are also of enormous strategic importance to the future wellbeing of the GAA. While Blue must become the colour of success, this is no cheap marketing gimmick. Blue is the colour of our Dublin heritage, of our Irish, Gaelic identity in the capital city, the colour that helped separate the capital from its colonial past. It is the colour of the ideal… of Heffernan and Foley, of Mullins and Doherty, of Boland and McMahon, of Barr and Curran, of Brogan and Whelan, of Rushe and Keaney… of Hill 16. It is an extraordinarily effective promotional tool, enshrined in the anthem of the county’s often maligned but fiercely loyal supporters. Blue is also the colour of a commercial phenomenon, of capacity crowds, of broadcasting schedules and of ambitious sponsorship. But it is a success harnessed by the centre which can serve to sustain the peripheries.


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A STRATEGY FOR DUBLIN GAA 2011-2017

We can’t copyright a colour but the subliminal exploitation of Dublin’s unique sporting hue by our competitors has not gone unnoticed. Mutual respect is essential in Irish sport yet the appeal of a flourishing professional franchise is still a real challenge in the struggle for hearts and minds in Dublin while the demographic shift continues to distort traditional values and interests. Our Blue affords Dublin GAA the greatest potential to evolve as the flagship brand of commercial sport in Ireland. Successful implementation of our strategy will also reinforce the fact that Dublin is GAA Country. We are a progressive county, administered by a county committee whose commitment to development and change is reflected in the improvements that continue to be made. The 2011 Allianz Spring Series was a snapshot of our ongoing innovations. The success of our Board’s games development work is evidenced by the growth in juvenile numbers, underpinned by effective administration. But as always, success poses new and greater challenges; we are never more vulnerable than when things are going well. The GAA in Dublin must continue to maximise participation in our games which in turn will require a greater investment in structures and resources. The premium of space will require continual honing of administrative models and a possible expansion of the traditional playing weekend. Stronger links must continue to be forged with the education sector, once such a critical component in the development of players. The message and the approach should be consistent. The counties infrastructure deficit, for decades distorted from over-reliance on Croke Park, must be addressed through the development of stadia affording low cost spectator accommodation and participation/centre of excellence facilities in the county.

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In 1974 Kevin Heffernan reawakened a moribund senior football team and helped revolutionise the GAA in Dublin in the process.

Our Ladies Football teams have brought great pride to the county and have become role models for the exploding interest in ladies football. Similarly camogie is being carried to new levels at club and county level by the successes in hurling. Yet the continuing separation of male and female associations contrasts sharply with the singular responsibility for promoting both genders entrenched throughout Dublin’s GAA club network.

This was wonderful, this was proper, this is Dublin. Acceleration of the integration agenda at national level would serve to underpin the work being done on the ground and afford greater potential for growth, synergies and commercial opportunity. In 1974 Kevin Heffernan reawakened a moribund senior football team and helped revolutionise the GAA in Dublin in the process. He did so by changing a mind-set. Dublin has a strong present built on the solid foundations of our past. Our future must now be informed by a comprehensive, ambitious strategic plan, guided by a willingness within Dublin’s GAA community, and across the GAA nationally to embrace a different mind-set, one which genuinely twins the long-term health of the GAA in Dublin with that of the Association as a whole.

Unleashed. 5:05pm September 18, 2011 4:50pm September 18, 2011. The strained hearts of massed Blue hoards longed for a break, a reward for the spirit and effort that had carried the county to the cusp in four finals. Three painful steps and a fourth following the same harrowing path. There had been no loss of dignity, no set-backs, merely the cruel twist of fate’s capricious hand, yet again. All sports are games of inches. But as September’s gloom enveloped Croke Park the brightest blue spark ignited an explosion which hadn’t yet subsided when, with the truest strike of Stephen Cluxton’s left boot, the dreams of generations sailed over the bar into the rapturous embrace of Hill 16.

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Only the coldest of hearts or those of expectant Kingdom stock could not embrace the extraordinary outpouring of emotion. The clichéd vision of grown men crying with joy was surpassed by the sight of thousands of children doing likewise, carried on the Blue Wave of elation coursing around the famous stadium and on to the streets of the city and county.

This is the beginning.


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president cumann lúthchleas Gael

Táimthar a bheith sasta an réamhrá seo a scríobh ar láoll mhór do mhuintir CLG igContae Átha Cliath agus gach éinne a bhfuil acu in ár gcursaí sa phríomh chathair.

here and we all have happy memories of Croke Park and Dublin, no matter where it is we call home.The superb network of clubs in Dublin have provided a sporting infrastructure to behold that otherwise would not exist.

You don’t have to reside in Dublin or in its surroundings to fully appreciate the importance of the city and county to the overall health and well being of the Gaelic Athletic Association. However, as someone who has spent a lot of time in the capital city at various different times over the course of my life, this has always been abundantly clear to me.

They have also assisted in a subtle but not insignificant way in the movement of people both within Ireland but also into Ireland through the provision of outlets that foster community ethos and spirit that can be hard to come by in urban settings.

The facts and figures speak for themselves and if we are not well organised, ambitious and competitive in our main urban bases and in Dublin in particular, there is a gaping hole in our Association. Thankfully we are on track – even before the publication of this review, and you only have to glance back at the championship year enjoyed by Dublin to back this up. By any standards it was a remarkable season. Of course Dublin would have liked to have secured more All-Ireland silverware to go with the famous football title they annexed in such dramatic fashion by Pat Gilroy’s fine team. However, that the county reached a total of four finals is not easily overlooked – and I pay particular reference to hurling in that observation. The rise of hurling in the county over the last decade has been a massive boost to the game and also a template for how counties can re-organise themselves and reinvigorate already ongoing efforts to promote our activities. As a city and county Dublin has always held a special place in the Association that extends far beyond the numbers game that goes hand in hand with capital city demographics.The playing and administrative centre of the Association is located

Of course there are challenges. There are areas of the county were we are not as strong on the ground as we would like to be. We have fantastic clubs who attempt to cater for areas and numbers that mean they are fully stretched. This is where the significance of what has been produced between these two covers comes into play. The success or otherwise of a sporting body can be measured in participation levels. Everything flows from the people who play our games from an early age – whether it is a desire to provide top level coaching, to attend county games or to develop the best facilities we can for our young people. In many ways this is timely coming as it does on the back of a season of massive promise for those who wear and support sky blue. I encourage everyone with an interest in the fortunes of this county to buy into the plan outlined here and to play your role. 2011 does not have to be a one off. It could in time be bettered if some of the goals and aspirations outlined here bear fruit. Ar aghaidh len ár gcluichí, CRIOSTÓIR Ó CUANA UACHTARÁN, CHUMANN LÚTHCHLEAS GAEL.

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CHAIRMAN DUBLIN COUNTY COMMITTEE CLG

Dublin GAA’s strategic plan (2011-2017) outlines the path the Dublin County Committee (DCC) will take to achieve our vision of positioning Dublin as the leading GAA county. Achieving our goals will allow Dublin to effectively help the Association to confirm its position as the leading driver of sport and community development in Ireland. The continuation of the GAA’s role as the largest generator of social capital in Ireland and the greatest force for equalising access to sport across the genders is now more necessary than ever in the Ireland of 2011. This position is reinforced by the principle driving the games development policy of “play and stay with the GAA”. Dublin GAA is also in the best position, due to its extensive classless club network, to create increased social inclusion consistent with Government policy. In short it can be a vehicle for Government and local authorities to help redress social deficit through sport and community-based funding and projects. The County Committee recognises that Dublin GAA must continue to broaden its base and emphasise participation, health, wellbeing and community spirit. After extensive research, analysis and stakeholder consultation we have identified nine strategic goals that cover all aspects of the County Committee’s activities. These start with the many thousands of children who experience GAA games from a very early age and who progress through underage participation, then participation in club activity leading to representing Dublin in the inter-county competitions right through to those volunteering and being involved in all aspects of club and County Board activities. The current county committee structure has served Dublin well but today’s challenges dictate that we cannot stand still. We must ensure that the county committee is itself adequately resourced and is supported by strong

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sub-committees such as brand and commercial development, infrastructure and finance. In working towards our vision we will create opportunities for all Dubliners to engage with the games and other activities in a way that suits their life stages, lifestyles and aspirations. We will continue to monitor social and demographic trends and respond positively to such changes while protecting and adding to our values to ensure that Gaelic games will continue to be meaningful and consequently grow and make a positive contribution to the quality of life for people living in Dublin. We will provide clear pathways of excellence for our talented juveniles, both male and female, so that they are given every chance to achieve success in club and inter-county competitions at the highest level of our games. Dublin GAA, which is pivotal to the future wellbeing of the GAA and the Dublin County Committee, looks forward to working with the Leinster and Central Councils of the Association and the people of Dublin over the coming years to convert our goals and aspirations into reality. We enjoyed unparalleled success on the inter-county playing fields this year. This success was a result of hard work and planning by a large number of dedicated people across the GAA community in Dublin. We need to build on this success and this Strategic Plan will provide the pathway to future achievements. This is a beginning, not an end. ANDY KETTLE CHAIRMAN, DUBLIN COUNTY COMMITTEE CLG


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ARD StiÚrthÓir cumann lúthchleas gael

Is cúis mhór áthais dom an deis seo a bheith agam na focail seo a leanas a scríobh don foilseacháin fíorthabhachtach seo do gach éinne a bhfuil baint acu len’ár gCumann an seo i gContae Átha Cliath. As part of the Association’s Strategic Vision and Action Plan in 2008 it was agreed that all county and provincial units would undertake their own Strategic Reviews with the objective of putting in place a detailed plan covering the activities and promotion of the Association within their area of operation. I am pleased to say that the vast majority of our units have by now completed this review and planning process, and that the process is already producing positive results. Croke Park does not accord a favoured status to any unit, but it would be denying demographic facts not to recognise that Dublin is a region of vital importance to the GAA. According to preliminary figures from Census 2011, almost 1.3 million people live in Dublin city and county, which represents 20% of the entire population of Ireland. It is a simple statistical fact that Dublin constitutes, in terms of population catchment area, the single largest county unit in the Association, and is, therefore, a region in which the health of the GAA has a profound impact on the wider health of the Association. Apart from the high concentration of population, Dublin also offers the vast range of cultural and leisure activities of a major capital city – not only does the GAA have to compete against the strong presences of other sporting organisations in Dublin, it must also fight for attention against the calls of activities and opportunities that tempt people away from sport altogether.

Championship and National Hurling League, have generated excellent coverage for the Association in national media and it is an indisputable fact that successful Dublin county teams create an excitement and anticipation that no other county can match. Such coverage is crucial – if the GAA does not get these column inches and this broadcast time, they will surely go to other sports, and will act as promotional activity for sports with which the GAA is in competition in Dublin. Those wonderful successes reflect the hard work of so many people with development squads and underage teams. But the groundwork for the success of county teams takes place, as always in the GAA, at club level. Here, the GAA has a strong and vibrant presence in Dublin. The county’s 90 clubs provide an unrivalled network that brings the Association’s community ethos to all areas of city and county. And it is also at club level that the success of the GAA will be measured. Dublin, indeed, presents a unique challenge to the Association, one we must all be ready to accept: is the GAA offering good enough to allow the Association to survive and thrive in the most competitive geographic area in the country? It is in the interests of the Association as a whole that it is. If we can compete successfully for members and volunteers at club level, then the Association will prosper. The formulation and enactment of the Dublin Strategic Plan are critical elements in the Association’s drive to maintain and build upon its presence in Dublin. I am grateful to everyone who has contributed to the formulation of the Dublin Strategic Plan, and I look forward with optimism to seeing its implementation strengthen the Association in Dublin city and county. Rath Déar an obair.

One indication of the importance of a successful GAA in Dublin at a national level is visible in the recent success of both the senior county football and hurling teams. Both teams, through winning the All-Ireland Senior Football

PARAIC Ó DUFAIGH ARD STIÚRTHÓIR

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CHAIRMAN strategic review committee

THE GAA IS UNDERPINNED by a strong community-based structure which has helped to integrate people drawn from increasingly different cultures. Dublin GAA’s network of 90 clubs is crucial to fostering and further developing this community ethos in all areas of Dublin city and county. Furthermore Gaelic games play an important part in the life of Dublin society and have a unique profile where the county teams captivate the imagination and unify the entire population of the county behind one jersey.

■ The collapse of the Irish economy and its impact on Irish society

Dublin is home to 20% of the population of our island which places a significant responsibility on Dublin GAA to ensure the promotion and development of Gaelic games in the country’s largest population centre. This responsibility has grown in recent years as nearly 30% of all the births in the 26 counties are to mothers resident in Dublin. These challenges are considerable in a county operating under the control of four different local authorities with such a diverse population and developing communities.

■ The opportunities and expectations created by the commercialisation of sport

In addition, because of its size and the potential for future playing numbers, the children of Dublin are also the primary focus of the Association’s main competitors. The task of ensuring that the Association can provide the playing opportunities to meet these demographic movements places a considerable onus on both Dublin GAA and the Association nationally. The enormity of this task is reflected in the need to increase the numbers participating in Go-Games from 12,063 in 2010 to 18,000 in 2017 if we are to increase participation in real terms by ten percent over our current rates. In addition to the increase in the population, the Strategic Committee recognises the major environmental challenges facing Dublin GAA:

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■ Changing social and demographic trends and the uneven geographic and social distribution of the population ■ The increased media profile of sport generally and of Gaelic games in particular

■ The evolving expectations of both players and supporters ■ Developments in the use of technology, especially communications technologies, and the need for the Association to harness and manage those changes to its advantage The participation of an tArd Stiúrthóir at the meetings of the main Strategic Committee demonstrates the GAA’s recognition of the extent of the challenges and the significance of Dublin to the future growth and development of the Association. It has also served to heighten awareness at Central Council level of some of the practical challenges facing Dublin GAA as well as emphasising the mutual dependency between the national and Dublin units of the Association.


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The enormous contribution of our volunteers, players and club administrators is also recognised and acknowledged as critical to the prosperity of Dublin GAA. The many selfless hours they dedicate to the sport at the grassroots level ensures Gaelic games in Dublin remain the favourite sports for both children and adults. Their tireless dedication also fosters and develops our elite players – both today’s and tomorrows - football, hurling and camogie heroes. The Government, the Irish Sports Council, Local Authorities, NAMA, the education sector and our sponsors are also important stakeholders. Effective consultation with all these groups will assist us in tackling the issues we face in bringing the goals and objectives of this Strategic Plan to fruition. Our plan seeks to harness the Human Capital of our volunteers, the Intangible Capital inherent in the Dublin Brand, the Commercial Capital of our Sponsors and other stakeholders and the Financial and Cultural Capital of Central Council to increase the Social Capital necessary to create a vibrant capital city.

Striving to be the best in all that we do, will underpin each of the objectives we have set, and will help us to develop the best players, coaches, administrators, facilities, participation, promotion events and experience possible. I wish to thank everybody who was involved in the preparation of this plan and who worked selflessly for the advancement of the GAA in Dublin. The implementation of this plan will be monitored over its duration in order to ensure that our vision of making Dublin Ireland’s leading GAA county becomes a reality. We will not meet the challenges of today with yesterday’s tools and expect to be successful tomorrow BRENDAN WATERS CHAIRMAN, STRATEGIC REVIEW COMMITTEE

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A Strategy for Dublin GAA 2011-2017

2. a look back before we go forward On 2 December 1885 the Dublin County Committee was established with John Wyse Power, one of the seven founders of the GAA, as its first chairperson. The Association thrived in its early years and by 1888 there were one hundred and fourteen clubs of variable scales in the county. It is estimated that these clubs catered for some 6,000 footballers and about a hundred hurlers. The hurling clubs, concentrated in the inner city, were made up of rural migrants who worked mainly in the retail draperies, the bakeries, transport services, and public houses. Football dominated rural County Dublin. But it was the hurlers of Kickhams, the representatives of the drapery trade, who won the first of Dublin’s six hurling All-Irelands by defeating the representatives of County Clare at Inchicore on 3 November, 1889. The first of the county’s twenty-three football All-Ireland titles was secured when Young Irelands, drawn mainly from brewery employees, beat Clondrohid of Cork on 28 February 1892. But it was political events beyond the playing fields, which threatened to destroy the Association in its early years in Dublin. The condemnation of Charles Stewart Parnell, one of the GAA’s patrons, by the Catholic Church in 1891 because of his relationship with Kitty O’Shea, caused deep and lasting divisions. Many Dublin clubs failed to survive the ‘Parnell split’ and their numbers in Dublin declined from an estimated one hundred and twenty in 1889 to a mere thirty-eight in 1900. But Dublin GAA remained

faithful to Parnell. When the ‘uncrowned king’ died in October 1891 officers of the County Board, led by Thomas Lee, chairman, and including James Boland (chairman 1892 and father of Harry, chairman 19111918), marched in his funeral cortege at the head of some 2,000 followers with hurleys draped in black. Parnell is commemorated today in both the County Board’s headquarters and the county’s premier playing ground in Donnycarney. But Dublin guided by wise administrators, such as Lorcan O’Toole (O’Toole Park, appropriately opened by Kevin Boland in 1957 commemorates him) secretary of the County Board from 1915 to 1940, and benefiting from its core position at the centre of the rail and road network, overcame the travails of the 1890s. With willing volunteers and a large playing population to draw from, the county prospered so much that by 1920 it had won eleven All-Ireland football titles (half its total to date) and two hurling All-Irelands (one third of its total). But there were problems such as the withdrawal of the Kickhams club in 1913 and its formation of a rival organisation to the GAA. Kickhams, one of Dublin’s most successful dual clubs withdrew ostensibly over representation at County Board but the conflict was in reality about the unresolved question of constitutional and physical force nationalism.

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The Garda team, which represented Dublin in the All-Ireland of 1927, is generally recognised as one of the greatest hurling sides of all time.

Kickhams returned in 1919 to a much-changed Dublin, physically and politically shattered by the events of Easter Week 1916 in which as many as three hundred Dublin GAA members participated. Further away from their native city young Dublin men, again players and followers of the GAA, fell on the battlefields of the Great War. But the County Board managed to keep the games going through the War of Independence and the Civil War, albeit with championships running well beyond their calendar years. Looking back the years it seems that the summer of 1921, between the Truce and the yet to be signed Treaty, was a golden period for the GAA in Dublin. The young revolutionaries, Michael Collins, Harry Boland, Eamon de Valera, Dan Breen and Seán McKeon, often in military uniform, were feted in Croke Park. Collins photographed, addressing the Dublin and Kilkenny hurling teams, on the role of the GAA in the revolution, prior to a Leinster hurling final is a compelling image. In other photographs from the period one can see Harry Boland, hurler and former chairman of the County Board, exchanging banter, as former players do, with his old team mates. Within a year both Collins and Boland were dead, victims of the Civil War. Three Sundays between 1918 and 1924 carry great symbolism for the GAA in Dublin. In defiance of a government ban on the gathering of people to participate in Gaelic games the GAA designated Sunday, 4 August 1918 as Gaelic Sunday. ‘In one never to be forgotten tournament’, remembered Tommy Moore, ‘we crossed our hurleys with the lion’s claw and emerged victorious’. Sunday, 21 November 1920 is forever recalled as ‘Bloody Sunday’ for the deaths of players and supporters gathered in Croke Park for a football challenge match between Dublin and Tipperary. Those killed were representative of the people who played and followed the game in the city. They were the city boys from the precincts of Croke Park; the young men up from the country working in city pubs; the young girl who accompanied her fiancée to the game; and the older men from the outlying suburban clubs. Sunday, 28 September 1924, marks the beginning of modern times for the GAA. It was on that day that Dublin played and beat Kerry in the delayed 1923 All-Ireland final. The Civil War had divided but not fatally damaged

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the Association in Dublin. Teams took the sides of their captains or other key men, but on that Sunday the game persevered and helped heal the wounds. In the later 1920s the games became one of the building blocks of the new state. Both the new police force, An Garda Síochána, and Army Metro recruited the best players from all over Ireland to form teams in Dublin. The Garda hurling team won six county senior hurling championships between 1925 and 1931; Army Metro won three between 1933 and 1938. Eventually under pressure from the established clubs, these almost professional outfits were disbanded, but not before they provided the backbone of the Dublin teams that won the county’s last hurling All-Irelands in 1927 and 1938. The Garda team, which represented Dublin in the AllIreland of 1927, is generally recognised as one of the greatest hurling sides of all time. The most contentious issue and one that had a long-term impact on the GAA in Dublin was the Declaration Rule passed at the Annual Congress of the GAA in 1925. Under its provisions players born outside of Dublin but resident in the city could play in domestic competition in Dublin and, subject to ‘declaring’ their intentions by Easter Sunday of the calendar year, could transfer allegiance to the county of their birth for the All-Ireland championships. The rule was introduced to counter the success of institutional teams such as the Garda and Army, whom some feared were depleting rural counties of their talent to the advantage of Dublin. The Declaration Rule created a disconnection between club and county and meant that Dublin were unable to select a team from all the players participating in its championships. It is no surprise that in the period between 1925 and the 1950s, the heyday of the Rule, Dublin had a poor record in the All-Ireland championships – three football and two hurling wins between 1925 and 1973 – in contrast to the years preceding its introduction. By the year of its golden jubilee in 1934 the GAA was a settled body with a prominent place in Irish cultural life. All of the national newspapers carried


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1938 All-Ireland Hurling team

special supplements celebrating the Association’s 50 years and Dublin County Committee published a splendid jubilee brochure. By 1934 the various Boards administering the games from juvenile to senior levels were in place. If the ‘Declaration Rule’ dominated Dublin Conventions in the quartercentury after 1925, then from 1950 onwards the non-native rule championed by St. Vincents took centre stage. Originating in the parish schools on Griffith Avenue the club grew through the Christian Brothers, who were great nurturers of the games in Dublin, to dominate domestic competitions in both football and hurling from the 1950s to the 1970s. The non-native was excluded from their playing ranks and the County Board was to implement the same policy in the selection of county teams. Success for

St. Vincents in Dublin competitions was not translated at senior county level – one title in both the 1950s and 1960s – into national dominance. Perhaps the competition engendered by the city/country divide made the Dublin championship too intense. Perhaps, St Vincent’s greatest players, as adept with the camán as with the football, simply played too many games while their competitors at inter-county level, such as Kerry in football and Kilkenny in hurling, were focussed on a single code. Apart from its too brief Indian summer in 1961 Dublin hurling, if measured in national senior titles, suffered a dramatic decline. Paper wars over Rule 27, or the Ban as it was generally referred to, dominated the late 1960s and early 1970s. Dublin as a capital city had

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more ‘occasions of sin’ than rural Ireland and it was proving impracticable to police the regulations. Members of the Dublin County Committee pioneered the propaganda battle, but it was only when the clubs and counties of rural Ireland joined in support that the rule was jettisoned. The impact of the rule change is still unclear. The optimism of its proponents that its removal would lead to a resurgence of Gaelic games in the second level schools, which traditionally favoured ‘foreign games’, was misplaced as was the pessimism of its defenders that Gaelic games in the cities would be unable to compete with soccer and rugby. With the passage of time and the intense specialisation within all sports we have now reached the stage where dual players at senior inter-county level are banned de facto from playing both hurling and football. Within Ireland the emphasis on economic and physical planning developed apace from the 1960s. The GAA set down its response to changing circumstances in the McNamee Commission report published in 1971. It was perceived that the complexity of a modern organisation such as the GAA could not be efficiently governed according to the structures laid down in different days. In time governance by committee and professional administrators, rather than the representative model of delegates from individual clubs all having a say, became the norm in Dublin. Two coincidences helped the GAA in Dublin deal with the unprecedented scale of population growth in the 1970s and later. One was the farsightedness of administrators who pushed through the reforms recommended by McNamee and who constantly emphasised to clubs the importance of having both a ground and a social centre that would anchor the local community to them. Active intervention rather than a policy of laissez faire was the order of the day. The County Board was unable to fill in all the gaps on the map of the GAA in Dublin and its policy of fixing clubs in parish/suburbs had disastrous consequence for the old ‘gallowglass’ clubs who were like nations without territories. Time and again throughout the years clubs evolved rather than being imposed. It was the coming together of a group who had the faith that was as instrumental in the 1970s as it was in the 1880s.

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The other conjunction was the coincidence of population growth in the new suburbs with the emergence in the 1970s of what has to be regarded as Dublin’s most successful football team of all times. Fondly remembered as the golden age of Gaelic football in the capital, the team and its managers/selectors captured public imagination and became positive symbols for the game and the county. Their youthful dash and flowing style became the measure by which all those who went before and those who came after were to be assessed. Since 1977 the remainder of the century returned to a kind of struggling normality punctuated by the All-Ireland victories of 1983 and 1995. Sadly, there was no parallel success in hurling but the hurlers never lost the faith and the County Board through new structures and the voluntary commitment of dedicated enthusiasts have turned the tide with a hurling league title in 2011. However, when one looks at our clubs they have been very successful at all age levels. Dublin has enjoyed unprecedented success in the national Féile competitions. In hurling Dublin emerged victorious to claim the Christy Ring Cup (Division 1), in two of the last seven Féile na nGael finals with Castleknock’s glory in 2007 coming two years after Kilmacud Crokes’ success. Prior to that Ballyboden St Enda’s (1992) had been Dublin’s sole winners of the coveted competition dating back to its inauguration in 1971. In football Dublin’s representatives have enjoyed even greater success in modern times – being crowned National Féile Peil na nÓg winners on eight occasions in the last 12 years including the last four years in succession. St Vincent’s commenced this golden era with victory in Croke Park in 2000 and St Brigid’s retained the title the following year. Since then Kilmacud Crokes (2003) and St Sylvester’s (2005) also won the Féile title before the four in-a-row of Kilmacud Crokes (2008), Ballyboden St Enda’s (2009), Na Fianna (2010) and Ballymun Kickhams (2011). Dublin’s club football champions have prospered in the last decade in the All-Ireland series and even more so in the provincial club championship. St


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Brigid’s, St Vincent’s, and Kilmacud Crokes (on three occasions) have all claimed the Leinster title with both the Marino side and the men from Stillorgan going on to claim the Andy Merrigan Cup as All-Ireland senior club football champions. The GAA in Dublin began under difficult circumstances in a non-supportive hostile environment; over one hundred and twenty seven years later it finds itself in partnership with state and local authorities. The Association in the beginning struggled to find playing spaces in the Phoenix Park. Today, clubhouses and pitches dot the urban landscape of Dublin, albeit unevenly

spaced. The Park has lost its nurturing role as the clubs have become localised within their suburbs. Revivalism gave momentum to the young Association: the belief that it was part of an enterprise greater than the games forged its identity. Times and themes have changed but the context in which the GAA evolved will be always important. At the beginning of the twentieth century the GAA strove to make the people of Ireland more Irish and as we move further into the twenty-first century its primary purpose may be to make them healthier. The communion of interests, players, administrators and supporters, represents the trinity of family, club and county all sharing an abiding interest in their native games.

Times and themes have changed but the context in which the GAA evolved will be always important.

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A Strategy for Dublin GAA 2011-2017

3. challenges facing dublin gaa 3.1 » Dublin’s Demographic Time bomb Dublin is home to 20% of the population of Ireland. Our Association is a 32 county organisation but due to the different jurisdictions an analysis of population figures on a like for like basis presents various challenges. The total population of the island based on the preliminary 2011 Census for the 26 counties and projections for the 6 counties is 6,364,281. An analysis by province is shown in the pie chart but all further population figures in the report are based on the 26 counties. In the period from 2002 to 2005 there were circa 61,000 births per annum in the 26 counties with approximately 26% of the births to mothers resident in Dublin. However, from 2006 the annual number of births increased to 65,425 rising to over 74,500 in 2010 with the number of births to mothers resident in Dublin approaching 30% of the total for the 26 counties. The concentration of the population in Dublin has historically been alleviated by the movement to dormitory towns around Dublin, but in the context of the current economic climate with negative equity on dwellings in Dublin and the shortage of finance, this movement will create less of an impact in the future. These challenges are obviously issues not just for the GAA but for all stakeholders in the county.

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TAB LE 1

CENSUS DATA

NUMBER OF REGISTERED BIRTHS

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Munster

16,269

16,096

16,220

16,456

17,579

18,861

19,670

20,066

19,222

Connacht

6,795

6,951

6,898

6,912

7,142

7,816

8,297

8,163

8,114

Ulster

3,936

4,042

3,912

3,943

3,744

3,943

4,329

4,286

4,438

Leinster excl. Dublin

17,702

17,892

17,646

17,485

18,789

20,302

21,541

21,154

21,532

Dublin

15,729

15,691

15,778

16,280

18,171

19,698

20,159

20,609

21,452

City

5,189

5,096

5,259

5,723

6,548

7,123

7,553

7,827

8,220

South Dublin

3,982

3,899

3,976

3,951

4,450

4,711

4,575

4,524

4,746

Fingal

4,340

4,373

4,277

4,330

4,777

5,284

5,346

5,430

5,560

Dun Laghaire/R’down

2,218

2,323

2,266

2,276

2,396

2,580

2,685

2,828

2,926

Dublin Percentage

26.0%

25.9%

26.1%

26.7%

27.8%

27.9%

27.2%

27.7%

28.7%

GAA games are our national games and in order for them to continue in their pre-eminent position it is essential that we address the challenges that this population increase presents, it is necessary to ensure that all the inhabitants of Dublin are given the opportunity to embrace our ethos and participate in our Association. It is important from a strategic perspective that we understand the population changes in Dublin and devise a strategic plan that is grounded in this reality. Currently our engagement process is divided into a number of different age categories; ■ Pre-Nursery: Children at 4/5 are introduced to basic ball skills in line with their general motor and developing social skills. ■ Nursery: Children at 6/7 who are encouraged to develop general motor skills (ABC).

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■ Go-Games: Children from under 8, at the 1st January, to under 12 who play in small sided games in a friendly environment with the emphasis on fun rather than competition. ■ Juvenile Games: Children from under 13, at 1st January, to under 16 who play the traditional 15 a side game with an increasing emphasis on competition. ■ Minor Games: Youths at under 17 and 18 who are transitioning to adult games. ■ Adult Participation: Remainder of population who engage in different playing environments from elite to social and who will provide the majority of our non-playing volunteers.


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TAB LE 1A

A detailed analysis of the two key engagement age groups of Go-Games and Juvenile Games are contained in Appendix II. The scale of our ambition is to drive increases in participation in real terms relative to population growth and our objective over the period of the plan is to have a ten per cent increase on our current participation levels. This objective begins with the need to increase our penetration rate by 10% in Go-Games from the numbers participating in Go-Games from 12, 063 in 2010 to 18,000 in 2017 (Table 1A).

GO GAMES AGE GROUP TOTAL POPULATION 2010 Actuals Children

37,084

% Participation

FOOTBALL

HURLING

TOTAL

7,096

4,967

12,063

19.13%

13.39%

32.53%

10,534

7,466

18,000

21.05%

14.92%

35.97%

3.2 » Social Challenges Ireland and Dublin, as its largest concentration of population, face a huge challenge in providing for sport, recreation and leisure activities in a country that has become rapidly urbanised and is characterised by lifestyles that have resulted in significantly less natural physical activity. This lifestyle also tends to militate against voluntary involvement in sport, recreation and leisure activities. These factors allied to the challenges of building sustainable communities that provide for its inhabitants in terms of social inclusion, local identity and local empowerment are critical to social cohesion. The macro challenges create a series of underlying trends in sports, recreation and leisure activities best understood by reference to research conducted by the Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI). Examples of such trends include: ■ The definite correlation between good physical, mental health and the playing of regular sport. ■ The correlation between playing regular sport, improved academic performance and social skills. ■ The statistic that only 20% of Irish adults played sport regularly or from a recreational perspective that 22% of Irish adults had not played sport or taken a walk of at least 2 miles in the last year.

2017 Plan Children % Participation

50,044

■ The negative impact of lower educational attainment and lower incomes on sports involvement. ■ The trend of significantly higher male than female participation in sport. ■ The vital importance of volunteerism in creating social capital and the need to structure interventions around increasing volunteer involvement and maximising its productivity. ■ The potential ability of mainstream team focused sports clubs to engage the “greying” population in mutually beneficial social activities around the provision of sports for children and younger adults.

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■ The sometimes prohibitive financial costs of involvement in individual sports, leisure and recreation activities. ■ The result of the rapid population shift to and growth in urban areas is often a sense of alienation and of “not belonging” for the new entrants to the community. The aforementioned factors often create a climate where it is difficult to source and secure long-term volunteer commitment. ■ The educational sectors capacity to provide games and physical activity has been negatively affected by factors such as: ■ The lower number of males entering primary school teaching. ■ The reduced involvement of the Religious Orders in the management of schools. ■ Greater emphasis on academic results in schools. ■ Greater obligations on schools in terms of health, safety and child protection. ■ The result is children have less physical activity which will affect their development and health in later years. The cost-benefit of investing in pro-active initiatives to stimulate a robust healthy lifestyle has been clearly demonstrated in national and global studies. In the above cases and in many other instances highlighted in ESRI research the GAA has the structures, format, network, tradition and size to effectively deliver Government policy at community level in a sustainable and value for money way. This is not to say that the GAA can address all of Ireland’s social problems but it is in the best position of any sporting organisation to deliver on areas of common interest to the State as well as the Association.

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3.3 » Community and Family Challenges The big increase in the population of Dublin arising from the influx of Irish and new Irish families into the county has created many challenges and opportunities for Dublin GAA and the Association nationally. As Dublin has and continues to change significantly, Dublin GAA needs to change and grow in parallel with it whilst at the same time maintaining at its core the traditional values of the GAA. Community remains a key value for Dublin GAA. Everything we do helps to enrich the communities we serve. The Association should be seen, first and foremost, as a sporting body promoting Gaelic games, but one of whose main strengths is its presence in almost every community in Dublin. The ethos of Dublin GAA is promoted and most visible through the club, which aims to have a central role in its locality and within its community. The modern GAA club in Dublin is not a single-dimension, team-based organisation, but a family-focused organisation that provides sporting, leisure and social activities for males and females of all ages in its community. Dublin GAA is moving from its traditional role as an administrative body to that of a development agency stimulating pro social activity across the city and county. This requires an approach to sports development that is and will continue to be mainly volunteer driven and community based. The Strategic committee is conscious that all its interventions are designed to reinforce or newly create the inputs that drive sustainable club development. When Dublin GAA is successful in the creation of these inputs they create the synergies that stimulate the increased volunteerism that is required to embed the club in the community.


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3.4 » Volunteerism The volunteer in the GAA is the most important person to the Association. Volunteers are in essence the lifeblood of the GAA and always have been since its inception. The role of the ‘volunteer’ is in effect the pursuit of vocation, in the service of others, and without them the Association has no future. It is the incredible work carried out by thousands of volunteers, young and old, male and female, from every single walk of life which drives this remarkable organisation and keeps it fresh, relevant and a critically important part of the lives of Irish people. Being involved in the GAA gives a sense of fulfilment which is unrivalled. It brings membership of the biggest club in Ireland; it puts one right at the heart of Irish culture and provides a pastime for every member of the family. However, the challenge facing the GAA and Dublin GAA is to open the door to all potential volunteers and keep that door open. We need to provide volunteers with the necessary resources, skills and support to carry out their roles in nurturing and mentoring the teams and managing the club.

decision making on larger areas which may cover many parishes, schools and a number of clubs. The sense of community may be built around the club rather than the traditional concept of the club existing in a predefined place which is the community. The Strategic Committee recognises that the following inputs are essential to drive community-based sports development: ■ Participation Levels ■ Standards Development ■ Voluntary Administrators ■ Team Mentors ■ Competent Coaches ■ Facilities

The Inputs by Analogy 3.5 » Clubs The plan recognises that in order to provide a meaningful games programme for all age groups we must organise our clubs, volunteers and facilities in a manner that acknowledges the strengths and challenges in the different parts of the county. The GAA clubs in Dublin, similar to all GAA clubs, are not single-dimension, team-based organisations, but are family-focused organisations that provide sporting, leisure and social activities for all ages and genders in its community. However, the challenge for Dublin GAA is that urban life does not adhere to the “parish rule” which necessitates that we must base our planning and

“If a club can get people be they players of all ages, parents or sports volunteers of all types it’s got a chance of delivering for its local community. If that mobilised body can create sports activity in a fashion that ensures good coaching standards, opportunities for players of all abilities within an empowered democratic organisational structure that is support by access to good facilities then the local community has a sustainable club” At the moment not all community clubs have equal access to the essential inputs highlighted above. Some of the key differentiators for clubs in terms of access to the essential inputs required for sustainable community club development are set out on the next page.

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KEY CLUB DIFFERENTIATORS PARTICIPATION LEVELS (CLUB)

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VOLUNTARY ADMINISTRATORS

An individual clubs access to: ■ An effective school to club link in its local primary schools ■ An effective school to club link in its relevant second level schools ■ Parents who are prepared to take an active role in the club

An individual club’s access to and ability to recruit: ■ Voluntary adult administrators who are capable of building and managing large community entities ■ Some clubs are self sufficient in terms of voluntary administrative capacity but others have deficiencies in this respect

PARTICIPATION LEVELS (SCHOOLS)

COMPETENT COACHES

An individual club’s access to: ■ Schools with teachers that have: ■ A sports orientation ■ Capacity to organise and manage teams ■ Schools with a sports friendly management ■ Schools who have a GAA ethos

An individual club’s access to: ■ A sufficient pool of available volunteers ■ Coaching resources beyond the pool of coaches arising from parental involvement ■ Coaching expertise: ■ A traditionally strong club may have greater access to a pool of coaches than a new or emerging club

STANDARDS DEVELOPMENT

FACILITIES

An individual club’s ability to create and provide access to: ■ A playing environment at club level that manage the expectations of players of differing abilities

An individual club’s access to: ■ Facilities that are physically close to a club’s local community ■ Combined club and school facilities ■ Multi sport facilities ■ 3rd generation all weather and lighted facilities ■ People that are experienced in facilities management


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Dublin GAA, in responding to the need to serve communities that have a desire for GAA activity, have created four club development models which have been tailored to meet the challenges of community club growth in an urban setting. These include: MODEL 1: DEVELOPMENT OF AN EXISTING CLUB This involves the development of an existing club with interventions focused on the inputs to club growth. MODEL 2: EXISTING LARGE CLUB WITH MULTIPLE NURSERIES TO GO-GAMES HUBS This involves a large club with an extended hinterland setting up a separate Nursery to Go-Games structure in a location with sufficient population and localised identity. The desired outcome would be that a new sense of community would develop and generate a separate club. MODEL 3: NEW VOLUNTEER-LED CLUB This involves the formation of a new volunteer-led club from a community of spatial concentration of population. This process would be driven by an existing volunteer base

be undertaken to advance the Association in the area. This regionalised approach is suited to an expanding county like Dublin where it can take a better and more detailed account of the strength of the GAA and the unique characteristics and challenges of the different areas within the local region. This initiative should be viewed solely as a tool to grow the GAA in the county and it is not proposed to entail any changes to the games programme or the representative status of Dublin’s inter-county teams.

3.6 » Ladies Gaelic Games In 2002 the Gaelic games Integration Task Force was established to give expression to the wishes of the membership of Cumann Luthchleas Gael, Cumann Camógaíochta and Cumann Peil Gael na mBán that there be closer links between all three organisations and that the possibility of joint/overall membership be explored. The members recognised the following benefits for all three Associations and for the community: ■ Increase in membership

MODEL 4: HEAVILY SUPPORTED CLUB The model is focused on the formation of a new club in an area, without a significant demand for GAA activity, but with a large population base. The lack of demand for GAA activity may be due to severe socioeconomic problems or presence of a large new-Irish national population. This model requires significant intervention and could compromise the volunteer ethos. The ongoing work on the development models for clubs must continue in order to ensure that the Association has the tools and capacity to have a presence in all the areas of Dublin.

■ Increase in numbers playing our games ■ Increase in the numbers of voluntary workers ■ Additional skills and expertise ■ Sharing of experience ■ Encouraging the family ethos ■ An inclusive Association

The Strategic Committee proposes the division of Dublin into ten Local Area Development Regions, (LADRs) to allow the County Committee to work closely with the existing clubs in the region to determine what actions must

■ All three Associations can be truly involved with the community.

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Dublin has demonstrated the success of this initiative particularly at club, school and community level where by working together the three Associations have significantly increased the number of children, particularly girls, playing our sports. The increase has brought benefits to the club as it allows all of the family to participate in club and indeed community matters. It is now critical that this success at club level is replicated at County Committee level as the parents of boys and girls playing our games consider the GAA to be one family.

3.7 » Inter-county Success The success of our inter-county teams is vital for the promotion of Gaelic games in Dublin and the Strategic Committee recognises the importance of building a bridge between the large participation numbers at juvenile level, the development squads and ultimately our inter-county teams. The additional facilities and the extension of the weekend games schedule should also assist in the preparation of our inter-county teams as there will be additional space in the weekend calendar for development squad meetings and training. We have seen how the recent successes on the field at inter-county level strengthens the visibility and appeal of the Dublin Jersey.

3.8 » Branding of Dublin GAA The committee is cognisant that the Dublin Jersey would have a stronger message if all the inter-county ladies and men’s teams wore one Dublin Jersey. This jersey would further enhance the value of the Dublin brand which even today is one of, if not, the most recognised sporting brand in Ireland. Our plan will only succeed if the County Committee has the proper and dynamic integrated structures in place to drive the plan forward. The committee is aware that these proposals must be embraced by all units of Dublin GAA.

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3.9 » Financial pressure and constraints It is clear to the Strategic Committee that the financial resources that are currently available to the Dublin County Committee are inadequate to enable Dublin GAA to give effect to the initiatives identified as appropriate in this strategic review. The County Committee has traditionally operated a balanced budget with all revenues (which have been running at €5.2 million per year) being fully re-invested in current organisational and development initiatives. The scale and nature of the challenge today can be gauged from the following observations: ■ The total cost of the Dublin/SRC games development programme has been running at c €3m per year which has traditionally been part funded by the Irish Sports Council (€900k), Dublin Clubs (€860k), Central Council (€600k) and Leinster Council (€260k), with the balance being provided by the Dublin County Committee. ■ Dublin County Committee has a high dependency on the continued year-on-year financial support of the aforementioned agencies and GAA bodies to continue the SRC programme. ■ Dublin County Committee faces material downside risks from reduced gate receipts, affiliation fees, advertising revenues and fundraising capacity due to the economic downturn. ■ Dublin’s main source of revenue is from its principle commercial sponsor, Vodafone. Secondary and tertiary sponsorship and partnering arrangements have traditionally be informal and of moderate scale – it is considered that there is capacity to increase revenues from commercial sponsorship but this would require an increased investment on the part of the Dublin County Committee in brand development and in the employment of a professional commercial development team.

■ Dublin has no material surplus assets which could be monetised for re-investment although consideration could be given to the possible sale of O’Toole Park – although the realisation potential of O’Toole Park is limited given the current state of the property market. ■ With the exception of a trial venture with Croke Park for the 2011 Dublin Spring Series. Dublin, like all counties, has not traditionally benefited in any meaningful respect in gate receipts ffrom senior inter-county games despite attracting large attendances. This clearly fails to align responsibility for promoting the games with the resultant increased income streams. ■ Aside from gate receipts, the potential return to Dublin GAA from investing in the Dublin brand is limited as many of the valuable rights including TV, Media and Sponsorship revenues derived from increased brand recognition structurally accrue to other units within the GAA. The subsequent re-distribution of such revenues as between provinces and counties generally doesn’t take account of the scale and strategic significance of Dublin which in turn mitigates against Dublin’s ability to promote the GAA in the capital. The structural imbalance inherent in the traditional approach to sharing revenues within the GAA has been highlighted by Dublin’s experience in 2011. The success of Dublin’s inter-county teams in both football and hurling in 2011 has resulted in a significantly increased organisational cost directly linked to participation in increased matches including finals and related team expenses. This increased cost is expected to be considerably more than the related success-based revenues, so that rather than success being financially beneficial to the County Board, it is expected to entail an incremental cost.

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The Strategic Committee believes that funding for Dublin’s strategic development will require the adoption of a more professional approach on the part of the Dublin County Committee and a greater acceptance at the Central Council level that increased resources are required in Dublin. Specifically, funding for the strategic plan initiatives should be derived from two principle sources: ■ New and increased revenue sources generated by the Dublin County Board from increased commercial and fundraising initiatives during the plan period, and ■ The adoption of a collaborative approach with Central Council to funding the strategic initiatives, which acknowledges the scale and strategic importance of Dublin to the GAA as a whole. It also recognises the interdependent relationship between the health of the GAA in Dublin and that of the Association as a whole and aligns Dublin’s participation in broader GAA revenues with the valuation proposition derived by the GAA from Dublin. The continued growth in the birth rates in Dublin and in the other counties in Leinster relative to the other parts of the country now requires the Association to review its future resource allocation policies. This review is necessary in order to ensure that the GAA retains its pre-eminent position in Irish sport and Irish life in general. The case for increasing the allocation of funds from central resources to Dublin can be gauged from the following analysis:

Dublin is central to the Leinster Council Fortunes

■ Dublin births account for 48.75% of all births in Leinster – as such Dublin GAA and its club network is de facto responsible for introducing almost half the population of Leinster to Gaelic games

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■ In 2009, Dublin’s 1,223 juvenile teams and 281 adult teams comprised 24.14% and 18.43% of all such teams in Leinster. ■ Attendances at Dublin’s 3 Leinster Senior Football (LSF) Championship games in 2009 averaged 66,561, generating average gate receipts of €1.227million. Average attendances at LSF games not involving Dublin in 2009 were 8,144 (aggregate of 32,574) with average gate receipts of €107k. Hence the average premium for Dublin participation was 58,417 persons and €1.12 million. ■ The importance of Dublin GAA as a revenue resource for Leinster Council was emphasised in 2010 when Dublin did not reach the Leinster Senior Football final. ■ The gate receipts for 2010 were €4.9m down from €5.7m in 2009 while the gate receipts for the final itself fell by over €0.5m.

is central to ensuring that the GAA “ Dublin maintains its pre-eminent status ”

■ Dublin’s population at 1.27 million people comprises 20% of the 32 county population and over 28% on a 26 county basis. ■ Dublin children represent 25.96% of all children aged 0 to 4 in the 26 counties, 24.8% of children aged 5 to 9 and 27.5% of all births in the 26 counties (2006 Census). Preliminary outputs from the 2011 census indicate that the number of births to Dublin mothers is now almost 30%. ■ Hence, Dublin GAA is de facto responsible for introducing Gaelic games to almost 30% of the population of the 26 counties. ■ Dublin’s 223 club affiliations comprises c 10% of all club affiliation in the country.


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■ Dublin’s 1,223 youth teams comprise c 8.5% of all registered teams in 2009. ■ Central Council generated gross revenues of €66.7 million in 2009 of which €43.3million was distributed to provincial councils, county boards and clubs via various programmes. It is nonetheless a valid observation that the level of funding that has traditionally been allocated to Dublin is considerably less than would be warranted based on any population, activity, or revenue analysis. The Strategic Committee believes that there should be a mutual recognition of the interdependent relationship between Dublin’s ambitions for the GAA in the capital city and the overall wellbeing of the Association. It will require Dublin County Board to step up to its responsibility to implement the strategic initiatives recommended in this review. It will also require Central Council to embrace a different funding model, one which addresses the strategic significance of Dublin. One way of addressing this issue is for the GAA to extend Provincial status to Dublin for certain purposes including: ■ providing a long-term commitment to an agreed minimum annual level of funding, commensurate with the development challenge for the GAA in Dublin, to support games development, and club and county infrastructure development. ■ affording the Chairman of the Dublin Co Board permanent representation on Coisti Banaistí.

The Strategic Committee is confident that Central Council will achieve a strong return on its investment in Dublin GAA. In the short term this return will see the attendances by Dublin fans grow and continue to underpin match day income for Central Council, Leinster Council and Páirc an Chrócaigh Teo. In planning for the longer term the investment from Central Council will help Dublin achieve an increased market share over and above the increase in the population. This increase in market share and the greater interest in Gaelic games will in turn continue to generate much-needed income for other units of the Association from increased attendances at games.

3.10 Challenges from the increase of the Dual player The growth in hurling at all ages has led to a considerable challenge for the County Committee. The fact that all of the major clubs are now catering for dual players, is somewhat unique to the GAA in Dublin and adds to the task of the County Committee. It must now cater for the growth of the two codes at a time of significant population growth when more and more children want to play our games. Dublin GAA’s response to these myriad of challenges and issues is set out in the next section: Unleashing “The Blue Wave”: Our Action Plan The Blue Wave of Hill 16 is synonymous with the vibrancy and energy of the championship come summer, and inspires the goals, dreams and ambitions of every young child in Dublin who plays Gaelic games and who aspires to play before the adoring fans of the Hill.

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A Strategy for Dublin GAA 2011-2017

4. unleashing “the Blue Wave” our action plan This action plan sets out the direction for Dublin GAA from 2011 to 2017. It is based on current developments and practices in the County and the outputs from the strategic consultation and planning process as described in this document. Our plan is based on the following vision: 4.1 » Vision The promotion of local and national identity should be combined with the G.A.A.’s sporting and cultural objectives, to achieve the Association’s vision to:

“Promote and organise the playing of our national games by having sustainable structures at club and county level built on achieving a strong sense of local community identity”

To achieve this Vision, Dublin GAA must be an inclusive and representative organisation, which uses its heritage, the commitment of its members, the loyalty to its games and its immense investment in physical assets to provide recreational opportunities for all in society, in such a way as to promote community spirit and local identity as an inherent element of Irish culture.

4.2 » Mission Statement ■ To maximise the opportunity for all to participate in our National Games. ■ To foster family participation through the effective integration and workings of the three County Boards. ■ To provide Clubs with an attractive programme of games that will cater for all juveniles and adults. ■ To cater for the development and welfare of present and future Dublin Players.

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■ To be successful in Leinster and All-Ireland competitions in all codes at inter-county and club levels and in so doing establishing Dublin as the most successful dual county. ■ To provide Clubs with the human resources and management tools necessary to protect and grow volunteer involvement ■ To provide mentors, players, parents and officials with best in class training programmes to maximise the effectiveness and further commitment of voluntary time ■ To provide an appropriate players pathway that will make Dublin GAA an attractive proposition for elite performers relative to other sports ■ To provide the necessary infrastructure to meet the needs of clubs and county teams

IT WILL MAINTAIN ITS VOLUNTARY ETHOS Despite the immense changes in society and in social attitudes towards opportunities for commercialisation, the numbers volunteering their time and efforts to the GAA will have to be maintained and increased, if Dublin GAA is to emerge as an organisation which provides games and recreation for more people in the future. IT WILL CONTINUE TO BE A COMMUNITY-BASED ORGANISATION WITH A VIBRANT SENSE OF COMMUNITY IDENTITY The Dublin GAA of the future will facilitate and accommodate the changing lifestyles and commitments of its members. In the twenty-first century, it will take a ‘whole of life’ view and facilitate its members in any changes of location or lifestyle due to education, career or family, rather than expecting members to build their lives around existing GAA structures and practices. It will encourage involvement from cradle to grave from both a playing environment, competitive and recreational and officer/administration.

4.3 » Values IT WILL PROVIDE GAMES FOR ALL The workings of the Dublin County Committee and the implementation of this Strategic Plan will be underpinned by the following key values of the GAA, in pursuing its vision: IT WILL BE AN INCLUSIVE ORGANISATION The GAA is a uniquely Irish organisation that is welcoming to all those who wish to join and who show respect for its ethos and values, irrespective of gender, creed or race. The Dublin of today is multi-cultural and multi-racial. Dublin GAA of the future will be an inclusive organisation that is confident of its role, its status in Irish life, its potential and its prospects.

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Dublin GAA has created an outlet for players to compete to the best of their ability and, in the process, provided a forum through which generations, at home and abroad, have shared in the excitement, successes and failures of teams at club and county levels. These activities can, and will, be developed and expanded in the future. They will be supplemented by a variety of new activities which will include both indoor games and ‘recreational’ games for those who do not wish to participate in competitive sport. It will cater for those who would like to play its games for recreational and social reasons, and for the sheer enjoyment of the games.


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A STRATEGY FOR DUBLIN GAA 2011-2017

IT WILL CONTINUE TO BE A FAMILY-ORIENTATED ORGANISATION Dublin GAA will be a fully-inclusive organisation built on all family structures, with: ■ its core activity of organising games and competitions for all members of the family; ■ its facilities – including playing facilities for those who require a recreational outlet; ■ its ethos and welcome it provides to all – playing and non-playing; ■ unification of all units – male, female, club and educational bodies in its decision-making structures. IT WILL CONTINUE TO PROMOTE BEST PRACTICE IN CHILD PROTECTION ■ Over 3,500 applications have been processed for Garda Vetting ■ A Child Protection Officer will be appointed in every club ■ All coaches will undergo Code of Best Practice Training It will continue to engage directly with young people to ensure that all who participate in any of our activities understand our shared responsibilities and are in a position to gain the maximum benefit and enjoyment from our games in a safe environment. IT WILL PROMOTE IRISH IDENTITY AND CULTURE Support the promotion of the Irish language and other elements of Irish culture; Value all aspects of Irish culture and identity, by its actions as well as by its stated policies, and, in the process, provide an example to other sectors of Irish society.

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4.4 » Strategic themes The Strategic Committee in examining the challenges it faces, together with its vision, mission and values above, identified nine strategic themes as central to the development of the GAA in Dublin. The strategic themes are: Theme 1:

Developing local regional plans and appropriate club structures for each of the regions

Theme 2:

Maximising participation in Gaelic games in Dublin

Theme 3:

Supporting the Club

Theme 4:

Resourcing the volunteer

Theme 5:

Creating the bridge from participation to inter-county success

Theme 6:

Ensuring the provision of appropriate facilities

Theme 7:

Investing in the commercial potential of the Dublin GAA Brand

Theme 8:

Procuring the financial resources necessary to develop Dublin GAA

Theme 9:

Providing a first-class management and governance structure for Dublin GAA

Each theme is presented below in a consistent manner. Key strategic objectives for each theme set out the overall aspiration of where Dublin GAA wants to be in terms of development in this theme / area by 2017. These objectives will be realised through a Key and Supporting Actions, ownership of each action, expected outcomes and timelines show how the objectives will be achieved.

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DUBLIN an active GAA County Internet Hits Hill16

Clubs

12million per annum

90 Active Primary Schools

320

Bord na nÓg

15,000 games 1,359 Teams

Active Secondary Schools

90

Inter-School games

Number of Children coached in Club School-Link Program

2,500

75000

Adult Club

4000 Games 494 Teams Go-Games Referees Trained last 3 years

584

Number of Children in Club Nurseries

7,600 = vibrant capital city

Members

56,000 35


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DUBLIN GAA LOCAL AREA DEVELOPMENT REGIONS

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strategic themes

THEME 1:

DEVELOPING LOCAL REGIONAL PLANS AND APPROPRIATE CLUB STRUCTURES FOR EACH OF THE REGIONS

38

THEME 2:

MAXIMISING PARTICIPATION IN GAELIC GAMES IN DUBLIN

41

THEME 3:

SUPPORTING THE CLUB

45

THEME 4:

RESOURCING THE VOLUNTEER

49

THEME 5:

CREATING THE BRIDGE FROM PARTICIPATION TO INTER-COUNTY SUCCESS

51

THEME 6:

ENSURING THE PROVISION OF APPROPRIATE FACILITIES

56

THEME 7:

INVESTING IN THE COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL OF THE DUBLIN GAA BRAND

60

THEME 8:

PROCURING THE FINANCIAL RESOURCES NECESSARY TO DEVELOP DUBLIN GAA

64

THEME 9:

PROVIDING A FIRST-CLASS MANAGEMENT AND GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE FOR DUBLIN GAA

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theme 1: DEVELOP LOCAL AREA REGIONAL PLANS AND APPROPRIATE CLUB STRUCTURES FOR EACH OF THE REGIONS The Strategic Committee recognises that Dublin GAA needs detailed knowledge of what is happening in every locality and proposes the division of Dublin into ten Local Area Development Regions, (LADRs) in order to ensure that Gaelic games are brought to every community. This regional focus will allow the County Committee to work closely with the existing clubs in the region to determine the characteristics of the different areas within the LADR and devise strategies to drive participation in the area. These strategies will focus on club development, volunteer recruitment, schools involvement and physical infrastructure. A major increase in physical infrastructure will be required to facilitate the further growth of our games. They will necessitate Dublin GAA working closely with the local authorities, government bodies, NAMA and the educational sectors to secure the necessary land banks. The LADR structure will be best placed to work more effectively with all relevant stakeholders for the benefit of local communities. The Strategic Committee divided the county into ten areas which are aligned as closely as possible with local authority structures:

LADR Lucan/Clondalkin Tallaght Rathfarnham/Terenure Blanchardstown Swords Fingal Costal Strip North City 1 North City 2 South City Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown

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The following are the key strategic objectives under this theme: 1. Develop a plan for each of the 10 LADRs which will be consistent with the overall County Strategic Plan in order to: a. Ensure all communities are covered by a long term sustainable club structure. b. Maximise the number of participating schools. c. Achieve an appropriate number of nurseries and local participation initiatives (Camps, Games on the Green etc.) d. Deliver the required physical infrastructure. e. Deliver the human resources, both voluntary and professional together with the necessary resources required. 2. LADRs will also become the vehicle for engaging with the relevant stakeholders regarding physical facilities for the region.

POPULATION PER 2006 CENSUS

POPULATION PER 2011 CENSUS

% INCREASE

84,971 75,815 123,395 85,212 55,242 89,281 197,768 105,888 176,394 193,211

105,883 84,585 124,734 92,304 67,272 111,396 206,362 111,109 183,249 205,676

24.6 11.6 1.1 8.0 21.8 24.8 4.3 4.9 3.9 6.5


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A STRATEGY FOR DUBLIN GAA 2011-2017

These objectives will be achieved through the realisation of the following Key Actions:

THEME

KA1

KEY ACTIONS

OWNERSHIP

MILESTONES

DESIRED OUTCOME

Complete a full review of each LADR in County Dublin.

DCC Staff

All relevant information for each community in the sub-areas of each LADR.

Division of each LADR into appropriate sub-areas.

Before end Quarter 1 2012

KA2

Complete a review and develop an integrated strategy (club structures, participation initiatives and physical infrastructure) for one LADR.

DCC Staff

Development of an integrated strategy (club structures, promotion and participation initiatives and physical infrastructure priorities) for the area. Before end Quarter 2 2012

1

Understand the demographics and key characteristics of the communities in each sub area.

Development of milestones for an initial area and for each club that is consistent with the overall milestones for the county Strategic Plan and a timeline to achieve the club structures (existing and new), infrastructure requirements and roll out of participation initiatives to achieve targeted participation growth.

KA3

Appoint area committees comprised of chairpersons and a strategy officer from the local clubs to oversee the implementation of the plan.

DCC Staff

Before end Quarter 2 2012

As above.

KA4

Complete a review and develop an integrated strategy (club structures, participation initiatives and physical infrastructure) for the remaining nine LADRs in County Dublin.

DCC staff

Before end Quarter 4 2014

As above.

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THEME

1

These objectives will be achieved through the realisation of the following Supporting Actions:

SUPPORTING ACTIONS

OWNERSHIP

MILESTONES

DESIRED OUTCOME

Align DCC Staff to provide capacity to implement Key Actions.

DCC Executive Staff

End Quarter 1 2012

Required Management Structure.

Establish a voluntary committee that will comprise of the requisite skill base – local authority, educational and planning - to support the initial project.

DCC Executive Staff

End Quarter 1 2012

Establish requirements of the proposed plan.

SA3

Engage with local authorities.

DCC Staff, Clubs

End Quarter 2 2012

Full engagement by all areas leading to partnerships with Local Authorities.

SA4

Review of GPO utilisation in each area.

DCC Staff, Clubs

End Quarter 1 2014

Increased Value of GPO Investment.

SA5

Put in place a panel of experts from existing clubs to assist the DCC in supporting new and existing clubs in their management capabilities and capacity.

DCC

Quarter 1 2012 Ongoing

To have sufficient volunteer capability available to assist clubs in preparing and achieving their plans.

SA1

SA2

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theme 2: MAXIMISE PARTICIPATION IN GAELIC GAMES IN DUBLIN In reviewing how the Dublin County Committee could increase participation the strategic committee used the following guidelines to assess all proposals: ■ Dublin GAA is a dual player county with equal status given to both football and hurling. ■ Dublin GAA provides all club players (dual and single code) with the opportunity to play one game every week during the season. (Approx 25-30 games). ■ Dublin GAA’s Games Programme needs to facilitate/support intercounty success in both hurling and football. ■ Ensure that clubs and schools forge strong links. ■ Dublin GAA players and clubs require certainty in respect of when games will be played.

The following are the key strategic objectives under this theme: 1. Increase participation rates as at January 2011 by a factor of 10% by the end of the plan. 2. To provide the opportunity for all children and adults who want to play Gaelic games in a competitive or non-competitive environment. 3. To provide meaningful games programme for all players. 5. To formalise links with the management of schools in order to achieve a coordinated games programme. 6. To develop coaching standards in our clubs. 7. To provide structured training programmes to ensure the consistency and high standard of refereeing throughout the county.

■ Player welfare underpins Dublin GAA’s games programme.

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THEME

42

2

These objectives will be achieved through the realisation of the following Key Actions:

KEY ACTIONS

OWNERSHIP

MILESTONES

DESIRED OUTCOME

KA1

Develop an integrated Games Programme structure for clubs and schools that caters for all age groups and skills levels.

Coaching and Games CCCs Schools Bodies

Agreed competitive structure by Quarter 2 2012

A Games Programme that provides meaningful games and allows players participate to the maximum of their abilities.

KA2

Ensure sufficient resources are available in terms of facilities, mentors and referees to support the Games Programme structure.

CCC Coaching & Games Infrastructure Committee

Facilities – see Theme 6 Mentors – Training Programme Referees – Referees Pathway Quarter 2 2012 – Quarter 4 2017

Sufficient resources to support the Games Programme structure.

KA3

Camogie and Ladies Football to be fully integrated into Dublin County activities, with co-ordinated fixtures programme being extended to include Ladies Football and Camogie fixtures.

3 County Boards

Agreed SLA’s for 1 Committee Structure Quarter 1 2013

Integrated fixtures programme for all Dublin club fixtures.

KA4

To establish integrated calendar for club/school fixtures.

CCC’S/School Bodies

Agree overarching fixtures Body Quarter 1 2013

Integrated club/school fixture list.

KA5

Develop Specific Coaching Pathway for each club.

Coaching and Games

2 pilot clubs Qtr 2 2012 Rollout to all clubs by end of 2014

Higher standards with increased retention.

KA6

Develop Referee Strategy for Dublin.

Referee Committee/Coaching and Games

Agreed Strategy from Go-Games to Adult Quarter 2 2012

Consistent and high standard of refereeing.


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A STRATEGY FOR DUBLIN GAA 2011-2017

These objectives will be achieved through the realisation of the following Supporting Actions:

THEME SUPPORTING ACTIONS

OWNERSHIP

MILESTONES

DESIRED OUTCOME

SA1

Juvenile Hurling / Football played on Alternative Weeks. Structure Weekly Programs of Games. All Juvenile games on Saturday. 13/15 One Code, 14/16 Other Code. Enhanced Subsidiary Competitions for players who only play one code.

Bord na nÓg

Implemented Quarter 2 2012

Greater Choice of Games for all.

SA2

Adult Hurling / Football played on Alternative Weeks. Structure Weekly Programs of Games. Restructure Senior Football/Hurling Championship to enhance competitive environment and ensure timely completion.

CCC

Review Committee established 1st QTR 2012 Report 2nd Qtr 2012 Revised Programme 2013

More Competitive Games Programme.

SA3

Move responsibility for minor competitions to CCC2.

Management Committee

Quarter 1 2013 Programme

Greater Emphasis on minor activity.

SA4

Bridge the Gap between 18 & 21 to retain players, i.e. U21 leagues exclusively for U21 players & possible U19 league

CCC

Under 21 weekly competitions Quarter 1 2014

Developmental Pathway – Reduce level of drop off.

SA5

Extend the weekend programme to include Friday night matches to cater for club players. This initiative will require additional mentors, referees and the provision of more floodlit and all-weather pitches.

DCC, CCC and clubs

Quarter 1 2013 – Quarter 4 2017

Provide an adequate games programme for club players to cater for the overlapping demands of both the dual and inter-county player.

2

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THEME

44

2

These objectives will be achieved through the realisation of the following Supporting Actions:

SUPPORTING ACTIONS

OWNERSHIP

MILESTONES

DESIRED OUTCOME

SA6

Support the development and promotion of handball in Dublin through quarterly meetings with the Handball County Board.

DCC and Dublin handball

Quarter 2 2012 – Quarter 4 2017

Increase in the numbers playing handball in Dublin.

SA7

Coaching Pathway Criteria by club type.

Coaching and Games

Quarter 3 2013

Increase Playing Standards and Retention.

SA8

Referee Training Audit.

Coaching and Games / Referee Committee

Agree training programme from Go-Games to Adult Quarter 2 2012

Increase Referee Standards and Numbers.

SA9

Referee Management System.

Coaching and Games / Referee Committee

Agreed grading and progression protocols from Go-Games to Adult Quarter 1 2013

Increased Referee Standards.


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theme 3: SUPPORTING THE CLUB If the volunteer is the lifeblood of the GAA, then the club is the heart of the GAA. The club has always been and will remain the corner-stone of GAA activities. The changing environment faced by the Association has many implications for how clubs in Dublin are managed and organised in the LADRs (as addressed in Theme 1), but there are certain core activities and best practice standards that are fundamental to the growth and development of each club in Dublin and these are addressed in this theme. Also, the club should be involved in non-team based activities, by supporting local developments, promoting cultural activities, especially Irish cultural activities, supporting schools and contributing to community infrastructure. The following are the key strategic objectives under this theme: 1. To ensure club structures and activities reflect the ‘one family, one community’ ethos underpinned by volunteers. 2. To promote best practice standards across the full range of GAA club activity in Dublin. 3. To encourage and exploit synergies between Dublin GAA clubs. 4. To leverage current Croke Park and Local Sports Partnership programmes.

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THEME

46

3

These objectives will be achieved through the realisation of the following Key Actions:

KEY ACTIONS

OWNERSHIP

MILESTONES

DESIRED OUTCOME

KA1

Work with Ladies football and Camogie to ensure that club structures continue to reflect the ‘one family, one culture, one community’ ethos underpinned by volunteers.

DCC Staff

Quarter 2 2012

Greater alignment of different County Board activities.

KA2

Development of a Dublin best practice programme - club maith structure.

DCC Staff

Club accreditation structure in place and launched in Dublin by Quarter 4 2012.

Recognition and implementation of best practice in clubs.

KA3

Collaboration – Centrally encourage increased collaboration between all Dublin clubs to target financial benefits such as savings from centrally organised shared services and central procurement synergies, and to collaboratively develop pan club commercial opportunities.

DCC staff and clubs

Prepare discussion paper. Quarter 2 2012 Ongoing

Improve synergies and exploit financial benefits arising from collaboration between Dublin GAA clubs.

KA4

Design and roll out a comprehensive Club Volunteer training programme – See KA2 Strategic Theme 4.

See KA2 Strategic Theme 4

See KA2 Strategic Theme 4 Quarter 4 2012

See KA2 Strategic Theme 4.


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A STRATEGY FOR DUBLIN GAA 2011-2017

These objectives will be achieved through the realisation of the following Supporting Actions:

THEME SUPPORTING ACTIONS

OWNERSHIP

MILESTONES

DESIRED OUTCOME

SA1

Development of Statement of Best Practice for GAA Clubs.

DCC Staff

Quarter 4 2012

Development of Best Practice.

SA2

Continued implementation of the best practice programme in the area of Child Welfare and Protection in all Dublin GAA clubs.

DCC Staff

Quarter 4 2011 Ongoing

A games programme that will cater for all juveniles, in a safe and enjoyable environment, whilst ensuring that all clubs are in compliance with all requirements.

SA3

Develop a programme to support the Dublin GAA’s communications strategy by optimising the use of latest technology, (e.g. internet, social networking), to enable the County Committee maintain continuous links with its members and supporters living in Ireland and overseas.

PR and Communications Committee with DCC staff

Quarter 2 2012 – Quarter 4 2017

The County Committee will use the latest technologies to communicate with our members and supporters to keep Dublin GAA activities as part of their daily lives.

SA4

Implementation of Toolkit on Club Planning & Administration.

DCC Staff

10 Clubs 2012 20 Clubs 2013 20 Clubs 2014 Remainder 2015

Club Management Improvement.

SA5

Develop non-core activity programme in each club to cement community positioning.

DCC Staff/Clubs

Disseminate activity currently undertaken in different clubs

Community Focus.

3

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THEME

3

These objectives will be achieved through the realisation of the following Supporting Actions:

SUPPORTING ACTIONS

OWNERSHIP

MILESTONES

DESIRED OUTCOME

Develop structures to facilitate information sharing and best Practice. Targeted club Seminars to address common issues e.g. Finance. Social Network Site to allow information sharing. See sa3.

PR and Communications Committee with DCC staff

4 Club Forums each year on major club activity

The GAA clubs across Dublin have within their ranks a resource that if accessible to clubs will contribute handsomely to improving quality across all clubs.

SA7

Engage team of volunteer professionals who will mentor clubs with management skill deficits.

Dublin County Committee

Agreed Panel of Volunteers Quarter 2 2012

Improved Management Capacity at Clubs.

SA8

Promotion of Scór activities in clubs with a view to expanding its role in the promotion of culture and contributing to greater inclusiveness and community awareness in clubs.

Clubs

Quarter 1 2012

Expansion of Scor activities.

SA6

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Social Network Site Quarter 4 2012 Ongoing


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A STRATEGY FOR DUBLIN GAA 2011-2017

theme 4: RESOURCING THE VOLUNTEER The volunteer in the GAA is the most important person to the Association. Volunteers are in essence the lifeblood of the GAA and always have been since its inception. The role of the ‘volunteer’ is in effect the pursuit of a vocation, in the service of others, and without them the Association has no future.

However, the challenge facing Dublin GAA is to open the door to all potential volunteers and keep that door open. We need to provide volunteers with the necessary resources, skills and support to carry out their duties in administering and managing their clubs. The following are the key strategic objectives under this theme:

It is the incredible work carried out by thousands of volunteers, young and old, male and female, from every single walk of life which drives this remarkable organisation and keeps it fresh, relevant and a critically important part of the lives of Irish people. Being involved in the GAA gives a sense of fulfilment which is unrivalled. It brings membership of the biggest club in Ireland, puts one right at the heart of Irish culture and provides a pastime for every member of the family.

1. To ensure adequate resources are in place to assist the volunteer in their activities. 2. To create the environment and programmes for life stage volunteering. 3. To provide the resources that will assist clubs in growing and dealing with the unique characteristics of their area.

These objectives will be achieved through the realisation of the following Key Actions:

KEY ACTIONS

OWNERSHIP

MILESTONES

DESIRED OUTCOME

KA1

Development a life stage volunteer recruitment and continuous training strategy.

Coaching & Games Department

Develop Club Volunteer Recruitment Strategy Quarter 4 2012

A strategy that drives the recruitment of volunteers in clubs in Dublin.

KA2

Implement a comprehensive club volunteer training programme to empower volunteers and enable them achieve a high degree of technical competence through a structured training path.

Club Operations Manager

Delivery of club volunteer training programme 20 Clubs in 2012 20 Clubs in 2013 20 Clubs in 2014 Remainder in 2015

A programme that provides volunteers with the necessary information and skills to successfully operate and manage their clubs.

KA3

Identification and development of best practice volunteer tool-kits to support volunteers.

Club Operations Manager

All Toolkits ready Ongoing

Best practice toolkits that support and assist volunteers in the operation and management of their clubs.

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THEME

50

4

These objectives will be achieved through the realisation of the following Supporting Actions:

SUPPORTING ACTIONS

OWNERSHIP

MILESTONES

DESIRED OUTCOME

SA1

Brand, celebrate and consistently acknowledge the volunteer as the lynchpin of the Dublin GAA community.

Club Operations Manager

Volunteer Recognition Ceremony Quarter 3 2013

Place the volunteer at the centre of our Association.

SA2

Develop training programmes and toolkits for the various volunteer positions in the club.

Club Operations Manager

Rollout of volunteer training and toolkits Executive position training Quarter 4 2012

Provide the volunteer with the necessary resources.

SA3

Establish a Club Forum whereby all Dublin clubs can share experiences and advice on issues such as e.g. fundraising, grant aid etc. (could be done on website under certain headings etc).

Club Operations Manager

Quarter 1 2013

Dublin Club Forum established by March 2013.

SA4

Development of induction programme for new volunteers.

Club Operations Manager

Generic programmes Quarter 3 2012 – Quarter 4 2017

All clubs 2014.

SA5

Encourage people under 35 to get involved and contribute to County administration by promoting SA1.

Club Operations Manager

Quarter 1 2013 – Quarter 4 2017

20% made up of these groups.


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theme 5: CREATING THE BRIDGE FROM PARTICIPATION TO INTER-COUNTY SUCCESS Dublin football is a significant flagship for the County Committee and generates sizeable revenues for the entire Association. Considerable competition exists for elite players and an attractive environment is necessary for these players to engage in GAA activity. Hurling is now another platform which elite players can aspire too. The benefits for Dublin having developed into a Tier One hurling county cannot be underestimated and continued success for Dublin at national level will do for hurling what the 70s team did for football and drive activity in the clubs and schools. The success of our inter county teams is vital to the promotion of Gaelic games in Dublin and the committee recognises the importance of building the bridge between the large participation numbers at juvenile level, to the development squads and ultimately to our inter county teams. The additional facilities and the extension of the weekend games schedule should also assist in the preparation of Dublin’s inter county teams as there will be additional space in the weekend calendar for development squad meetings and training. Success on the field at inter county level has demonstrated the ability of the Dublin jersey to captivate an entire county and beyond. Through the implementation and delivery on each of the key strategic actions identified below, the DCC has set out the following performance targets for the years 2011 to 2017.

The Strategic Committee recognises that Dublin GAA’s commitment to a dual player strategy at club level will bring challenges in creating favourable conditions for excellence and the development of elite talent. Best practice on skill development advises that specialisation in one code (be it football or hurling) from age 15 onwards is preferable to enable the advanced technical development of players and achieve peak performance in the chosen code. Whilst acknowledging best practice advice the committee believes that a balance must be sought between the competing demands of elite player development and Dublin GAA’s dual player ethos, and this is reflected in the key actions presented. The following are the key strategic objectives under this theme: 1. Building the bridge from participation to inter-county success. 2. Set key performance targets for the inter-county teams at all age levels in both codes. ■ Win a Senior football All-Ireland every 3 years. ■ Win Senior All-Ireland Hurling Final every 5 years. ■ Win one Minor All-Ireland Football and one Minor All-Ireland Hurling title every 3 years. ■ Win one U21 All-Ireland Football and one U21 All-Ireland Hurling titles every 5 years.

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The Dublin Hurling squad, 2011

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A STRATEGY FOR DUBLIN GAA 2011-2017

The Dublin Football squad, 2011

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THEME

54

5

These objectives will be achieved through the realisation of the following Key Actions:

KEY ACTIONS

OWNERSHIP

MILESTONES

DESIRED OUTCOME

KA1

Development of a dual player policy for development and inter-county level.

Coaching and Games

Development of dual player policy by Quarter 1 2012 with a review every two years.

Development Squads for both codes will start at age 13 and cater for dual players up to age 15. From U16 minimise the number of dual players at ages 16/17. The selection of dual players will be decided by the welfare committee and team managers in consultation with the players.

KA2

Development Squads – Develop player pathway structures from U13 in Development Squads.

Coaching and Games

Agreed player pathway structures by Quarter 1 2013

Player pathway structures in place from U13 in development squads.

KA3

Establish structures for strength and conditioning and age-specific skills for development and inter-county level.

Coaching and Games

Agreed structures for strength and conditioning and age-specific skills by Quarter 1 2013

Structures for strength and conditioning and age-specific skills.

KA4

Develop programme for development squad mentors.

Coaching and Games

Mentor pathway Quarter 1 2013

Best in Class Coaching.

KA5

Develop Centres of Excellence for inter-county Training.

Infrastructure Committee

See Theme 6

See Theme 6.


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These objectives will be achieved through the realisation of the following Supporting Actions:

THEME SUPPORTING ACTIONS

OWNERSHIP

MILESTONES

DESIRED OUTCOME

SA1

Player Welfare: Set up Player Welfare Group.

DCC

Committee established Quarter 1 2012

Guidelines for combining Club/School/Inter-county Activity.

SA2

Monitor training regime and potential burnout.

DCC

Initiate programme to review activity in light of Player Welfare Guidelines Quarter 3 2012 – Quarter 4 2017

Report on Implementation on Guidelines with ongoing review and burnout/injury reporting.

SA3

Establish Career Advice Programme.

DCC

Develop programme to advise on personal development and career opportunities Quarter 1 2013

Ensure all players are prepared to meet a challenging job environment.

SA4

Management Selection: Establish Criteria for appointment of Inter-County/Development Squad Mentors/Managers.

DCC

Job descriptions Quarter 1 2013

Agreed management selection criteria and management charter in place by 2013.

5

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theme 6: ENSURE THE PROVISION OF APPROPRIATE FACILITIES For Dublin GAA to grow and sustain the targeted increase in the numbers playing our games it will be necessary for the County Committee to adopt a more proactive and effective approach to the development of infrastructure facilities. The relatively high cost of land in Dublin over the last two decades and the lack of investment in stadia facilities in Dublin in the era prior to the development of Parnell Park in the early 1990s has led to a significant infrastructure gap at both club and county level in the capital. The current economic conditions represent both an opportunity and challenge in meeting this gap. A long-term investment commitment is required by all stakeholders to leverage the current opportunities. While many Dublin clubs have made significant investment in existing facilities in recent years, the economic downturn has made it increasingly challenging for clubs to finance, develop and maintain existing facilities let alone develop new facilities to cater for targeted growth in team numbers. Our analysis has shown that many clubs are very dependent on local authority pitches, which cannot always provide the utilisation necessary to meet their fixture commitments. The demands placed on club facilities, by the vibrant level of activity in football, hurling, ladies football and camogie, generally serves to exacerbate this infrastructure gap. At Inter-county level the lack of appropriate facilities is now acute. The development of Parnell Park in the early 90s provided Dublin with a home venue but it is clear that the current capacity restriction on Parnell Park to below 10,000 spectators and its tight confines, renders it insufficient to meet the needs of successful Dublin inter county teams. The infrastructure deficit also extends to a lack of training academy and centres of excellence suitable to adequately cater for development squads at all age groups up to senior level in all codes that match the on-field ambitions of Dublin intercounty teams.

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The traditional match weekend arrangement for Saturday and Sunday games cannot provide an adequate games programme for clubs players as it seeks to cater for the overlapping demands of both the dual and inter-county player within the constraints of an already strained infrastructure platform. In order to secure greater usage from existing and new facilities, the Strategic Committee proposes that the traditional playing weekend should be extended to include Friday night matches to cater for club players. This initiative will require the provision of more floodlit and all-weather pitches in each of the ten local regional development areas. Through the implementation and delivery on each of the key strategic actions identified below, the DCC has set out the following performance targets for the years 2012 to 2017. The following are the key strategic objectives under this theme: 1. Develop two centres of excellence, one on the Northside and one on the Southside of the county, on a phased basis. 2. Provide sufficient number of cluster facilities with floodlight and all weather capacity to provide for current and targeted increased games requirements in all codes and to allow for the extension of club fixtures to Friday nights. 3. Develop a stadium to bridge the gap between the capacity of Parnell Park and the 82,300 capacity of Croke Park to meet the needs of Dublin and its population. 4. Optimise the use of all existing GAA facilities in Dublin, including second and third level colleges, to support our Games Programme.


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These objectives will be achieved through the realisation of the following Key Actions:

THEME KEY ACTIONS

OWNERSHIP

MILESTONES

DESIRED OUTCOME

KA1

Develop a playing facilities strategy for the urban environment to incorporate the nature and location of each regional area to provide the pitches to play club games by way of a roll out plan for between 5 and 10 cluster facilities over the next five years.

Infrastructure Committee DCC

Playing facilities strategy for all regions to be developed by Quarter 3 2012, with at least two cluster facilities developed in the short term

Playing facilities that meet the needs of the 10 LADRs.

KA2

Development of a strategy following an economic appraisal for the construction of an optimum size stadium taking into account the stadia deficit in the neighbouring counties.

CrokePark, Leinster Council and DCC

Agree policy with Páirc an Chrócaigh Teo for using Croke Park for Dublin’s major senior inter-county games.

Dublin County Board

Quarter 4 2011

Centres of Excellence – Development of two centres of excellence in key locations in the county – one on Southside and one on Northside, one of which should incorporateelite best in class facilities.

Infrastructure Committee DCC

2 centres of excellence in operation Quarter 1 2014 – Quarter 4 2017

Following the completion of the facilities audit and in parallel with KA1 and KA2 in Theme 2 (in relation to Games Programme), DCC to collaborate with the Education Sector (including Third Level) to achieve an optimal shared use of GAA and education-based facilities.

DCC/Education Sector

KA3

KA4

KA5

All feasibility studies and proposals to be completed by Quarter 2 2012, funding to be in place by June 2013 and development to commence by March 2014

Agreement with second and third level colleges for use of facilities by Quarter 4 2012

6

Appropriate facilities in Dublin that ensure that all Dublin inter-county games are watched by optimum attendances.

There will be an agreement in place with Páirc an Chrócaigh Teo to facilitate Dublin GAA playing their major senior inter county games in Croke park. Ensuring a centre of excellence infrastructure that provides for the needs of all Dublin Inter-county teams.

Optimum shared use of GAA and education-based facilities.

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THEME

58

6

These objectives will be achieved through the realisation of the following Supporting Actions:

SUPPORTING ACTIONS

OWNERSHIP

MILESTONES

DESIRED OUTCOME

SA1

Facilities Audit: Carry out an audit of all GAA games facilities in Dublin (GAA, schools, local authorities) to determine current and future needs.

Infrastructure Committee

Quarter 1 2012 Audit Completed

Establish current requirements.

SA2

Club Facilities Development: Develop a long-term sustainable model that will include provision for younger children to play near their communities and a strategy for older participants in areas where land is at a premium.

Infrastructure Committee

Model Quarter 2 2012

Robust plans that will allow an increasing population have access to facilities in an urban environment where additional recreational space is available.

SA3

Develop best in class (centralised) facilities maintenance programme.

Infrastructure Committee

Guidelines and training programme on facilities maintenance Quarter 4 2012

Increase usage capacity.

SA4

Develop Toolkit to help clubs with pitch development in terms of advice and expertise.

Infrastructure Committee

Guidelines and training programme on facilities maintenance Quarter 4 2012

Increase usage capacity.


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These objectives will be achieved through the realisation of the following Supporting Actions:

THEME SUPPORTING ACTIONS

OWNERSHIP

MILESTONES

DESIRED OUTCOME

SA5

Following agreement on KA3, and awaiting results of KA2 review County Grounds Strategy with the use of Croke Park and current facilities.

Infrastructure Committee

Quarter 2 2012

Robust Strategy that will ensure County Board can maximise attendances at all county games – inter-county and club.

SA6

In advance of completion of centres of excellence, DCC to run tender amongst clubs with all weather facilities to secure 3 year commitment of prime time slots for use by development and inter-county squads.

DCC

Quarter 1 2012 – Quarter 4 2017

To maximise use of current facilities.

SA7

Ensuring Value for Money: – All capital projects to be subject to detailed value for money assessment and independent sign off and regular review.

Infrastructure Committee

Project Evaluation System Quarter 1 2012 6 month Review process beginning Dec 2012

To ensure appropriate benefits are being targeted and focused on.

6

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theme 7: INVESTING IN THE COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL OF THE DUBLIN GAA BRAND Dublin GAA owns one of the most supported and recognised sports brands in Ireland. This success is despite the lack of any formal brand development strategy or market-focused investment. However, the potential of the Dublin Brand is not being fully maximised. The Strategic Committee believes that there is strong potential to develop the Dublin Brand to be the most recognised and valuable sports brand in Ireland. In addition there is an opportunity for the GAA, as the overarching body, and the other counties, to collaborate with Dublin to raise the profile and commercial value of all GAA brands. Central to the development of the Dublin Brand will be an overall strategy that seeks to engage all relevant stakeholders (including the Dublin County Committee, Ladies Associations, all Dublin Clubs, Club Members and all Dublin Fans, County Teams, Sponsors, and all other units of the GAA) in a revolutionary approach to unlock the full potential of the Dublin Brand and its related assets. The following are the key strategic objectives under this theme: 1. To develop the Dublin GAA Brand as the leading sports brand in Ireland 2. To support the Leinster Council and Central Council in developing the brand potential of the Leinster Championship and National League respectively and in so doing support the brand development and commercial potential of all participating counties 3. To fully integrate Camogie and Ladies Football in the brand development initiatives to ensure consistency of brand objectives and a single view of the Dublin GAA Brand 4. To fully engage all stakeholders in the Dublin GAA Brand development process.

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These objectives will be achieved through the realisation of the following Key Actions:

THEME KEY ACTIONS

OWNERSHIP

MILESTONES

DESIRED OUTCOME

KA1

Develop enhanced Strategy for development of Dublin GAA as an iconic sport brand.

Commercial Committee and DCC staff

Strategy in place Quarter 1 2012

To establish Dublin GAA as the leading sports brand in Irish sport and ensure that the value inherent in the brand is maximised

KA2

Develop individual programmes to underpin the Dublin Brand proposition for each stakeholder category including Fans, Clubs, Sponsors, Media, National and Local Government, the Public generally and across all units of the GAA.

Commercial Committee and DCC staff

All programmes to be completed and adopted by end 2012

Enhanced engagement of all Sponsors, Media and all GAA Stakeholders in promotion of GAA in Dublin and development of Dublin GAA Brand.

KA3

Develop and roll out of a professional tiered sponsorship strategy and sponsor management capability

Commercial Committee and DCC staff

By end Quarter 1 2012

Provide for an effective means of managing all sponsorship relationships and to support enhanced commitment of commercial sponsors to invest behind Dublin brand development effort.

KA4

Develop and agree a pan association commitment to create a single family-oriented Dublin Brand. Investigate the full integration of Ladies Football and Camogie Associations in Dublin into Dublin GAA to create single male and female association and brand proposition in the capital.

3 County Boards

Agreement by end Quarter 1 2012 Ongoing

To ensure consistency of brand development amongst all three associations in Dublin.

KA5

Co-ordinate and integrate various existing fans clubs in Dublin to create a single “Dublin GAA Fans Club“, and develop a members database meeting all applicable data protection and security guidelines to support the roll out of affinity relationships.

Commercial Committee and DCC staff

By end Quarter 4 2012

Successful Dublin Fans Club and effective members’ database.

7

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THEME

62

7

These objectives will be achieved through the realisation of the following Supporting Actions:

SUPPORTING ACTIONS

OWNERSHIP

MILESTONES

DESIRED OUTCOME

SA1

Dublin County Committee to appoint a professional brand and commercial development team of up to 4 professional executives to comprise Brand and Commercial Director, Brand Development Manager, Sponsorship Relationship Manager and Club Commercial Manage.

Commercial Committee & DCC

Executives to be employed on phased basis in line with increased revenue generation commencing with the appointment of the Brand Development Manager in Quarter 1 2012

Development of Brand and Commercial Relationship capability to be underpinned by properly resourced professional team.

SA2

Engage with Central Council to capitalise on and further develop the Dublin Spring Series concept in 2012 to maximise attendances and brand impact for Dublin’s home and away National League fixtures.

Commercial Committee & DCC

Quarter 4 2011

To maximise attendances and potential of National League fixtures to create an enhanced GAA match day family experience and to allow opposition counties in the league to leverage Dublin’s brand development experience to support their own brand development ambitions.

SA3

Engage with Leinster Council to target revamped format for 2013 Leinster Championship that supports fixtures planning, maximising attendances, and active marketing of Dublin’s (and all Leinster counties) Leinster Championship games packages and to build the Leinster Championship brand.

Commercial Committee & DCC

Quarter 1 2012

To maximise attendances at games and assist in generating more interest in the Leinster Championship. as well as providing support for all other Leinster counties to leverage Dublin Brand development experience to support their own brand development ambitions.

SA4

Engage with Leinster Council to seek the admittance of additional Dublin teams (and teams from other larger counties) in the provincial club championships (similar to hurling in Féile).

Commercial Committee & DCC

By end Quarter 2 2012

To leverage the unique potential of club participation in the provincial championships to strengthen GAA brand recognition in more local communities.


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These objectives will be achieved through the realisation of the following Supporting Actions:

THEME SUPPORTING ACTIONS

OWNERSHIP

MILESTONES

DESIRED OUTCOME

SA5

Embed Brand Development responsibility in RDOs, GPOs and SRC programme generally through enhanced Learning and Development Programme for all county board employees.

Commercial Committee & DCC

Quarter 2 2012

Promotion of Dublin GAA in all operational programmes and greater appreciation and consistency across all organs of Dublin GAA of brand potential and objectives.

SA6

Develop full range of Dublin GAA Merchandise and On and Off pitch apparel (aka “the New York Yankees�) and appropriate distribution channels.

Commercial Committee & DCC

By end Quarter 4 2012

Underpin brand development through roll out of merchandise range.

SA7

Discuss with media outlets for coverage of underage county finals for screening at a later date.

DCC

Coverage by Quarter 2 2013

Maximum coverage of all GAA activities.

SA8

Arrange annual Dublin GAA Awards Gala which collectively recognises club and inter-county playing and volunteering success and achievements.

Commercial Committee & DCC

Quarter 4 2012

Acknowledge club and intercounty playing and volunteering success and achievements.

7

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theme 8: PROCURING THE FINANCIAL RESOURCES NECESSARY TO DEVELOP DUBLIN GAA The Strategic Committee believe that the financial resources that are currently available to the Dublin County Committee are inadequate to enable Dublin GAA to give effect to the initiatives identified as appropriate in this strategic review. As noted in section 3.9, the County Committee has traditionally operated a balanced budget with all revenues (which have been running at €5.2 million per year) being fully reinvested in current organisational and development initiatives. In the current economic climate the ability to secure additional funds to finance the increased investment contemplated in this plan is very challenging. A professional and proactive approach is a prerequisite. However, the Dublin County Committee cannot be expected to finance the rollout of the strategic development of GAA in the capital city, one which has a catchment population as big as the rest of Leinster and of each of the other provinces. The level of funding that has traditionally been allocated to Dublin is considerably less than would be warranted based on any population, activity, or revenue analysis. The Strategic Committee believes that the starting point towards addressing this shortfall should be the recognition of the interdependent relationship between Dublin’s ambitions for the GAA in the capital city and the overall wellbeing of the Association. It will require the Dublin County Committee to step up to its responsibility to implement the strategic initiatives recommended in this review. It will also require Central Council to embrace a different funding model, one which acknowledges the strategic significance of Dublin. Dublin GAA’s plans, if they are to succeed, will need additional resources from Central Council to add to the increased funds to be targeted by additional investment in the Dublin Brand and a refocused commercial sponsorship and fundraising drive.

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The following are the key strategic objectives under this theme: 1. Increase annual commercial revenues of the County Board by at least €1.5m over the plan period. 2. Achieve Provincial status for Dublin in terms of funding allocated by Central Council. 3. Professionalise Dublin’s Brand and Commercial Development Focus to ensure that the revenue potential of Ireland leading sports brand is optimised. 4. Create an enhanced sense of collaboration between the Dublin County Committee and Dublin Clubs to generate incremental financial benefit for the clubs of at least €1m per annum. 5. Secure sufficient funding for the roll out of two centres of excellence and approximately six club-based cluster facilities over the plan period. 6. Collaborate with Leinster Council and Central Council to ensure Dublin perspective is brought to the maximisation of GAA income streams and to harness the resources of all stakeholders to procure the necessary funding to develop a suitably-sized stadium in Dublin to cater for the needs of Dublin and the East Coast counties generally.


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These objectives will be achieved through the realisation of the following Key Actions:

THEME KEY ACTIONS

OWNERSHIP

MILESTONES

DESIRED OUTCOME

KA1

Develop detailed financial strategy to finance all current commitments and investments required by the Dublin GAA strategy 2011 to 2017.

Finance Committee and DCC staff

By end Quarter 2 2012

Clear Strategy for financing operational and capital investments in Dublin over plan period.

KA2

Engage with Central Council and other units of the Association to secure agreement for Dublin GAA to attain provincial status development purposes in order to secure an adequate share of GAA disbursements and capital grants.

DCC

Agreement in place by end Quarter 2 2012

To secure adequate funding from Central Council, on an annual basis, to meet the challenges of increasing participation rates and advancing the Association in Dublin.

KA3

Refresh sponsorship strategy towards more formal tiered sponsorship programme targeting incremental sponsorship revenues of €1.5 million per year by end of plan period

Finance Committee and DCC staff

Target 20% pa growth in revenues

Secure receipt of enhanced and sustainable streams.

KA4

Develop range of fundraising initiatives and commercial collaborations (2/3 annually) to include the Dublin Spring Series, to raise up to €1m annually for development of Dublin Club infrastructure.

Finance Committee and DCC staff

First initiative by end Quarter 2 2012

Harness collective capacity of Dublin clubs to collaborate in major financing initiatives and achieve commercial and procurement synergies.

KA5

Continue and enhance Dublin Spring Series in 2012 based on updated financial arrangement with Croke Park.

Finance Committee and DCC staff

Updated agreement by end November 2011 – to maximise attendances

Increase revenue participation for Dublin County Committee and Dublin clubs while simultaneously investing in Dublin Brand.

KA6

Engage with Leinster Council and the other counties to seek to revamp the Leinster Championship in both Hurling and Football, to increase the revenue potential of the premier competitions in Leinster for all participating counties.

DCC

Agreement by end Quarter 3 2012

Support efforts to increase in the revenue generating capacity of Leinster Championship where the allocation of such increased revenue for all participating counties is based on attendances, thus aligning reward with promotional commitment.

8

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THEME

66

8

These objectives will be achieved through the realisation of the following Supporting Actions:

SUPPORTING ACTIONS

OWNERSHIP

MILESTONES

DESIRED OUTCOME

SA1

Collaborate with Central Council to ensure that the Irish Sports Council grant towards Dublin’s SRC games promotions programme is maintained at a minimum of 2010 levels.

DCC, Irish Sports Council

Maintain SRC funding over the period of the plan Quarter 1 2012 - Quarter 4 2017.

Securing and maintaining income from Irish Sports Council.

SA2

Broaden engagement with national and Local Government, including the four Dublin local authorities, NAMA and educational bodies to secure increased operational, infrastructure and financial support for games development in Dublin.

DCC, various local and national government agencies

Quarterly meetings with all local authorities from Quarter 1 2012

Enhanced co-operation and direct and indirect financial support from local authorities to ensure funding allocations towards sport are fairly distributed across all sports, including GAA.

SA3

In line with Theme 7 – SA1, Dublin County Committee to appoint a professional brand and commercial development team comprising Brand and Commercial Director, Brand Development Manager, Sponsorship Relationship Manager and Club Commercial Manager.

Commercial Committee, & DCC

Executives to be employed on phased basis in line with increased revenue generation commencing with the appointment of the Brand Development Manager in Quarter 1 2012

Development of Brand and Commercial Relationship capability to be underpinned by properly resourced professional team.

SA4

Roll out refreshed merchandising strategy to generate increased licensing revenues.

Finance Committee and DCC staff

Quarter 2 2012

Initiate new merchandising strategy

SA5

Propose amendments to Official Guide GAA Sponsorship Rules to allow for secondary and tertiary sponsorship logos on playing gear while working within the core values of the GAA.

Finance Committee and DCC staff

Quarter 4 2011

To allow GAA to compete with other sports codes for increased share of sponsorship revenues


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These objectives will be achieved through the realisation of the following Supporting Actions:

THEME SUPPORTING ACTIONS

OWNERSHIP

MILESTONES

DESIRED OUTCOME

SA6

All sponsorship relationships to be reviewed annually.

Finance Committee and DCC staff

Annually from 2012

To ensure that sponsors are getting good value for their investment as a means of deepening sponsor relationship and safeguarding Dublin GAA revenues.

SA7

Engage legal team to ensure all unauthorised marketing and merchandising (ambush marketing) of Dublin imagery is eliminated.

Finance Committee and DCC staff

Appointment in Quarter 1 2012

To protect value of Dublin Brand and prevent unauthorised use of Dublin Image Rights.

SA8

On and off Field Apparel Sponsor to be openly and formally tendered on expiry of current agreements.

Finance Committee and DCC staff

Tender Process during Quarter 1 2012

To maximise value for Dublin County Committee and Dublin Clubs from apparel rights.

SA9

Formal procedures to be adopted for all other material commercial and procurement contracts to ensure value for money and revenue optimisation with effect from adoption of DCC strategy 2012 to 2017.

Finance Committee and DCC staff

Quarter 1 2012 – Quarter 4 2017

To maximise value for Dublin County Committee and Dublin Clubs.

SA10

Strategy to embed enhanced collaboration between Dublin County Committee and Dublin Clubs to be developed to ensure that the interests of all units are aligned towards maximising the financial potential of such collaboration for both the Clubs and the County Board.

Finance Committee Dublin Clubs and DCC

To be completed by end Quarter 2 2012

Clear alignment of interest and mutual drive to increase overall revenue potential of the Association in Dublin between County Board and Clubs.

8

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THEME

68

8

These objectives will be achieved through the realisation of the following Supporting Actions:

SUPPORTING ACTIONS

OWNERSHIP

MILESTONES

DESIRED OUTCOME

SA11

Prepare financial feasibility for the construction of an optimum size stadium taking into account the stadia deficit in the neighbouring counties Croke Park, Leinster Council and Finance subcommittee and DCC.

Croke Park, Leinster Council and Finance Committee and DCC

Feasibility studies and proposals to be completed by Quarter 2 2012, funding to be in place by June 2013.

To ensure that funding is in place to develop the Stadium.

SA12

Undertake economic appraisal of the contribution to the social capital of Dublin arising from the activities of the Dublin County Committee and the Dublin Club network.

Finance Committee and DCC

To be completed by end Quarter 1 2012

To have a robust economic report available to underpin financial discussions as between Dublin GAA and other stakeholders.

SA13

Seek local and national government support for reduced rates including water rates charges for all voluntary sports organisations that are recognised by the revenue commissioners as having charitable status.

Finance Committee and DCC

By end Quarter 2 2012

Reduction of the cost of rates for sports bodies.


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theme 9: providing FIRST-CLASS MANAGEMENT AND GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE FOR DUBLIN GAA For Dublin GAA to grow and prosper the management of the County Committee and the clubs must be in strong hands. Strong leadership and a meaningful connection to participants, our supporters, key stakeholders and sponsors will assist Dublin GAA in becoming the leading GAA county and the key driver for the future development of the Association nationally. Following the publication of the strategic review in 2002 a significant investment was made by all the stakeholders in Dublin GAA to employ coaching and games personnel, predominantly at club level (Games Promotions officers). The appointments included 50 GPOs, 3 regional development officers reporting to the clubs operations manager (formally strategic programmes manager). The Strategic Committee recognises that there will be additional manpower investment required to implement the commercial and LADR initiatives. It is important that the volunteer structures are strengthened to ensure that volunteers continue to have an effective oversight of these personals. This plan will only succeed if the County Committee has the seamless and dynamic integrated structures in place to implement the recommendations. In this report the Strategic Committee stresses the urgency for the plan’s proposals to be embraced by all units of Dublin GAA and for the clubs to work in an integrated manner with the County Committee. It is also necessary to have this integrated approach at the centre of Dublin GAA’s relationship with Coiste Báinistí and Leinster Council as the Association must be single minded in its tactics of providing games and facilities for the large population who live in the province. The statistics in Section 3 demonstrate that the increase in births is not just a Dublin phenomenon but that 57% of births in 2010 were to mothers resident in all of Leinster. The Strategic Committee recognises that it is only by having integrated action plans in place will the Association be able to provide the resources necessary for the expanding urban communities. Dublin is at the heart of the demographic challenge and should participate on the management committees.

The committee believe that this seamless approach requires the following steps: ■ The clubs being represented at the County Committee by their chairperson and/or other senior officers ■ Dublin having provincial status for developmental purposes to allow the chairman of the County Committee be a permanent member of Coiste Báinistí ■ Dublin GAA having a permanent member on the Leinster Council’s Management Committee The implementation and delivery on each of the key strategic actions and performance targets for the years 2011 to 2017 identified in the themes is critical to the success of Dublin GAA. The Strategic Committee proposes changes to improve the workings of Dublin’s County Committee, Management Committee together with reorganising the executive staff, with a small increase in personnel in order to service the regionalisation of the games development needs of Dublin GAA. The following are the key strategic objectives under this theme: I. Ensure that the clubs work in an integrated manner with the County Committee. II. Ensure that there is an effective and vibrant management structure in place. III. To have one Dublin GAA County Committee, similar to the arrangements in the clubs to deal with all GAA affairs in the County. IV. To ensure that the day-to-day management team is adequate to meet the targets set out in plan. V. Obtain Provincial status for developmental purposes by representation of the Dublin Chairman on Coiste Báinistí. VI. Achieve permanent representation on the Leinster Management Committee to integrate planning, obtain resources, achieve efficiencies and exploit commercial opportunities.

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THEME

9

These objectives will be achieved through the realisation of the following Key Actions:

KEY ACTIONS

70

OWNERSHIP

MILESTONES

DESIRED OUTCOME

KA1

Clubs to be represented at County Committee meetings by Chairman, Secretary or Treasurer

Dublin County Committee

Quarter 1 2012 – Quarter 4 2017

Greater Club/County alignment

KA2

Redesign management structures to allow elected and selected positions on the County Management Committee

Dublin County Committee

Quarter 1 2012

Specialised Expertise on Management Committee

KA3

Set up Operational Committee to deal with issues between management meetings

Dublin County Committee

Quarter 1 2012

Quicker Decision Meeting

KA4

Reorganise the subcommittee structure of County Committee

Dublin County sub-committee

Quarter 1 2012

Quicker Decision Meeting

KA5

The Chairman of the implementation committee is a member of the Dublin Management Committee

Dublin County Committee

Quarter 1 2012

Strategic Plan Focus

KA6

Develop the steps to integrate the management of all Dublin GAA activity to reflect current club practices

All Dublin County Boards

Implementation Sub-Committee to be established by Quarter 1 2012 Full integration of Ladies Football and Camogie into Dublin GAA Quarter 4 2017

All Dublin GAA activity integrated into a co-ordinated management structure

KA7

Seek the designation of provincial status for Dublin for development purposes and the appointment of The Dublin Chairman to Coiste Báinistí

Dublin County Committee, Central Council

Quarter 1 2012

Input in decision making and greater national / Dublin alignment

KA8

Seek appointment of a permanent representative on the Leinster Council Management Committee

Dublin County Committee, Leinster Council

Quarter 1 2012

Input in decision making and greater provincial alignment


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These objectives will be achieved through the realisation of the following Supporting Actions:

THEME SUPPORTING ACTIONS

OWNERSHIP

MILESTONES

DESIRED OUTCOME

SA1

Improve collaboration between the Dublin County Board and Dublin Clubs from a financial and commercial perspective.

DCC and strategic sub committees

Quarter 1 2012 – Quarter 4 2017

Improved collaboration between the Dublin Co Board and Dublin Clubs.

SA2

DCC to host an Annual Dublin Strategic Workshop which: • Brings together all Dublin GAA key stakeholders and Clubs, with a distinct input from players of all levels and codes • Reviews the progress of the Strategic Plan • Identifies new issues to be addressed by Dublin GAA.

DCC staff

Quarter 4 2012

Annual strategic workshop hosted each year with the input of the whole Dublin GAA community.

SA3

Production of an annual county information manual released in January that includes contacts for Chairpersons, Secretaries, Youth Officers, Coaching Officers, and team management from youth to senior Level.

DCC staff

Quarter 1 2013

One point of contact for all bodies promoting Gaelic Games in the County.

SA4

Reduce the number of County Committee Meetings to 4/5 a year.

DCC

Quarter 1 2012

Club officer participation at County Committee meetings.

SA5

Establish Strategic Committee to oversee and ensure implementation of the Strategic Plan.

DCC

Quarter 4 2011

All strategic performance targets achieved.

9

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THEME

72

9

These objectives will be achieved through the realisation of the following Supporting Actions:

SUPPORTING ACTIONS

OWNERSHIP

MILESTONES

DESIRED OUTCOME

SA6

Sub Committees: Terms of Reference of the Finance committee, Planning and Physical Development committee, as provided for by paragraph 3.22 of Treoir Oifigúil, to be updated to incorporate the strategic ambitions of the plan and to mandate their operation in accordance with the Strategic Plan.

DCC and Strategic Committee

Quarter 4 2011

All strategic performance targets achieved.

SA7

Finance Committee brief to incorporate clear directions in relation to Brand and Commercial Development and Protection.

Finance Committee

Quarter 4 2011

All strategic performance targets achieved.

SA8

Committee chairpersons and members to be nominated by the Management Committee and ratified by County Committee

DCC

Quarter 1 2012

All strategic performance targets achieved.

SA9

Promote the integration and cohesion between the various GAA bodies regarding insurance, registration and other costs - Develop and define a common approach between the GAA, Ladies Gaelic Football Association and Camogie Association regarding insurance, registration and other administrative issues, leading to eventual integration and more cohesive relationship between the three associations.

Three Associations

Quarter 1 2012 – Quarter 4 2017

In the current economic climate it is becoming more challenging to finance the cost of participating in Gaelic games. For a moderate size club playing in all codes the costs of entry fees, affiliation, registration and insurance costs to participate are c €40,000 now. The desired outcome from this initiative would be to reduce these costs.


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A Strategy for Dublin GAA 2011-2017

5. what gets measured gets done... The success, implementation and management of this strategic plan will be dependent on the adherence to a robust monitoring strategy. The ownership of each strategic action has being assigned in this plan. It is the intention that these strategic actions will form the basis for the annual work plans that each Dublin County Board Sub-Committee will be expected to draw up and work to. In order to keep a strategic, county-wide focus, a Strategic Implementation Committee will be set up by the County Board. It will be tasked with maintaining an ongoing overview of the plan’s implementation and to report formally to the County Board. This will ensure transparency and accountability and help to provide the various units in Dublin GAA with valuable updates on progress being made.

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A Strategy for Dublin GAA 2011-2017

6. recommendations

to other units of the association

â– Propose introduction of U16 Feile as an initiative to keep young people involved in Gaelic games â–  Propose to Leinster Council that the earlier rounds of the football and hurling championship are played on the same weekend. This initiative would free up some weekends for club games, lower the costs for supporters and the Council while improving attendances at the games.

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strategic committees Name

Club

overall Committee Brendan Waters

Chairperson St Brigids

Padraic Duffy

Ard Stiurthoir Cumann Luthchleas Gael

Andy Kettle

Chairperson Dublin County Committee

Sean Donnelly

Kilmacud Crokes

Michael Hand Gerry Harrington

Finance

Support Services Michael Roche

Lucan Sarsfields

David Kennedy

Thomas Davis

Bríd Power

St. Vincents

Niall Cooper

Dublin County Board Staff

Donal Doyle

Dublin County Board Staff

Herbert Sharkey

Ballinteer St Johns

Paraic Fahey

Templeogue/Synge Street

Kevin Kellet

Beann Eadair

John O’Leary

O’Dwyers

John Holland

Naomh Mearnog

Conal Markey

Fingallians

Maire Ni Cheallaigh

Raheny Ballinteer St Johns

Ballinteer St Johns Naomh Mearnog

Noel Kelly

O’Tooles

Ger Quinn

Dave Kennedy

Thomas Davis

Peter Kettle

Fingal Ravens

Gerry O’Sullivan

Ballyboden St Enda’s

Fergus McNally

St Judes

Susan Naughton

Scoil Uí Chonaill

Kevin O’Shaughnessy

Dublin County Board Staff

Bríd Power

St Vincents

Michael Roche

Lucan Sarsfields

John Costello

CEO Dublin County Board

Conor O’Brien Gerry Rowley Donal Nolan Kevin O’Shaughnessy

Sean Donnelly

Kilmacud Crokes

Gerard O’Connor

Dublin County Board Staff

Noel Kelly

O’Tooles

John McNicholas

Dublin County Board Staff

Susan Naughton

Scoil Uí Chonaill

Damian Allen

St Vincents

Eimear Dignam

Dublin County Board Staff

Frank Lynch

Naomh Mearnog

Phil Gough

Crumlin

Seamus Harrington

St Brendans

Christy Cox

Erins Isle

Conor Foley

Naomh Olaf

Enda O’Toole

Thomas Davis

Mark Duncan

Kilmacud Crokes

Cathal O’Donnell

St Sylvesters

Paul Casey

Clontarf

John O’Brien

Naomh Olaf

Clontarf

Ray O’Connell

Croí Ro Naofa

Paddy Christie

Ballymun Kickhams

Dublin County Board Staff

Edel Williams

Robert Emmets

Declan Coulter

Naomh Barrog

Infrastructure Michael Hand

Club Development

Activities

Ballinteer St Johns Ballinteer St. Johns Scoil Uí Chonaill

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appendices 2. demographic timebomb

» 1. developing a strategy for dublin gaa

»

76

77

79 3. local area development regions

»

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APPENDIX I - DEVELOPING A STRATEGY FOR DUBLIN GAA Scope

2. FOCUS GROUP NIGHT HELD ON 18th OCTOBER 2010.

The plan is based on a number of significant drivers which form the foundation for the future growth of Dublin GAA and is built on the key components of club, youth participation, player, volunteer and facilities. We will also deliver the requisite programmes to maximise the benefits from these components. Additionally, these programmes will be seen as a means of enhancing and enriching the lives of all GAA people involved.

All clubs were invited to nominate 2 members of their club, who were selected to participate in two focus groups on the night. The object of each of these groups was to identify: ■ the main challenges facing Dublin GAA family from that group’s perspective ■ what should be included in the plan to address those challenges

Methodology

■ the success criteria of which those initiatives should be judged

1. STRATEGIC STEERING COMMITTEE & STRATEGIC SUB–COMMITTEES The overall Strategic Committee assembled 5 sub-committees. Each sub-committee’s chairperson reported directly to the overall Strategic Committee. The following is a list of the sub-committees formed: ■ Finance ■ Activities ■ Club Development ■ Support Services ■ Infrastructure

Each attendee was asked to reflect on the above objectives before the meeting and below is a list of topics which could have formed part of their deliberation. This list was not seen as an exclusive list but as an aid to start the thought process. Club-School Link, Coaching Qualifications/Standards, Coaching Standards, Collaboration, Community, County Board Support, County vs. Club, Croke Park Support, Development Squads, Dual Players, Facilities Development, Financial Management, Fixture Programme, Games for All, Governance Issues, Image, Injuries/Player Welfare, Integration, Inter-County Success, Leinster Support, Local Authority Relationship, Marketing, Participation, Playing Standards, PR, Referee Standards, Role of Media, School Games, Schools, Shared Objectives, Standards, Volunteer Recruitment.

Each sub-committee was tasked with setting out their terms of reference at their 1st meeting and subsequent meetings took place over a period of 8 months.

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Groups were split up according to area of knowledge / expertise within the club. Groups were as follows:

4. ONLINE SURVEY An Online Survey was posted on www.hill16.ie in the following languages:

■ Club Executive ■ Juvenile Executive ■ Adult Player / Mentor ■ Parent ■ Juvenile Mentor ■ Teacher ■ Local Government ■ Elite Player There were also 4 separate consultation groups consisting of members from: ■ Dublin Camogie ■ Dublin Ladies Football ■ Bord na nÓg ■ Elite Mangers

3. CONSULTATION MEETINGS A series of consultation meetings was held for the following groups: ■ Club Chairpersons ■ Club Secretaries ■ GPOs

78

■ English ■ Irish ■ Polish ■ Nigerian ■ Spanish ■ French This survey was also emailed to all mailing lists, including club chairmen, secretaries, GPO’s, Local Authority contacts & steering committees etc.


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A STRATEGY FOR DUBLIN GAA 2011-2017

APPENDIX II - Demographic timebomb The detailed analysis focuses on four key dates (a) 2006 the year of the latest census (b) 2010 (c) 2015 and (d) 2017 when male children born 2010 will first engage in Go-Games activity. The source of the demographic analysis is the CSO census of 2006 and the CSO Vital Statistics on births by county of the residency of the mother. Tables 2 and 3 detail the position of each of the local authorities within Dublin at the two key engagement age group as at 2006, 2010, 2015 and 2017 and the percentage increase on the last census. Table 4 is the same as Table 2 with adjustments for mothers who have a Dublin residency at birth but move to non-Dublin locations. This is factored in at 6.81% decrease for Dublin, for the period 2006 to 2010, when the

2005 Vital Statistics are compared to the Census. The comparable figures are used for each local authority in Dublin. The impact on Dublin GAA clubs of this population growth is significant and to retain the penetration rates of Go-Games we require an overall increase in numbers playing of between 13% and 23% in 2015 and 25% and 35% in 2017 compared to 2010. However the scale of our ambition must be to drive increases in participation in real terms and the objective over the period of the plan is to have a ten percent increase on our current participation rates. This level of ambition requires numbers participating in Go-Games rising from 12,063 in 2010 to 18,000 in 2017.

TAB LE 2

GO GAMES ENGAGEMENT

Pop

South Dublin Inc.

Fingal Pop

Inc.

Pop

City Council Inc.

Total Pop

Inc.

35,774

6,133

12,747

8,178

Dun Laoghaire/Rathdown Pop Inc.

2006

8,716

2010

9,758

12%

8,778

7.3%

12,653

-0.7%

5,895

-3.9%

37,084

3.7%

2015

11,368

30.4%

11,958

46.2%

16,000

25.5%

6,136

0.0%

45,462

27.1%

2017

11,503

32.0%

13,397

61.4%

18,636

46.2%

6,708

9.4%

50,044

39.9%

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TAB LE 3

JUVENILE ENGAGEMENT

Pop

South Dublin Inc.

Fingal Pop

Inc.

Pop

City Council Inc.

Total Pop

Inc.

28,743

5,292

10,265

5,972

Dun Laoghaire/Rathdown Pop Inc.

2006

7,214

2010

7,133

-1.1%

6,025

0.9%

9,866

-3.9%

4,886

-7.7%

27,910

-2.9%

2015

8,343

15.7%

8,000

34.0%

10,185

-0.8%

4,559

-13.9%

31,087

8.2%

2017

8,869

22.9%

8,519

42.6%

10,531

2.6%

4,624

-12.6%

32,543

13.2%

TAB LE 4

GO GAMES ENGAGEMENT

Pop

80

South Dublin Inc.

Fingal Pop

Inc.

Pop

City Council Inc.

Total Pop

Inc.

35,774

6,133

12,747

8,178

Dun Laoghaire/Rathdown Pop Inc.

2006

8,716

2010

9,758

12%

8,778

7.3%

12,653

-0.7%

5,895

-3.9%

37,084

3.7%

2015

10,999

26.2%

11,963

46.3%

14,509

13.8%

5,976

-2.6

43,447

21.4%

2017

10,886

24.9%

13,208

61.5%

16,017

25.7%

6,428

-4.8%

46,539

30.1%


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A STRATEGY FOR DUBLIN GAA 2011-2017

APPENDIX III - LOCAL AREA DEVELOPMENT REGIONS LADR LUCAN/CLONDALKIN TALLAGHT

POPULATION PER 2006 CENSUS

POPULATION PER 2011 CENSUS

% INCREASE

97,013

105,884

9.1

75,815

84,585

11.6

123,395

124,734

1.1

BLANCHARDSTOWN

85,212

92,304

8.0

SWORDS

55,242

67,272

21.8

RATHFARNHAM/TERENURE

FINGAL COASTAL STRIP NORTH CITY 1 NORTH CITY 2

97,234

111,397

14.6

197,768

206,362

4.3

97,935

101,161

3.3

SOUTH CITY

164,351

171,498

4.3

DÚN LAOGHAIRE - RATHDOWN

193,211

205,676

6.5

The clubs included in the above LADRs are listed on page 82. The number of clubs total 75 and include only those clubs who have a precise geographical location with teams at juvenile participation competitions. All other clubs will be included in the process to ensure that they are included in the development plans and are listed seperately.

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82

Area

Club

Area

Club

Blanchardstown

Castleknock

Lucan/Clondalkin

St Finian’s, Newcastle

Blanchardstown

Erin Go Bragh

Lucan/Clondalkin

St Patricks, Palmerstown

Blanchardstown

St Brigids

North 1

Ballymun Kickhams

Blanchardstown

St Peregrines

North 1

Erins Isle

Blanchardstown

Tyrellstown

North 1

Na Fianna

Blanchardstown

Westmanstown

North 1

Naomh Fionnbarra

Fingal Costal Strip

BeannEadair

North 1

Setanta

Fingal Costal Strip

Innisfails

North 1

St Josephs/O’Connell Boys

Fingal Costal Strip

Man-O-War North 1

St Oliver Plunketts Eoghan Ruadh

North 1

St Vincents

North 1

Whitehall Colmcille

North 2

Clontarf

North 2

Croabh Chiaráin

North 2

Naomh Barróg

Fingal Costal Strip

Na DubhGhall

Fingal Costal Strip

NaomhMearnog

Fingal Costal Strip

O’Dwyers

Fingal Costal Strip

Round Towers Lusk

Fingal Costal Strip

Skerries Harps

Fingal Costal Strip

St Maurs

Fingal Costal Strip

St Patricks Donabate

North 2

O’Tooles

Fingal Costal Strip

St. Sylvesters

North 2

Parnells

Dun Laoghaire

Ballinteer St Johns

North 2

Raheny

Dun Laoghaire

Foxrock-Cabinteely

North 2

Scoil Uí Chonaill

Dun Laoghaire

Cuala

North 2

St. Monicas

Dun Laoghaire

Geraldine Morans

North 2

Trinity Gaels

Dun Laoghaire

Kilmacud Crokes

Rathfarnham/Terenure

Ballyboden St Enda’s

Dun Laoghaire

Naomh Olaf

Rathfarnham/Terenure

Wanderers

Dun Laoghaire

Stars of Erin

Rathfarnham/Terenure

Faughs

Lucan/Clondalkin

Lucan Sarsfields

Rathfarnham/Terenure

St Judes

Lucan/Clondalkin

Round Towers, Clondalkin

Rathfarnham/Terenure

Templeogue/Synge St


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A STRATEGY FOR DUBLIN GAA 2011-2017

Area

Club

South City

Ballyfermot De La Salle

South City

Clanna Gael/Fontenoy

South City

Crumlin

South City

Good Counsel

South City

Kevins

South City

Liffey Gaels

South City

Robert Emmets

South City

St James Gaels

Swords

Ballyboughal

Swords

Clann Mhuire

Swords

Fingal Ravens

Swords

Fingallians

Swords

Garristown

Swords

St Colmcille

Swords

St Finnians, Swords

Swords

St Margarets

Swords

Wild Geese

Tallaght

Commercials

Tallaght

Croí Ró Naofa

Tallaght

St Annes

Tallaght

St Kevins Killians

Tallaght

St Mark’s

Tallaght

St Mary’s

Tallaght

Thomas Davis

adult only clubs AIB/Banc Aontais Éireann Bank of Ireland Civil Service Football Civil Service Hurling Garda Na Gaeil Óga Park Rangers Portobello Ranelagh Gaels Réalt Dearg Starlights Rosmini Gaels St Brendans St Francis Gaels Cabinteely U.C.D.

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acknowledgements Many people have contributed to the development of this plan. It would be impossible to thank every individual and organisation individually but Dublin GAA wishes to acknowledge their appreciation of all the volunteers and staff who gave freely of their time in committees and focus groups. It is appropriate to thank a number of individuals who contributed who have not been included in the sub-committees above. John Crimmins John Treacy Lorcán O’Rourke Marcella Kinsella Marcus Mac Raghnaill Peter Finnegan Rob Hartnett Sean Potts C.S.O. Genprint (Ireland) Limited Sportsfile

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Blue Wave  

Dublin Strategy Document

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