Issuu on Google+

Caring Connection S t .

J o s e p h ’ s

A Publication of St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center | Spring 2011 | Vol. 8, No. 1

IN THIS ISSUE:

From Bagpipes to Basketball, Sports Medicine Is a Winner


A Higher Level of Care

T

Contents

oday’s hospitals, St. Joseph’s included, are showcases for every sort of health care technology you can imagine. All of it is aimed at improving the quality of care we offer our patients. If you sense a “but” coming, you’re right. While each of us at St. Joseph’s recognizes the power of today’s medical technology, we must also understand that the overall quality of our patient care depends on the simple things we do every day. For example, take a look at the way we wash our hands. Did you ever stop to question “why”? The answer is alarming. On a national basis, more than 1 million hospitalized patients this year will acquire “nosocomial” infections. These are infections acquired in a hospital, regardless of why a patient was there in the first place. As if Kathryn H. Ruscitto that is not worry enough for patients who come to our hospital to be healed, they must also be on guard against the spread of the so-called MDROs (multi-drug resistant organisms)— bacteria that have developed immunity to many common antibiotics. Although hospital-acquired infections are cause for alarm, study after study has proven that the most effective way to prevent these sometimes fatal infections is by having all employees follow a simple protocol of hand hygiene. St. Joseph’s has long recognized the importance of such hand care. As a result, we have a lower than average infection rate when compared to other hospitals both in New York state and nationally. Despite that record, we view even a single patient hospital-acquired infection as one too many. That’s why we’re stepping up an already robust effort aimed at informing all employees—not just nurses and doctors—about the vital importance and correct procedure for keeping hands clean. Not only is there inservice training about proper handwashing, but there also is on-the-job observation to make sure we’re doing it correctly. Since part of my job involves visiting a few patients every day just to chat and see how they think we’re doing, I have had to relearn how to wash my hands correctly with soap and water. And, I am now trained to apply an alcohol-based gel whenever I enter a patient’s room and again when I leave that room. I may do this a dozen times a day. It is that important! It is so important we have begun educating the public about the importance of hand hygiene when they enter the hospital to visit relatives or friends. We have kiosks at every entry point urging visitors to use the gel when they enter and leave a patient’s room and also to use facemasks when they have a cough or cold. My point is that St. Joseph’s is committed to taking quality in all its forms— including infection control—to the highest level. The only way we can succeed is by focusing intently on whatever needs to be done. We have appointed Dennis Ehrich, MD, as the hospital’s chief quality officer to guide us in the effort, and working with him is St. Joseph’s new director of quality resources, Dorothy Haag, MS, RN. They have a daunting job, but it is made easier by the more than 4,000 St. Joseph’s employees who share the common understanding that quality is really measured by how well we care for our patients and their families. If you’d like to learn more about St. Joseph’s efforts to improve quality for its patients and their families, I encourage you to visit my blog on line at kathrynhruscitto.blogspot. com. We’ve also included a brief article about proper handwashing techniques on page 4 of this issue of the Caring Connection.

Up-to-Date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 St. Joseph’s New President is a ‘Country’ Girl—and Collaborator—at Heart . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 His Full-Time Quest Is the End of Pain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sports Medicine Isn’t Just for ‘Athletes’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Those Treating Student Athletes Stand Ready at the Sidelines . . . . . . . 11 Physicians and Patients Are in It Together . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Back to Playing the Pipes . . . . . . . . . . . 16 New Mother-Baby Unit Pampers Families . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Your Valve’s in the Right Place . . . . . . . 20 Our Foundation Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Donor Listing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Front Cover: When Tom Parlato, a teacher at Madison-Oneida BOCES, tore his distal biceps tendon lifting a 700pound cast iron radiator, one of his greatest fears was the loss of his ability to play the highland bagpipes. He turned to the expertise of a sports medicine physician for help.

Our Mission

We are passionate healers dedicated to honoring the Sacred in our sisters and brothers.

Our Vision To be world-renowned for passionate patient care and outstanding clinical outcomes.

Our Core Values

In the spirit of good Stewardship, we heal by practicing: Compassion through our kindness, concern and genuine caring; Reverence in honoring the dignity of the human spirit; Excellence by expecting the best of ourselves and others; Integrity by being and speaking the truth.

Sincerely,

Kathryn H. Ruscitto President

2   caring Connection

l

St. Joseph’s hospital Health Center

l

SPRING 2011

l

www.sjhsyr.org


up to date l

l

Franciscan Companies Appoints Timothy Scanlon Executive Vice President

F

Investing in Our Community

P

art of St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center’s $220 million expansion project, construction of St. Joseph’s new emergency services building (far left) is well underway. The three-story structure will house the emergency department on the first floor; emergency psychiatric services and clinical observation/chest pain unit on the second floor; and central sterile and “green” data center on the third floor. The emergency services building is anticipated to be completed by year end. It will be joined to the main hospital by an addition that will house a patient tower with private rooms, operating room suite and intensive care units. Once completed, St. Joseph’s expansion of services will create approximately 200 highly skilled health care positions.

ranciscan Companies, a member of the St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center network, has appointed Timothy Scanlon to the position of executive vice president. Scanlon has served Franciscan Companies for the past 20 years, first as operations manager of Franciscan Health Support Inc. and most recently as vice president, a position he has held for the past decade. Prior to joining Franciscan Companies, Scanlon was director of respiratory care at St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center. Timothy Scanlon Scanlon received his bachelor of science degree in respiratory therapy from SUNY Upstate Medical Center and his master of science degree in health services management from the New School for Social Research in New York City. He sits on a number of local and regional boards of directors and is a member of the American Association of Health Care Executives and the American Association of Respiratory Care. With services covering 16 counties in Upstate New York, Franciscan Companies is a member of the St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center network. It provides a variety of ancillary health care services to St. Joseph’s patients as well as those referred by physicians and other health care facilities.

A Higher Level of Care

T

he following organizations have acknowledged the St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center network with national recognitions and awards:

National Research Corp. l 2010/2011 Consumer Choice #1 Award for highest

overall quality and image in the Syracuse area

American Association of Critical-Care Nurses

Excellus BlueCross BlueShield

l Beacon Award for excellence in critical care nursing

l Blue Distinction Centers for Cardiac and

American Hospital Association (Hospitals & Health Networks magazine) l One of nation’s “100 most-wired” hospitals

Orthopedic Care Outcome Concept Systems l St. Joseph’s Home Care and Hospitals Home Health

Care included on the HomeCare Elite Top 500 List

American Nurses Credentialing Center l Magnet Recognition for Excellence in Nursing

(2007-2011) DNV Healthcare Inc.

Press Ganey l Outpatient surgery centers received Summit Award for patient satisfaction

l Accreditation for St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center

Society of Chest Pain Centers

HealthGrades 2011

l Accredited as a Chest Pain Center with PCI

l Five-star rated for coronary interventional

procedures—nine years in a row (2003-2011) l Five-star rated for treatment of heart attack—

two years in a row (2010-2011) l Joint Replacement Excellence Award™ l Five-star rated for joint replacement—five years in a row (2007-2011) l Ranked among the top 5 percent in the nation for joint replacement The Joint Commission l Accreditation for Franciscan Health Support,

Lourdes Health Support and St. Elizabeth Health Support Services

“Heart Attack? Every Second Counts,” St. Joseph’s public service advertising campaign to educate the public about the importance of seeking help fast if someone is experiencing heart attack HEART ATTACK? symptoms, was a Silver EVERY SECOND COUNTS. Award winner in the 2010 CALL 9-1-1. CardioVascular Advertising G HELP FAST ON THE LINE, GETTIN IS HEART YOUR WHEN ENCE. CAN MAKE ALL THE DIFFER Awards competition, sponsored by Creative Images Inc. and Marketing Healthcare Today. Shortness of breath; sign of a heart attack. Chest pain isn’t the only heavy sweating also ort; severe nausea; or back, arm or jaw discomf Chest Pain Center in . As the first Accredited e and may indicate a problem important it is to diagnos how just knows s medical help Syracuse, St. Joseph’ and accurately. Seeking quickly ms sympto treat these heart damage and protect you from serious help can away right ally dangerous outcome from a potenti positive more life— a your and create to call 9-1-1. Your heart— situation. So, don’t hesitate may depend on it.

SYRACUSE’S FIRST ACCREDITED CHEST PAIN CENTER

www.sjhsyr.org

l

spring 2011

l

A Higher Level of Care

www.sjhsyr.org Ave. Syracuse, NY Center 301 Prospect 138 St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Information): 315-703-2 Line (Physician & Program St. Joseph’s Resource Francis.

St. Joseph’s hospital Health Center

l

by the Sisters of St. St. Joseph’s is sponsored Hospital Health Center. affiliate of St. Joseph’s nt Services, Inc. is an Franciscan Manageme

3

caring Connection   


up to date l

l

Your Mother Was Right: Please Wash Your Hands

H

andwashing is the best way to prevent health care-associated infections. It is also the best way to keep yourself healthy outside of a health care facility. To help protect you and your loved ones from infection, the handwashing techniques used at St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center appear below. For more information about efforts to protect St. Joseph’s patients from infections, see hospital President Kathryn Ruscitto’s letter on page 2 of the Caring Connection.

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy allows patients to breathe 100 percent oxygen, which aids in wound healing. Nurses are able to communicate with patients during treatment, and televisions help patients pass the time.

Center for Wound Care and Hyperbaric Medicine Expands

S

t. Joseph’s Center for Wound Care and Hyperbaric Medicine has added 1,500 square feet of space in an expansion that aims to accommodate the growing need for wound care as well as improve current clinic flow and scheduling demands. The center is located in the Northeast Medical Center, in Fayetteville, NY. “We now have the appropriate space to accommodate the growth we have continued to experience each year since our program opened in 2004,” says Barbara Simonian, program director. The center can see 20 to 30 additional new patients and increase the frequency of visits of existing patients. “For the most part, wounds require treatment on a weekly basis to promote more rapid healing,” Simonian says. “Outside of that, the risks may increase.” In addition to featuring the latest in advanced wound care treatment for wounds caused by diabetes, circulatory problems, radiation damage and many other conditions, the center has four state-of-the-art hyperbaric oxygen therapy chambers. The program is one of only 97 in the country to be accredited by the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society and one of only two in New York state that is accredited with distinction. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is a treatment in which the patient breathes 100 percent oxygen inside a pressurized chamber thus allowing oxygen to reach the areas of the wound that have been oxygen deprived and unable to heal. HBOT is effective in fighting certain types of infections, stimulates the growth of new blood vessels and improves circulation. The treatment also is used to treat crush injuries, bone infections and compromised skin grafts.

4   caring Connection

l

St. Joseph’s hospital Health Center

l

Use Soap and Water When hands are visibly soiled or thought to be contaminated, use soap and water. 1. Wet hands with water using a temperature that is comfortable. Water that is too hot or too cold can affect skin integrity. 2. Apply appropriate soap and wash hands and wrists vigorously for 15 to 30 seconds, covering all surfaces of hands and fingers. 3. Rinse hands under running water, allowing water to drip from fingertips in a downward fashion. 4. Thoroughly dry hands and wrists with paper towel. 5. Turn faucet off using a dry paper towel to touch the handle. Also, use a clean paper towel to open bathroom doors before exiting. Use Alcohol-based Products Alcohol-based products are the preferred method of disinfecting hands provided they are not visibly soiled or thought to be contaminated. 1. Apply product to palm of one hand and rub hands together covering all surfaces of hands and fingers until hands are dry.

St. Joseph’s College of Nursing welcomed Congresswoman Ann Marie Buerkle to its campus on Feb. 2. The Congresswoman is a 1972 graduate of St. Joseph’s and visited the college to see the tremendous growth to the school since she attended, meet and greet administrators and college of nursing students, as well as tour St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center’s expansion project and changes in the North Side neighborhood. Congresswoman Buerkle worked as a nurse at St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center prior to attending the Syracuse University College of Law and beginning her political career.

Spring 2011

l

www.sjhsyr.org


Here We Grow: St. Joseph’s Acquires North Medical, PC

Dr. Seth Greenky Honored with Dr. Pease Award

S

O

t. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center acquired North Medical, PC (NMPC) in December 2010, creating one of New York state’s largest health care networks. With more than 450 professional and support staff, including nearly 80 physicians and mid-levels, North Medical, PC serves more than 320,000 patients annually through its five practices located at North and Northeast Medical centers. The five practices include Family Physicians, Urgent Care, Orthopedics & Rehabilitation, The Women’s Place and Living Proof Longevity Centre. St. Joseph’s made this strategic business decision to help stabilize its network and ensure it has enough primary care physicians, which are essential as health care reform is implemented.

Bloggers

S

t. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center President Kathryn Ruscitto is now blogging at kathrynhruscitto. blogspot.com. Community members are encouraged to follow her blog and comment. Orthopedic surgeons Seth Greenky, MD, and Brett Greenky, MD, are blogging about orthopedics at stjosephsortho.blogspot.com. Their blog includes commentary on the latest orthopedic research innovations and news.

E-Commerce Site for Medical Supplies Launched

F

ranciscan Companies, a member of the St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center network, has launched www.CNYMedicalSupply.com, a new way to buy medical supplies. The site enables people in Central New York— and across the country—to order a variety of medical products conveniently and securely online.

On the website, customers may buy: l mobility products, including rollators, canes and walkers l respiratory items such as nebulizers l wound care products l diabetes management products l daily living aids, including power seats, benches and other comfort and safety devices l specialty items such as designer canes “Franciscan Companies has been providing medical products and services to hospitals, medical professionals and the Central New York community for more than 25 years,” says Frank L. Smith Jr., president and CEO of Franciscan Companies. “This is the next step in utilizing technology and innovation to cater to our customers and patients by enabling them to order needed products from the comfort of home.” The website www.CNYMedicalSupply.com will be joined by convenient kiosk ordering locations in pharmacies, hospitals and physician offices throughout Central New York.

www.sjhsyr.org

l

rthopedic surgeon Seth Greenky, MD, who practices with Syracuse Orthopedic Specialists, was honored in January with St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center’s 3rd annual Roger W. Pease PEER (Physician Exemplifying Excellence and Reverence) Award. Named for Roger W. Pease, MD, a humanitarian who served as St. Joseph’s first surgeon, the award is presented annually to a physician who embodies leadership, clinical expertise and social responsibility. Winners of the Upon receiving the Roger W. Pease PEER Award, award are nominated by their Seth Greenky, MD, is congratulated by St. Joseph’s medical staff President Marya Gendzielewski, MD. peers or fellow physicians. Dr. Greenky was cited for his “outstanding ability to be a visionary for his program,” having “the most outstanding results and commitment to excellence” and being “on top of his profession and generous with his time.” Dr. Seth Greenky is St. Joseph’s chief orthopedic surgeon. He and his brother, Brett Greenky, MD, also an orthopedic surgeon, are co-directors of St. Joseph’s Total Joint Replacement Program. He also is a faculty member of the SUNY Health Science Center/ Upstate Medical Center Orthopedic Surgery Residency Program.

AHA Book Recognizes St. Joseph’s for Its Community Revitalization Efforts

T

he American Hospital Association (AHA) has recognized St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center’s work to help revitalize Syracuse’s North Side by including the hospital’s efforts in the 6th edition of Community Connections: Ideas and Innovations for Hospital Leaders. The book highlights hospitals that are meeting the needs of their community’s social and basic needs, promoting community health, improving access and coverage, and enhancing the quality of life for the people they serve. The AHA hopes that by sharing such case studies hospitals will benefit from the examples and find new strategies for community partnerships and programs. More information is available at www.caringforcommunities.org.

spring 2011

l

St. Joseph’s hospital Health Center

l

5

caring Connection   


A Higher Level of Care

St. Joseph’s New President Is a ‘Country’ Girl—and Collaborator—at Heart

K

athryn Ruscitto, St. Joseph Hospital Health Center’s new president and chief executive officer, may describe herself as a country girl at heart, but she’s come a very long way from those days when she wrapped rubber bands around bunches of asparagus on her grandfather’s farm on Syracuse’s northern outskirts. Take, for example, the church-sponsored committee she headed to bring relief to desperate earthquake victims in Haiti. Chances are good that the Congressmen, retired generals and CEOs of international companies on that committee she “commanded” a year ago had no inkling of her rural background. Although they never met in person, the committee raised more than $2.5 million in cash and supplies for Haiti. Finding, gathering, moving and distributing that aid was accomplished through international conference calls originating in Ruscitto’s office every Monday for four months. And when the cargo containers meant to aid the sick and injured were lassoed by red tape in a Haitian port, a few strategic calls to committee members familiar with the military got them on their way to the quake victims who needed them. When the infamous Labor Day storm struck Syracuse in 1998, thousands of area residents were left without power for more than a week. Ruscitto was then working as senior vice president of strategy for Loretto, the not-for-

Photographed at a Missioning Ceremony to mark and celebrate the transition of leadership to Kathryn Ruscitto and to confirm the new president’s commitment to the mission and culture of St. Joseph’s network are (from left to right) Elizabeth, Kathryn and Daniel Ruscitto. The ceremony was held at St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center in January 2011.

6   caring Connection

l

St. Joseph’s hospital Health Center

l

profit agency supplying elder care services to hundreds of Central New Yorkers. Loretto also lost power to many of its facilities that night, but within less than 24 hours most of the aging residents being cared for within the system once again had light, refrigeration, climate control and communications as flatbed trucks hauled generators up to their doors. Oddly enough, the generators were stenciled with names like “Fishkill State Prison” or “Attica State Prison.” Ruscitto may not have known the ins and outs of providing a temporary power source, but she had “reached out” to a friend who got in touch with another friend in the state prison system who did. These are but two examples of the many Ruscitto can recite that illustrate her ability to bring people together to solve problems far beyond her own knowledge. She is a generalist, as well as a bit of a general. “I may not be an expert in a certain area,” Ruscitto says, “but I know how to find the people who are. I’m a hometown girl with a lot of deep connections within the city from having been here a long time.” After graduation from Le Moyne College with her bachelor’s degree in political science and economics, and before she earned a master’s in public administration from Syracuse University’s Maxwell School, Ruscitto says that as a 21-year-old she realized the importance of forming strong networks and circles of friends and mentors. Those “circles” adopted her, she says, and steered her in the ways to effect change. Even the informal book group she joined contributed to her growth. “In fact, we only occasionally read a book, but we spent a lot of time talking about community and world issues. “My parents didn’t have much, but they taught us the importance of hard work. They also taught us that success isn’t about what you have, it’s a matter of what you do with what you have.” Perhaps with her parents’ teachings in mind, Ruscitto says she grew up wanting to “change the world.” She describes herself as “advocacy oriented and socially conscious.” She tried to find ways in which she could create change, always seeking the advice of others along the way. At Catholic Charities, her work centered on developing resources for those in poverty. As administrator for human services for Onondaga County, she oversaw the development of the county’s 911 Emergency Communications System. She also was instrumental in reforming the Department of Social Services and Children’s Division, trying, as she says, “to humanize and solve some of its problems.” She joined St. Joseph’s as senior vice president for strategic, development and governmental affairs in 2001, and became executive vice president in 2009. St. Joseph’s 4,000 employees are liable to see more of the collaborative spirit she has demonstrated throughout

Spring 2011

l

www.sjhsyr.org


her career. They also will experience a CEO that seeks to turn the traditional pyramid-shaped organizational chart on its head—literally. She calls it the “servant-leader” model and admits that “it’s very Franciscan.” “I have always said that the organizational chart is upside down,” Ruscitto says. “The point should be at the bottom. It should be me down there serving and supporting our employees, so they can do their best to serve our patients. At the same time, I also have to be a leader, set some standards and goals, and help people stay focused so they can do the best they can for our patients and each other.”

St. Joseph’s President Kathryn Ruscitto speaks to a patient’s father at St. Joseph’s Westside Family Health Center. Located on Seymour Street in Syracuse, the Westside Family Health Center serves a large number of people who have come to the United States from other countries, including the Sudan, Bosnia and the Ukraine. Eighty-five percent of patients do not speak English or have limited English proficiency.

At a Glance Kathryn Howe Ruscitto

I’m making a conscious effort to talk to families and patients in their rooms, the elevator, the cafeteria, even walking up the hill. I’ll be asking how we’re doing, and what we could be doing better.”

Birthplace: Syracuse Husband: Daniel Ruscitto, high school sweetheart, photographer and retired lieutenant from the Onondaga County Sheriff’s Department Daughter: Elizabeth Ruscitto, Syracuse University iSchool master’s degree candidate and coach for Syracuse Student Sandbox, a business incubator that mentors student entrepreneurs

—Kathryn Ruscitto

Other Family Members: Ashley, a yellow Labrador, and Shadow, an abandoned black cat that had lost its ears to frostbite Pastime: Gardening, especially hummingbird gardens Exercise: Kayaking and hiking in the Adirondacks

Regardless of how the organizational chart looks, Ruscitto pledges not to change the values that have brought the hospital to where it stands today. Everything the hospital staff does, she says, revolves around values of integrity, reverence and respect for patients and the coworkers who serve them, as well as a passion for providing good care while acting as stewards of the hospital’s resources. Being out in the community as much as she is, talking with everyone from patients, to physicians, to peers at other hospitals locally as well as around the country, she has come to the conclusion that St. Joseph’s is unique. Others, she says, openly envy the hospital’s culture. Part of it, says Ruscitto, is the clarity and certainty with which the Sisters of St. Francis, sponsors of St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center, have expressed the values. “It is very clear that they hold the hospital’s leadership accountable for preserving the values with which the hospital has served the community,” Ruscitto says. “But they don’t tell us how to do it. Their presence is just wonderful. As a result, the people who work at St. Joseph’s, regardless of what they do, believe in the values and live them.”

www.sjhsyr.org

l

It’s not unusual, she says, to hear frequent examples of employees going out of the way for patients. A nurse took money out of her purse so a patient who didn’t have cab fare could get back to her home in Oswego. A nurse in the emergency department gave his shoes to a patient who walked into the hospital barefoot. “We don’t tell people to do this,” Ruscitto says. “They just do it. It’s a matter of living our values without even thinking about it.” So some things won’t change at St. Joseph’s, Ruscitto vows, but some things, at least for her, are already changing. She estimates receiving about 200 emails a day, not to mention the old-fashioned phone calls. The technology is great, she says, but only if it doesn’t get in the way of working with people face to face. Right now, she spends about half of her time doing what an administrator does—returning those emails and phone calls, looking at contracts, and doing what she described as “nudging things along that need nudging.” Her intent is to reduce the administrative load in favor of spending more time with patients and their families, hospital employees and those within the broader community. She has already blocked the roaming-around time into her schedule, calling it “rounding,” the term used by physicians and nurses to describe the time spent checking up on their hospitalized patients in person. “I’m not going to let email rule my life anymore,” Ruscitto says with a smile. “I’m making a conscious effort to talk to families and patients in their rooms, the elevator, the cafeteria, even walking up the hill. I’ll be asking how we’re doing, and what we could be doing better.” When Ruscitto recently visited a friend hospitalized at St. Joseph’s, she also made it a point to introduce

spring 2011

l

St. Joseph’s hospital Health Center

l

7

caring Connection   


A Higher Level of Care

herself to the patient in the other bed. She asked if the hospital was doing a good job of taking care of him. He smiled, gestured at the nurses, one on each side of his bed, and said, “You see this? Don’t screw it up.” “That’s the fun part of the job,” she says. “Patients are really grateful for good care. And you can hear about problems, too. By getting out and talking with them, you learn things that are impossible to learn sitting in your office.” Toward the end of 2010 before Ruscitto had officially taken over the reins, she asked St. Joseph employees four questions: What do you hope I do as CEO? What do you hope I don’t do? What are you most proud of at St. Joseph’s? What are you most concerned about at St. Joseph’s? Once again, she was using the skills honed throughout college and her professional life to gather data and insights that would help clarify the hospital’s path as it, like every other hospital in the country, begins to deal with a series of difficult challenges in the way American health care is delivered. “There are many things we’re going to have to do differently as the health care model changes,” Ruscitto says. “Medicare is demanding changes. Our patients are demanding change. We have to be open to new ways of working with our medical and nursing staffs. “We don’t have all the answers, and I know I can’t do it alone. All I can do is make sure that the right systems, the right processes and the right resources are available to the people who can do it—our clinical staff and the people who support them for the benefit of our patients.” l

Ruscitto Named One of Top ‘52 Women Hospital & Healthcare Leaders’

S

t. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center’s President and Chief Executive Officer Kathryn Ruscitto was included among the top women leaders in the hospital and health care industry in Becker’s Hospital Review’s annual list, “52 Women Hospital & Healthcare Leaders” released in November 2010. Members of the list were selected for their accomplishments in leading health care and hospital organizations, including improvement of patient care, development of relationships between providers and facilitation of organizational growth. To create the list, the editorial team at Becker’s Hospital Review accepted nominations for the most influential women in health care through the Becker’s Hospital Review website and weekly online news­ letters. After several months of collecting nominations and researching the background of each nominee, the editorial team narrowed the contenders to a list of the top women leaders. Becker’s Hospital Review repeats this process annually to ensure an up-to-date compendium. Leaders do not pay and cannot pay to be included on this list. Becker’s Hospital Review is a Chicago-based publication focusing on hospital and health care news and business advice. The primary audience for the publication is hospital executives and health care industry leaders. l

8   caring Connection

l

St. Joseph’s hospital Health Center

l

His Full-Time Quest

I

t’s a worn-out old joke, but how fortunate we are when the punch line, “Take two aspirins and call me in the morning,” is all we need to rid ourselves of pain. Unfortunately, for many, pain is an unwanted companion that seems to never go away. What’s the good news? It doesn’t have to be that way. Just ask St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center’s Jason Lok, MD, one of relatively few physicians who have made the alleviation of pain their full-time quest. After earning his medical degree from SUNY Upstate Medical University in 1994, Dr. Lok was board-certified in anesthesiology in 2005 and pain medicine in 2006. The proportion of his time spent on anesthesiology gradually decreased until he made pain medicine his full-time practice last year. We all suffer pain of one sort or another, and that, Dr. Lok says, is good. If you touch something hot or sharp, pain is what makes us get out of the way—quickly. If you feel pain for no apparent reason somewhere in your body, it could be a sign that something is wrong and you’d better get it checked out. That, in 60 words or so, is a very, very simple look at pain. Chat with Dr. Lok for an hour or so and you’ll realize that pain, and the alleviation of pain, are extremely complex topics. There is little wonder it requires a year-long course of intense study and practice to earn certification as a fellow in pain medicine. There are, Dr. Lok says, two primary types of pain—nociceptive and neuropathic. Nociceptive pain is caused by the stimulation of pain receptors —nerves throughout the body whose only purpose is to warn you that you’re being hurt by something sharp or hot, or you’re being squeezed or twisted, or you’ve broken a bone. Neuropathic pain, on the other hand, mainly originates in the brain, spine or any part of the nervous system. Patients may feel the pain in the spinal cord itself or the pain may be radiated to other parts of the body. To complicate matters, in some cases like cancer, the pain sources are mixed. Some pain is described as burning, some as stabbing, some as achy and some as electric. Acute pain may last anywhere from a few seconds to an hour. Chronic pain lasts for three months or more in varying levels of intensity. And just as there are many types of pain with a variety of symptoms, there are as many, or more, ways to treat the pain, Dr. Lok says, and what works on one type of pain, won’t work on another. “My single goal is to improve my patient’s quality of life,” Dr. Lok says, “to get them back to what they like to do—whether it’s going back to work, or just

Spring 2011

l

www.sjhsyr.org


Is the End of Pain doing things they enjoy like playing a round of golf or picking up a grandchild—anything I can do to improve their functionality.” It’s a common misunderstanding, Dr. Lok says, that a pain specialist’s primary function is to solely prescribe narcotics. The fact is, he says, patients should expect to be treated with the most conservative drugs, first—like well-known anti-inflammatory drugs available over the counter in your local drugstore. These non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (aspirin is among them) reduce swelling and inflammation. Steroids also reduce swelling and inflammation to reduce pain, and both, Dr. Lok says, should be considered by a patient’s primary care physician before turning to more drastic treatments like narcotics or surgery. “One St. Joseph’s surgeon who had a patient referred to him for back surgery to reduce pain contacted me, along with the man’s family physician, and said this patient wasn’t really ready for surgery until some more conservative steps like physical therapy had been tried,” Dr. Lok recalls. “But the patient was in too much pain to endure the physical therapy. I treated him with non-narcotic medications along with carefully placed (using X-ray) steroid injections that allowed him to exercise. He was then able to strengthen his lower back enough through physical therapy that the muscles were able to support the compressed disc that was causing the original pain.” Dr. Lok says that patients can often use over-thecounter drugs for the short term to alleviate pain without resorting to narcotics or even surgery—even without seeing a pain specialist. But when the pain is extreme, complex, goes on for long periods, or is difficult to locate in the first place, pain medicine specialists have both the training and the experience to find the cause and then treat the pain, although not necessarily the cause of the pain, as in cancer patients. “In cancer patients, we sometimes cannot treat the cause of the pain, but we may be able to reduce or alleviate the pain being caused by the cancer,” Dr. Lok says. “With terminal patients we have techniques to improve their ability to function as they near the end of their lives without resorting to narcotics that essentially make them unconscious and unable to communicate with friends and loved ones.” It is possible, Dr. Lok says, to increase the efficiency of pain medicines and reduce their side effects by delivering them directly into the area around the spine. “In other cases, we can sometimes eliminate pain by injecting chemicals directly into specific nerves that destroy their ability to transmit ‘messages’ to the brain,” Dr. Lok says. Take the case of Eddie Thornton who was injured in a truck accident in 1998 that resulted in almost continuous pain in his lower back that radiated down his left hip and thigh.

www.sjhsyr.org

l

During a follow-up office visit, Jason Lok, MD, explains to his patient, Eddie Thornton, the location of the medial branch nerves responsible for his facet joint pain.

Thornton had tried medications and physical therapy, but his pain continued for years. When Dr. Lok met and diagnosed Thornton last summer, he discovered that two pairs of small joints in the lower spine called facet joints were inflamed and probably causing the pain. He convinced Thornton to try a treatment called a medial branch block in which the signals going from the inflamed joints to the brain would be interrupted when medications were injected into the area of the facet joints. “Before the treatment, when I was standing, sitting, twisting, bending—whatever—I would have sharp pains and spasms that immediately stopped me from doing what I was doing. It took my breath away—really got my attention! Compared to what I could do before, the improvement has been great. I’m able to do my physical therapy better, too.” The “stable” pain that Thornton felt he had to live with the rest of his life was corrected by a relatively simple treatment that Dr. Lok felt had been overlooked. The majority of Dr. Lok’s patients are not suffering from cancer or other life-threatening illnesses, but the pain they suffer can still be devastating. In some cases, as Dr. Lok says, the pain itself has become the disease. In many cases, along with the original physical pain, comes depression, disability, drug abuse, the loss of job and income, anger, and even possible suicide. “It doesn’t have to be this way,” Dr. Lok says. “Patients and their primary care physicians need to understand that relief from both acute and chronic pain, regardless of the cause, is possible. It may be complex, but it is no longer something we have to grit our teeth against and ‘struggle through.’” l

spring 2011

l

St. Joseph’s hospital Health Center

l

9

caring Connection   


A Higher Level of Care

Sports Medicine Isn’t Just for ‘Athletes’

T

here is no easy definition for the term “sports medicine.” It conjures many meanings and is prone to more than a few misconceptions. You don’t have to be a high-level athlete (or even an occasional jogger) to be treated by a physician who specializes in sports medicine. The fact is that many of the injuries associated with sports may also happen on the job or even working in the garden. Even most physicians who specialize in sports medicine tend to treat more injuries and illnesses that are not sports related. Many believe that all sports medicine physicians are orthopedists dealing only with injured joints, muscles and bones. But, says Seth Greenky, MD, medical director of St. Joseph’s ortho­pedic services, the fact is that only about 10 percent of sports-related injuries require the specialized skills of orthopedists like St. Joseph Hospital Health Center’s Glenn Axelrod, MD, Alfred Moretz, MD, Irving Raphael, MD, or L. Ryan Smart, MD. St. Joseph’s family medicine physicians like Michael Kernan, MD, Jennifer McCaul, MD, and James Tucker, MD, who serve as sports team physicians, treat by far a greater number of sports-related injuries and illnesses than their orthopedic counterparts. “Sports medicine is one spoke of St. Joseph’s orthopedic service line,” Dr. Greenky says. “The other spokes include fracture care, hand care, spine care and joint replacement. But it’s different in that it’s the only spoke that includes the surgical and medical (non-surgical) side of things.” One thing does appear to be common among those at St. Joseph’s who are involved in sports medicine: They seem to have a passion for it. Dr. Raphael, who has his own orthopedic practice, also serves as director of sports medicine and as team physician for Syracuse University. In 19 years with SU, he has missed only three football games. He works closely with Drs. Tucker, Kernan and McCaul who handle the non-orthopedic side of sports medicine for the university. Dr. Tucker, who started working with SU teams in 1987, says he spends between eight and 10 hours a day at St. Joseph’s and about eight to 10 hours a week with SU, and he never tires of it. Dr. Axelrod gained an interest in sports medicine when he was learning about arthroscopic surgery and saw the potential it offered for young people with sports-related injuries. Dr. Smart, who earned a fellowship in sports medicine before coming to Syracuse, started out on the other side when he was injured as a member of Cornell University’s hockey team. What could have been a professional hockey career when he was drafted, ended up as a career in sports medicine. This issue of the Caring Connection takes a look at the many facets of sports medicine. l

10   caring Connection

l

St. Joseph’s hospital Health Center

l

SPRING 2011

l

www.sjhsyr.org


Those Treating Student Athletes Stand Ready at the Sidelines Syracuse University head team physician Irving Raphael, MD, examines SU basketball center Arinze Onuaku at the Carmelo K. Anthony Basketball Center. Dr. Raphael’s practice focuses on athletes of all ages and levels of competition.

F

or someone who has missed only three Syracuse University football games in 19 years, whether at home or on the road, it seems odd when Irving Raphael, MD, says he doesn’t really enjoy the games all that much. You can see him along the sidelines pacing as much or more than the coach. He paces because he knows what can happen in a high-speed contact sport like football. He appreciates all the kinetic energy that is built up by solidly muscled players racing toward each other at full speed. He also understands the fragility of even well-conditioned players’ muscles, joints and bones when collisions happen and all that energy is released. So he paces, hoping he won’t be called into action. “My friends say they’ve never seen me enjoy a football game when I’m on the sidelines,” Dr. Raphael says. “That’s because I understand what can happen and I just don’t want anyone to get hurt. “I love for us to win, but I don’t worry about the score or celebrate until the game is over.” As director of sports medicine and head team physician for SU, Dr. Raphael, an orthopedic surgeon who also has a private practice, is responsible for making sure that all of the hundreds of student athletes competing for SU in 21 sports have the best chance of not being injured and the best medical or surgical care if they are. It’s far more complex than it sounds, and it’s a yearround job for Dr. Raphael and the team of other doctors and trainers who look after SU athletes. Even though the injuries to which serious athletes are subject are

www.sjhsyr.org

l

no different than what the rest of us may face, treating those injuries requires a different outlook, Dr. Raphael says, primarily because those athletes and the teams for which they play have different expectations than the general public. “You don’t treat elite athletes the same way you treat non-athletes,” Dr. Raphael says. “Their bodies do things that our bodies won’t do. Our job is to get them back to doing things at a much higher level than any of us function in our daily activities. “If you or I went out and got a pretty bad sprain, I’d send you to a physical therapist two or three times a week, ask to see you in a month and we’d probably have you running by then. If someone on the SU basket­ ball team had a similar sprain, they may work with trainers two or three times every day getting every opportunity to get better as quickly as possible. “Their job is to get better, and they expect that.” Dr. Raphael should know about the rigors of college sports. In his college days he earned a dozen varsity letters in basketball, tennis and sailing while earning his undergraduate degree in naval architecture and marine engineering at Webb Institute in 1967. He earned his MD from Yale University’s School of Medicine in 1971 and then served an orthopedic residency at Upstate Medical Center. Dr. Raphael admits to being “smitten” by the possibilities of arthroscopic surgery for his patients in the mid-1970s when the use of a lens to look inside a joint was in its infancy. “This was before the days of fiberoptics and miniaturized surgical instruments, so we could look inside a knee joint to see what the problem was, but

spring 2011

l

St. Joseph’s hospital Health Center

l

11

caring Connection   


A Higher Level of Care

there wasn’t much we could do about it. We’d take out the scope and then do traditional open surgery,” Dr. Raphael recalls. Arthroscopic surgery has advanced greatly since the mid-1970s and has become the core of Dr. Raphael’s practice—at least with college athletes in need of surgery. Hospital stays used to be required, but Dr. Raphael says he was the first orthopedist in Syracuse to operate on a patient using arthroscopy in an outpatient setting, so they didn’t have to stay overnight in the hospital. What was rare is now common. Dr. Raphael performed more than 350 surgeries (including arthroscopies) last year alone at St. Joseph’s, many of them on athletes. He was also among the first in Central New York to perform arthroscopic hip surgery on athletes.

“When you have to tell them they can’t play, you feel like the worst person on earth. There can be tears or they might slam something because they love their sport. They really love it and want to go ahead and play and you’re the one who’s telling them they can’t. They’ll beg, plead, promise to do anything, but we have to look at them and their illness objectively and treat them appropriately.” —jennifer mccaul, MD

While orthopedic surgery involving college and professional athletes is covered widely on the sports pages and national broadcasts, there is far more to modern sports medicine than orthopedic surgery, Dr. Raphael says. Years of experience getting to know each sport and the typical injuries they generate, he adds, is what separates a sports medicine specialist from a general orthopedist. “We have to view each athlete differently,” Dr. Raphael continues. “It’s not just knowing what sport they play, we also have to know what position they play and what their training schedule is like. Knowing all this tells me what the injury is likely to be. “For instance, the backstroke and butterfly are more likely to injure a swimmer’s shoulders. In volleyball, ‘spiking’ will cause hand and wrist injuries. Long distance runners are more prone to shin splints or stress fractures whereas sprinters more often suffer from tendonitis.

12   caring Connection

l

St. Joseph’s hospital Health Center

l

Throwing athletes show up with shoulder and elbow problems. That’s why there are national regulations on how many throws a little leaguer can make in a game.” The more Dr. Raphael talks about his long involvement in sports medicine, the more excited he gets. He charts the new treatments—new arrows in his quiver— that were unheard of 20 years ago, such as injections of an athlete’s own platelet rich plasma that triggers the release of the body’s growth factors that speed healing. A lacrosse or basketball player who tears the anterior cruciate ligament in her knee after making a sudden stop or sharp turn may shorten her healing time significantly. “Our job as sports medicine specialists is to make sure we deliver these athletes the best and latest treatments we can,” Dr. Raphael says, “and that means that this job—a passion, really—never becomes boring.” The same is true for the rest of the other physicians and trainers on the SU sports medicine team. That fact is, Dr. Raphael admits, the expertise of Drs. Michael Kernan, Jennifer McCaul and James Tucker is called upon more often than his in the case of medical, rather than strictly orthopedic, concerns. Dr. Tucker, who is residency director for St. Joseph’s family medicine program, as well as in a private practice that includes sports medicine patients, smiles when he recalls an anonymous quip made years ago describing sports medicine as “orthopedics in sweaty people.” “Whoever said that was wrong because obviously there are more medical concerns in any college sports program than there are strictly orthopedic concerns. In Division 1 college athletics, 70 to 90 percent of what physicians treat are medical rather than orthopedic problems.” Dr. Tucker started seeing sports medicine patients in 1979 and served as school physician for JamesvilleDeWitt and Bishop Grimes high schools, and as team physician for Onondaga Community College. He joined the Syracuse University medical team in 1986, operating weekly clinics for athletes who were sick or had other medical problems. He still smiles when he says, “Dr. Raphael lets us do most of the medical stuff and we certainly recognize his expertise in orthopedic matters.” Essentially all family physicians, Dr. Tucker says, handle their share of sports medicine cases. Virtually all are called on to handle pre-participation evaluation physicals on a high school kid who wants to play sports, someone in Pop Warner football who sprained their ankle, or a 60-year-old who has decided to run the Boston Marathon. But sports medicine at the SU level is far different. It can come close to being a full-time operation. At SU, there are five, two- to three-hour medical clinics each week that are covered by Drs. Tucker, Kernan and McCaul. Three orthopedic clinics occur on weekdays, in

Spring 2011

l

www.sjhsyr.org


St. Joseph’s family medicine physicians James Tucker, MD, Jennifer McCaul, MD, and Michael Kernan, MD, provide medical care to Syracuse University athletes at five medical clinics each week. Most of the care required by college athletes is the same as non-athletes— illnesses such as coughs, colds, fever, bruises and stomachaches.

addition to the weekend clinics. The time commitments are greater than that, however, since all contact sports have one physician on site for home games and football has two physicians for all home and away games. The SU trainers are full-time employees who cover other athletic events and know that the team doctors are on call at all times. They are also highly praised by the team physicians. In many ways, the conditions that the medical team physicians encounter from SU’s student athletes are essentially the same as any non-athlete student group of the same age—coughs and colds, fevers, diarrhea, stomachaches, urinary tract infections, cuts, bruises, a poke in the eye going up for a rebound, blisters, infectious mononucleosis, eating disorders…. The list keeps going and there can be significant differences. “A lot of kids get skin infections like folliculitis, but if a wrestler gets it and it can’t be completely covered, they can’t compete because it could be spread to their opponents,” says Dr. McCaul, the newest member of the SU team. “Because they’re stuck in a bus together, or in the locker room, the closeness of the team can predispose them to communicable illnesses like mononucleosis. “While ‘mono’ is fairly common, it can cause a patient’s spleen to swell and if the athlete were playing a contact sport and it were hit, it might rupture and that could be fatal. “When you have to tell them they can’t play, you feel like the worst person on earth. There can be tears or they might slam something because they love their sport. They really love it and want to go ahead and play and you’re the one who’s telling them they can’t. They’ll beg, plead, promise to do anything, but we have to look at them and their illness objectively and treat them appropriately.”

www.sjhsyr.org

l

Concussions are another hot topic in the sports world and it affects the college athlete—and St. Joseph’s sports medicine doctors, as well. “We have learned more about the biology and potential outcomes of concussions in the past five years that we did in the preceding 150 years,” Dr. Tucker says, “and that’s been good for us.” Adds Dr. Kernan, “With the National Football League paying more attention to it, and when the public sees people like Troy Aikman retiring because of it, it’s a lot easier to convince a parent that their child shouldn’t play in the next game.” One thing that isn’t often mentioned as part of the sports medicine realm is the diagnosis and treatment of emotional elements like depression among young student athletes. Dr. Tucker describes athletes who may come in complaining of headaches, not sleeping well, being tired, or saying that his coach made him come because he’s not the same anymore. It’s the sports medicine physicians who must root out the possibilities— have their grades fallen, did they just breakup with their girlfriend or boyfriend, are they overtraining—and then, following this emotional triage, suggest they might see a clinical psychologist within the university. “I have a tremendous amount of respect for student athletes,” Dr. Tucker says. “They have two full-time, demanding jobs. The crew team is out on the water at 5:30 in the morning. The field hockey team may be in the weight room at 6:00 in the morning, and yet these are students who are carrying a full academic load, and some are carrying full academic loads in majors that would scare the heck out of me. “It is physically and emotionally demanding, and that’s why we’re here.” l

spring 2011

l

St. Joseph’s hospital Health Center

l

13

caring Connection   


A Higher Level of Care

Physicians and Patients Are in It Together

S

Many sports medicinetype surgeries are performed on people who aren’t athletes, say orthopedic surgeons Glenn Axelrod, MD, (left) and Ryan Smart, MD. The body doesn’t know if it was injured playing a sport or just going about the activities of daily living. Drs. Axelrod and Smart are in an operating room at St. Joseph’s Northeast Surgery Center in Fayetteville, NY.

uppose you’re a 4.5 tennis player with a terrific serve and you’ve torn the rotator cuff in your serving shoulder. You’re not a level 7.0 touring pro, but still you love the game and can’t raise your racket hand more than a few inches. Do you need a doctor who specializes in sports medicine? You certainly do! Now suppose you’re a lifelong mason used to lifting 80-pound bags of concrete for a living and have torn your rotator cuff, too. Do you need a doctor who specializes in sports medicine even though your most strenuous pastime may be a few hands of cards? You bet! A person’s rotator cuff (or knee, or hip, or ankle or elbow) doesn’t know whether it was hurt on the job, playing amateur tennis or competing in the Olympics. The injury is the same, and it still hurts. Glenn Axelrod, MD, has been treating sports-type injuries for 28 years—almost before the term “sports medicine” was coined. Ryan Smart, MD, completed an intense, yearlong fellowship in sports medicine in 2010. Alfred Moretz, MD, an orthopedist who has been

14   caring Connection

l

St. Joseph’s hospital Health Center

l

practicing for nearly 30 years, sees sports medicine as a philosophy rather than strictly a specialty. All three St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center orthopedic surgeons agree that amateur and non-athletes shouldn’t be frightened away by the sports medicine title. “A lot of sports medicine-type surgeries are done for regular people who were not injured playing a sport,” Dr. Axelrod says. “The surgery I perform on a homemaker who has torn the meniscus in her knee by stooping and picking up something beside her on the kitchen floor may be the same surgery I’d give to an elite athlete who turned his knee when his foot was planted.” The difference, Dr. Axelrod says, is how the patient may be treated after the surgery. “You don’t want to be treated as an elite athlete if you aren’t an elite athlete,” Dr. Axelrod continues. “Most people don’t have the time, or money, to afford the kind of rehab an elite athlete requires. They are doing conditioning and physical therapy for hours a day under the auspices of a trained physical therapist and conditioner. “Professional and college athletes are different people. Ordinary people like you and me get back to what they consider to be a normal functional level for them, and not have the same postoperative treatment a professional would want. But we’re both happy and it’s been a successful surgery because the patient understands what they really wanted out of the whole thing.” It’s very important to remember, Dr. Axelrod says, that sports medicine treatments often demand a great deal of patient involvement for total success. “Patients must understand that they are not Peyton Manning or Serena Williams,” Dr. Axelrod says. “They must understand the postoperative plan and this is what they have to do to get the outcome that they want. I tell my patients, ‘We’re both in this together.’” Dr. Smart, who understands how his patients feel by having sustained three ice hockey injuries himself while working on his undergraduate degree at Cornell University, says most of his patients also are in their teens through their 60s, and otherwise healthy and pursuing active lifestyles. “Most sports medicine doctors will admit that most of their patients are regular people who are getting hurt just by living life or working on the job or at home,” Dr. Smart says. (See cover story on p. 16.) All three agree it’s a fact that there are relatively few elite college or professional athletes out there. The vast majority of athletes who play high school sports, even the best ones, are finished after high school because they recognize that the commitment to even collegelevel sports is excessive, and the chances of a professional career may be as remote as winning the lottery. But there are many “weekend warriors” who still need good care because they want to stay active as long as possible.

SPRING 2011

l

www.sjhsyr.org


Dr. Moretz, who practices in Utica but performs all of his arthroscopic knee and shoulder surgeries at St. Joseph’s North Surgery Center in Liverpool, NY, treats his patients as if they were athletes, even though they may not be. “Sports medicine is a philosophy to me rather than a specialty,” Dr. Moretz says. “I could have a badly sprained ankle myself, stay off of it for three or four weeks, undergo some physical therapy and be fine, but if you’re a high school football player who has only seven weeks in his season, time is very important. In those cases, our philosophy is to do everything we can to get them back to their original level of activity as quickly as we can as long as there is no increased risk of further injury.” That philosophy applies to non-athletes—such as a self-employed carpenter who is unable to work—as well as athletes. For these people, “no work, no pay” is a powerful incentive, so Dr. Moretz treats these patients like athletes, as well. The rest of us who may eventually need the care of a sports medicine doctor for whatever reason are fortunate to live at a time when the science is leapfrogging itself with one advancement after another. Drs. Axelrod and Moretz came to sports medicine at different times and through different pathways than Dr. Smart. When Dr. Axelrod and Dr. Moretz completed their residencies, arthroscopic surgery was

Surgeon Alfred Moretz, MD, performs arthroscopic surgery on a patient who tore his meniscus while playing high school soccer. He is looking toward a monitor that visualizes the knee.

www.sjhsyr.org

l

in its earliest stages and fellowships in sports medicine were not yet offered. The miniature instruments and closed-circuit television cameras the size of a soda straw had not been invented yet, but as they were, Dr. Axelrod and Dr. Moretz seized every opportunity to polish their operative skills with the new technology over the years. Dr. Smart, on the other hand, entered a one-year fellowship in sports medicine at the New England Baptist Hospital in Boston following his orthopedic internship and residency at the Yale New Haven Hospital in Connecticut. That consisted, he says, of practically a whole year doing little else besides arthroscopic surgery on all the body’s major joints, but primarily on the most often injured knees and shoulders. Part of that involved working with a sports team, in his case, the Boston Celtics and Harvard’s athletic teams. All three surgeons continue to be challenged by fastmoving changes to equipment and techniques. “The concepts and equipment we use in shoulder surgery today are totally different than they were only three years ago,” Dr. Moretz says, “so staying current is a real challenge.” But talk to any orthopedist and you’re liable to hear the same thing when you ask them how they like their jobs. They are virtually all happy, they say, because their patients have very definable problems with very specific solutions, and they get better quickly. The patients are also motivated to work with their physicians. At some point, they even have to be “reined in.” That, all three admit, is fun and very satisfying. l

spring 2011

l

St. Joseph’s hospital Health Center

l

Dr. Moretz reassures his patient prior to surgery to repair an injury to his right knee. In addition to his private practice, Dr. Moretz is a team physician at Utica College.

15

caring Connection   


A Higher Level of Care

Back to Playing the Pipes Specialist in Sports Medicine Was Just What the Doctor Ordered

H

ow do you connect sports medicine, an old 700-pound cast iron radiator and a beloved set of highland bagpipes? For Tom Parlato and Ryan Smart, MD, the fit was easy. First, comes the radiator that Parlato planned to make part of his home heating system. Parlato figures he now has one of the most expensive old cast iron radiators in existence, even though it started out as a 700-pound piece of scrap. The 47-year-old heavy equipment operation teacher at Madison-Oneida BOCES and his two teenaged sons had successfully moved the radiator down a flight of stairs and were trying to maneuver it onto a hand truck when Parlato felt something in his left arm give way. “I just felt something tear,” Parlato says as he recalls that late summer day last year. “There was some pain and immediate weakness. I knew something was

amiss, but I had a physical coming up in a few weeks, so I decided to ice it and take it easy.” As soon as she saw the arm two or three weeks later, Parlato’s family physician sent him straight to an orthopedic surgeon for diagnosis and possible treatment. Ryan Smart, MD, an orthopedic surgeon with Syracuse Orthopedic Specialists, specializes in sports medicine and diagnosed the injury as a badly torn distal biceps tendon—the tendon that connects the lower end of Parlato’s biceps muscle to the radius bone, the smaller bone in the lower arm. Without that connection, or with a badly compromised connection like Parlato’s, the arm’s major muscle has nothing to pull against and is nearly useless. Like the majority of Dr. Smart’s patients, Parlato was not an athlete, but the injuries are the same

Preparing to perform on his highland pipes, Tom Parlato rewraps his tuning pin to tighten up the pipe’s drone. Before surgery to repair a torn tendon in his arm, Parlato was unable to hold his pipes and told his surgeon, Ryan Smart, MD, before surgery that his biggest fear was that he would be unable to play. Part of the Syracuse Scottish Pipe Band, Parlato says the pipes are a passion of his.

16   caring Connection

l

St. Joseph’s hospital Health Center

l

Spring 2011

l

www.sjhsyr.org


whether earned on a football field, a tennis court or while moving an old radiator. They are, he says, “just ordinary active adults who are living life or getting hurt on the job. “Whether I’m operating on a college football player with a damaged knee, a high-level amateur tennis player with a torn rotator cuff, or a mason who earns his livelihood lifting heavy weights, it’s the same,” Dr. Smart says. Dr. Smart would learn that Parlato earned his bachelor’s degree from SUNY Oswego in industrial arts education, but when he graduated, there were few, if any new jobs in his field. With neither he nor his wife wanting to relocate from Upstate New York, Parlato fell back to an earlier talent—horseshoeing—to earn his living for nearly 20 years in Onondaga, Madison, Oneida, Cayuga and Tompkins counties. He missed teaching all along, he says, and would give presentations on various aspects of equine husbandry to pony clubs and 4-H groups. He earned a part-time job as a teacher’s assistant for BOCES, before becoming a fulltime faculty member three years ago. As Parlato likes to say, he spends his days teaching industrial equipment operation to 45 young men “who are just dying to push dirt around and burn diesel fuel.” While teaching is his full-time profession, he still shoes a few horses and harvests firewood from his property—neither of them easy tasks. As a result of his active lifestyle, the 6-foot-1-inch Parlato maintains broad shoulders and, as Dr. Smart describes, “massive forearms and biceps,” at least until he tried to move a 700-pound radiator. When Parlato held his arms out with his palms up for Dr. Smart, the difference was obvious with the biceps on his left arm sagging to one side like a loosely filled sausage casing. Dr. Smart told Parlato that some men his age or older with an inactive lifestyle might choose not to have surgery, but that with Parlato’s active lifestyle he’d definitely recommend it. Following Dr. Smart’s advice, Parlato scheduled his first surgery ever. It was then that the sports medicine doctor learned about another facet of Parlato’s active life—the highland bagpipes. He’s been playing the highland pipes for about 10 years and plays regularly with the Syracuse Scottish Pipe Band. He even plays in the BOCES parking lot occasionally during lunch—to the amusement of most. “I told Dr. Smart the day we scheduled the surgery that I didn’t want to put any more pressure on him than he already had as a surgeon, but I wanted him to understand that not being able to play the pipes was one of my biggest fears. “The horseshoeing I’m doing I am getting a little old for, so I’m going to have to give that up anyway. I don’t necessarily need my physical nature to teach. It’s more intellect and using my educational skills. But, if there were one thing I would miss it would be the piping.

www.sjhsyr.org

l

The pipes are a passion I picked up later in life. Playing serves as a catharsis for me.” So dedicated is Parlato to piping that he postponed his original surgery date, so he could play the pipes at a friend’s funeral. “I could still play, but it was uncomfortable, and whatever was wrong wasn’t getting right again just by laying off and letting it try to heal,” Parlato says. In fact, postponing his original visit to his primary care physician and “letting it heal” had made things worse in that the damaged tendon was forming scar tissue in places where it wasn’t wanted. Dr. Smart, with Parlato’s fears in mind, performed the surgery at St. Joseph’s Northeast Surgery Center in Fayetteville over 90 minutes. It sounds easy enough when Dr. Smart describes it: “You find the tendon still attached to the lower biceps and then put stitches in it. Meanwhile, a hole is drilled through the upper end of the radius bone and the tendon is passed through the hole to the back of the bone and attached to what we call ‘a button.’ The bone then grows around the button and the tendon is secured.”

“Whether I’m operating on a college football player with a damaged knee, a high-level amateur tennis player with a torn rotator cuff, or a mason who earns his livelihood lifting heavy weights, it’s the same.” —Ryan Smart, MD

The surgery started on a Friday at 11 a.m. and Parlato was in the postanesthesia care unit by 1 p.m. He was soon asking when he could go home and even when he could go back to work: “It’s just a little cut. I’ve been kicked worse than that by a horse!” Although he was expected to be away from BOCES for two weeks, he was back in the classroom on Monday, three days later—his arm in both a sling and a brace. It was swollen at the end of the day, but with several days of icing “the swelling began to subside and it didn’t look like my arm weighed 800 pounds anymore.” It was eight weeks, just before Christmas, that Parlato first tried playing the pipes. He used small “parlor pipes” to begin with, but soon graduated to the “great pipes” around which so much Scottish lore is woven. And how was it? “I couldn’t turn my wrist very well, but I just had to try it. The fingers still move and it’s happening,” says Parlato. “It’ll come, and I’ll be back on the street playing in no time.” l

spring 2011

l

St. Joseph’s hospital Health Center

l

17

caring Connection   


A Higher Level of Care

New Mother-Baby Unit Pampers Families

I

t’s amazing what can be done with a little love as opposed to a lot of money. Just ask the women (and their families) whose eyes light up in amazement when they first see St. Joseph Hospital Health Center’s new mother-baby unit. It may be a hospital, but the atmosphere in the mother-baby unit is like that of a small boutique hotel with private rooms, a comfortable couch that opens out to a bed for fathers or other family members, room service and an open kitchen. Said one visitor: “This is like the Taj Mahal.” St. Joseph’s new postpartum unit has attracted enough attention within the hospital that staff from other floors have been stopping by to see in person what they’ve heard so much about through the grapevine. Perhaps the area is attracting so much attention because the mothers who would be staying there and the nurses and doctors who would be working there essentially designed it. During the design phase, nurses contributed their ideas to architects about what would make the mother-baby unit a more welcoming place for mothers and their new infants and a better place in which to work for nurses and doctors.

St. Joseph’s Is a ‘Baby-Friendly’ Hospital

S

t. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center is designated a “Baby-Friendly” hospital by the World Health Organization through its Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative. It is the only Central New York hospital to receive this designation and one of only 105 in the country. New York state has just three other hospitals with the distinction. The Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) is a global program sponsored by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) to encourage and recognize hospitals and birthing centers that offer an optimal level of care for lactation. The BFHI assists hospitals in giving breastfeeding mothers the information, confidence and skills needed to successfully initiate and continue breastfeeding their babies and gives special recognition to hospitals that have done so. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, research shows that what happens in the hospital or birth center plays a crucial role in establishing breastfeeding and helping mothers to continue breastfeeding after leaving the birth facility. Through the BFHI, St. Joseph’s promotes, protects and supports breastfeeding, guided by the 10 steps outlined by UNICEF/WHO. These steps include everything from training both at the hospital and at home, to specific practices to help encourage mothers who want to breastfeed their infants. A full list of the steps may be found at www.babyfriendlyusa.org. St. Joseph’s lactation (breastfeeding) consultants visit with mothers while they are in the hospital, and are available to assist moms whenever needed. Each breastfeeding mom receives a phone call after she goes home and is also encouraged to feel free to call anytime—24 hours a day—if she has questions. If additional help is needed, breastfeeding moms may come back to St. Joseph’s breastfeeding center at no charge after leaving the hospital. l

18   caring Connection

l

St. Joseph’s hospital Health Center

l

“The nurses knew what they wanted and we talked to mothers for their ideas,” Lynne Ponto, RN, nurse manager, says. “This is a place built for women, and some of the concepts were different, so it took awhile to get these ideas across to the designers, most of whom were male; but, when they understood what we wanted and why, they were very enthusiastic.” The men even admitted they liked the color selected for the walls—peach instead of hospital green or linen white. The previous unit, built in exactly the same space, had 26 beds in 14 rooms so only two rooms were private. Today, each of the 20 rooms in the area is private. Walk into the room and there’s a genuine feeling of tranquility not likely to be experienced in most double rooms in which the mothers and babies are not necessarily on the same schedules. “I really felt loved and cared for,” says one mother who had delivered in both the former and the new unit. The rooms are, to a degree, customizable, as well. Beds and cribs can be arranged according to the mother’s wishes. And each room also has its own 32-inch digital television and DVD player if mom craves some diversion. There is a hanging wardrobe closet, and private bathrooms with showers that are larger than most. Instead of rolling a computer into each room on a cart, each room now has its own laptop to keep patient records up to date, and a wireless scanner system that reads barcodes on the mother’s and infant’s wristbands to make sure the right medicines are being administered to the right patient at the right time. The rooms are designed for mothers and their families, but a great deal of thought was given to work areas, as well. Instead of one central nursing station far away from some rooms, the mother-baby unit now has smaller pods located near the rooms. Each pod has its own printer, fax machine and copier. Physicians have their own dictation rooms for privacy. Old-fashioned “white boards” that listed the names of each patient have become electronic—again for privacy. Thought was even given to electrical outlets. Instead of being on the floor and requiring a lot of unnecessary back bending, they now are located at waist level. And, there is room service. Patients can order their own meals from a menu that offers an assortment of food anytime between the hours of 6:45 a.m. and 6 p.m. There also is a 24-hour kitchen on the floor stocked with sandwiches, snacks and beverages for patients. Richard Waldman, MD, chair of St. Joseph’s obstetrics and gynecology department, said the staff was tight-fisted when it came to controlling costs. “We proved that we could come up with something different and something better for the patients without spending a lot of money,” Dr. Waldman says. “You really can say it’s been done with love, not money,” echoes Ponto. l

Spring 2011

l

www.sjhsyr.org


St. Joseph’s new motherbaby unit features all private patient rooms with individual showers, a pull-out couch for fathers and other family members, 32-inch digital televisions, and medical supplies that are kept out of sight. Mothers may order their own meals anytime between the hours of 6:45 a.m. and 6 p.m., and a kitchen on the unit is stocked 24 hours a day with sandwiches, snacks and beverages. Mother-baby nurse Gladys Cornish, RN, delivers flowers to a mom and her newborn son.

And There’s More…

W

ith a philosophy that centers on family-centered care, a renovated mother-baby unit is just one of the many ways St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center cares for its new families. St. Joseph’s also features:

l St. Joseph’s state-of-the-art intensive care nursery (ICN) for

l Labor/delivery/recovery (LDR) rooms where mothers stay in one self-sufficient room throughout the entire birth process. The LDR unit includes a whirlpool tub, two operative delivery rooms for cesarean births, and a nine-bed triage room for testing during pregnancy and evaluation of labor. A full bathroom with a shower is shared by each pair of LDRs. After delivery, mother and baby are taken to the nearby mother-baby unit. One nurse cares for both, and 24-hour rooming in with baby is encouraged to promote bonding. Breastfeeding consultants are available seven days a week.

l Syracuse’s only Birth Place where low-risk mothers deliver

babies who need special care. Equipped and staffed 24 hours a day to provide newborn critical care, about 350 newborns from 16 counties receive care each year in St. Joseph’s level III, non-regional ICN. The ICN is fully staffed with registered nurses, neonatal nurse practitioners and board-certified neonatologists trained in the care of infants born prematurely and/or with special needs.

l Many classes to prepare families before the arrival of baby and to provide support after families go home. Classes include: fit and healthy pregnancy, breastfeeding, labor preparation, newborn care, sibling class, and stay in touch for breastfeeding moms who return to work outside the home. For more information about St. Joseph’s family-centered care, visit www.sjhsyr.org or call 315-448-5515. l

in a homelike setting with minimal medical intervention. Mothers and babies typically go home 24 to 36 hours after birth, and they receive a home visit from a Birth Place nurse within 48 hours of discharge. Moms labor and give birth in a queen-size bed in one of three “bedrooms,” where families bond throughout their stay. Kitchen facilities and a lounge are available for families. While in labor, moms may take a warm bath in a whirlpool tub or shower in a private bathroom. Mothers are free to wear their own clothes and eat and drink as they please. Friends and families, including baby’s siblings and grandparents, are welcome. Mom’s support person may spend the night with her and baby, and every room is equipped with a television, VCR and DVD. A room service menu is available from 6:45 a.m. to 6 p.m., and there is a fully stocked kitchen available at other times.

www.sjhsyr.org

l

SPRING 2011

l

St. Joseph’s hospital Health Center

l

19

caring Connection   


A Higher Level of Care

Your Valve’s in the Right Place

H

ow could anyone say that hearing you need to have the valve in your heart repaired is good news? To Robert Brewster, a librarian from Scarsdale, NY, it was. Valve replacement started in the 1960s, but it is still serious surgery that carries significant risk. The good news, however, is that cardiac surgeons today have so many options at their command that they can provide almost “tailor-made” repairs or replacements for a widening group of patients. The numbers, at least at St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center, confirm the increasing possibilities of surgery for cardiac valve disease, according to Mehdi Marvasti, MD, a St. Joseph’s cardiac surgeon with years of experience performing both coronary artery bypass surgery and cardiac valve repairs and replacements. “The numbers are interesting,” Dr. Marvasti says in his slow, measured voice. “In the year 2000, we did 1,081 heart procedures at St. Joseph’s and 665 of those—61 percent—were coronary artery bypass grafts. In 2010, we did essentially the same number of surgeries, but only 50 percent of them were coronary artery bypass grafts. “Some of that is due to more angioplasty and stenting, but what has happened is that we are seeing and treating more patients at an advanced age with significant aortic or mitral valve disease.”

Running several times a week and lifting weights, school librarian Robert Brewster didn’t know he had a leaky mitral valve until his primary care physician detected a murmur and referred him to a St. Joseph’s cardiologist. Brewster later had surgery to repair the valve before his condition worsened.

20   caring Connection

l

St. Joseph’s hospital Health Center

l

The options are many, both Dr. Marvasti and cardiac surgeon G. Randall Green, MD, agree. Mechanical valves are usually used in young patients. The drawback to replacement of the patient’s own mitral or aortic valve with a mechanical valve was, and still is, the requirement that patients take anticoagulants—blood “thinners”—like warfarin for the rest of their lives to prevent blood clots. “We’ve tended away from mechanical valves,” Dr. Green says, “using bioprosthetic valves made from pig or cow tissue almost exclusively. Repair is better than replacement theoretically because it preserves heart function. That said, a mitral valve replacement performed in a certain way will also retain optimal heart function, although it’s more technically challenging. “There was a period of time when our hubris got in the way. We wanted to feel we were capable and creative enough to repair every valve, but that’s not appropriate for everybody. Sometimes in a 65- or 70-year-old patient who has a particular pathology, it might be better, faster and easier—and perhaps even more durable—to just replace the valve.” St. Joseph’s cardiac surgeons also have the ability to perform “minimally invasive” valve replacements, but, again, it’s an individual matter for each patient. Dr. Marvasti does both whenever one is called for over the other, but takes a long hard look before proceeding with the minimally invasive technique. It is, he said, a misnomer in that there is no such thing as a minimally invasive heart surgery. Dr. Marvasti thinks the proper term should be “smaller incision surgery.” “Any heart surgery is invasive when you can still have serious complications like death or stroke,” Dr. Marvasti says. “You can still have those complications with minimally invasive techniques, but there are some advantages.” Drs. Marvasti and Green both say that performing the surgery through a smaller incision has less risk of infection, less risk of bleeding, and perhaps a shorter stay in the hospital. A younger patient still in the workforce also may be able to return to work and resume normal activity sooner. “The most important thing that patients and physicians have to realize when it comes to heart surgery is to fix the heart the best way you can,” Dr. Marvasti says forcefully. “It has to be the right technique, and you should not hesitate to tell the patient that a minimally invasive approach is not good in her or his situation.” In the case of Robert Brewster, a minimally invasive approach by Dr. Marvasti worked very well. Brewster, who was 40 at the time of his surgery in 2009, lifted weights and was an active runner for years, averaging seven or eight miles three times a week. He didn’t know he had a valve problem until his primary care physician heard a telltale murmur during a routine physical.

Spring 2011

l

www.sjhsyr.org


Robert Brewster’s cardiac surgeon, Mehdi Marvasti, MD, (left) speaks will fellow cardiac surgeon Randall Green, MD, in St. Joseph’s main operating room.

Brewster and his physician followed the mitral valve anomaly as it worsened over the course of a few years until Brewster’s physician referred him to a cardiologist in Syracuse. Following a transesophageal echocardiogram or TEE that confirmed the mitral valve disease in April, Dr. Marvasti repaired Brewster’s mitral valve in July using minimally invasive surgery. Instead of approaching Brewster’s heart through a larger incision in the center of his chest, Dr. Marvasti used a smaller incision between two ribs in the right side of his chest without sawing through any bones. “I was in some pain after the surgery until they removed a drain on the second day, but after that I felt like a new person.” Brewster says. “The surgery was on Monday and I went home on Friday. If my doctor hadn’t been watching my heart and referred me when he did, the valve would have worsened and might have changed the shape and structure of my heart. As it is, I’m back to running and lifting weights.” As an example of how often minimally invasive techniques are employed at St. Joseph’s, of all the heart surgeries performed in 2010, 127 used minimally invasive techniques and 81 of those were valve repairs or replacements; 46 of them were coronary artery bypass grafts. Regardless of what heart surgeons like Dr. Green and Dr. Marvasti believe, they’ll find once the surgery has begun, they are always prepared for, and capable of, changing course. Valve replacements typically take two to three hours, but, Dr. Green says, he and Dr. Marvasti spend another two or three hours outside the operating room before the surgery starts looking at studies and reviewing the patient’s overall condition. The final check is often a TEE, in which a probe is maneuvered to a spot in the patient’s esophagus directly behind the heart. Sending out sound waves, the TEE helps the surgeon gauge the size and shape of the heart, blood flow patterns and, most importantly, the condition of the heart’s four valves.

www.sjhsyr.org

l

“The TEE helps us make a whole lot of educated guesses,” Dr. Green says, “about what we’ll find once we’re inside the heart. We can see in real time where and how the valves close and what the valves’ leaflets look like. It’s more confirmation than anything.” Even with reams of information beforehand, the situation can still change once the surgeon is actually looking at the stilled heart and its valves in person. That’s why Dr. Green and Dr. Marvasti are prepared for anything as the surgery begins. “I never want to get into the position of putting a square peg in a round hole,” Dr. Green quips. “I may have planned on repairing the valve, but if I discover a whole lot of calcium on the mitral valve that I didn’t see during the echo, I may think twice about repairing it. I may just say, ‘This patient is 70 years old, I’ll just decalcify the area and put in a replacement bioprosthetic valve,’ because at the end of the day what the patient really wants is a valve that doesn’t leak and that opens and closes properly. They don’t really care whether it was a repair or replacement. They just want to feel better.” Just as treatment for valve disease has changed in the last 50 years, the technology continues to advance, Dr. Green says. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is currently evaluating a new procedure in which a patient’s aortic valve could be replaced during a catheter-based operation in which only a tiny incision would be required and the heart would not have to be stopped, as it is now, to thread the new valve into position. St. Joseph’s, Dr. Green says, is preparing for the new technique by creating a hybrid operating room in which both robotic surgery and fluoroscopy (moving X-rays) could be combined in the same space. Such foresight, Dr. Green says, is one of the reasons that St. Joseph’s is one of top cardiac valve replacement centers in the United States. That’s good news. l

spring 2011

l

St. Joseph’s hospital Health Center

l

21

caring Connection   


A Higher Level of Care

Our

Foundation Report Dear Friend of St. Joseph’s, “The future is not something we enter. The future is something we create.” —Leonard I. Sweet, theologian, author, scholar

A

973 James St., Suite 250 Syracuse, NY 13203 Phone: 315-703-2137 Fax: 315-703-2139 Email: Foundation@sjhsyr.org Donate Online: www.sjhsyr.org/foundation

s we pass from the end of a successful year and into the promise of a brilliant new one, let me begin by extending a warm welcome to Kathryn Ruscitto as she begins her tenure as president and chief executive officer of St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center. Because the past and present influence the future, last December was a month of celebration. As an organization, we applauded Margaret Martin the 36 years of dedication and outstanding leadership provided to St. Joseph’s by Theodore Pasinski, who retired as the hospital’s president and CEO at the end of 2010. While it goes without saying that we will miss Ted immensely, Kathryn’s vision and strategic leadership will continue the path set forth for St. Joseph’s during her predecessor’s time in office. St. Joseph’s will continue to invest in the Central New York community and its residents. Progress will continue on the hospital’s facility expansion and renovation. This project is not only one of the largest green health care construction projects in New York state, but also one that will help revitalize Syracuse’s North Side neighborhood as well as generate 600 long-term construction jobs and 200 permanent health care positions. St. Joseph’s many donors help to build the foundation of that future through their generous contributions. The generosity they extend to the hospital is passed on to the patients we are proud to care for through St. Joseph’s many programs and services. In 2010 alone, donors to St. Joseph’s capital campaign—Generations of Compassion F  Healing F Innovation—contributed more than $3 million toward the hospital’s facility expansion, including a recent $272,500 gift from M&T Bank to name the hospital’s new North Garden. As of March 2011, the Generations Capital Campaign has raised more than $6.7 million and it currently has another $10 million out in requests for support. Moreover, nearly $1.6 million in revenue was raised by St. Joseph’s Hospital Foundation in 2010 through its various fund-raising programs, including a $50,000 award from St. Agatha’s Foundation to increase access to St. Joseph’s breast cancer services. Contributing to the fundraising successes of 2010 were the annual gala and golf tournament which, thanks to the community’s generosity, netted nearly $530,000 in revenue with proceeds from both events supporting St. Joseph’s nationally recognized programs and services.  Because their gifts help to make quality care possible, we would like to recognize our 2010 donors on pages 27 through 37 in this issue of the Caring Connection. It is my honor to extend my own most sincere thanks to these individuals, foundations and corporations as we move into a bright future filled with optimism for the residents of our community. As poet Elizabeth Barrett Browning so aptly stated, let us “light tomorrow with today!” Sincerely,

Margaret Martin Vice President

22   caring Connection

l

St. Joseph’s hospital Health Center

l

Spring 2011

l

www.sjhsyr.org


Helping to fund the largest expansion in St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center’s history is the Generations of Compassion F Healing F Innovation Capital Campaign. At an estimated cost of $220 million, the project includes a new emergency services building with new, larger medical and psychiatric emergency departments as well as an observation/chest pain unit, data center and kitchen. The second stage will include a new surgical suite, a patient tower with private rooms and new intensive care units, as well as a greenway corridor to North Side businesses. There are many opportunities for giving at any level, and all gifts are truly appreciated. This issue of Caring Connection profiles recent gifts from a few of our generous contributors. For more information about how you can join

Because access to natural light has been shown to have a positive influence on the body’s physiological comfort and psychological well-being, leading to shorter hospital stays for patients and greater productivity for staff, St. Joseph’s new emergency department has been designed with skylights. The skylights will let in natural light, brightening the healing atmosphere and creating a sense of spaciousness for patients, families and staff. 

St. Joseph’s in enriching health care in our community, please visit www.generationscampaign.org.

M&T Bank Commits $272,500 to Generations Campaign

F

or M&T Bank Regional President Allen Garden area of St. Joseph’s facility expansion—a Naples, the bank’s donation of more $272,500 gift. It was not a decision made lightly; than a quarter of a million dollars in supall of M&T’s contributions greater than $20,000 port of St. Joseph’s facility master plan must go to M&T Chairman and CEO Robert was equal parts charitable intent and rigorous Wilmers and President Mark Czarnecki for final business decision. approval. “St. Joseph’s is an outstanding hospital that The size of M&T’s donation is a deeply provides tremendous services, so certainly a charappreciated affirmation of St. Joseph’s own straitable commitment is appropriate,” Naples says. tegic direction. “The value St. Joseph’s delivers in “At M&T, however, we evaluate these decisions health care is first rate,” Naples says. “In addition, based on outcomes: we carefully assess the value decision-making from the hospital’s management of the organization to the larger community.” is very systematic and well-structured, which preIn that regard, M&T does a lot of detailed serves the organization’s financial integrity. study and a lot of charitable giving. One of the “Beyond that, St. Joseph’s reinvests in the country’s 20th largest banks, it donates more than community—what CEO Kathryn Ruscitto and the $15 million a year throughout its 15 regions to leadership team have done to revitalize neighborbenefit 2,900 not-for-profit organizations. M&T hood housing and commercial development is M&T has donated $272,500 to name employees log 333,000 hours of volunteer work spectacular.” the North Garden area of St. Joseph’s annually, and the company requires its officers to Hospital Health Center’s expansion. Naples has significant insights into the hospibe involved on community boards and with other Allen Naples is M&T regional presital’s management and direction, as M&T and dent, Central New York. charitable endeavors. St. Joseph’s have enjoyed a successful business “Fundamentally, we believe if our communirelationship stretching back more than 50 years ties are not strong and vital, our business and our to the days of one of M&T’s earlier acquisitions, employees will not be strong and vital,” Naples says. “In Central Merchants Bank, which was founded in 1850 in Syracuse, a city New York alone, we donate more than $1 million annually and incorporated just two years prior. support about 200 different organizations.” A 39-year veteran of the banking industry, the last six with To enable those decisions, Naples chairs the bank’s local comM&T, Naples is enthusiastic about his organization’s decision to munity relations committee, coordinating closely with Alissa Viti, support St. Joseph’s Generations Campaign. “We have studied and vice president of charitable and community relations. The bank’s believe in the mission of the hospital and the value it delivers to the and the committee’s strategic shift from organizational sponsorships community,” he notes. “What the hospital is doing matches up with to community outcomes drove the decision to name the North our own philosophy.” l

www.sjhsyr.org

l

spring 2011

l

St. Joseph’s hospital Health Center

l

23

caring Connection   


A Higher Level of Care

IBEW/NECA Members Give Back to the Community

A

s construction proceeds on Phase II of St. Joseph’s facility master plan, members of IBEW (International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers) Local 43 and the NECA (National Electrical Contractors Association) Finger Lakes Chapter are devoting their skills and hard work to make sure the largest construction project in the hospital’s history is of the highest quality. And they’re devoting something above and beyond that—$75,000 to the Generations Campaign in support of the project. As a result, St. Joseph’s new elevator lobby will be named in appreciation of IBEW/NECA.

Inside the construction site at St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center are (from left to right) IBEW/NECA employees Todd Naramore, Mike Freund, John Tacklyn, Marilyn Oppedisano, Jacob Kelly (behind Oppedisano), Robert Prince, Don Morgan, Jeremy Hildreth and Paul Skeval.

24   caring Connection

l

St. Joseph’s hospital Health Center

l

“This project is good for this community, and our members support it,” says Don Morgan, business manager for IBEW Local 43. “We really believe in giving back.” Marilyn Oppedisano, executive manager for NECA’s Finger Lakes Chapter, reinforces that commitment. “Together, IBEW/NECA does so much in the community to improve the quality of life where our members live and work,” she says. “We have a long history of charitable support, and it keeps growing.” IBEW, established 114 years ago, represents approximately 1,200 electrical workers locally, and NECA, founded 110 years ago, represents more than 50 contracting firms in the area. Working together, they sponsor the Central New York Joint Apprenticeship and Training Committee to provide skills training in energy efficient technologies, such as solar photovoltaic systems and other green innovations, which are intrinsic to St. Joseph’s plans. Each has a long relationship with the hospital, and bases its charitable donations on hours worked. “Our revenues are based on hours worked, and our monies to charities derive from that,” Morgan says. “The more we’re able to put our members to work, the more we are enabled to support worthy charitable initiatives, and we believe strongly in what St. Joseph’s is doing throughout Central New York.” St. Joseph’s is privileged to join a number of other health and human service organizations that benefit from IBEW/NECA’s community focus, including their Red Hat Sponsorship of the American Heart Association, the United Way of Central New York, the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure, Hospice of Central New York, Newspapers in Education and Habitat for Humanity. When visitors to St. Joseph’s walk through the new lobby to ride in the elevators, they can feel good knowing that IBEW/NECA made them work…in more ways than one. l

Spring 2011

l

www.sjhsyr.org


Brown & Brown Empire State Names North Café Landing

A

n organization founded on Syracuse’s North Side many decades ago thrives there still, with a family atmosphere and a long legacy of community service. This description applies not only to St. Joseph’s —it also fits Brown & Brown Empire State, a long-time business partner and supporter of the hospital. Indeed, while the insurance broker and the hospital obviously provide different services, their histories have remarkable similarities and the relationship between them has been mutually supportive for nearly 45 years. Recently, Brown & Brown Empire State added to this shared history with a $50,000 gift to the Generations Capital Campaign to name the North Café Landing in the hospital’s expansion. Brown & Brown Empire State President Nick Dereszynski says that the company’s unique position is that of a long-term, community-based business that is successfully transitioning to a business with an everexpanding reach. Based in Daytona Beach, Florida, Brown & Brown (NYSE Symbol: BRO) is a billion-dollar organization, with operations in 38 states, that looks, acts and feels like a hometown business. Seeking qualified and successful insurance brokerages across the country, Brown & Brown has grown rapidly both organically and through acquisition. In Central New York, they have written a model success story through the 2001 acquisition of the Young Agency, founded in 1905 in a building on North Salina Street by George Young. His grandson George Schunck, now senior vice president for Brown & Brown Empire State, made the strategic decision with his five shareholders to become part of Brown & Brown to form the current organization, which combines the hometown knowledge and experience of the Young Agency with the greater resources and decentralized operating philosophy of Brown & Brown. “Family, tradition and service to the community are the values that built this company,” says Dereszynski. “The future is about maintaining those core values while providing additional benefit to our customers.” An 18-year veteran of Brown & Brown, Dereszynski became president of

www.sjhsyr.org

the brokerage responsible for the Eastern half of Upstate New York in 2005. He and Kevin Delaney, vice president of Brown & Brown Empire State’s commercial lines, are the organization’s primary consultants to St. Joseph’s. Recently, Brown & Brown Empire State hosted a “Spotlight on Success” luncheon for the hospital’s executive team, expressing appreciation for the relationship, and unveiling a lobby showcase featuring St. Joseph’s facility master plan and key service lines. “It’s truly been a privilege to work with St. Joseph’s,” Dereszynski says. “We have learned from their leadership, and certainly wish to support all the good they do in our community.” As both Brown & Brown Empire State and St. Joseph’s continue their successful growth into a new century, Schunck recalls an unusual encounter in 1966 that eventually entwined their histories. “My phone rang on a Monday, and it was the head of the hospital, Sister Patricia Ann Mulherin,” he says. “She asked—well, really, she told— me to be at her office at 2:00 the next afternoon. So I met her there, and found her sitting behind a small kneehole desk that was bare except for a large stack of insurance policies and a calculator on it. “She said, ‘I want you to examine all our coverage and figure out how we can do it better through your firm,’ which I did, and the relationship has strengthened and grown ever since,” Schunck continues. “She had done her homework about our firm and moved decisively—she was a very gentle lady, but she knew her business and she let you know she knew her business. “I admired her so much, as I do her successors, Jim Abbott, Bill Watt, Ted Pasinski and Kathryn Ruscitto; working with them has meant a lot to me and my own development.” From an out-of-the-blue phone call to a local insurance broker more than four decades ago to a much more complex strategic partnership in the 21st century, Brown & Brown Empire State and St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center continue to share an ethic of commitment to the community. Thanks to Brown & Brown’s generous gift to the Generations Campaign, future generations of patients will experience the benefits of that shared commitment. l

l

spring 2011

l

Brown & Brown Empire State has made a $50,000 gift to name the North Café Landing, part of St. Joseph’s expansion. Nick Dereszynski is president of Brown & Brown Empire State.

St. Joseph’s hospital Health Center

l

25

caring Connection   


A Higher Level of Care

Sisters of St. Francis Honor Ted Pasinski Through Naming Gift

A

mong the tributes and honors presented to former St. Joseph’s President and Chief Executive Officer Ted Pasinski upon his retirement was a particularly meaningful gift: a room. The Sisters of St. Francis of the Neumann Communities, founders and sponsors of the hospital, have made a $25,000 naming gift to the Generations Capital Campaign, establishing the Theodore M. Pasinski Family Consultation Room to be built in the new section of the hospital. According to Sister Patricia Burkard, general minister, the room will serve as a permanent reminder of Ted’s exemplary service in carrying out the mission of the Sisters of St. Francis and St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center. “We thought it fitting that this naming gift would be for a family consultation room,” Sister Patricia says. “Ted is such a caring family man, and has been so devoted to the Sisters’ mission of helping families in times of sickness and need.” The room will be used for private meetings among hospital staff and patients’ families, providing an extra measure of welcome and comfort. Sister Patricia became head of the Sisters of St. Francis of the Neumann Communities in 2004 and was chair of the hospital’s Board of Trustees in 2009 and part of 2010. She noted that Ted helped her get acclimated to her new duties, showing great interest in the vision and direction of the Franciscan Community. “It was a mutually helpful experience,” she says. “I learned about the hospital’s operations, while Ted kept the Order informed on hospital strategy and direction.” Sister Patricia said that Ted helped the religious community as the hospital’s sponsors recognize the major shifts that were to come in health care, and led them to necessary changes so the Order and hospital would not, as she put it, “miss the future.” His vision was enabled by a constancy of purpose and fidelity to the mission of the Sisters and St. Joseph’s. “Ted is very attuned to the mission, and he’s genial and compassionate, but he also has a great sense of the business we’re in,” Sister Patricia says. “He and the board took on the big challenges of modernization in

26   caring Connection

l

St. Joseph’s hospital Health Center

l

Sister Patricia Burkard presents St. Joseph’s former President Ted Pasinski with a plaque that will be displayed in the room named in his honor. It includes the words of the Greek philosopher Pericles: “What you leave behind is not what is engraved in stone monuments, but what is woven into the lives of others.”

a changing health care environment.” Ted, she emphasizes, didn’t shrink from considerable challenges, and understood deeply how the whole organization must continue to serve in the future. “Ted is a genuinely good person—what you see is what you get,” Sister Patricia observes. “His nonanxious presence and unswerving loyalty to duty have enabled St. Joseph’s to address today’s challenges and position the organization for the years ahead.” Future visitors to the room named for him will appreciate the services made possible by Ted Pasinski’s, and the Sisters’, leadership. l

Spring 2011

l

www.sjhsyr.org


Donor Listing In 2010, donors to St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center Foundation contributed generously to help physicians and nurses make a difference in our community. Listed are cash donations received between Jan. 1 and Dec. 31, 2010. We are truly grateful for your support of St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center.

$300,000 and up Auxiliary of St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center, Inc. Josephine Eagan Trust – Bequest $40,000–$299,000 Anesthesia Group, P.C. CNY Infusion Services, LLC Mr. Timothy Conan Franciscan Companies Ms. Frances A. Gibbons Dr. and Mrs. Anthony LaTessa M&T Bank Estate of John T. McKee Kopp Billing Agency, Inc. and The O’Connor Family The Saint Agatha Foundation Inc. St. Joseph’s Imaging Associates Syracuse Orthopedic Specialists, P.C. Estate of Clara S. Towell Vascular Surgeons of CNY, PLLC $8,000–$39,999 Mr. and Mrs. James H. Abbott Associates for Women’s Medicine, PLLC Atlas Health Care Linen Services The Bank of America Charitable Foundation, Inc. Byrne Dairy, Inc. Keith and Pat Civil Coca Cola Bottling Co., Inc. of Syracuse Costello, Cooney & Fearon, PLLC Mrs. Therese M. DeFuria The Dorothy and Marshall M. Reisman Foundation Excellus BlueCross BlueShield, Central New York Region Fidelis Care New York Flora Bernice Smith Foundation Fust Charles Chambers LLP The Hayner Hoyt Corp Estate of Myron Hrynczuk Hueber-Breuer Construction Co., Inc. IBEW Local 43 King & King Architects, LLP Kinney Drugs, Inc. Estate of Jayne Krawczyk Laboratory Alliance of Central New York, LLC A. John Merola, MD Mr. and Mrs. John J. Murphy III The Pike Company RBC Wealth Management Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Romano S.J. Thomas Company, Inc. Sack & Associates Sisters of St. Francis of the Neumann Communities SJH Cardiology Associates Mr. E. Carlyle Smith

St. Joseph’s Medical Staff St. Joseph’s Pathology, P.C. Susan G. Komen for the Cure Sysco Syracuse, LLC United Way of Central New York Upstate Surgical Group, P.C. Young & Franklin Inc. $5,000–$7,999 Alesco Advisors LLC Anonymous Auer Family Foundation Beacon Federal Benefit Consulting Group, LLC Bristol-Myers Squibb Company Brown & Brown Empire State Burns Bros Contractors Dr. and Mrs. Ronald Caputo Cardiovascular Group of Syracuse Carrier Corporation CNY Family Care, LLP Diversified Therapy William A. Graber MD, PC Green & Seifter, Attorneys, PLLC Hancock & Estabrook, LLP Harris Beach LLP Heart Care Center, P.C. Hess Corporation ING Financial Advisers, LLC/ING Funds Johnston Paper Mohawk Hospital Equipment, Inc. Murphy & Nolan, Inc. North Medical Family Physicians P. Drescher Co. Inc. Dr. and Mrs. Nicholas Ricciardi Dr. and Mrs. Lawrence Semel Siemens Building Technologies, Inc. St. Joseph’s Medical Education Dept. Syracuse Research Corporation Syracuse Time & Alarm Co., Inc. $2,500–$4,999 Allscripts Amerinet Associated Gastroenterologists of CNY, P.C. Bailey, Haskell & LaLonde Insurance Services The Barter Group Bivens & Associates Architects, PLLC Bond, Schoeneck & King, PLLC Mr. and Mrs. Rick Brown Carestream Health, Inc. Carrier Commercial Service CBD Builders, LLC Cygnus Management Foundation Inc. Mr. Anthony W. D’Angelo George S. and Mikell G. Deptula Edwards LifeSciences First Niagara Bank Dr. and Mrs. Alan B. Foster Ms. Marylin Galimi

www.sjhsyr.org

l

Gastroenterology & Hepatology of Central New York, P.C. Dr. Pam Horst and Dr. Tom Dennison Ikon Office Solutions, Inc. Dr. and Mrs. Randy J. Kalish Kopp Billing Agency Inc. Le Moyne College – Arts & Sciences Loretto Magnetic Diagnostic Resources of Central NY Marsh USA Inc. Dr. Laura Martin Margaret and Donald Martin MDI Medtronic Spinal and Biologics National Grid NEC Unified Solutions New England Financial Otis Elevator Company Ted and Diane Pasinski Pinckney Hugo Group Postler & Jaeckle Corp. Print Solutions Plus, Inc. Pulmonary Health Physicians, P.C. Pyramid Technologies, LLC Robert H. Law, Inc. Dr. and Mrs. William Roberts Dr. Lewis and Mrs. Kathy Robinson Dr. and Mrs. Gary Schopfer Mr. and Mrs. Michael Shaffer Dr. and Mrs. George A. Shaheen Sirius Computer Solutions, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Frank L. Smith, Jr. Syracuse Community Health Center, Inc. TeamHealth East Terumo Cardiovascular Systems Thornberry Ltd. Toshiba Business Solutions Upstate New York Empowerment Fund Welch Allyn, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph H. Wood Mr. and Mrs. Charles D. Zimmerman $1,000–$2,499 Ahern, Murphy & Associates Allied Electric Co. Americar Leasing Mr. and Mrs. Albert F. Antonini Dr. and Mrs. Carl Austin Ms. Margaret B. Ball Dr. and Mrs. Edward Bell Msgr. Ronald C. Bill Mr. Joseph Bitzel C&S Companies Mr. and Mrs. John J. Cannizzaro Dr. and Mrs. Edward Carsky Century Heating & Air Conditioning, Inc. Ms. Susan L. Chappuis Ms. Shannon Colvin Community Counselling Service Co., LLC

spring 2011

l

Dr. Robert Constantine Mr. W. Carroll Coyne Dr. DeAnn Cummings Dr. John Dale Dalpos Architects & Integrators Dewald Roofing Co., Inc. Dr. and Mrs. Edward T. Downing Ms. Catherine Dukat-Wilson EBS-RMSCO, Inc. Eclipsys Dr. and Mrs. Dennis Ehrich Endodontic Associates, P.C. Mr. and Mrs. Robert R. Falter Mr. and Mrs. Charles Fennell Dr. Joseph F. Finelli Fisher & Paykel Healthcare Dr. and Mrs. Robert T. Friedman Drs. Carolyn and Paul Frymoyer Mr. Douglas Fye Mr. and Mrs. Roger F. Garner GE Foundation Dr. and Mrs. Donald M. Haswell Hematology-Oncology Associates Henry A. Panasci Jr. Charitable Trust Hiscock & Barclay, LLP Drs. Peter and Lisa Hogenkamp Ms. N. Joan Horan Hummel’s Office Plus IBM Immediate Mail Service John P. Stopen Engineering Mr. Arthur A. Jutton Mr. and Mrs. Russell A. King Dr. Sally Klemens Ms. Mary Knepper John and Candace Marsellus Dr. Mehdi Marvasti Matt Industries, Inc. Dr. and Mrs. Richard Mayne Dr. Kristen McNamara Medtronic USA, Inc. Mrs. Anne L. Messenger Dr. and Mrs. Ahmad Nazem Neurosurgical Associates of Central New York, LLP New Country Dental Group, P.C. P.C.I. Paper Conversions, Inc. Janice and David Panasci Patterson Dental Supply, Inc. Plan & Print Systems Dr. Bobby Pohar POMCO Group Ms. Elizabeth B. Ross Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. Rothman Rural Metro Medical Services Kathryn and Daniel Ruscitto Mr. John Salemme Schwab Charitable Fund Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Scicchitano Mr. Lowell Seifter and Mrs. Sharon McAuliffe Dr. Sandra Sulik Syracuse ASC Management, LLC Syracuse Office Environments T.H. Kinsella Inc. Target Total Lighting Concepts Vital Images Wells Fargo Mr. H. Edward Walker Dr. Kevin M. Walsh Watson Farms LLC Dr. and Mrs. David Wormuth Yaffee & Co. Mr. and Mrs. John A. Zawadzki Dr. and Mrs. Robert Zimmer Zimmer Upstate New York

St. Joseph’s hospital Health Center

l

$500–$999 Dr. Anwar S. Ahmad Dr. Samuel S. Badalian Ms. Rebecca Bender Dr. and Mrs. Frank Bersani Mr. George Betts Ms. Mary Bishop Ms. Elisabeth M. Bolduc Joseph R. Bonacci D.D.S., PC Build.Com, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Burrows Ms. Patricia A. Calpeter Dr. Donald Calzolaio Mr. Gary Carlston Mr. Peter F. Carranti Catholic Charities of Onondaga County Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. Corp Mr. Paul Costello Curbside, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Keith R. Cuttler Mr. and Mrs. Jeremy S. Czyz Mr. Richard Dabrowski, Jr. Mr. Bernie Delello Ms. Ellen Dethloff Ms. Lydia A. DeVeau Ms. Kathy Dodge FamilyCare Medical Group, PC Mr. and Mrs. Gregory Fernandez Ms. Dottie Foster Gibar, Inc. Ms. Sharon Goettel Ms. Ann Gorton Mr. and Mrs. Edward Grabowski Ms. Laura Gray Mr. Rosario Greco Dr. and Mrs. Seth S. Greenky Mr. Stewart W. Handy Mr. and Mrs. Charles Holmberg Ms. Maureen Iacono Iflow Corporation James Square Nursing Home, Inc. Ms. Amie G. Jamison Mr. Jeffrey Jenkusky Just the Right Stuff, Inc. Dr. and Mrs. Philip Kaplan Ms. Pamela Kennedy Ms. Stacy D. Keppler Key Bank Ms. Catherine LeMura Dr. Laura Leso P. Gard Lorey, D.D.S., P.C. Ms. Mary Luziani Dr. Janet S. Mackenzie Ms. Rachael L. Malay Dr. and Mrs. John Marangola Mr. and Mrs. George J. Markowitz Michael D. Mattiacio, DDS PC Ms. Diane Mazza Ms. Michele Mecomonaco MediaMarCon Drs. Stanley Meltzer and Patricia Randall Ms. Nancy L. Miller Mrs. Patricia Miller Ms. Katherine J. Mueller Mr. Martin Mulderig Mr. Patrick Murphy Ms. Kimberley Murray Dr. Vanlinh Tien Nguyen Mr. Jamie Nicolosi Dr. Katiuschka Nunez Willoughby Oneida Dental Group Mr. and Mrs. James Pompo Dr. and Mrs. Joel Potash Ms. Jill Potter Ms. Rose Ann Procopio

27

caring Connection   


A Higher Level of Care

Dr. and Mrs. Daniel D. Rabuzzi Mr. Gregg Rinaldi Mr. Michael J. Salamone Mr. and Mrs. Timothy E. Scanlon Ms. Catherine M. Schaffer Mr. Mike Scherr Mrs. Michelle L. Schmidt Ms. Christine Schrank Shirley W. & William L. Griffin Foundation Mr. and Mrs. John Short Signage Systems Dr. and Mrs. Russell Silverman Mr. Chris Snow Ms. Stella J. Sroka Ms. Mary Studdiford Sun Life Financial Ms. Tara J. Tifft Carol and Robert Triggs Ms. Maureen K. Tuck Ms. Lydia Turnipseed Mrs. Mary Ann Wafer Mr. Adan Warfa Mr. Jack Webb Dr. and Mrs. Robert Weiss Mrs. Deborah Welch Mr. David Wieland Woodcock & Armani Mechanical Contractors $250–$499 Mr. David M. Abell Ms. Melissa Allard Ms. Denise Amigh Appel Osborne Landscape Architecture Ms. Christin Aris Dr. Joan L. Armstrong Ms. Laura Arndt Arthritis Health Association, PLLC Ms. Debra Bailey Ms. Susan L. Baldacci Mr. Brian Barboline Mr. Steven Barlow Ms. Lynn Basile Mr. Joshua H. Blodgett Ms. Nicole Blumin Mr. and Mrs. Jim Boeheim Dr. Jo-Ellen Bossert Ms. Leanne Bowers Ms. Polly Bowers Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Bowhall Ms. Shirley J. Boyd Ms. Eleanor Braun Brian’s Custom Framing Mr. and Mrs. Larry Briest Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation Mr. Joseph J. Burdick Mr. Bob Busko Camillus Dental Associates Dr. and Mrs. Emanuel Campanile Ms. Lola Caputo Mr. Daniel Carelli Ms. Barbara Carranti Carthage Dental Health Group, LLC Mr. Jay V. Casper, Jr. Mr. Rick Castle CB Richard Ellis Mr. Antonio Cedeno Ms. Cynthia Cheney Clay Dental Care L.L.P. Mr. Timothy Cleary Ms. Diane Coogan Deborah B. Corkan DDS, PC Mrs. Linda Corrigan Mr. Joseph Costantini Ms. Marlene Crockford

Ms. Michelle Cusimano Ms. Gina Cusworth Mr. and Mrs. Edward Dabrowski John T. Damiano, D.D.S. Mr. and Mrs. John P. Danial Mrs. Mary Davis Ms. Patricia H. DeFerio Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey DeFuria Mr. Arthur DeGirolamo Dental Systems Group Dr. Denise Deppoliti Ms. Tamela DeSimone Mr. and Mrs. Larry DeWitt Mr. Joseph N. DiRienzo Dr. Kenneth Dolatowski Ms. Jodi M. Donahue Donald J. Fager & Associates, Inc. Ms. Kathy Donlick Ms. Barbara L. Dougherty Mr. and Mrs. Ira S. Dubnoff Mrs. Barbara Dubnoff-Bayanaker Eastwood Litho, Inc. Ms. Mary Clare Ehde Ms. Carolyn J. Eich Ms. Mary H. Esposito Faculty Student Association Honorable Joseph Fahey and Ms. Terri Bright Ms. Diana Farneti Ms. Tammy Feeney Feher Rubbish Removal, Inc. Mr. Mike Fifield Ms. Kathleen Findley Mr. and Mrs. Peter Finn Mr. Doug Firpo Mr. John Flask Mr. Kevin Flegal Mrs. Carol Fontana Mr. Carl Foriero Ms. Gloria Fox Francis House Ms. Nancy Frazier Mr. and Mrs. David Fry Mr. and Mrs. Henry W. Fust Ms. Nancy J. Galipeau Mr. Fred L. Galletti Mr. and Mrs. Joseph J. Geglia Ms. Isabelle Gerbin Ms. Virginia G. Giarusso Ms. Roxanne Giglio Ms. Sara Gleasman-DeSimone Ms. Anne Grande Mr. Lawrence Anthony Graser Ms. Kathleen Groesbeck Glenn J. Halbritter, D.M.D. Dr. Matthew Hall Mr. Gene Hares Dr. Richard Hehir Dr. David G. Heisig Mr. Vance T. Hellwig Herkimer Dental, LLC Ms. Sheryl High Mr. David T. Himiak Ms. Deborah J. Hopkins Hospice of CNY Ms. Tacy Jenkins Ms. Denise Jochem-Robertson Mr. Donald Kates Ms. E. Zoe Keeler Ms. Barbara Keith Mr. Edward Kennar Mr. Christopher Keppler Mr. and Mrs. Tim Keyes Mr. Philip C. Khairi Ms. Mary King Mr. William B. Knowlton Mr. Robert Kosinski Ms. Jennifer Krafft

28   caring Connection

l

Ladies Auxiliary Mattydale VFW Post 3146 Ms. Karen LaFrance Ms. Nancy Laufer Ms. Teresa M. LaValle Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Lavelle Ms. Nicole Lesperance Ms. Allison Lewis Mr. Howard Lewis Lexi-Comp, Inc. Lexicon Graphix, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Carmen Louise Lyons Dentistry Dr. John A. Lyons Lawrence B. Marks DDS, PC Martin and Winkler, D.D.S., P.C. Dr. Bernadine A. Martin Mr. Gary Mayne Mr. Michael McDermott Mr. Ronnie A. McIntyre, Jr. Ms. Cindy Merchant Ms. Theresa Meyers Ms. Jane A. Miller Ms. Margaret Mills Mr. Sean Mills Morgan Stanley Ms. Teresa Moroz Ms. Catherine Mucenski Ms. Cheryl Murphy Ms. Leah Murphy Mr. Mark Murphy Ms. Delores Neal Ms. Pamela Netti Ms. Sharon Neuman Dr. and Mrs. John D. Nicholson Mr. and Mrs. Joseph J. Nicoletti Ms. Denise Nolan Northern Oswego County Health Services, Inc. Ms. Paula O’Brien Dr. Francis O’Connor Mr. David Omilanowicz Dr. Barbara Panko Mr. and Mrs. Frank Panzetta Ms. Joan M. Payne Mrs. Shirley Pease Ms. Deirdre P. Pierce Ms. Janice Pierson Ms. Michele Podolak Ms. Valerie Potash Potter Heating & Air Conditioning Ms. Karen A. Potter Ms. Kay Powell Power-Comm. Electric Co., Inc. Ms. JoAnne Priest Ms. Nancy Purdy Mr. and Mrs. James Quigley, Jr. Mr. Timothy M. Rauer Ms. Claudia Rayome Mr. Gary Richter Mr. William Riggall Ms. Jan Robertson Mr. William K. Rogers Mr. John Taylor Rosier Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. Rossetti Mr. Alfonso Salemi Mr. John S. Sanborn Mr. Thomas Sandford Mr. Roger J. Sanford Ms. Milena Schir Mr. and Mrs. Mike Schneider Dr. and Mrs. Carl Scruggs Mr. Frank V. Servadio Mr. Steven J. Shih Ms. Carla Shults Estate of Ruby Sitnik Skaneateles Artisans Ms. Lisa Slade

St. Joseph’s hospital Health Center

l

Smiles By Design Dental, P.C. Mr. and Mrs. Michael P. Smith Ms. Dawn M. Smith-Zellar Ms. Judy Sokolowski Ms. Karen St. Hilaire Mr. Steve St. Onge Mr. and Mrs. Louis J. Steigerwald III Ms. Debra Taylor Mr. and Mrs. Peter I. Taylor Dr. and Mrs. Sanford Temes Ms. Mary Teske Dr. and Mrs. Terrence J. Thines Mrs. Cheryl Thomas Ms. Karen Thomson Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Thornton Doan Trang Tran Ms. Mary Chau Tran Ms. Sarah Tubbert Mr. and Mrs. Jit Turakhia Ms. Kathleen Turo Ms. Kristie Valentino Ms. Wendy M. Van DerBogart Ms. Chris Vona Ms. Pauline Wadzinski Mr. and Mrs. David Wall Mr. Jason R. Warner Mr. Jeffrey Wentworth Mr. Andrew L. Whipple Wladis Law Firm, PC Mrs. Mary Ann Wood Ms. Meghan Wright Mr. Roger Yanow $249 AND BELOW Ms. Deborah Abbatiello Mr. Mohamed Aboubaker Ms. Darlene D. Abrams Ms. Tiffiany Abruzzese Ms. Maudine Acevedo Ms. Sandra L. Acevedo Mr. James Achuil Ms. Natisha Adair Ms. Susan E. Adams Ms. Stacey Adamy Ms. Reggie I. Adler Advanced Endodontics PC Ms. Maria Agosh Ms. Kerry Ahern Mr. and Mrs. Pasqual S. Aiello Ms. Patricia Aiken Airside Technology Corp. Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Alaimo Mr. Peter J. Alaimo Ms. Alicia Alampi Ms. Alisa Albanese Ms. Antonia Albury Ms. Jacqui Aldinger Ms. Susan M. Aldrich Ms. Gloria Alexander Ms. Lois D. Allen Alliance Bank N.A. Ms. Karen Alsever Drs. Maritza Alvarado and Andrew Knoll Ms. Marianne Aman Mr. and Mrs. Joseph D. Ambroise Mrs. Eileen Amedio American College of Radiology Ms. Joanne Amore Mr. John Andersen Ms. Anita Anderson Ms. Sharon P. Anderson Ms. Janice M. Anderton Mr. and Mrs. Robert R. Andrews Mr. Russell Angelo Ms. Jeanette S. Angeloro Mr. and Mrs. Vito Angerson

Spring 2011

l

www.sjhsyr.org

Ms. Christine L. Angiolillo Mrs. Lynda M. Angiolillo J. Anselment Mr. Andrew C. Antil Mr. and Mrs. James N. Antonacci, Jr. Ms. Melissa Argy Mr. and Mrs. John A. Armstrong Ms. Shellie Armstrong Ms. Elizabeth S. Arner Ms. Mardi Arnold Mr. and Mrs. Mark Arnow Mr. Naizgi Asfaw Mr. Thaddeus J. Astemborski Ms. Tia Atwood Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Auer Mr. and Mrs. James Auer Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Auer Mr. and Mrs. Steve Auer Mr. and Mrs. Ted Auer Mr. and Mrs. William Auer Ms. Monica Aungier Ms. Christine Austin Ms. Kathy Austin Ms. Martha Austin Mr. and Mrs. Ralph A. Austin Mr. Matthew Auwae Ms. Melissa Avery Ms. Dawn Ayers Ms. Flora Ayobo Ms. Violet M. Ayres Ms. Jane M. Bach Ms. Marcia M. Bacon Ms. Sandra C. Baker Mr. Scott Baker Mr. and Mrs. David M. Balcom Ms. Angela Baldini Ms. June P. Balduf Ms. Yowali Balume Mr. Ross Barbarino Ms. Ellen Barbas Mr. George E. Barnes Mr. Robert Barraco Ms. Susan M. Barrett Ms. Judith Barry Mr. and Mrs. Michael Barry Ms. Olga Bartley Mr. Daniel W. Barton Mr. and Mrs. Michael E. Bartowski Ms. Judith Basar Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Bastable Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Battaglia Battery Power Systems, Inc. Ms. Susan M. Baum Ms. Jan Bauman Mr. Christian Baur Mr. Thomas Baxter Ms. Stephanie Beard Mr. James Beardsley Mr. and Mrs. James R. Beavan Mr. Bernie Beck Ms. Jo-Ann A. Beckwith Mrs. Mary T. Beddard Mr. and Mrs. Bert R. Belanger Ms. Michelle Belden Belgium Cold Springs Volunteer Fire Department Mr. Brian Benedict Ms. Jennifer Benjamin Ms. Margaret S. Benjamin Ms. Marie Bennett Ms. Sandra Bennett Mr. Thomas Berdan Ms. Elizabeth Bergstraesser Mr. and Mrs. David E. Berman Ms. Gayle Bero Ms. Caroline Berrios Ms. Mary M. Berthelot


Mr. and Mrs. Harold Bertram Ms. Charlotte R. Bessee Ms. Linda Betley Mr. Steven Bianco Ms. Nancy Bibbens Mr. Joseph Bick Ms. Margaret A. Biddlecome Ms. Amy L. Bidwell Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. Bielemeier Ms. Maureen Bigness Ms. Donna M. Bills Ms. Elizabeth Billy Ms. Tammy Bingham Ms. Michelle Bishop Ms. Elizabeth Bistrovich Ms. Debby Bittel Ms. Melanie Bixby Ms. Joni Blackburn Ms. Pamela Blair Ms. Susan Bland-Medicis Ms. Judi L. Bliss Ms. Denise Blowers Ms. Kathryne Blowers Ms. Kathryn C. Blundell Ms. Margit Bluto Ms. Maureen Bogardus Ms. Pamela Bogdan Ms. Louise Bogett Ms. Elizabeth Boljonis Mrs. Donna M. Bonacci Mr. and Mrs. Rob Bonanno Mr. Mauricio Bonifacio Ms. Pamela Bonvouloir Book Ends Book Club Mr. and Mrs. Frank Borer Ms. Olga Borozinski Mr. and Mrs. Dale E. Bort Ms. Anne Bosco Ms. Lily Boskovski Mr. Thomas M. Bottar Ms. Susan Bottino Mr. Nick Bouchard

Ms. Irene Boucher Ms. Margaret Bowes Bovard Ms. Christine Bowers Ms. Denise Bowles Mr. Ronald D. Bowman Ms. Sherry Bowman Mrs. Sudaphorn Boyce Ms. Eileen Boyd Ms. Jill Boyer Mr. Ronald Boyer Ms. Nancy A. Boyke Ms. Easter Bradford Mr. and Mrs. Arthur J. Bradstreet Ms. Edith Brant-Burdekin Ms. Cynthia A. Braunmueller Ms. Susan L. Bravos Mr. Timothy Brayman Ms. Ann Brazell Mr. Brian Brennan Ms. Deborah A. Brennan Mr. and Mrs. James Breuer Ms. Mary Brice Mr. and Mrs. John R. Briggs Ms. Grace Bristol Mr. Michael Brochowicz Mr. Michael Broeker Ms. Faye A. Brooks Ms. Joyce Brooks Ms. Sonia Brooks Ms. Stacey Brooks Ms. Bridget Brotzki Ms. Cheryl M. Brown Ms. Elizabeth A. Brown Mrs. Kathleen M. Brown Ms. Laurie Brown Ms. Michelle Brown Ms. Yolanda C. Brown Ms. Susanna Brown-Cook Mr. Robert Brunette Ms. Rebecca Bruno Ms. Kimberly Brunson-Williams Mrs. Regina Bubnack

Mr. William L. Buchanen Ms. Kathy Buck Ms. Chloe Budenhagen Ms. Heather Bulla Ms. Dawn Bullett Ms. Kathleen Bullion Ms. Amber Bunaisky Ms. Maureen A. Burke Ms. Patricia D. Burke Ms. Susan Burke Ms. Kathleen M. Burlin Mr. Joy Burns Ms. Lacey Burns Ms. Mary Jo Burns Mr. and Mrs. Michael Burns Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Burns Mrs. Patricia A. Burton Ms. Kimberly A. Bush Ms. Marce C. Bush Ms. Sabrina Bush Ms. Elaine M. Busher Mr. Daniel P. Buyer Ms. Julia Byrne Ms. Mary Byrne Ms. Helen A. Byron C & A Realty, LLC Mr. Fred Caesar Ms. Lizbeth Caiello Ms. Sharon Calabria Ms. Christine Caldwell-Rudolph Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Cambareri Ms. Linda Caminiti Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Campanino Vincent S. Campanino, D.D.S., P.C. Ms. Mary J. Campbell Ms. Melissa A. Campbell Ms. Mary Beth Campo Ms. Gabriella Canal Ms. Sue Candee Ms. Theresa Canestrare Ms. Marion Cangemi Mr. David Capella

Ms. Antonise Capers Mr. Mark H. Capozzella Ms. Libby Capriotti Ms. Linda M. Capurso Ms. Samantha Cardinell Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Cardone Ms. Carol Carioti Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Carlino Ms. Linda L. Carlisle Ms. Rachel Caron Ms. Laurie J. Carr Mr. Philip Carrieri Mr. and Mrs. Kennett Carter, Jr. Mr. Mark Carter Ms. Ruth Carter Ms. Judy Carulli Ms. Jessica Caruso Ms. Kathleen A. Casatelli Ms. Marie L. Casavant Ms. Beverly Caskinette Ms. Georgia Caskinette Ms. Elizabeth Cassant Ms. Joan Cassant Ms. Donna Cassidy Ms. Margaret Castellini Mr. Michael S. Castner Ms. Denise Castro Dr. and Mrs. Luis Castro Mrs. Natalie Cavalieri Mr. John Cavender CD Construction Mr. Alfred Cehfus, Jr. Mrs. Josephine Celio Ms. Michele Centolella Dr. and Mrs. Thomas Certo Mr. Arthur Chalupnicki Dr. and Mrs. Brian Chanatry Mr. Juan Chanelo Ms. Joyce Chapman Mr. Paul F. Chapman Mr. and Mrs. Robert Chapman Mrs. Christine Chapman-Angiolillo

Circle of Excellence

Circle of Service

$10,000 and above

$1,000 to $2,499

A. John Merola, MD

Mr. and Mrs. Albert F. Antonini Msgr. Ronald C. Bill Mr. Joseph Bitzel Dr. Jerry Brown Dr. Robert Constantine Mr. W. Carroll Coyne Dr. DeAnn Cummings George S. and Mikell G. Deptula Dr. and Mrs. Edward T. Downing Mr. and Mrs. Robert R. Falter Dr. Joseph F. Finelli In memory of Rose Finelli Dr. and Mrs. Alan B. Foster Dr. and Mrs. Robert T. Friedman Drs. Carolyn and Paul Frymoyer Dr. and Mrs. Donald M. Haswell Mr. Arthur A. Jutton Mr. and Mrs. Russell A. King John and Candace Marsellus Margaret and Donald Martin Dr. Mehdi Marvasti Dr. and Mrs. John D. Nicholson Janice and David Panasci Ted and Diane Pasinski Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. Rothman Dr. and Mrs. Robert Zimmer

Circle of Compassion $5,000 to $9,999

Circle of Stewardship $2,500 to $4,999 Dr. and Mrs. Ronald Caputo Keith and Pat Civil Dr. Pam Horst and Dr. Tom Dennison Dr. Lewis and Mrs. Kathy Robinson

www.sjhsyr.org

l

Drs. Larry and Jayne Charlamb Mr. and Mrs. Joseph L. Charles Ms. Michelle Chase Ms. Nikole K. Chastain Chelsea Building Products Chestnut Hill Elementary School – Social Committee Mrs. Elaine M. Chiasson Mr. Andy Childs Ms. Jeanna Childs Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Chilinski Deng Chol Mr. and Mrs. Edward Christensen Mr. Jonathan Christian Ms. Anne Christopher Ms. Kristen Chrysler Ms. Judith L. Chwalek Ms. Elaine B. Cieslak Dr. and Mrs. Armand Cincotta Citizens for A New New York Mr. and Mrs. Patrick J. Clancy Mr. Ryan Clapper Ms. Dianne S. Clark Mr. and Mrs. Jack A. Clark Mr. and Mrs. Robert F. Clark Ms. Rosa Clark Mr. Tim Clark Mr. John Clemente Ms. Myra Clemente Ms. Monica A. Clemons-Vincent Ms. Dana Clinton Mrs. Ruth Clough Mr. Eugene Coates Ms. Carol Cole Ms. Linda J. Cole Ms. Grace Colella Ms. Isha M. Coleman St. Joseph’s College of Nursing Class of 1960 Ms. Erica Collins Ms. Tracy A. Collins Ms. Fiorina Colosi

spring 2011

l

St. Joseph’s hospital Health Center

l

29

caring Connection   


A Higher Level of Care

Ms. Cheryl J. Colton Mr. and Mrs. Donald M. Commerford, Jr. Ms. Kristin Conable Mr. and Mrs. Peter A. Congel Mr. and Mrs. Joseph P. Coniski Mrs. Carolyn Connors Ms. Kathryn Contos Ms. Susan Converse Ms. Kathleen Cook Ms. Maureen Cooke Mr. Stephen R. Cooke Ms. Cheryl E. Cooper Ms. Cynthia Cooper Mr. Gerald Cooper Dr. and Mrs. Robert A. Cooper COR Development Company, LLC Mr. and Mrs. Joseph S. Corapi Ms. Edith P. Cordone Ms. Gladys Cornish Ms. Teresa Corrigan Ms. Jennifer Cortese Ms. Cathy Coryell Ms. Eletta Costantino Ms. Lori Anne Costello Ms. Patricia Costello Mr. Thomas E. Costello Ms. Roberta L. Countryman Mr. David A. Cowburn Ms. Kathleen Cowen Mr. Bryan Cox Ms. Louise Cox Ms. Deborah Coyle Mr. L. Bruce Crabtree Ms. Jodi Crane Mr. Duane Crapser Ms. Jodine H. Crast Mrs. Megan C. Cross Mr. and Mrs. William Crossett Ms. Roberta J. Crouch Ms. Natalina Crouse Mr. and Mrs. Anthony F. Crupi Ms. Margaret A. Culhane Ms. Anne Culligan Ms. Beth A. Currado Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Curran Ms. Kelly Currie Mr. Kenneth Curry Ms. Maria T. Cusing Ms. Angela Cuskey Ms. Aida Custodio Ms. Adele M. Cutrone Ms. Julie Cyr Ms. Martha Czaplicki Reverend Joshua M. Czyz Ms. Susan Dabrowski Ms. Olasumba Dada Gyan Dahal Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence D. Daley Ms. Debra D’Alfonso Ms. Helen Dali Ms. Denise Dann Ms. Holly L. Darling Ms. Laura B. Darling Ms. Elahnna D’Arrigo Ms. Carmella Dateno Ms. Amanda D’Auria Mr. and Mrs. Irwin Davidson Mrs. Sandra Davies Mr. Dale Davis Ms. Laurie J. Davis Mr. and Mrs. Neil Davis Ms. Patricia Davis Ms. Debra Day Mr. Donald Day, Jr. Mr. Geoffrey Day Ms. Emilia C. De Forest Ms. Kelly DeBeer

Decorative Product Source Mr. and Mrs. John D. Deleo Ms. Marian E. DelGobbo Ms. Clarissa DeLong Mr. Eric DeMarche Mr. Philip DeMatteo Ms. Anna Maria Demko Mr. Mike Demmerle Ms. Rose Marie Demperio-Zullo Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Dempsey Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Dempsey Mr. Mathiang M. Deng Ms. Linda Dennis Carmen Denny Ms. Jessica DeOrdio Ms. Andrea L. Derby Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. DeRidder Ms. Donna D. DeRocha Mr. Paul DeRose Mr. Alfonso Desiderio Ms. Beverly DeSignor Ms. Linda Detor Ms. Julia Devires-Leroux Ms. Deborah Dewey Ms. Susan Dickerson Ms. Kathleen Dickinson Ms. Natalie N. Dickinson Mr. Joseph Dicob Dr. and Mrs. Charles DiCosimo Robert J. Dietz, Jr., D.D.S. Ms. Patricia diGiovanna Mr. and Mrs. Gerard A. DiGiovanni DiLauro’s Bakery & Pizza Inc. Ms. Kathy Dillman Ms. Catherine B. DiLorenzo Dr. Vincent D. DiMento Ms. Kim Dingman Mrs. Marie Dittmar Mr. Michael Dixon Mr. Terral Dixon Mr. and Mrs. William Dixon Ms. Yvette Dixon Mr. James Doane Ms. Laura Dodge Mr. Robert Domachowski Ms. Cathleen Donegan Ms. Roseanne Donegan Ms. Tricia Donovan Mrs. Natalia Doran Ms. Joanne Dority Ms. Jean M. Dougherty Ms. Jennifer Dougherty Mr. and Mrs. Joseph E. Doyle Ms. Kim M. Doyle Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Draves Mr. Robert Driscoll Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Dubaniewicz Mrs. Joan Duffy Mr. Jack H. Duger Ms. Linda DuLong Ms. Julie Dumas Ms. Brigid Dunn Mr. John Dunn Ms. Susan Dunn Ms. Kelly M. Durand Sister Adelbert Durant Ms. Marie Durst Dr. and Mrs. William Dutch, Jr. Ms. Echo Duva-Sprague Mrs. Lucia W. Dwyer Ms. Lucille V. Dwyer Ms. Mary Ann Dwyer Ms. Michele A. Dwyer Ms. Janice Dyball Ms. Ashley B. Dyke Ms. Monica Eades Mr. John Eallonardo Sister Gratia Eallonardo

30   caring Connection

l

Ms. Denise Earl Ms. Rose Ann Eason Ms. Lisa Ebert Edco Sales, Inc. Ms. Sharon E. Eddy Ms. Nancy K. Edmonds Dr. and Mrs. Gerry Edwards Mr. Jim Egan Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence W. Egnaczyk Ms. Joy Eidt Ms. Bonnie W. Eisenfeld Mr. Michael F. Elder Mr. and Mrs. C. Michael Elliott Ms. Carol J. Elliott Dr. and Mrs. Charles Elliott Ms. Mary Ann Ellis Emerald Resources, Inc. Emergency Medical Services, Inc. Ms. Roberta Emmert Mr. Barrett T. Enck Mr. Michael F. Endries Dr. and Mrs. David Eng Ms. Jody S. Engel EspressOasis Mr. and Mrs. Donald M. Ettelson Ramanda Eudell Ms. Janet Evans Mr. Kevin Evans Ms. Karen Ewald Ms. Natalie Fadden Ms. Judith Fager Ms. Rosalie Faigle Ms. Theresa Faircloth Ms. Lori Falck Mr. and Mrs. Richard D. Falkiewicz Ms. Colleen N. Fall Ms. Jane E. Fallon Ms. Julie A. Farr Ms. Lauralee Farrar Ms. Carol Farrell Ms. Beverly Fayette Ms. Valerie R. Fedele Ms. Lori Femano Ms. Janice Fenn Mr. Frank Ferrante Ms. Donna Ferris Ms. Patricia J. Ferro Mr. and Mrs. Don Ferruggia Ms. Tricia Fiasconaro Ms. Ann Field Ms. Michelina Figliomeni Ms. Laurie Files Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Finistrella Gary H. Finnerty, D.D.S., P.C. Mr. Richard Fiore Ms. Roxanna Fiore Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas J. Fiorenza Ms. Amanda Fiscoe Mr. and Mrs. Donald N. Fitzer Mr. and Mrs. Donald Fitzgerald Ms. Kathleen Fitzgerald Ms. Kimberly J. Flaherty Dr. Ethan Flaks and Ms. Guna Romancik Ms. Heather A. Flanagan Mr. James D. Fleck Ms. Sonya S. Fleming Mr. Larry D. Flemmings Dr. and Mrs. Michael J. Flintrop Ms. Joan C. Floyd Ms. Laura Flubacher Ms. Lula Flucker Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. Foertch Ms. Dolores J. Foley Ms. Hillary Fonseca Ms. Lori Fonseca Ms. Karen E. Foran

St. Joseph’s hospital Health Center

l

Mr. James F. Forbes Ms. Mary E. Forbes Mr. and Mrs. James M. Ford Mr. and Mrs. Brian V. Foster Ms. Terry Foster Ms. Michelle H. Foti Mr. Robert Foucart Ms. Laurie T. Fowler Ms. Kimberly Fox Ms. Deborah Fradette Mr. and Mrs. Bart D. Franey Mr. Robert K. Franz Ms. Darlyn Frass Ms. Wendy Fratto Ms. Susan Frawley Ms. Melissa Fredericks Ms. Marie Free Ms. Yolanda Freeman Mr. Mark French Ms. Judith Friedman Mr. David R. Frigon, Sr. Ms. Harmony M. Frigon Ms. Sheila Fritz Mr. and Mrs. Paul Fruzzetti Mr. Ronald S. Fudala Ms. Sarah Fudala Ms. Debra Fugitt Mr. Gary Fugitt Dale Fuller Ms. Nancy Funk Mr. and Mrs. Martin Furgal Mr. Benjamin S. Furqan Mr. Nicholas J. Fusillo, Jr. Mr. James D. Fyler Ms. Christine Gabriell Ms. Ellen Gacek Ms. Maureen Gaffney Mr. and Mrs. Donald B. Gallery Ms. Mary Anne O. Garafalo Ms. Sally J. Gardner Ms. Jennifer Garlock Mr. Richard E. Garrett Ms. Susanna Garrow Ms. Katherine Geiss Genesee Grande Hotel Ms. Cynthia Gersch-Cianfavano Ms. Anna Marie Gerst Mr. and Mrs. Reno Ghezzi Ms. Marjorie Gianni Entisar Gibreel Mr. Abdul Gilbert Mr. Kathleen H. Gilbert Ms. Randi Gilbert Ms. M. Colleen Gilchriest Ms. Kathleen Gillies Ms. Deb Ginnelly Ms. Phyllis A. Girvan Ms. Michelle Glaski Mr. Walter M. Gleason, Jr. Ms. Jodi Glinecki Zarkpa Glotto Ms. MaryAnn M. Goe Ms. Laureen Goettel Mr. and Mrs. Joshua Goldberg Ms. Shirley A. Golden Ms. Monika Golebiowska-Dal Mr. and Mrs. Eugene W. Golomb Ms. Jacquelyn Gonza Ms. Joanne Gonzalez Ms. Linda Gonzalez Mrs. Jeanne Marie Goodman Ms. Loretta Gorczyca Mr. Kevin Gordon Mr. and Mrs. Richard Gordon Mr. and Mrs. James E. Gorman Ms. Diane Gould Mr. Francis Gozzi Ms. Kelly Grabowski

Spring 2011

l

www.sjhsyr.org

Ms. Mary A. Graceffo Ms. Donna M. Graczyk Ms. Renee Granato Ms. Lisa Graniero Mr. Michael Graniero Mr. Alonzo Grant Ms. LaDell A. Gray Ms. Catherine Greacen Greater Kansas City Community Foundation Ms. Susan Green Ms. Lauren Greenberg Ms. Jean Greene Ms. Benna Greenfield Mr. James Greenwood Ms. Caroline Gregory Mr. and Mrs. John Greis Ms. Elvira Grella Mr. Gary Grella Ms. Amy Gressler Dr. and Mrs. Michael Gridley Mr. Robert Griffin Mrs. Charlene Griffith Mr. Michael A. Grobsmith Ms. Michelle Grobsmith Mr. Bruce M. Groth Ms. Susan Grundy Mr. David Grygiel Ms. Deborah Guancial Ms. Deborah A. Guenther Mr. Antonio V. Guerrero, Jr. Ms. Rosalinda C. Guerrero Mr. Anthony J. Guido Ms. Tamara Guinta Mr. Gary Gunsel and Ms. Patricia Murphy Lyudmila Gura Ms. Mary Guyder Ms. Barbara Haag Ms. Dorothy Haag Ms. Mary Hagen Ms. Timothy Hague Ms. Joanne Hahn Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P. Hahn Ms. Denise A. Haley Ms. Alicia Hall Ms. Kristine Hall Ms. LouAnn Hall Ms. Maggie Hall Ms. Katherine C. Halsey Ms. Lorraine E. Halvorsen Ms. Loreen Hamann Ms. Lynn Hamilton Mrs. Dawn E. Hammat Ms. Lynette Hancock Hathaway Mr. and Mrs. Thomas T. Hanford Mr. Nelson Hardie Mr. Donald C. Hardy Ms. Norma B. Harer Ms. Dorothy Hares Ms. Jeanne C. Harmon Ms. Lynn B. Harrington Ms. Susan J. Harrington Mr. Timothy Harrington Ms. Dawn Harris Ms. Dolores Harris Ms. Rita Harris Ms. Margaret Harrison Mrs. Molly A. Hart Mrs. Nancy B. Hartel Ms. Jennie Hartfield Ms. Susan Harvey Mr. and Mrs. Francis E. Hatch Mr. and Mrs. Wistar H. Hatch Mr. John J. Haupt Mrs. Catherine Hayden Ms. Deborah Hayden Ms. Katherine Hayes


Mr. Brian K. Haynes Ms. Elahnna Haynes Health Consult HC LLC Ms. Carrie Heaphy Ms. Sarah Heath Ms. Lynne Heaviside Ms. Nadine Heberger Mr. and Mrs. Dennis R. Hedges Ms. Cynthia Hedman Ms. Kellie Heiselman Ms. Dorothy E. Heller Ms. Helen Hemings Ms. Melissa Henderson Ms. Patricia S. Henderson Mr. Shawn Henderson Mr. Jonathan Henry Ms. Vera Herasymovych Mr. Greg Herbert Heritage Masonry Restoration, Inc. Dr. John C. Herrman Mr. and Mrs. Victor J. Hershdorfer Mr. and Mrs. Lewis C. Herzog Ms. Mary Lu Hess Ms. Stacy Hessler Reverend and Mrs. Stewart Hild Mrs. Debbie Hill Ms. Marcia Hill Ms. Linda Hillenbrand Mr. and Mrs. Henry L. Hilliker Ms. Kristen Hines Ms. Alice M. Hinman Ms. Jacqueline L. Hintz Ms. Jennifer Hirsh Ms. Denise Hiser-Ruddick Ms. Mary Hlad Mr. Greg Hmiel Mr. and Mrs. Paul A. Hoag Ms. Regina Hoag Hoefler Communications Ms. Teresa J. Hoffman Mr. Mark Hoffmeister Ms. Carolyn D. Hofmann Ms. Deborah Hohl Ms. Kara Hollenbeck Ms. Ruth N. Holliday Ms. Carol Holt Mr. Mark Holt Mr. and Mrs. Harrison Homer Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Honour Mr. Jeffrey Hood Mrs. Judy Hooper Mr. Stephen Hoosock Mr. Hann Horn Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Hornik Horowitch Family Foundation Ms. Jennifer L. Hosler Mr. Joseph Hotchkiss Ms. Pamela B. Houck Ms. Julie House Ms. Susan House Ms. Elizabeth M. Howard Ms. Karen M. Howard Ms. Joyce Howden Ms. Agnes Howe Ms. Amanda R. Howland Mr. Kevin Howland Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. Hubbard Mr. and Mrs. Matthew T. Huber Mr. and Mrs. Paul H. Hudson Mr. Peter L. Hudson Ms. Wandalee Hughes Mr. Richard Hughs, Jr. Ms. Kaitlin Hunkele Dr. Peter and Mary Huntington Mr. and Mrs. Thomas F. Hurley, Jr. Ms. Donna L. Hussar Mberwa Hussin

Ms. Ronda Huston Ms. Mary Huxford Ms. Colleen Hyland Ms. Jaclyn Iasnik Dr. and Mrs. Michael A. Impaglia Ms. Mary Indick Ms. Kimberly Ingison Ms. Lorri Ingison Ms. Kathleen Ingram Mr. Finka Ivanova Mr. Sidney J. Ivory J&A Mechanical Contractors, Inc. Ms. Paula Janhonen Mr. John E. Janitz Mr. Robert Janowski Ms. Georgianna Javier Mr. Walt Jaworsky Ms. Penny Jemola Ms. Susan Jenks Mr. Manford R. Jerome Ms. Margaret M. Jevis Jim Carranti – Orthopedic Massage Ms. Susan A. Jobson Mr. Moses K. Joh Ms. Denise Johnson Ms. Kathy Johnson Ms. M. Kathleen Johnson Ms. Mary Anne Johnson Ms. Patricia O. Johnson Ms. Jennifer Johnstone Dr. and Mrs. Douglas A. Jones Mr. Harry A. Jones Mr. Peter Jones Mr. and Mrs. Donald Jordan Mr. Derek C. Jorden, Jr. Joseph A. Cimino Food Brokers, Inc. Ms. Joan E. Joy Mr. Vincent Juchimek Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Julian Mr. James Juliano Mrs. Rosemary Kaasa Mr. and Mrs. Len Kagelmacher Ms. Karen Kalivoda Mr. and Mrs. James F. Kanaley Ms. Virginia Kapusta Ms. Elizabeth A. Karan Ms. Alise H. Karchmer Brzezinski Mr. and Mrs. Clifford L. Karchmer Ms. Amy R. Karp Mr. Christopher Katz Mr. Edward Katz Ms. Maryann Katz Ms. Ronni Ann Katzowitz Ms. Edith S. Kauer Mr. Jim Kavanaugh Ms. Elaine M. Kazakis Mr. and Mrs. Kevin J. Kearney Mrs. Ann E. Keenan Mr. Grant Kelley Ms. Holly Kelley Mrs. Karin W. Kellogg Ms. Paulina Kelly Mr. William A. Kemp Mr. and Mrs. Alan G. Kendall Dr. and Mrs. Gregory Kenien Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Kenney Ms. Liliana Kernan Ms. Jennifer Kessler Reverend and Mrs. Hani W. Khoury Mr. and Mrs. Norbert A. Kieffer Ms. Lucinda Kiehl Ms. Susan Kielb Ms. Jeanne L. Kiesinger Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Kiggins Mr. Jung Kim Ms. Nancy King Ms. Sara King

www.sjhsyr.org

l

Ms. Sylvia R. King Ms. Valarie King Mr. Tom Kinney Ms. Gail Kinsella Mr. and Mrs. John Kinsella Ms. Sadie Kirkendall Ms. Sue Ellen Kirschenheiter Mr. and Mrs. Peter R. Kite Ms. Lisa Klapan Mrs. Luanne L. Kline Mr. and Mrs. Donald G. Knapp, Sr. Ms. Roberta Knapp Ms. June E. Knaul Ms. Kathleen Knittel Mr. Peter W. Knych, Esq. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Koes Ms. Kate Kohler Ms. M. Catherine Kohring Mr. and Mrs. Henry J. Kolakoski Ms. Cynthia Kolis Mrs. Deborah A. Kolod Dr. and Mrs. David Kolva Ms. Audrey Komorek Mr. and Mrs. Martin D. Kondziela Ms. Alice Konkol-Wilbur Mr. and Mrs. Ira M. Kopito Ms. Joanne Kottage Mr. Christopher Kowal Mr. Christopher J. Kozma Ms. Janice M. Kozma Ms. Margaret Kozsan Ms. Melissa Krausnick Ms. Claudette T. Krell Ms. Suzanne K. Kroth Ms. Nancy Krupka Ms. Susan A. Krzyzak Ms. Eileen Kuhn Ms. Kelly Kulp Ms. Helen E. Kuno Linda Kunzer-Faynor Ghafar Kurdieh Ms. Sharon Kurgan Ms. Karin M. Kurtz Mr. and Mrs. Vincent Kuss Mr. Dillon J. LaBarge Ms. Jean LaBarge Mr. Kevin LaBarge Ms. Lori LaBarre Mr. and Mrs. James M. Laboda Ms. Kathy Labulis Ms. Erin Lacey Mr. James R. LaDuke Ms. Carolyn Lafaver Ms. Susan Lafaver Mr. Allan A. LaFlore Mr. Philip K. LaFluer, Jr. Ms. Kristen LaForte-Spoon Ms. Debra Laframboise Ms. Lynn M. LaFrance Ms. Teresa Lagalante Ms. Jessica LaGrow Mr. and Mrs. John Lallier Mr. and Mrs. Joseph J. Lamanna Ms. Tiffany K. LaMarca Ms. Michelle Lamb Mr. and Mrs. Howard Lambertson Ms. Sharon Lampert Landscaped Interiors Mr. and Mrs. Charles Landy Ms. Deena Lankenau Mr. Sam J. Lanza Dr. Kathleen LaParne Ms. Lisa D. Laribee Ms. Kelly LaRocca Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Laronde Ms. Deborah Larrabee Ms. Nikky Lasinski Mr. Robert S. Laubach

spring 2011

l

Ms. Margaret M. Laufer Mr. and Mrs. Jim Laurain Ms. Joanne LaVigne Ms. Marybeth Lavin Mr. Henry Lawrence Ms. Lorraine Lawrence Mr. Michael Lawrence Ms. Amy LeClair Kwi Yeon Lee Ms. Vonn Y. Lee Dr. Susan Leeson Ms. Deborah Lehman Ms. Virginia R. Lemon Ms. Erin F. Lennon Ms. Lynn Leo Ms. Vivian M. Leonard Ms. Cathy Lewin Ms. Judith M. Lewis Mr. Ralph Lewis Mr. Dominic Liberati Mr. Mike Licciardello Mr. and Mrs. Philip H. Lilienthal Mr. Carlos Lind Ms. Catherine Lindberg Ms. Joyce Linnenbach Mr. John Lipari Ms. Beth Lipke Ms. Gretchen Lipp Lisa Snyder Consulting Mr. Edward F. Liszewski Ms. Linda Liszka Mr. James C. Little Ms. Flora Lively Ms. Nancy Livermore Mr. and Mrs. Richard Locastro The Lodge at Welch Allyn Mr. Michael Loeb Ms. Jeanette Loftus Mr. and Mrs. Elio Lombardi Ms. Gail M. Longcore Dr. Charles R. Longo Ms. Jane Longo Ms. Joan M. Longo Dr. and Mrs. Alfredo Lopez Ms. Lisa M. Losito Ms. Virginia Lostumbo Mr. and Mrs. Rocco P. Lotito Harry and Anne Louise Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Lounsbery Ms. Sandra Lovelace Mrs. Mae Loveland Ms. Susan Loysen Ms. Diane P. Lozowsky Mr. Dhal Lual Ms. Kimberly L. Luckette Ms. Mary Jane Luke Ms. Jeanine Luzzi Mr. Joseph Luzzi Ms. Jacqueline M. Lyboldt Mr. Ralph Lyboult, Jr. Mrs. Jane S. Lynn Ms. Dianne L. Mac Ewen Ms. Sarah MacDowell Ms. Jennifer K. Machmer Ms. Regina Macholl Mr. Daniel Macko Ms. Norma Jean Macko Ms. Paulinna R. Macko Ms. Faith L. Madden Mr. and Mrs. Brian Madigan Ms. Sara Madison Ms. Susan Magee Ms. Nancy Mahlberg Ms. Dorothy Mahoney Mrs. Alice M. Maida Ms. Jan Main Mr. John Main Mrs. Patricia Major

St. Joseph’s hospital Health Center

l

Mr. Thomas Malisa Mr. Robert J. Maloney Mr. John Mancini Manlius Pebble Hill School Ms. Ann Mann Manning & Napier Foundation Inc. Mr. John F. Mannion Ms. Jennifer Mansfield Ms. Laura Maracchion Mr. John Markes Ms. Lisa Markes Mr. Shawn Markes Ms. Diana Marley Mr. and Mrs. James R. Marsh Mr. and Mrs. Leonard R. Marsh Ms. Dena Martin Mr. and Mrs. John F. Martin Mr. and Mrs. Julio Martinez Mr. and Mr. Daniel D. Marusiak Ms. Mahnaz Marvasti Ms. Dorothy M. Marventano Ms. Christina Mascato Ms. Nicole A. Mason Ms. Perrine E. Masters Ms. Emily Maston Ms. Mary Matochik Ms. Rene L. Matthews Ms. Celestine Maurillo Ms. Margaret I. Maxam Ms. Christina A. May Mr. Greg May Ms. Jennifer Mayo Ms. Lise Mayo Ms. Mary Mayom Ms. Laura L. McBreairty-Pete Ms. Maureen McBride Ms. Christine McCarthy Ms. Janet McCarthy Mrs. Mary T. McConnell Ms. Diane McDermott Mr. and Mrs. William McDonagh Ms. Kathleen M. McEnery Ms. Jeanne McFee Ms. Amy McGrath Mr. and Mrs. Michael McGrath Mr. William McGrath Mr. Michael McGuirl Ms. Dorothy McHale Mr. Timothy McHenry Ms. Helen M. McLallen Ms. Susan C. McLoughlin Mr. and Mrs. Gerald V. McMahon Ms. Karen McManus Ms. Margaret G. Meccariello Ms. Susan M. Medved Ms. Frances Meehan Ms. Norma Meeks Radhika Mehra Mr. and Mrs. Henry H. Melchor Mr. William Melfi Mr. and Mrs. Stuart A. Mencher Ms. Victoria Menzel Mr. and Mrs. Merino Merola, Jr. Asmira Mesic Mr. David Messinger Mr. James F. Meyers, Jr. Ms. Laura Meyers MGM Auto Parts Mr. and Mrs. John M. Michalec Mrs. Judith Michalski Ms. Frances E. Mickens Mr. William Midlar Mr. Paul Migliorisi Ms. Eileen M. Millard Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Miller Ms. Ann Miller Bode Ms. Kathleen Miller Mr. and Mrs. Willie Miller

31

caring Connection   


A Higher Level of Care

Ms. Joni Milliron Ms. Michelle Mills Ms. Laura Minnoe Mr. and Mrs. Lee M. Miringoff Ms. Cindy Mitchell Ms. Diane A. Mitchell Ms. LaToya Mitchell Ms. Lisa T. Mitchell Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Mogish Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Molinari Mr. and Mrs. Joseph P. Molinaro Ms. Doreen M. Moltrup Mr. Gerald Monica Mr. Frank Montana Ms. Susan Moon Ms. Cheryl Moore Ms. Margaret Moore Ms. Tonia M. Moore Ms. Anna Marie Moosbrugger Dr. and Mrs. Ross B. Moquin Ms. Roberta Morales Mr. James E. Moran Mr. James J. Morelli Ms. Ann Marie Moreno Ms. Vicki Morey Ms. Bette Morgan Ms. Kathryn Morgan Ms. Roberta Morgan Ms. Roni Morgenstern Ms. Patricia Morini Mrs. Patricia A. Morreale Ms. Melissa A. Morris Ms. Dyana Morrow Mr. Bryan H. Morse Teresa Zielinski Mortise Ms. Theresa A. Moser Ms. Jeanne Moskal Ms. Ann Marie Mosley Ms. Kimberly Mowers Ms. Sara Moynihan Ms. Susan Mulcahy Ms. Melissa Muldoon Mr. Ed Mulpagano Ms. Martha E. Mulroy, Esq. Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Mulvey Ms. Nancy K. Muncy Ms. Carol Murnane Ms. Julie Murphy Mr. and Mrs. Kevin C. Murphy Ms. Lois Murphy Mr. Matthew Murphy Mr. and Mrs. R. Blake Murphy Ms. Catherine Murray Mr. Gary Murray Ms. Lakeshia Murray Ms. Marla R. Murray MVP Health Plan, Inc. Mr. James Myers Ms. Joan Marie Myers Ms. Claire A. Myers-Usiatynski Ms. Bonnie Myles Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Nappi Dr. and Mrs. Christopher Nardone Ms. Lisa Nash Ms. Marjorie Neal Ms. Juliann M. Nedell Ms. Lois Needham Mrs. Amanda L. Neill Mr. John F. Nelligan Ms. Mary Kay Nels Ms. Vanessa Nels Ms. Elizabeth A. Nemier Ms. Pamela A. Nesbitt Ms. Donna E. Neuman Chuyen Nguyen Dr. Elizabeth Nguyen Ms. MariJill A. Nicholson Ms. Susan Nicholson

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Nickolas Mr. and Mrs. William N. Nigey III Mr. Trent A. Nish Mr. Sam Noble Ms. Donene Noce Ms. Ann M. Noel Ms. Cheryl Noetscher Ms. Kathy Anne Noonan Northstar Soccer Club, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Wayne J. Nowakowski Mr. Isaac Ntansah-Boateng Mr. Liam O’Bannion Ms. Linda Obit Ms. Danielle O’Brien Ms. Judith O’Brien Ms. Rebecca Obrist Sister Mary Obrist Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. O’Connell Ms. Margaret O’Hara OI ARC Sunshine Club Ms. Martha Okello Ms. Martha O’Leary Ms. Frances Oliva Ms. Kelie I. Oliver Ms. Winifred Olmstead Ms. Linda Olmsted Ms. Mary M. Olson Ms. Karen O’Neill Mr. Peter Opperman Ms. Anne J. Orr Mr. and Mrs. Robert Ortlieb Ms. Rebecca Orzechowicz Mr. and Mrs. Daniel L. Orzell Ms. Susan Osborne Ms. Christine M. Ostrowski Ms. Meghan Ostuni Ms. Christine Osuchowski Mr. and Mrs. John G. Oswald Mr. and Mrs. John C. Ott Ovid Williard Lions Club Mr. Charles H. Owens Yaa Owusu Ms. Abbie Oxford Mr. Richard Paccio Ms. Jill Pacholyk Ms. Christine Pagano Ms. Jennifer Page Ms. Claire Paiko Mrs. Jean Palmiter Ms. Rustina Papini Paragon Mills Elementary Mr. Gerry C. Pardy Ms. Kelly Parker Ms. Suzanne E. Parker Ms. Amber Parkhurst Ms. Kim Parkinson Mr. Gennaro Parlato Parrone Engineering Ms. Katherine Parsons Ms. Assunta Pascarella Ms. Maria Pascarella Ms. Joanne M. Pastella Ms. Charlene Patane Ms. Angelika Patterson Ms. Joyce V. Patterson Mr. Michael F. Patti Mrs. Mary Ann Pawlikowski Ms. Laurie Payne Mr. and Mrs. Edward V. Pearse Mr. and Mrs. Randall Pearse Ms. Ann W. Peglow Ms. April Pelkey Ms. Bethany Pelky Ms. Bonnie J. Penoyer Ms. Carleen Pensero Ms. Elizabeth Peppone Mrs. Mattia Peppone Mr. and Mrs. Fred L. Percival

32   caring Connection

l

Mr. Abe Pereira Mr. Mark E. Perioli The Perrotta Family Ms. Sheila A. Perrotti Mr. Douglas Peterson Ms. Mary Peterson Mr. Richard Petitto Ms. Barbara Petrosky Ms. Arlene Pfohl Ms. Tina Pham Ms. Kathleen Phillips Ms. Lynn Phillips Ms. Susan Phillips Mr. Danny Philpot Ms. Nina Phimmahom Ms. Cathleen Picarel Mr. and Mrs. Louis J. Piedmonte Ms. Sharon Pieper Mrs. Danielle Pierce Ms. Dawn Pierce Mr. Paul Pietrantonio Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Pinchuk Ms. Amy Pine Ms. Lucritia Pine Ms. Tara Pinney Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Pino Mr. and Mrs. Philip Pinsky Ms. Doni Piper Ms. Theresa Piraino Mr. Nicholas Pirro Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Pirro Planned Results, Inc. Mr. Ronald G. Planty Ms. Maryann Platania Ms. Kathleen R. Platco Ms. Ann Platler Ms. Linda Platt Ms. Jean Player Ms. Diane M. Plumadore Ms. Maureen Polacci Mr. Thomas Polhamus, Jr. Ms. Christina Poli Mr. Curtis Pollard Ms. Kathleen Pollastro Mr. Edward Polly Ms. Oksana Pompo Mr. and Mrs. Anthony P. Ponto Ms. Cathy Ponto Ms. Tammy Ponto Ms. Dianne Poore Mrs. Beth Porter Ms. Lori A. Post Ms. Kathleen A. Powell Ms. Katie Powell Ms. Laverne L. Powell Ms. Marty Prater Ms. Sharon Pratt Mr. and Mrs. Duane J. Preske Ms. Bonnie Prevost-Limoges Mr. and Mrs. John J. Prianti Ms. Colleen G. Price Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Prince Mr. and Mrs. Joseph J. Prince, Jr. Ms. Shannon Prince Ms. Kathleen C. Procita Ms. Dianne Procopio Ms. Donna Proulx Ms. Jennifer Prutzman Ms. Eleanor R. Pryor Mr. Walter Pulaski Purcell’s Wallpaper & Paint Co., Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Stephen T. Pynn Ms. Debra Quay Ms. Susan Querreveld Ms. Liz Quill Mr. and Mrs. Irving J. Quinn Ms. Kathleen J. Quinn

St. Joseph’s hospital Health Center

l

Ms. Dominique Racona Ms. Jane Ramont Ms. Connie Randolph Ms. Sonia I. Ranger Ms. Sarah Rasmussen Mr. Gregory Rathbun Ms. Stacey Raughley Ms. Janine Ravesi Mr. James Rayome Mr. Robert H. Read Ms. Kelly Reader Ms. Rhonda Reader Mr. and Mrs. Bruce L. Reagan Ms. Albertina Reale Mr. John D. Reale Mr. and Mrs. George Reck Mr. William Regan Mr. Donald Reifschneider Ms. Susan N. Reilly Ms. Lori Reinhart Ms. Mary Ellen Reistrom Research/Innovations Committee Ms. Betsy Retchless Ms. Amy Rhone Mr. Eric T. Riccardi Ms. Carolyn A. Rich Ms. Jayne E. Richards Ms. Laura K. Richards Ms. Nancy Richards Ms. Theresa Richardson Mrs. Eleanor Riley Mrs. Janice L. Riley Ms. Sue Ellen Rimkevitz Mr. and Mrs. Angelo Rinaldi Mr. and Mrs. Mark A. Rinefierd Ms. June Riordan Mr. Jack Rittenhouse Ms. Suzanne Ritter Ms. Marissa Rivera Ms. Amanda Rivet Ms. Noreen Rix Mr. John E. Rixford Ms. Jamla M. Rizek Karema Rizek Ms. Jean Roach Ms. Katherine Robb Drs. Leo and Linda Roberge Ms. Karen Roberts Mr. Robert W. Robertson Ms. Brittnie Robinson Ms. Ivy Robinson Ms. Pearlena Robinson Drs. Stephen and Linda Nancy Robinson Ms. Summer Rockwell Ms. Mia Rodriguez Ms. Odalys Rodriguez Ms. Katherine Roesser Mr. and Mrs. Brenden Rogers Ms. Carol J. Rogers Ms. Cheryl A. Rollin Mr. and Mrs. Stephen J. Romano Dr. and Mrs. Thomas Romano Mr. Charles Romeo Ms. Jeanne M. Rood Ms. Carroll Root Ms. Antonietta Rosano Ms. Kimberly A. Ross Mr. and Mrs. Dominic Rossi Mr. Peter A. Rossi, Jr. Ms. Rachel Rothman Mr. Kevin P. Rourke Ms. Susan G. Rowles Mr. Richard Rowlinson Ms. Therese M. Royal Yaroslav Rubakha Ms. Brenda Rudy Ms. Christina Rushford

Spring 2011

l

www.sjhsyr.org

Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Rusinko Mr. Claude Russell Ms. Janice H. Russell Dr. and Mrs. Michael Rutkowski Ms. Carol A. Ryan Ms. Kimberly Ryan Ms. Mary Ryan Ms. Jennifer Ryfun Ms. Mary Margaret Sabel Mrs. Vita J. Sada Ms. Ann Sadowski Mr. Albert R. Sahm Mr. Theodore W. Salcedo Mr. Clifford M. Saliba Ms. Elaine M. Salmon Mr. Silvio Salvagni Ms. Rosemary Samentello Ms. Bridget T. Sammon Mr. Kevin Sanborn Ms. Amy Sanderson Mr. Joey Santana Mrs. Michelle Santaro Ms. Nanette A. Santoro Ms. Kathryn Sapp Ms. Elaine Sarem Ms. Catherine Satimore Mr. Erik Sauer Ms. Zakia Saunders Mr. Dale D. Sauro & Family Ms. Pauline Savage Ms. Jodi Sawyer Ms. Cheryl Scaia Ms. M. Kathleen Scanlon Ms. Tina Schad Ms. Anne Schaefer Ms. Jacqueline Schill Mr. Joseph Schiltz Mr. Don Schmidt Mr. David F. Schmitt Mr. Donald H. Schnackel Ms. Stacey Schneble Mr. and Mrs. Karl Schnitzler Ms. Cindy Schnur Ms. Maribeth A. Schoeneck Ms. Dorothea M. Scholes Ms. Cynthia Schultz Mr. Thomas A. Schultz Stephen E. Schwartz, D.D.S. Mr. Neal S. Schweber Ms. Laurianne Schwitter Ms. Jody Scimone Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Scimone Ms. Mary Scimone Ms. Ruth S. Sciortino Scolaro, Shulman, Cohen, Fetter & Burstein, P.C. The Scotsman Press, Inc. Ms. Jessica Scott Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth C. Scott, Jr. Mr. David C. Scrimale Ms. Laura Scruggs Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Scuderi Ms. Linda Sees Mr. and Mrs. Steven Segal Ms. Karen M. Selesky-Siemer Ms. Cheryl Semmens Ms. Sarah M. Sempler Ms. Agnes E. Sennett Ms. Dorine Setter Mr. Paul R. Seymour Mrs. Carol A. Sgarlata Ms. Linda Shaffer Ms. Deborah Shanahan Ms. Laurie Shanahan Ms. Melodie Sharp Mr. and Mrs. Paul Shaver Dr. and Mrs. Michael Sheehan Ms. Elaina P. Sheiman


Ms. Annette Sheldon Ms. Mary Beth Sheldon Ms. Anna V. Shelley Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Shepardson Mr. and Mrs. Stewart Sheppard Mr. John M. Sheridan Sheridan, Edwards, French & Corso Dentists, P.C. Ms. Carolyn Sherwood Ms. Beatrice Shetler Mr. Craig Shoebridge Ms. Elizabeth Shoff Ms. Elizabeth A. Shubsda Ms. Phyllis Sickinger Ms. Pamela Silfer Ms. Candice A. Silino Ms. Bonnie Silva Ms. Kathye M. Silva Mr. and Mrs. Harold J. Silverman Mr. and Mrs. Herbert A. Silverman Ms. Karen Simmons Ms. Lucille Sims Ms. Bonnie Simson Ms. Marcy J. Singer Mr. Gurnek Singh Skaneateles Jewelers Ms. Nancy Skelly Ms. Joanne M. Skeval Ms. Cindy Slavinski Mr. Ralph A. Slepecky Ms. Joanne W. Sliter Ms. Ann Smith Ms. Arlethia Smith Mrs. Carla C. Smith Ms. Carol A. Smith Ms. Cheryl Smith Ms. Danielle Smith Ms. Deborah Smith Mr. and Mrs. Earl J. Smith Mr. Frederick A. Smith Dr. Janet Smith Mr. Mitchell Smith Ms. Rita D. Smith Ms. Robyn Smith Ms. Rosa Smith Ms. Shilo C. Smith Ms. Suzanne Smith Ms. Teri Smithers Ms. Anne Smola Ms. Donna G. Snow Mrs. Joanna Snow Mr. Craig W. Snyder Ms. Joanne Snyder Mr. Orville M. Snyder Dr. Thomas E. Snyder Mr. Eddie Sochia Ms. Tina Sokolova Mr. Richard Sokolowski Ms. Diana Soltis Mr. Paul Sonneborn Mr. and Mrs. Anthony V. Sorrentino Ms. J.R. Soule South Onondaga Fire Dept. Ms. Deborah Sowan Ms. Joanne L. Sparks Ms. Pamela Speach Ms. Velma M. Speer Ms. Susan K. Spencer Ms. Lynnette Spies Ms. Michelle Spinella Ms. Rosaline Spinella Mr. and Mrs. George Spinnegan Mr. James C. Spinner Mr. Andrew Spry Ms. Patricia Squitieri Mr. and Mrs. Frank J. St. Elmo Ms. Mary St. John

St. Joseph’s Infection Control Department St. Joseph’s Nurse Practitioners Dr. Stahl Ms. Judith Stahrr Ms. Claudine Stanley Mr. Erik L. Stannard Ms. Dawn M. Stanton Ms. Diane Stanton Ms. Arleen Stapleton Ms. Christine Stapleton Ms. Stephanie Starie Ms. Kristen L. Stebbins Mr. Lyle Stedman Mr. Eric G. Stephens Ms. Tabitha Stephens Mr. Benjamin Steuerwalt Ms. Erin Stevens Mr. and Mrs. Jack A. Stevens Mr. and Mrs. Michael Stevens Ms. Terri Stevens Mr. Alvin Stever Ms. Debra A. Steves Ms. Diane Steves Ms. Michele Stiles Elena and Arthur Stipanovic Ms. Debra Stith Ms. Deborah A. Stivers Ms. Leslee Stivers Mr. Eric Stohrer and Ms. Gail Calcagnino Ms. Joanna Stump Honorable and Mrs. Glen Suddaby Ms. Karen Sullivan and Mr. Jeff Herrick Summerwood Pediatrics Summit Dental Arts, P.C. The Summit Dental Group, P.C. Summit Environmental Services Ms. Catherine A. Surace Mr. Greg Swain Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Swierczek Ms. Bobbi Swistak Ms. Barbara Synowicki Ms. Sandi Syrko Mr. and Mrs. Gregory Szymaniak Ms. Deborah Szymanowski Ms. Melanie Szymanowski Ms. Erma Tackman Mr. Deifallah Tadrous Mr. James M. Taft Ms. Suzanne M. Talarico Mr. and Mrs. Philip J. Talucci Ms. Christine M. Tancredi Ms. Lauren Tangredi Ms. Brendan Tanner Ms. Debra Tanous Mr. and Mrs. Kevin Tansey Mr. Matt Taranto Ms. Gladys M. Tarlow Ms. Mary Jo Tartaglia Mr. Matthew Tartaglia Mr. George Tarter Ms. Joann Taylor Mr. John W. Taylor Mr. Charles Terotta Mr. Walter G. Terwilliger Ms. Tristan Tesorio Ms. Brooke Thiroux Ms. Peggy A. Thomas Ms. Christina Thompson Ms. Nancy Thompson Mr. William E. Thompson Ms. Bridgit Thomson Mr. and Mrs. Bruce E. Thorpe Ms. Lisa Tibbs Ms. Jessica Tillapaugh Ms. Karen Timmins

www.sjhsyr.org

l

Sister Elizabeth John Timson Mr. and Mrs. Howard Tipper Ms. Lorraine G. Toher Mr. Anthony J. Tolbert Ms. Colleen P. Tompkins Mr. and Mrs. Robert Toomath Ms. Diane Toteda Ms. Jennifer Toteda Ms. Shelley Trace Mr. Mark Tracy Mr. Michael Traino Mr. William Traver Ms. Madeline C. Tremblay Mr. Gregg A. Tripoli Ms. Jacquelin Trosky Ms. Denise Truelson Reverend Richard G. Tucker Ms. Jacquelyn D. Turner Ms. Paula Turtura Ms. Amy Tuttle Dr. and Mrs. John A. Tygart Mr. and Mrs. Charles Tyler Ms. Maria Tymiak Ms. Donna Tyo Mr. Thomas E. Tyo U.S. Financial Life Insurance Co. UBS Financial Services, Inc. Mr. John R. Urciuoli Ms. Sandra Valdez Ms. Camille Valentine Ms. Sundae Valentine Ms. Betty Valerio Ms. Cynthia VanDerveer Ms. Jessica VanEtten Ms. Barbara Vannoy Ms. Vicki VanSlyke Ms. Bette Lou Varden-Wells Mr. Julian Vault Ms. Patricia Vescio Ms. Joann Vetere Mr. John Vincent Mr. Richard B. Vincent, Jr. Mr. John Viola Ms. Suzanne Viola Mr. and Mrs. John B. Vita VNA Systems, Inc. Mr. Meryl S. Vogrin Ms. Mary Jo Vona Ms. Miriam Vosburgh Ms. Carol Vurraro Wachovia Foundation Matching Gifts Program Ms. Barbara Wagoner Mr. Mark Waite Ms. Susan Walburger Dr. and Mrs. Richard Waldman Ms. Constance Waldon Ms. Diane Waldon Ms. Cheri Walker Ms. Tammi Walker Azizzi Waller Ms. Lindsay Walsh Ms. Rose Walters Mr. Russell Walters Mr. and Mrs. Brian K. Walton Mr. John D. Walton Mr. Ronald Ward Mr. Charles A. Warner Ms. Evelyn D. Warner Mr. Timothy Warren Mr. Steven Waterman Ms. Linda Waters Mr. Daniel Webb Ms. Carolyn Weber Ms. Helen Weber Mr. James W. Weber Ms. Juanita Webster-DeLee Mr. Fred Weeks

spring 2011

l

Ms. Wendy S. Weisbrod Mr. Barry Weiss Ms. Heather Welch Mr. Marvin J. Weldin Ms. Lori Welge-Houppert The Wellington House Mr. John A. Wells Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Wells Mr. and Mrs. Melvin J. Wentland Mr. Thomas Wentworth Mr. Ernest G. Werner Ms. Deborah West Ms. Sharon West Ms. Karen M. Whalen Ms. Rebecca Whalen Ms. Sabrina Wheat Ms. Tammy Wheat Mr. Ronald D. Wheatley Ms. Ann Wheelin Ms. Jeannine White Ms. Kirsten White Ms. Catherine S. Whitford Mr. Robert Whitmarsh Ms. Judy Whitney Dr. Therese Whitt Ms. Sandra Whittaker Ms. June M. Wicker Mr. Neil B. Widrick Dr. Eva Wiesner Mr. and Mrs. David B. Wiest Mr. and Mrs. James R. Wiginton Ms. Helen Wilbur Wild Birds Unlimited Ms. Christine William Ms. Bethany Williams Mrs. Carol A. Williams Mr. Emmanuel Williams Mr. Glenn D. Williams Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence R. Williams Ms. Trajanka Williams Ms. Nancy A. Willms Ms. Anne Wilson Mr. Jeff Wilson Ms. Mary Beth Wilson Mr. and Mrs. Frederick R. Windhausen Dr. Monique Winnett Mr. and Mrs. Chris Witting Ms. Joan Wlad Ms. Roberta Wladis Mrs. Florence Wojcik Mr. and Mrs. John J. Wojcik, Jr. Ms. Marilyn Wojnowicz Ms. Rhonda L. Wolfersberger Mr. and Mrs. K. Wolff Mr. and Mrs. Denny Wolterding Mr. Jason Woodsome Mr. Richard L. Worden Ms. Nancy A. Workman Mr. and Mrs. Edward Woyciechowski Ms. Elizabeth A. Woytowicz Ms. Christine Wright Ms. Kim Wright Ms. Rebecca Wright Mr. William E. Wright Ms. Marilyn A. Wurzburger Ms. Barbara Wynkoop Mr. Mike Yacano Ms. Suzanna Yancy Mr. Theodore A. Yandeau Mr. and Mrs. John A. Yandon Mrs. Ann Yankay Ms. Morgan B. Yoder Ms. Cindy Young Ms. Maureen E. Young Mr. and Mrs. Steven Zalatan Mr. James Zampini

St. Joseph’s hospital Health Center

l

Ms. Kimberly A. Zeleznik Mr. and Mrs. Geoffrey M. Ziff Mr. William P. Zimmer Ms. Kara Zimmerman Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph F. Zona Ms. Patricia Zubrowski Mrs. Gina C. Zucker

33

caring Connection   


A Higher Level of Care

The following donations were given “In Honor” as a tribute to an admired individual or “In Memory” of a special loved one. We thank these thoughtful contributors.

In memory of David Baildon Mr. and Mrs. Steven Zalatan In memory of Mary Jane Baker Mrs. Joanna Snow In memory of Ali M. Balume Ms. Yowali Balume In memory of Carmella Barbarino Mr. Ross Barbarino In memory of Joseph Barboline Mr. Brian Barboline In memory of John Basar Ms. Judith Basar In memory of Frederick Batorski Ms. Linda Platt In memory of Ann Baxter Ms. Louise Bogett In memory of Arloe Baxter Ms. Louise Bogett In honor of Dr. Jacqueline Bays Ms. Vivian M. Leonard In memory of Mary Bazan Ms. Elaine B. Cieslak Ms. Deborah Dewey Mrs. Mary Ann Pawlikowski Ms. Cathy Ponto In memory of Larry Nolan Beeman Ms. Darlene D. Abrams In memory of Rita Berdan Ms. Deborah Coyle Ms. Martha Czaplicki Mrs. Nancy B. Hartel Mrs. Rosemary Kaasa Ms. Winifred Olmstead In honor of Art and Joyce Berg Ms. Kristen LaForte-Spoon In memory of Evelyn Berglund Ms. Deirdre P. Pierce In memory of Marion Bessee Ms. Charlotte R. Bessee In honor of Amy L. Bhagalia Ms. Jennifer K. Machmer In honor of Maureen and Jim Bigness Ms. Maureen Bigness In memory of Milton G. Bilyeu Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Burns In memory of Edward Blair Ms. Pamela Blair In memory of Eugene Bloom Mr. Steven Barlow In memory of Anne M. Bogue Mr. and Mrs. Edward Woyciechowski In honor of Fatouma Booh Mr. Adan Warfa In memory of Jerome and Betty Bornhurst Mr. Robert Brunette In memory of Victoria Boskovski Ms. Lily Boskovski In honor of Mary Bove Margaret and Donald Martin In honor of Ryan James Boyer Mr. Ronald Boyer In honor of Easter B. Bradford Ms. Easter Bradford In memory of Roger Bradford, Jr. Ms. Easter Bradford In memory of Beverly Brazell Ms. Ann Brazell

in Honor/in memory In honor of James Abbott Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Bastable In memory of Michael Nolan Abrams Ms. Darlene D. Abrams In honor of Carl Adamy Ms. Stacey Adamy In memory of John Adler Mr. Peter Jones In memory of Jean Aiello Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Campanino Vincent S. Campanino, D.D.S., P.C. Catholic Charities of Onondaga County Mr. Joseph Costantini Dr. and Mrs. Seth S. Greenky Mrs. Mattia Peppone In memory of Mary K. Albertsman McLallen Ms. Helen M. McLallen In memory of A.W. and Inez Allcon Ms. Valarie King In memory of Ronald Amigh Ms. Denise Amigh In memory of Daniel G. Angeloro Ms. Jeanette S. Angeloro In memory of Joseph Armani Ms. Joyce Linnenbach In memory of Thomas Arnold Ms. Lois Murphy In memory of Joseph P. Ascherl Mr. Michael J. Salamone In memory of Mary Margaret Auer Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Auer Auer Family Foundation Mr. and Mrs. James Auer Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Auer Mr. and Mrs. Steve Auer Mr. and Mrs. Ted Auer Mr. and Mrs. William Auer Mr. and Mrs. David E. Berman Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. Bielemeier Mr. and Mrs. Rob Bonanno Build.Com, Inc. Mr. Gary Carlston Ms. Laurie J. Carr Dr. and Mrs. Robert A. Cooper Decorative Product Source Mr. and Mrs. Don Ferruggia Mr. and Mrs. Donald Fitzgerald Mr. and Mrs. John Greis Mrs. Charlene Griffith Mr. Gary Gunsel and Ms. Patricia Murphy Mr. and Mrs. Thomas T. Hanford Mr. and Mrs. Donald Jordan Mr. and Mrs. Howard Lambertson Mr. and Mrs. William McDonagh Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Nappi Mr. and Mrs. Fred L. Percival Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Pino Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Prince Mr. Jack Rittenhouse Mr. and Mrs. Brenden Rogers Mr. and Mrs. Michael Stevens Mr. Eric Stohrer and Ms. Gail Calcagnino Ms. Carolyn Weber Mr. James W. Weber In memory of Tucker Ausman Ms. Deborah West In memory of Donald C. Austin Ms. Christine Austin

34   caring Connection

l

In memory of Bianca Bresadola Mr. Timothy Warren In memory of Margaret Bresnahan O’Hara Ms. Margaret O’Hara In memory of Mr. and Mrs. George Briggs Ms. Margaret B. Ball In memory of Jeanne Bronson Ms. Debra Day In memory of Cheryl Brown Ms. Louise Bogett In memory of Frederic Brown Ms. Mary Beth Sheldon In memory of Gerald Brown Ms. Lynn Basile In memory of Jane Brown Wladis Law Firm, PC In memory of Susan D. Burke Ms. Dawn M. Stanton In memory of M. Pauline Calenzo Ms. Paulinna R. Macko In honor of Justin Campbell Ms. Donna Ferris In memory of Samuel Cangemi Ms. Marion Cangemi In honor of Wattie and Aubrey Capers Ms. Antonise Capers In memory of August Caponecchi Young & Franklin Inc. In memory of Dr. Henry Capozzella Mr. Mark H. Capozzella In memory of W. Caraher Mr. Tom Kinney In memory of Deacon Pio Carranti Ms. Barbara Carranti Mr. Peter F. Carranti Mr. and Mrs. Michael P. Smith In memory of Eleanor Carson Ms. Laura Dodge In honor of St. Joseph’s Case Management Service Ms. Mary Luziani In memory of George A. M. Cashman Mr. Philip C. Khairi In memory of Margaret M. Castle Mr. Rick Castle In memory of Semida Castro Dr. and Mrs. Luis Castro In memory of Edward L. and Mary Cavaleri Devine Ms. Cynthia Kolis In honor of The Cedeno Family Mr. Antonio Cedeno In memory of John Celio Mrs. Josephine Celio In memory of Mary Ellen Chapman Mr. Paul F. Chapman Mrs. Christine Chapman-Angiolillo In honor of Paul F. Chapman Mrs. Christine Chapman-Angiolillo In memory of Harvey Chase Ms. Heather Bulla In memory of James and Lillian Chetwin Ms. Jodi Sawyer In honor of The Nedell Children Ms. Juliann M. Nedell In memory of Lee Anna Chipp Mr. Ronnie A. McIntyre, Jr. In honor of Jesus Christ Ms. Harmony M. Frigon In memory of Michael Cifaratta Ms. Ann Sadowski In honor of Jane Clancy Mrs. Mary Davis

St. Joseph’s hospital Health Center

l

Spring 2011

l

In honor of Katie Cleary Mr. Timothy Cleary In memory of Sandra Clemons Ms. Monica A. Clemons-Vincent In memory of Donald Coe Mr. Donald Day, Jr. In memory of Rita Cole Mrs. Beth Porter In memory of Doris Coleman Ms. Zakia Saunders In memory of Fransica Colon Ms. Aida Custodio In memory of Dylan Michael Colvin Ms. Vicki Morey In memory of Dr. Mark Conan Mr. Timothy Conan In memory of Patricia Conan Mr. Timothy Conan In memory of Santo Conte Mr. and Mrs. Melvin J. Wentland In memory of Shirley Cooper Ms. Cheryl E. Cooper In memory of C. Thomas Costello Mr. Thomas E. Costello In memory of Marjorie Coyne Ms. Lola Caputo In honor of Lisa, Scott and Paul Crockford Ms. Marlene Crockford In memory of Dennis L. Cromp Ms. Michelle Bishop In memory of David Cuffy Wladis Law Firm, PC In memory of Sister Mary Sheila Daley Mr. and Mrs. Peter A. Congel In honor of The D’Alfonso Family Ms. Debra D’Alfonso In memory of Robert Davenport Book Ends Book Club In memory of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick David Ms. Dawn M. Stanton In memory of Frederick and Viola Davis Mr. and Mrs. Neil Davis In memory of Peter Davis Ms. Patricia Davis In memory of Erma Day Mr. Geoffrey Day In memory of Bernard Delello Ms. Marla R. Murray In memory of Rose Delello Ms. Marla R. Murray In memory of Edmund DeMatteo Mr. Philip DeMatteo In memory of Anthony and Blanche Denall Dr. Elizabeth Nguyen In memory of Giles M. Denny, Jr. Ms. Jodi M. Donahue In memory of Mathew Thomas DeVeau Ms. Lydia A. DeVeau In memory of James and Leabra DiMento Ms. Dolores Harris In memory of Robert and Patricia DiRubbo Ms. Teresa Moroz In memory of Wayne Dodge, Jr. Mr. William Traver In honor of Donna Dominic Mrs. Beth Porter In honor of Mike Donovan Ms. Peggy A. Thomas In honor of Marie Doran Mrs. Natalia Doran

www.sjhsyr.org


In honor of Bea and Ed Driscoll Mr. Robert Driscoll In memory of Alexis Duger Mr. Jack H. Duger In memory of Mark Dunn Ms. Janice M. Kozma In memory of Mary L. Dwyer Ms. Mary Ann Dwyer Ms. Michele A. Dwyer In memory of Dennis Earl Mr. Robert Griffin In memory of Joyce and Edwin Eckel Ms. Susan M. Baum In memory of David Edmonds Ms. Nancy K. Edmonds In honor of Dr. Gerald Edsell Mr. and Mrs. Geoffrey M. Ziff In memory of Jake Edwards Ms. Zakia Saunders In memory of Vincenza and John Egidio Ms. Janice Fenn In memory of William and Maggie Eifler Ms. Mary M. Olson In honor of The Endries Family Mr. Michael F. Endries In memory of Joseph F. Eppolito Ms. Shirley J. Boyd In memory of Edward and Jennie Falkowski Ms. Nancy J. Galipeau In honor of Dr. Paul T. Fallon Greater Kansas City Community Foundation In memory of Lorraine and Roland Fay Ms. Deborah A. Stivers In memory of Michael Fecco Wladis Law Firm, PC In memory of Mary Irene Fetterly Ms. Allison Lewis In honor of Karen Filkins Ms. Tina Pham In memory of Margaret Findley Ms. Kathleen Findley In memory of Rose Finelli Dr. Joseph F. Finelli In honor of Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Finelli, Sr. Mrs. Catherine Hayden In memory of Sr. Letitia Fischer Ms. Barbara Keith In memory of Bertha Fitzer Mr. and Mrs. Donald N. Fitzer In honor of Julie Flack Mrs. Eileen Amedio In honor of Karessa Flemmings Mr. Larry D. Flemmings In memory of Gertrude Foell Mr. and Mrs. John D. Deleo In memory of William F. Foley Mr. and Mrs. Michael E. Bartowski Mrs. N. Patricia Foley Mr. and Mrs. Brian V. Foster Mr. and Mrs. Donald B. Gallery Mr. and Mrs. Paul A. Hoag Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. Hubbard Mr. and Mrs. Brian K. Walton Mr. and Mrs. John A. Yandon In memory of Joanne Frawley Ms. Susan Frawley In memory of James Fresina Mrs. Adele Fresina In memory of Cindy Friske Ms. Patricia O. Johnson In memory of Earl Fults, Jr. Wladis Law Firm, PC

In memory of Richard P. Fye Mr. Douglas Fye In memory of Mary Gabriel Ms. Sabrina Bush In memory of Domenico Galimi Ms. Marylin Galimi In memory of Anthony L. Galli Ms. Kim Wright In honor of David S. Gandino Ms. Ellen Barbas In memory of Mr. and Mrs. Jos P. Ganey Ms. Kathy Johnson In honor of The Garafalo Family Ms. Mary Anne O. Garafalo In memory of Matthew Garrett Mr. Richard E. Garrett In memory of Daniel Gersch Ms. Cynthia Gersch-Cianfavano In memory of Jillian Gilbert Ms. Jennifer L. Hosler In memory of Carol Gloska Ms. Ann Mann In memory of Carmen Francis Goffredo Mrs. Patricia Major In memory of Helen Gondeck Mrs. Ann Yankay In honor of Helen Gonza Ms. Jacquelyn Gonza In memory of Stephen Gonza Ms. Jacquelyn Gonza In memory of Patricia Goodroe Ms. Jaclyn Iasnik In memory of Edward and Marguerite Gratien Mrs. Patricia A. Burton In memory of Linda Green-McDonald Ms. Laura Gray In memory of Leonard Greenwood Wladis Law Firm, PC In memory of Ernest Grillo Ms. Sandi Syrko In memory of Giuseppe Grimaldi Ms. Nanette A. Santoro In memory of Edward and Ida Guancial Ms. Deborah Guancial In memory of Emerson Haag Ms. Barbara Haag In memory of John P. Hable, Sr. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas F. Hurley, Jr. In memory of George Harris Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Kiggins In memory of Ruth K. Harrison Mr. Joey Santana In memory of John and Joan Hartner Ms. Kathryn Sapp In memory of Ilene Harvey Mr. Kenneth Curry In memory of Mark Harwood Ms. Wendy M. Van DerBogart In memory of Nancy Hellwig Mrs. Cheryl Thomas In memory of Chris L. Henderson Ms. Patricia S. Henderson In memory of Jim and Sarah Hillenbrand Mr. Greg May In memory of Alexey Hlad Ms. Mary Hlad In memory of David Hollenbeck Ms. Ronda Huston In honor of Dr. Pamela Horst Ms. Reggie I. Adler In memory of Mr. and Mrs. William Horstman Ms. Sylvia R. King

www.sjhsyr.org

l

spring 2011

l

In memory of Marie Ada Houck Ms. Cynthia Cheney Ms. Carolyn D. Hofmann Ms. Lorri Ingison Ms. Lisa T. Mitchell Ms. Bridget T. Sammon Ms. Laurianne Schwitter In memory of James Hurley Ms. Margaret A. Biddlecome Ms. Kathryn C. Blundell Mrs. Natalie Cavalieri Ms. Rosa Clark Ms. Roberta J. Crouch Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Finistrella Ms. Kaitlin Hunkele Mr. and Mrs. Len Kagelmacher Ms. Alise H. Karchmer Brzezinski Mr. and Mrs. Clifford L. Karchmer Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Kenney Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Lounsbery Mr. and Mrs. Michael McGrath MGM Auto Parts Mr. and Mrs. Lee M. Miringoff Mr. Gerry C. Pardy Ms. Elizabeth Peppone Ms. Carolyn A. Rich Mr. Benjamin Steuerwalt The Perrotta Family Mr. Anthony J. Tolbert In memory of Jack and Ceil Huss Ms. Kristine Hall In honor of The Iacono Family Ms. Maureen Iacono In memory of Robert Indick Ms. Mary Indick In memory of Vincent Internicola Mr. and Mrs. George J. Markowitz In memory of James Allen Jackson Ms. Doni Piper In memory of Nancy Jackson Mr. and Mrs. Donald M. Commerford, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Gerard A. DiGiovanni Mr. and Mrs. Dennis R. Hedges Mr. and Mrs. James F. Kanaley Mr. and Mrs. Kevin J. Kearney Mr. and Mrs. John M. Michalec Mrs. Patricia A. Morreale Mr. and Mrs. Anthony V. Sorrentino In memory of Audrey James Ms. LaToya Mitchell In memory of Henry Jasinski Ms. Anne J. Orr In memory of James Jenkins Ms. Tacy Jenkins In honor of Mary Ellen Jenkins Ms. Tacy Jenkins In memory of Marilyn Jenkusky Mr. Jeffrey Jenkusky In honor of Sister Joan Clare Jenny Mr. and Mrs. Edward Grabowski In memory of Donald E. and Charlotte L. Jochem Ms. Denise Jochem-Robertson In honor of Gary and Mary Anne Johnson Ms. Melanie Bixby In memory of Edwin and Kathleen Jordan Ms. Jennifer Hirsh In memory of Dr. Marc Kahgan Mr. Paul Sonneborn In memory of Robert and Bertha Karkruff Ms. Cheryl Moore In memory of Nancy Karlovitz Ms. Lori Femano In memory of Barry E. Katz Mr. Christopher Katz

St. Joseph’s hospital Health Center

In memory of Isaac and Jennie Katzowitz Ms. Ronni Ann Katzowitz In honor of Elaine Marie Kazakis and Family Ms. Elaine M. Kazakis In honor of Bill Kelly Mr. James D. Fyler In memory of Daniel J. Kernan Ms. Liliana Kernan In memory of The William Kieffer Family Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph F. Zona In honor of Mary L. Kilmer Ms. Jill Pacholyk In memory of Eleanor Kindt Ms. Beverly DeSignor In memory of John J. King Ms. Mary Teske In memory of Nancy A. King Ms. Christine Bowers In memory of James Kirby Ms. Joni Blackburn Mr. and Mrs. Henry L. Hilliker Mr. and Mr. Daniel D. Marusiak Ms. Pamela A. Nesbitt Ms. Kathleen R. Platco Ms. Velma M. Speer In honor of Kristina Klapan Ms. Lisa Klapan In memory of Reverend and Mrs. John S. Klo Mr. and Mrs. John Lallier In memory of Lorraine Klobus Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Battaglia Chestnut Hill Elementary School – Social Committee Northstar Soccer Club, Inc. In memory of Shirley Knittel Mr. and Mrs. Dale E. Bort Mr. and Mrs. Lewis C. Herzog Ms. Edith S. Kauer Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Koes Mr. and Mrs. Edward V. Pearse In memory of Thomas Kohler Ms. Kate Kohler In memory of Walter and Pauline Kosinski Mr. Robert Kosinski In memory of Peter Kostyk Ms. Phyllis Sickinger In memory of Thelma Kottage Ms. Joanne Kottage In memory of Bernie Kraft Ms. Deborah Fradette In honor of Phyllis Krombach Ms. Jodine H. Crast In memory of Michael Kruegman Ms. Deborah Sowan In memory of Wes T. Kubacki Ms. Maryann Katz In memory of Julius Kuno Ms. Marianne Aman J. Anselment Belgium Cold Springs Volunteer Fire Department Ms. Kathleen M. Burlin Mr. and Mrs. Patrick J. Clancy Mr. and Mrs. Joseph E. Doyle Mr. Walter M. Gleason, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Francis E. Hatch Dr. and Mrs. Douglas A. Jones Ms. Helen E. Kuno Ms. Erin Lacey Mr. and Mrs. Robert Ortlieb Paragon Mills Elementary

l

35

caring Connection   


A Higher Level of Care

Planned Results, Inc. Ms. Laverne L. Powell Mr. Theodore W. Salcedo Ms. Agnes E. Sennett Mr. Paul R. Seymour South Onondaga Fire Dept. Mr. and Mrs. Howard Tipper Mr. and Mrs. David B. Wiest Mr. and Mrs. K. Wolff In memory of John H. Ladd Mr. William Regan In memory of Josephine LaFave Ms. Cheryl Semmens In memory of Christopher LaFrance Ms. Karen LaFrance In honor of Annette L. Lamb Ms. Rhonda L. Wolfersberger In honor of James and Michelle Lamb Ms. Michelle Lamb In memory of Vincent F. Lang Ms. Nancy L. Miller In honor of Roseanne and Vincent LaValle Ms. Teresa M. LaValle In memory of Eleanor Lawrence Mr. Michael Lawrence In honor of Sofia Rose Lawson Ms. Fiorina Colosi In memory of Charles Lawyer Ms. Margaret G. Meccariello In memory of Arthur Leatz Mr. John Mancini In honor of Ben and Joyce Lees Ms. Karen M. Whalen In memory of Theresa Lewis Mr. Russell Walters In memory of Bernice Liberman Drs. Stanley Meltzer and Patricia Randall In memory of Thomas L. Limoges Ms. Bonnie Prevost-Limoges In honor of Dr. George Litman Ms. Diane Coogan In memory of Carol Livingston Ms. Beth A. Currado In honor of The LoCastro Family Mr. Peter L. Hudson In honor of Zachary Loeb Mr. Michael Loeb In memory of Vito W. Losito Ms. Lisa M. Losito In memory of Bill and Esther Loucks Ms. Susan N. Reilly In honor of Mary Jane Loverock Ms. Susan Grundy In memory of Kathleen Lowery Balcom Ms. Ann Field In memory of Frank D. Luckette Ms. Kimberly L. Luckette In memory of Andrew Luke Ms. Gladys Cornish Ms. Deborah J. Hopkins Mr. and Mrs. Paul H. Hudson Mrs. Karin W. Kellogg Ms. Roberta Morgan Mrs. Amanda L. Neill Ted and Diane Pasinski In memory of Florence Lyboldt Ms. Jacqueline M. Lyboldt In memory of Melvin MacEwen Mr. and Mrs. James R. Beavan Mr. and Mrs. Bert R. Belanger Mr. and Mrs. Jack A. Clark Ms. Laurie J. Davis Mr. and Mrs. Paul Fruzzetti Mr. and Mrs. Jim Laurain Ms. Dianne L. Mac Ewen Ms. Susan Moon

36   caring Connection

l

OI ARC Sunshine Club Ms. Eleanor R. Pryor In memory of Pete and Regina Macko Mr. Daniel Macko In honor of Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Madden Ms. Faith L. Madden In memory of Mr. and Mrs. James Maher Mr. and Mrs. James E. Gorman In memory of Robert Maher Mr. and Mrs. James E. Gorman In memory of Betty, Fred and Phillip Main Ms. Jan Main In memory of Genevieve Maloney Mr. Robert J. Maloney In honor of Anna Marineli Ms. Theresa Meyers In memory of Daniel Marley Ms. Diana Marley In memory of Patrick Marley Ms. Diana Marley In honor of Margaret R. Martin Ms. Marcia Hill In memory of Shelley Martin Ms. Maureen Polacci In honor of Dr. Mehdi Marvasti Mrs. Sudaphorn Boyce In memory of Peter Tuller Masters Ms. Perrine E. Masters In memory of Denise Mathews Ms. Cathleen Donegan In memory of James McBride Ms. Linda Shaffer In memory of Arlene D. McCarthy Ms. Shannon Colvin In memory of John F. McCurn Ms. Laura Scruggs In memory of Charles M. McManus Ms. Karen McManus In memory of Jill McShane Ms. Paula Turtura In memory of Abhay Mehta Radhika Mehra In honor of Albert and Margarete Meyers Ms. Gail M. Longcore In memory of Roxanne Meyers Mr. James F. Meyers, Jr. In memory of Robert and Jane Miller Ms. Mary Beth Campo In memory of Shirley Montgomery Ms. Martha O’Leary In memory of Vera Morelli Mr. James J. Morelli In memory of Helen Morley Ms. Sue Ellen Kirschenheiter In memory of Marie Mosey Ms. Carol Farrell Ms. Dolores J. Foley Ms. Dorothy M. Marventano In memory of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel P. Moynihan Ms. Margit Bluto In memory of Timothy G. Mulcahey Ms. Rick Castle In honor of Joe and Joan Mulderig Mr. Martin Mulderig In memory of Salvatore and Caterina Mule Ms. Frances Meehan In memory of Dr. Edward Mullin Ms. Kathryne Blowers

In memory of Shin Murnane Ms. Carol Murnane In honor of Don and Janice Myers Ms. Joan Marie Myers In memory of Martha and Walter Nels Ms. Elizabeth A. Woytowicz In memory of John J. Netti Ms. Adele M. Cutrone In memory of Patricia Neu Ms. Regina Macholl In memory of Jasmine Nicole Ms. Shelley Trace In memory of Vera Niles Mr. and Mrs. John F. Martin In memory of Alice Norris Mrs. Mae Loveland In memory of Agnes L. Obrist Ms. Jennifer Page In honor of Jim and Carole Obrist Ms. Rebecca Obrist In memory of Norman Obrist Ms. Jennifer Page In honor of Sister Mary Obrist Ms. Margaret M. Jevis Mr. Howard Lewis Ms. Katherine J. Mueller Mr. and Mrs. George Reck Ms. Suzanne M. Talarico In memory of Anthony and Grace Oliva Mrs. Josephine Celio In memory of Jack Olmsted Ms. Linda Olmsted In honor of Vincent and Helen Orzel Ms. Mary Jo Vona In memory of Ethel Ostrander Ms. Gloria Alexander In memory of Josephine Pagano Mr. and Mrs. John C. Ott U.S. Financial Life Insurance Co. In memory of Frank and Sarah Paratore Ms. Joanne Dority In memory of Alfred and Mary Jane Parker Ms. Marian E. DelGobbo In memory of Patricia Parkhurst Ms. Linda Obit In memory of Martin Parkinson Ms. Kim Parkinson In memory of Carmel Parlato Ms. Maria Agosh Mr. Gennaro Parlato In memory of Charles Parsons Ms. Katherine Parsons In memory of Amparo Pasamba Ms. Georgianna Javier In honor of Theodore M. Pasinski Sisters of St. Francis of the Neumann Communities Ms. Shirley J. Boyd Sr. Gratia Eallonardo In memory of Karen Payment Mrs. Mae Loveland In memory of Roger E. Penoyer Ms. Bonnie J. Penoyer In memory of Carol Lee Pereira Mr. Abe Pereira Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Wells In memory of Bernard Petrosy Ms. Barbara Petrosky In memory of The Phillips and Yerger Families Ms. Kathy Austin In memory of Danny Phillips Mr. Jim Egan

St. Joseph’s hospital Health Center

l

Spring 2011

l

In memory of Mary Pietrantonio Mr. Paul Pietrantonio In memory of Eleinor Piper-Jackson Ms. Doni Piper In memory of David Pirong Ms. Joy Eidt In honor of Bernice Poel Ms. Doreen M. Moltrup In memory of John Poel Ms. Doreen M. Moltrup In memory of Edward L. Polly, Jr. Mr. Edward Polly In honor of Frank and Oksana Pompo Mr. and Mrs. James Pompo In memory of Kathryn Powers Ms. Libby Capriotti In memory of Robert Primo Mr. John D. Reale In memory of Rick Proctor Mr. Fred Caesar In memory of Barbara Proppe Ms. Rhonda L. Wolfersberger In memory of Robert E. Pudney, Jr. Ms. Kristen Hines In memory of William Putzer Chelsea Building Products Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P. Hahn Ms. Gail Kinsella In memory of Sylvia Raughley Ms. Stacey Raughley In memory of Hestana Reese Ms. Maudine Acevedo In honor of Margaret Reff Mr. Andrew Spry In honor of Sister Rose Ann Renna Ms. Anne Schaefer In honor of Jacob Ethan Rheaume Mr. James Rayome In memory of Dr. Jenifer Rich Ms. Elisabeth M. Bolduc In memory of Darlene Richardson Mr. Sam J. Lanza In memory of Russell K. Richer Ms. Suzanne K. Kroth In memory of Edward Richman Ms. Stacey Brooks In memory of William Riggall, Sr. Mr. William Riggall In memory of George and Mary Rinaldi Mr. Gregg Rinaldi In honor of Rhonda Rinaldo Ms. Kim Dingman In memory of Martha Riordan Mr. Andrew Spry In memory of Sharon L. Roberts Ms. Rita Harris In honor of Susan K. Rourke Mr. Kevin P. Rourke In memory of Kathryn Rowbottom Ms. Amber Parkhurst In honor of Kathryn Ruscitto Dr. Bobby Pohar In memory of Catherine Ryan Margaret and Donald Martin In memory of William and Mary Sabel Ms. Mary Margaret Sabel In honor of Trudy Sacco Ms. Michele A. Dwyer In memory of Anthony Sada, Sr. Mrs. Vita J. Sada In memory of Lillian Sadlocha Ms. Catherine S. Whitford In memory of John and Mary Alice Salanger Ms. Patricia Costello

www.sjhsyr.org


In honor of Carolyn Sandford Mr. Thomas Sandford In honor of Floyd Sandford Mr. Thomas Sandford In memory of Marie Sauro Mr. Dale D. Sauro and Family In memory of Bill and Gert Scalzo Ms. Judi L. Bliss In memory of William P. Scanlon Mr. and Mrs. Timothy E. Scanlon In memory of Dr. Robert Schelper Ms. Ruth N. Holliday In memory of Carmella Scherr Mr. Mike Scherr In memory of Donna Schneble Ms. Stacey Schneble In honor of Michelle Schneider Margaret and Donald Martin In memory of George Schrader Ms. Michelle Glaski In memory of Debbie Schumaker Ms. Mary Huxford In memory of George Schumpf, Sr. Ms. Debra Quay In memory of John E. Scott Ms. Heather A. Flanagan In memory of Jesse Scruton Ms. Amanda R. Howland In honor of Nicholas Sees Ms. Linda Sees In memory of Richard Segreti Mr. Steven J. Shih In memory of K. Shannon-Yandeau American College of Radiology Anonymous Mr. L. Bruce Crabtree Ms. Janice Dyball Mr. Theodore A. Yandeau In memory of Katie Shatraw Ms. Suzanne Smith In memory of Michael J. Shelmidine Ms. Denise Johnson In memory of Thomas Shepardson Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Shepardson In memory of Victor J. Shepardson Ms. Virginia Kapusta In memory of Edward Shoebridge Ms. Jan Bauman Mr. Craig Shoebridge In memory of Charles Simek Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Cardone Mr. and Mrs. R. Blake Murphy Ms. Claire Paiko Mr. Neal S. Schweber Mr. and Mrs. John B. Vita In memory of Gerald and Catherine Simmons Ms. Deborah Guancial In memory of Joseph and Alta Singer Ms. Marcy J. Singer In honor of The Sisters of St. Francis Mr. Howard Lewis In memory of Ruby Sitnik Estate of Ruby Sitnik In honor of SJHHC Employees Mrs. Linda Corrigan In memory of Anthony and Thelma Skane Ms. Marissa Rivera In memory of Arlene K. Skellett Mr. and Mrs. Arthur J. Bradstreet Linda Kunzer-Faynor Mr. James C. Little Mr. and Mrs. William N. Nigey III Mr. and Mrs. John G. Oswald Mr. Richard Paccio

In memory of Jim Slattery Ms. Deborah Lehman In memory of Ellie Smith, RN Ms. Kelly Parker In memory of Catherine Snyder Dr. Thomas E. Snyder In memory of Sheryl Dorothy Snyder Ms. Craig W. Snyder In memory of Robert Southard, Jr. Ms. Susan House In memory of Ann Sova Dr. and Mrs. Michael Gridley In memory of Leonard Spaziani Alliance Bank N.A. Ms. Irene Boucher COR Development Company, LLC Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Dempsey Mr. and Mrs. James M. Laboda Parrone Engineering Mr. and Mrs. Bruce E. Thorpe Ms. Nancy A. Workman In memory of Roy W. Spies Ms. Lynnette Spies In honor of Sister Jacqueline Spiridilozzi Mr. John Cavender In memory of Stella Sroka Mr. and Mrs. Henry J. Kolakoski Mr. and Mrs. George J. Markowitz Ms. Stella J. Sroka Mrs. Mary Ann Wood In memory of Thelma Starling Ms. Arlethia Smith In memory of Ann Stemmler Ms. Patricia A. Calpeter In memory of John and Gabrilla Stevens Ms. Betty Valerio In memory of Elizabeth Stever Mr. Alvin Stever In memory of Myron, May and Sharon Stivers Ms. Leslee Stivers In memory of Mary Swinsick Ms. Susan M. Aldrich In honor of Gerard L. Syrocki Ms. Dorothy Haag In memory of Walter and Helen Tansey Mr. John Salemme In memory of Kevin L. Tansey, Sr. Mr. and Mrs. Kevin Tansey In memory of Joyce Tartaglia Ms. Mary Jo Tartaglia In memory of Vito Terzulli Ms. Lynn Phillips In honor of Donna J. Thomas Ms. Christina Rushford In memory of Charlotte G. Thompson Mr. William E. Thompson In memory of Mary and Paul Tindall Ms. Kathryn Morgan In memory of Cindy Titus Mr. and Mrs. Donald G. Knapp, Sr. In memory of Olga and Thomas E. Toher Ms. Lorraine G. Toher In honor of Bob Triggs Carol and Robert Triggs In memory of Philip Tripolone Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence R. Williams In memory of James and Agnes Tuck Ms. Virginia G. Giarusso In memory of Philip A. Tully Ms. Maureen Bogardus In memory of Francis E. Turo Ms. Kathleen Turo

www.sjhsyr.org

l

spring 2011

l

In honor of Loretta C. Turo Ms. Kathleen Turo In honor Elaine and Rodney VanEtten Ms. Jessica VanEtten In memory of Raymond VanGiesen Mrs. Jean Palmiter In memory of Stella VanGiesen Mrs. Jean Palmiter In memory of Stanley VanScoter Margaret and Donald Martin Ted and Diane Pasinski In memory of Robert Varden Ms. Bette Lou Varden-Wells In memory of Margaret Vault Mr. Julian Vault In memory of Ann Marie Verostek Ms. Kathleen Bullion Ms. Dawn Harris Ms. Melissa Muldoon Mr. and Mrs. Anthony P. Ponto Ms. Barbara Synowicki In honor of Albert Viola, Sr. Mr. John Viola In memory of Clement Wadden Ms. Debbie Hill In memory of George Waelde Ms. Janice M. Anderton Mrs. Lynda M. Angiolillo Ms. Denise Castro Ms. Julie A. Farr Mr. and Mrs. James M. Ford Ms. Sheila Fritz Mrs. Ann E. Keenan Ms. Joanne M. Pastella Ms. Mary Scimone In memory of Joanne Paino Walker Mr. H. Edward Walker In memory of James W. Walker, M.D. Mr. Orville M. Snyder In memory of John Walsh Syracuse ASC Management, LLC Dr. Kevin M. Walsh In memory of Sophia Waltz Anonymous Ms. Tracy A. Collins Mr. Mark Hoffmeister Mr. and Mrs. Alan G. Kendall Mrs. Deborah A. Kolod Ms. J.R. Soule In memory Hadi Warfa Mr. Adan Warfa In memory of Frederick Warner Ms. Evelyn D. Warner In memory of Eleanor Warrick Ms. Sharon P. Anderson Ms. Eileen Boyd Mr. and Mrs. Anthony F. Crupi Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. DeRidder Ms. Marie Free Ms. Deborah A. Guenther Ovid Williard Lions Club Mr. and Mrs. George Spinnegan In memory of Laure Waterman Mr. Steven Waterman In memory of Andrew Weiland Ms. Grace Bristol In memory of Janet Welge Ms. Lori Welge-Houppert In memory of Irma Wells Ms. Laura B. Darling In memory of Al and Toby White Ms. Bette Lou Varden-Wells In memory of Thomas White Ms. Marcia M. Bacon Mr. and Mrs. John R. Briggs Ms. Chloe Budenhagen Ms. Catherine B. DiLorenzo

St. Joseph’s hospital Health Center

Ms. Dawn Harris Ms. Dorothy E. Heller Dr. and Mrs. Richard Mayne Mr. and Mrs. Wayne J. Nowakowski Mr. and Mrs. Michael P. Smith Ms. Karen Sullivan and Mr. Jeff Herrick In memory of Eva Whorrall Ms. Yvette Dixon In memory of Bill Wilkinson Ms. Faye A. Brooks Ms. Susan C. McLoughlin Mr. and Mrs. Duane J. Preske The Scotsman Press, Inc. Ms. Joanne W. Sliter In memory of Earl Williams Mrs. Carla C. Smith In memory of Earline Williams Ms. Mary Brice In memory of Helen M. Williams Ms. Patricia D. Burke In memory of Donald and Clara Wilmot Ms. Clarissa DeLong In honor of The Winderl-Schoeneck Family Ms. Maribeth A. Schoeneck In memory of Paul, Josephine and Andrew Winkelmann Ms. Monica Eades In memory of Frank Witek Ms. Elizabeth A. Karan In memory of Mr. and Mrs. Francis M. Wlad Ms. Joan Wlad In honor of Tyler Wladis Drs. Larry and Jayne Charlamb Mr. and Mrs. Irwin Davidson Ms. Bonnie W. Eisenfeld Mr. and Mrs. Bart D. Franey Ms. Lauren Greenberg Mr. and Mrs. Victor J. Hershdorfer Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Hornik Mr. and Mrs. Matthew T. Huber Mr. and Mrs. Ira M. Kopito Mr. and Mrs. Charles Landy Mr. and Mrs. Philip H. Lilienthal Lisa Snyder Consulting Mr. and Mrs. Stuart A. Mencher Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Miller Mr. and Mrs. Kevin C. Murphy Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Pinchuk Mr. and Mrs. Steven Segal Mr. and Mrs. Harold J. Silverman Mr. and Mrs. Herbert A. Silverman Ms. Gladys M. Tarlow Mr. Barry Weiss Wladis Law Firm, PC Ms. Roberta Wladis In memory of John J. Wojcik Mrs. Florence Wojcik In memory of Dennis Wolterding Mr. and Mrs. Denny Wolterding In honor of Devin and Cierra Wolterding Mr. and Mrs. Denny Wolterding In memory of A.P. Worden Mr. Richard L. Worden In honor of R.G. Worden Mr. Richard L. Worden In memory of Mr. and Mrs. Mark Worley Ms. Faith L. Madden

l

37

caring Connection   


A Higher Level of Care

Save These Dates St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center Foundation presents:

Green & Silver Gala: An Eco-Chic Evening Friday, June 3, 2011 Turning Stone Resort & Casino St. Joseph’s Foundation’s annual Gala Dinner Dance will celebrate the first stage of one of the largest “green” building projects in Upstate New York—St. Joseph’s emergency services building—as well as the 20th (Green) anniversary of successful galas held to support the hospital’s many programs and services. Sponsored by Central New York Infusion Services, LLC, the eco-chic evening will take place in hues from emerald green to pearl gray, featuring sumptuous dining and dancing to live music by Atlas. Cocktails will begin at 6:45 p.m. in the event center atrium, with dinner and dancing following at 8 p.m. in the main ballroom. Black tie is optional. Overnight accommodations are available at a discounted rate by calling 1-800-771-7711. The Gala will feature Champagne “On Ice” during which one lucky guest will take home a pair of 1-carat total weight diamond stud earrings. Raffle prizes for the evening include: a Ford Mustang Coupe summer rental donated by AmeriCar, a Turning Stone Resort Putt & Pamper Package, a custom closet makeover from California Closets, and a private dinner party package for 10 people from Karen’s Catering/Julie’s Place. Co-chairs of this year’s Gala are Susan MerolaMcConn, MD, Mark McConn, MD, Alan Simons, MD, and Deborah Simons. Tickets are $200 per person or $300 per patron. A patron table of 10 is $3,000. Gala sponsorship and advertising opportunities are available. Sponsorship levels begin at $300, and program ads start at just $100.

19th Annual Golf Classic 2011 Friday, Sept. 9, 2011 Turning Stone Resort & Casino Try your swing on one of three unique courses at St. Joseph’s 19th Annual Golf Classic, the region’s largest and most anticipated charity golf event. Choose from three outstanding courses: Shenendoah, Kaluhyat and the famed Atunyote, site of Turning Stone’s PGA Tournament. (Please note that an additional $125 per person premium will be charged for the Atunyote PGA course, where players will play their own ball.) Afternoon tee times only are available, and format will be announced during the event registration period. Sponsored by Franciscan Companies, the event includes lunch, cocktails, hors d’oeuvres, golfer gifts and an awards ceremony. Overnight accommodations are available at a discounted rate by calling 1-800-771-7711. Sponsorship and advertising opportunities are available. Sponsorship levels begin at $500, and program ads start at just $100.

For more information about either the Green & Silver Gala or the Golf Classic, visit www.sjhsyr.org/foundation, call 315-703-2128 or email Foundation@sjhsyr.org. In 2011, net proceeds from St. Joseph’s Gala Dinner Dance and Golf Tournament will benefit St. Joseph’s comprehensive (including missionbased) services, which provide compassionate care and state-of-the-art technology to meet the health care needs of our community.

38   caring Connection

l

St. Joseph’s hospital Health Center

l

Spring 2011

l

www.sjhsyr.org


College Corner St. Joseph’s College of Nursing Receives Largest Gift in Its History

S

t. Joseph’s College of Nursing at St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center has received a $1 million gift from the estate of alumna Josephine Mastrangelo Eagan. The unrestricted gift represents the largest bequest from Eagan’s estate and the largest donation ever received by the college of nursing. Eagan was born in Rome, NY, and graduated from St. Joseph’s Hospital School of Nursing in 1954. She then received her bachelor of arts degree from Boston College and practiced nursing in California before marrying and moving to Detroit, where she lived for the remainder of her life.

“Latest statistics show that by 2025, our country could experience a shortage of 260,000 registered nurses,” says Marianne Markowitz, dean of the college. “This generous gift enables St. Joseph’s College of Nursing to build upon its already competitive and innovative nursing programs as we prepare students for the future.” Appreciation for the education provided by the college stretches across generations of students who have gone on to serve the nursing profession all over the world. That appreciation is exemplified by this momentous gift from a student who graduated from St. Joseph’s more than half a century ago. l

Josephine Mastrangelo Eagan, St. Joseph’s College of Nursing class of ’54, left $1 million to her alma mater.

Recent Grant Awards We thank the following foundations and agencies for their support of St. Joseph’s mission and services: Bank of America Charitable Foundation has awarded $35,000 toward the Green Construction Pre-Apprenticeship Job Experience—a transitional job experience for graduates of the North Side “Green Train” program, a hands-on job training program developed by the Northside Urban Partnership and CenterState CEO. This grant will enable participants in the program to work on St. Joseph’s expansion—including green components of the project such as carpentry and the green roof—gaining valuable work experience with a local contractor. This pilot program is being viewed as a model for replication in other Syracuse city neighborhoods. An award of $25,000 from KeyBank Foundation will help provide a simulation mannequin for the clinical learning lab at St. Joseph’s College of Nursing. Highfidelity simulation provides an experiential learning opportunity in which nursing students can apply their skills and decision-making abilities without risk to human beings. This “dress rehearsal” with a high-tech “patient” mannequin allows students to hone skills they will need when faced with real patients in critical situations. An award of $17,500 from the Flora Bernice Smith Foundation will provide bedside mobile workstations (BMWs) for the clinical observation unit/chest pain center, to be located in the new emergency services building. These computers-on-wheels allow nurses to access a

www.sjhsyr.org

l

patient’s electronic medical record at the bedside as well as enter the patient’s vital signs into the record and dispense patient-specific medication. Supporting some of the most frail infants in our community, the Fidelis Care Community Grant Fund awarded St. Joseph’s intensive care nursery (ICN) a grant of $10,106 for two nutritional warmers and supplies. Commonly recognized as the standard of care for nutritional warming in ICNs, this equipment will be used for heating baby feedings to body temperature, which is optimal for helping these tiny bodies maintain an ideal body temperature range. The Auer Family Foundation has awarded $3,800 to purchase audiovisual equipment for the classrooms and clinical learning lab at St. Joseph’s College of Nursing. This equipment will enhance educational opportunities at the college as well as support clinical simulation technology. Target Stores awarded $2,000 for books for the children’s reading program at St. Joseph’s Maternal Child Health Center pediatric office. St. Joseph’s participates in the national Reach Out and Read program, providing books for youngsters to take home with them. Reach Out and Read provides ongoing support to the children’s reading program at St. Joseph’s, contributing $1,636 in books during 2010.

spring 2011

l

St. Joseph’s hospital Health Center

l

39

caring Connection   


Non-Profit Organization US Postage Paid Permit No. 3560

Community Relations Office 301 Prospect Ave. Syracuse, NY 13203

Syracuse, NY

address Service Requested

St .

Caring Connection Jo s e ph’ s

St. Joseph’s Caring Connection is published by St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center, 301 Prospect Ave., Syracuse, NY 13203. Copyright © 2011 by St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without prior written consent of St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center. If you know someone who would like to receive Caring Connection or be removed from our mailing list, contact the editor c/o St. Joseph’s Marketing/ Communications Office, 301 Prospect Ave., Syracuse, NY 13203, or call 315-703-2140.

Denise Jochem-Robertson

Premier Joint Replacement: At St. Joseph’s, we approach each surgery as a team, but treat each patient as an individual.

Seth Greenky, MD, & Brett Greenky, MD Co-Directors, St. Joseph’s Joint Replacement Program

Editor

Margaret Martin Vice President, Marketing, Communications and Development

Contributors Eric Johnson Writer

Kiefer Creative Design

Chuck Wainwright Photography

Eastwood Litho Inc. Printing

Contact Us St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center 301 Prospect Ave., Syracuse, NY 13203 www.sjhsyr.org General information ���������������� 448-5111

ST. JOSEPH’S HEALTH IN MOTION Performing the most joint replacement procedures in Central New York At St. Joseph’s, we’re proud of our reputation for joint replacement: outstanding outcomes, shorter lengths of stay and an award-winning program—all while performing the most joint replacement procedures in Central New York. But the fact is, with each new patient we’re building a different kind of reputation by working with them and their families as a team—before surgery, during the procedure and throughout recovery. To us, that’s what a higher level of care is all about. n

n

n

Recipient of HealthGrades Joint Replacement Excellence Award™ (2011) Five-star rated by HealthGrades for joint surgery (2007-2011) Designated a Blue Distinction Center for Knee & Hip Replacement® by Excellus BlueCross BlueShield Orthopedic Services

Patient information������������������ 448-5113

13th Annual HealthGrades Hospital Quality in America Study.

Resource line (physician and program information)���������� 703-2138

Designation as Blue Distinction Centers® means these facilities’ overall experience and aggregate data met objective criteria established in collaboration with expert clinicians’ and leading professional organizations’ recommendations. Individual outcomes may vary. To find out which services are covered under your policy at any facilities, please call your local BlueCross and/or BlueShield Plan.

Foundation office (giving opportunities) ���������� 703-2137 Marketing/Communications office�������������������������������������� 703-2140 College of nursing�������������������� 448-5040 Volunteer office������������������������ 448-5186 All telephone numbers are in area code 315. St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center is sponsored by the Sisters of St. Francis.

Member of the St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center Network

2011

St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center • 301 Prospect Ave. • Syracuse, NY • www.sjhsyr.org St. Joseph’s Resource Line (Physician & Program Information): 315-703-2138 St. Joseph’s is sponsored by the Sisters of St. Francis. Franciscan Companies is a member of the St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center Network.


Caring Connection Spring 2011