Page 1

St. Joseph’s Health Care London

The next era in care, recovery and rehabilitation starts here.

“My pain, my pride, these scars are mine,” a mantra for Kimberly who has lived with schizophrenia since adolescence. Thanks to her courage, the love and support of her family and care at St. Joseph’s, Kimberly is on her way back. Read her story on page 5

ON NOVEMBER 16, AFTER DECADES IN THE MAKING, A NEW FUTURE BEGINS WITH THE OPENING OF ST. JOSEPH’S MENTAL HEALTH CARE BUILDING. This special building, dedicated to the treatment, recovery and rehabilitation of adolescents and adults experiencing severe and persistent mental illness, will stand proudly beside today’s Parkwood Hospital, originally established by the Woman’s Christian Association over 120 years ago. Parkwood Hospital has a well known legacy of caring for people with complex health conditions and through innovative rehabilitation programs helping people live life to the fullest. With similar strengths, hopes and possibilities for the future, these two facilities are coming together under one strong name - Parkwood Institute.

View the video explaining our focus on the body, mind and spirit sjhc.london.on.ca/ parkwoodinstitute

Parkwood Institute will reinforce St. Joseph’s vision of earning complete confidence, giving hope and providing compassionate, excellent care for those we serve. This is the time to bring mental illness and mental health care fully into the fabric of our health care system. With new synergies in care and research of the brain, we will build a community of innovation dedicated to serving Southwestern Ontario and teaching students from around the world.

CARING FOR THE BODY, MIND & SPIRIT SINCE 1869

sjhc.london.on.ca


2

Because the body and mind work in harmony... St. Joseph’s introduces Parkwood Institute. Two of London’s health care facilities – Regional Mental Health Care London and Parkwood Hospital – are joining in one location, under one name, marking a new era in care, recovery and rehabilitation. Erasing the lines between mental and physical illness, Parkwood Institute will be a vibrant academic health care community, advancing the understanding that conditions of the body and mind go hand-in-hand.

EMBRACING

PEOPLE

WITH MENTAL HEALTH CARE

IMPROVING

NEEDS

QUALITY

TRANSLATING

OF LIFE IN THE FACE OF

RESEARCH INTO CARE

LIFE-ALTERING

COMPLEX CONDITIONS

REACHING OUT

THROUGH

REMEMBERING

THROUGH

CARE

BUILDING A

OF OUR VETERANS

COMMUNITY

OF CARE & INNOVATION

EDUCATING

COMMUNITY PROGRAMS & TEAMS

STUDENTS

THE

WORLD PROVIDING

WORLD CLASS

REHAB

PROGRAMS INCLUDING:

SPINAL CORD, STROKE, ,

BRAIN INJURY AMPUTEE & SPECIALIZED GERIATRICS

PATIENTS

MAINTAIN

FROM

AROUND

HELPING

INDEPENDENCE

THROUGH

CARING

FOR TEENS

TO OLDER

ADULTS

SPECIALIZED TREATMENTS

& PROGRAMS

ERASING THE

BOUNDARIES

BETWEEN

PHYSICAL & MENTAL HEALTH

Parkwood Institute Care, Recovery & Rehabilitation

OVER 1 MILLION SQUARE FEET

559

INPATIENT BEDS

157,407 OUTPATIENT/OUTREACH VISITS PER YEAR

495 VOLUNTEERS

1,965 STAFF


3

Dignity after decades

OPENING

NOVEMBER 2014

MENTAL

HEALTH CARE BUILDING

A NEW HOPE HOPE-INSPIRING E-INSPIRING ENVIRONMENT ENVIR WILL HELP FOSTER RECOVERY AND SOCIAL INTERACTION, COUPLED C WITH PRIVACY AND DIGNITY. Patients will progress p in their rrehabilitation journey with a team of expert care providers p in this specially sp designed facility with light-filled rooms and corridors, co orridors, welcom welcoming colours and private patient bedrooms and an nd bathrooms. 460,578 square feet of healing, therapeutic space

More than 100 volunteers

10,000 square feet of research space

Gold Level for Leadership in Engineering and Environmental Design (LEED)

Capacity for 156 beds

More than 700 staff members

Built to facilitate a progressive recovery journey

More than 83,500 outpatient and outreach appointments each year

Buildings don’t provide care; people do. However, the impact of environments on healing, the capacity to teach and conduct research and our environment cannot be underestimated. We are inspired by the people who need our care and all those who reach out to support them. Dr. Gillian Kernaghan, President and CEO, St. Joseph’s Health Care London

A history of two London health care facilities...

Instantly at capacity, London Asylum for the Insane (LAI) opened in 1870 with 500 patients which grew to more than 1700 in the 1930s.

Built in 1884, the Chapel of Hope, a designated heritage site, has long been a spiritual haven for patients, visitors and staff.


4

Where does mental health care happen today?

The courage to heal

MENTAL HEALTH CARE HAPPENS ALMOST EVERYWHERE. St. Joseph’s is proud to play a distinct role in caring for people with severe and persistent mental illness. We salute our partners - acute care hospitals, community treatment services, crisis and emergency services, supportive housing organizations, family physicians, government funders, advocacy groups, donors and all those who are strengthening a network of care and support for the one in five Canadians who will experience a mental illness in their lifetime.

Recently transitioned off medication, Barb realizes living with a mental illness is a lifelong journey and the path to rehabilitation is different for everyone.

STANDING FROZEN AGAINST HOSPITAL WALLS, BARB WAS SCARED, TEARY EYED AND SILENT – THESE BEHAVIOURS LASTED TWO YEARS. In 1993, Barb was admitted to hospital to be treated for bipolar disorder, something she had struggled with since adolescence. “I constantly had crying spells and kept to myself for a long time,” she says. “I wouldn’t speak.” The interdisciplinary teams at St. Joseph’s were crucial to Barb’s recovery. With care, therapy and medication Barb traversed the long road to recovery. As her confidence grew, rehabilitation counsellor Donna McManus worked with Barb to match her skills with a job. They found the perfect position at a restaurant where she still works today.

“Seek help, it’s out there. Don’t fall victim to fear or stigma. I chose to see the light and never turned back.”

Barb’s pleasant demeanor is a great asset to the workforce. She is reliable, responsible and hard working. It’s wonderful to find an individual who really wants to give of herself. Donna McManus (inset below)

While so much has been accomplished there is still much we can do collectively to ensure people do not fall through the cracks. We need to work together – while investing in research, care and environments of hope and healing. St. Joseph’s is dedicated to continue a legacy of service, innovation, advocacy and philanthropy for those in need. Margaret McLaughlin, Chair, Board of Directors, St. Joseph’s Health Care London

Always giving back, Barb (above) takes a break during a day of volunteering at the hospital that once cared for her.

Overcrowding became an issue in the 1930s and sunrooms were converted to patient bedrooms.

LAI’s early superintendents felt work, amusement and diet were critical to recovery. Dr. Richard Bucke had some progressive ideas on care in his 25 year tenure.

After a name change to Ontario Hospital London in the early 1930s, demolition began on the hospital in the 1960s, making way for the new London Psychiatric Hospital (LPH). From the 1960s to the 1990s many changes to mental health care were developed.


5

Mom Barbara (left) and daughter Kimberly spend quality time together.

She always comes back JUST BEFORE CHRISTMAS 2009, BARBARA FOUND POLICE OFFICERS IN HER LIVING ROOM, EXPLAINING THAT HER DAUGHTER HAD A MENTAL ILLNESS.

You have to laugh, and sometimes you have to cry, but I always know with time, medicine, hope, rest and treatment, Kimberly always comes back. Barbara, Kimberly’s mom

When Kimberly was 13, she began hearing voices – and she ignored them. With aspirations of becoming a paramedic, Kimberly kept the voices to herself, afraid her dream would be dashed if she told anyone. At 17, she had visions and heard voices daily. After waking in a bathtub with a razor blade and no recollection of how she got there, Kimberly confided in a counsellor at her college, who notified the police. “I was quite relieved actually, now it was in the open,” states Kimberly. “I didn’t recognize any warning signs,” says Barbara. “She was doing incredibly well in school. Her grades were in the 90s.” Kimberly was hospitalized, transferred to the mental health care program at St. Joseph’s and diagnosed with schizophrenia. There would be many more hospital admissions, including emergency treatment for episodes of dissociation. “Dissociation is a disruption of and/or a discontinuity in the normal integration of consciousness, memory, identity, emotion, perception, body representation, motor control and behaviour,” explains Kimberly’s psychologist Dr. David LeMarquand. “It’s a challenge because those experiences can be very distressing. Right now we are treating it through awareness of triggers and managment techniques.” “You have to laugh, and sometimes you have to cry,” says Barbara. “But I know with time, medicine, hope, rest and treatment, Kimberly always comes back.”

Under St. Joseph’s governance since 2001, the hospital was renamed Regional Mental Health Care London.

Dr. Douglas Wickware, the LPH’s first medical director, showcased models of the old and new facilities.


6

Faith and determination AT 16, TIENA WAS DIAGNOSED WITH POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER STEMMING FROM ABUSE SHE ENDURED AS A CHILD. From 16 to 30 she would self-harm and attempt suicide. “I must have tried a hundred times,” recalls Tiena. “I just wanted someone to tell me they cared.” As her illness manifested, Tiena struggled with bulimia and abused laxatives. Dr. Robbie Campbell, Tiena’s psychiatrist, says eating disorders are often part of a bigger problem. “We need to look at things holistically – it’s often the tip of the iceberg. For Tiena the eating disorder was something she could control in a life that felt out of control.” Tiena has been in and out of care for more than two decades. The past several months have been her longest stay outside of hospital. She credits her faith, friends and care teams for her success. But her desire to make a difference also contributes. Through volunteer work and telling her story, Tiena hopes to encourage others who live with mental illness. “If I can inspire anyone to reach out and find help, I would be achieving a life goal.”

I’ve been through so much, some terrible and trying times; if I can inspire anyone to reach out and find help by telling my story I would be achieving a life goal. Dr. Robbie Campbell and Tiena share a laugh.

Parkwood Hospital was located at 81 Grand Avenue in London from 1921 to 1984.

The Women’s Christian Association (WCA), established in 1874, opened the Home for Incurables in 1894, which was re-named Victoria Home for Incurables in 1910, and Parkwood Hospital for Incurables in 1927.

The WCA continued operating Parkwood Hospital until 1997, when under the direction of the Health Services Restructuring Commission it changed governance to St. Joseph’s who continues to honour the legacy of the WCA, and their tradition of caring.


7

Giving fuelled by family FOR MIKE AND JOAN BANCROFT GIVING IS A MEANINGFUL PART OF THEIR LIVES. Mike, a retired professor, and Joan, who has a background in teaching and theology, have always given generously to causes dear to their hearts. Their choices are often fuelled by family and in the case of their donation to Parkwood Institute, having loved ones who have lived with mental illness helped them understand the need. “People would not recognize or even admit to mental illness 30 or 40 years ago,” says Mike. “Since then, there’s been a huge change of attitude and it really is positive that people are talking about it. Some of the stigma is disappearing, but it is a slow process.” Through St. Joseph’s Health Care Foundation, a therapeutic recreation room at the new mental health care facility will be named after the Bancrofts. Joan smiles when she speaks about the couple’s philanthropic passion, “We would rather miss a trip and know we are supporting the things we value and honour.”

LEARN MORE ABOUT HOW YOU CAN HELP SUPPORT ST. JOSEPH’S HEALTH CARE, PLEASE VISIT SJHCFOUNDATION.ORG

There’s been a huge change of attitude and it really is positive that people are talking about it. Some of the stigma is disappearing, but it is a slow process. Mike Bancroft

Parkwood Institute

Specialists rallying around brain health Coming together at one location is fuelling new possibilities for care and research. Parkwood Institute brings together some of Canada’s leading researchers and care teams all focused on recovery and rehabilitation from brain trauma, stroke, and mental illness, coupled with innovations in diagnosing and treating dementia. As part of Lawson Health Research Institute - our research arm - St. Joseph’s continues to make brain health a research, teaching and care priority. It touches all of us in some way. To learn more about how you can help call 519 646-6034.

Synergies in research helping people today and tomorrow. At Parkwood Institute, Lawson Health Research Institute is building on a legacy of innovation within four major focus areas: Aging, Rehabilitation and Geriatric Care: keeping the body and mind in optimal condition as we age, including restoring health after stroke and spinal cord injury. Centre for Cognitive Vitality: managing the impact of brain disorders by finding ways of improving early diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation – or preventing them entirely. Brain and Gait Lab: understanding how disorders that effect how we think, reason and remember can impact our movement as we age. Specialized Mental Health Care: exploring new pharmaceuticals to maximize mental health for all ages.

Complications from mental illnesses and cognitive disorders can differ from person to person. Dr. Amer Burhan, Neurophysicist, is researching alternatives to traditional treatment and is colla collaborating with researchers and teams to evaluate the effect of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) on brain activity. TMS is a non-invasive, painless method using magnetic fields to stimulate nerve cells in the brain to treat conditions such as depression and hallucinations. While not yet available for mainstream use, it is being tested on people with Alzheimer’s disease as a way to enhance cognitive function.


C UT & KE E P

Site chief for mental health care at Parkwood Institute Dr. Sarah Jarmain has your answers. Q How do I recognize someone with a mental illness? SJ Mental illness affects all of us. One in five Canadians will personally experience a mental illness at some point in their life. Mental illness can impact anyone regardless of their socio-economic status, culture, background, upbringing or education. It does not discriminate; you could be impacted, as could your family, friends, neighbours or colleagues.

Are you or someone you know experiencing a mental health crisis? Use the numbers below to contact the CMHA crisis response line and connect with mental health services in your community. If there is a need for an individual to get help in a non-urgent circumstance they can start with a family doctor, a walk-in clinic or the Mental Health Helpline at 1-866-531-2600. London & Middlesex County: 519-433-2023 or 1-866-933-2023 Windsor & Essex County:

519-973-4435

Q Parkwood Institute is right in my community. Am I unsafe living near people with mental illness?

Chatham & Kent County:

1-866-299-7447

St. Thomas & Elgin County:

1-888-631-2180

SJ The Mental Health Commission of Canada states that less than three percent of violent offenses can be attributed to people with mental illness, when substance abuse is not present. As a matter of fact those with mental illness can often be the victims of violent behaviour because of their vulnerability.

Sarnia & Lambton County:

519-336-3445

Q When people come to Parkwood Institute for care, what kinds of mental illness might they have? SJ Parkwood Institute will care for those with severe, complex or persistent mental illness who need the expertise of a specialized team. Care may be provided through hospitalization, ambulatory clinics or through outreach in the community. People who come into care have varying diagnoses which can include depression, schizophrenia and other conditions. Mental illness is a disease that affects the brain and is not caused by one single factor, but a complex interaction between genetic, biological, environmental and social factors. Treatment and rehabilitation can help a person return to everyday living. Q What happens when a patient is discharged? SJ Once a patient has reached a place in their recovery when they can make the transition from hospital to the community they continue to receive ongoing support through our outreach teams and outpatient programs. We also aid in this transition by helping patients make connections to community mental health care supports and providers. Q How do you address people with addictions? SJ Through our care we treat people with any combination of mental illness and addiction. This is part of the specialized services we provide with an interdisciplinary team of experts. Treatment plans, both in hospital and in the community, are developed with each person and their family, if they wish, and other care partners. Q Bed numbers in your new facility are going down, what is the impact on care? SJ Over the last number of years there has been a significant transformation of the mental health care system. While there has been a reduction in the number of inpatient beds at our facility, there has also been a change in how mental health care is delivered, including improving care planning with patients and their families and increasing coordination with community services when a patient is discharged. We have also expanded our outreach into the community with community mental health and addiction agencies, as well as long-term care and housing providers. These changes are resulting in better use of all services and a stronger network of care. This means improved access for patients coming to our mental health care programs from another hospital.

Dr. Sarah Jarmain Site Chief Mental health care at Parkwood Institute

DO YOU OR SOMEONE YOU KNOW HAVE A MENTAL HEALTH EMERGENCY?

CALL 9 •1•1

Woodstock & Oxford County: 1-877-339-8342

or go to the closest emergency department to receive immediate help.

For other health care resources in Ontario, please visit: healthline.ca

On November 5th come take the next steps with St. Joseph’s Public Open House Tour the new Mental Health Care Building The public is invited for a preview tour of the new state-of-the-art facility. This unveiling as part of St. Joseph’s launch of Parkwood Institute, signals the start of an exciting new era in care, recovery and rehabilitation.

Wednesday, November 5, 2014 Noon – 7pm Mental Health Care Building, 550 Wellington Road, London

To ask a specific question, please send a note to: askGillian@sjhc.london.on.ca To read full stories please visit: sjhc.london.on.ca/our-stories

CARING FOR THE BODY, MIND & SPIRIT SINCE 1869

Renowned for compassionate care, St. Joseph’s is one of the best academic health care organizations in Canada dedicated to helping people live to their fullest by minimizing the effects of injury, disease and disability through excellence in care, teaching and research.

sjhc.london.on.ca

Mental Health Care  

The next era in care, recovery and rehabilitation starts here.

Mental Health Care  

The next era in care, recovery and rehabilitation starts here.