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ST. JOSEPH’S magazine A magazine for friends of St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center

Volume 4, Issue 1, 2008

REPAIRING BROKEN HEARTS St. Joseph’s specialists offer effective option for people with heart valve disease

Home Away From Home New unit for congenital heart patients eases the stress of a hospital stay


OPENING THOUGHTS As we welcome a new year, it is always good to take stock of our successes and achievements for the past year. This issue of St. Joseph’s Magazine highlights a number of them, and I hope that when you finish reading this issue, you will be as proud of St. Joseph’s as I am. We continue to expand and enhance our medical services and have just finished remodeling the former Barrow Neuroscience Tower to house the new Heart & Lung Institute. Our capabilities in the area continue to grow, and we have developed some very unique clinical expertise. You’ll read about our new Pediatric Cardiothoracic Intensive Care Unit, which is devoted to caring for congenital heart patients with a continuity of care that is the first of its kind in the country. We also have a mitral-valve repair clinic that provides new hope to adult patients who are struggling with chronic heart disease. All of these innovations give our patients a level of heart and lung care that is unsurpassed in the Southwest. In other good news, St. Joseph’s recently received the Association of American Medical Colleges’ Spencer Foreman Award for Outstanding Community Service. The award recognizes exceptional programs that go well beyond the traditional role of academic medicine in reaching communities whose needs are not being met through the traditional healthdelivery system. We are one of a very small number of teaching hospitals in the United States that have won this award, and it is a prestigious national distinction for our hospital. We deliver our community outreach every day, sometimes in small ways—like providing new toys to young patients through community donations—and sometimes through larger efforts, like the home safety makeover you’ll read about in this issue. Each endeavor helps our patients and families heal, as well as transition back to their normal lives. That is the best gift we can give, and your support of our hospital helps us do that. I hope that you enjoy the stories in the magazine and that you join me in celebrating the work of St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center.

Linda Hunt President St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center

On the cover: Scott Duemler is back to rock climbing after undergoing a heart-valve repair at St. Joseph’s Heart & Lung Institute. Read more starting on page 2.


ST. JOSEPH’S magazine A magazine for friends of St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center

contents

Volume 4, Issue 1, 2008

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Repairing Broken Hearts St. Joseph’s specialists offer an effective option for people with heart valve disease.

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Their Home Away From Home Pediatric Cardiothoracic ICU eases stress of hospital stay.

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Heart & Lung Institute moves into renovated tower

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Take Me Out to the Ballpark Scott and Laura Eller Congenital Heart Center treats children and their families to a Diamondbacks game.

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A Gift of Comfort Arizona Diamondbacks pitcher Brandon Webb stocks lockers for kids in St. Joseph’s Pediatric ICU and CRS.

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Health & Wealth Raffle: Why I Participate

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Local Values, National Honor St. Joseph’s receives prestigious Spencer Foreman Award.

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Giving Back Patient hosts cut-a-thon to thank Women’s Wellness Clinic.

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Home Safe Home St. Joseph’s, Phoenix Fire and Arizona Childproofers give safety makeovers to soldiers’ homes.

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St. Joseph’s allRewards: Give While You Shop

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St. Joseph’s Santas Governor, local businesses make holidays brighter.

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Benefactor Briefs

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Puttin’ on the Ritz Annual event brings together benefactors, physicians and scientists.

Catherine Menor Editor Catherine.Menor@chw.edu

Jackie Mercandetti, Jeff Noble D Squared Productions, Murphy/Scully Photography

Justin Detwiler Art Director/Designer

Panoramic Press Printing

Linda Hunt, President St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center Mary Jane Crist, CFRE CEO, St. Joseph’s Foundation

• How to Reach Us • St. Joseph’s Magazine is published twice a year by St. Joseph’s Foundation. We welcome your comments, suggestions and requests to be added to or deleted from our mailing list. Call 602-406-1041, email Catherine.Menor@chw.edu or send mail to St. Joseph’s Magazine, Office of Philanthropy, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix, AZ, 85013. Please include your name, address, email address and daytime telephone number in all correspondence. Visit us online at www.StJosephs-Phx.com.


by Sarah Padilla

REPAIRING BROKEN HEARTS ST. JOSEPH’S SPECIALISTS OFFER EFFECTIVE OPTION FOR PEOPLE WITH HEART VALVE DISEASE

Dan Sierka

Edward Lifesciences, a leading heart-valve company, has recognized the Heart & Lung Institute at St. Joseph’s for having the only Center of Excellence in Heart Valve Repair in the western United States.

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n avid runner and a regular at spin class, 42-yearold Dan Sierka was a model of perfect health. So, imagine everyone’s surprise when the married father of three discovered he had a life-threatening heart condition. It was during a routine physical in early 2007 that Sierka’s primary-care physician and friend, Dr. Scott Steingard, discovered that Sierka had a loud heart murmur. An evaluation by a cardiologist revealed severe mitral regurgitation, a common condition in which one of the heart’s four valves does not close properly, causing blood to leak backwards towards the lungs and increasing the workload on the heart. Sierka received the same advice that many patients with his condition receive: to simply monitor it until symptoms or evidence of subtle heart damage develop, at which point surgery to replace the faulty valve would be necessary.

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“I wasn’t happy with waiting until I had a minor heart attack to do something about it,”says Sierka.“I’m a typical man and if something’s broken, I want to fix it. I wanted a second opinion.” In a fortunate coincidence, Dr. Steingard had recently attended a seminar about new treatment options for valve disease. Impressed by what he’d learned, he referred Sierka to the Heart Valve Clinic at St. Joseph’s Heart & Lung Institute (HLI). Established by Dr. Lishan Aklog, director of the Cardiovascular Center and chief of Cardiovascular Surgery, and Dr. Brian deGuzman, associate chief of Cardiovascular Surgery, the clinic provides a patient-centered multidisciplinary care model unique to the region and the nation. The benefits of repairing rather than replacing heart valves Patients with valvular heart disease typically have two options: to replace the valve or to repair the valve. With the former, the valve is replaced by either a mechanical or animal-tissue valve. Due to a high risk of blood clots, most patients who receive a mechanical valve have to take blood thinners indefinitely. On the other hand, animal-tissue valves can wear out and have to be replaced as often as every 10 years. Repairing the valve, on the other hand, is a cutting-edge procedure in which a faulty valve is reconstructed using the patient’s own tissues and restored to normal function. Both Dr. Aklog and Dr. deGuzman, who were recruited from prestigious medical centers in New York and Boston, are recognized experts in heart-valve repair and believe that it offers several advantages over valve replacement. “Patients whose valves are repaired live longer, have better heart function and suffer significantly fewer complications, such as stroke, bleeding or infection,” says Dr. deGuzman. The St. Joseph’s physicians aren’t alone in their beliefs. In fact, a new set of guidelines released in 2006 by the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA) recommends early and preventative mitral-valve repair even in patients who don’t have symptoms or evidence of subtle heart damage—patients like Dan Sierka. The guidelines further recommend that such patients be referred to the limited number of centers, such as the Heart & Lung Institute at St. Joseph’s, with expertise in valve repair and a likelihood of repair greater than 90 percent. The national average is less than 50 percent.

Opting for surgery now rather than later Based on the criteria in the new guidelines, Sierka fit the bill for early surgical intervention. In April 2007, he had surgery to repair his valve. The minimally invasive procedure left only a 4.5-inch scar. At 43, he was back to his active lifestyle in less than two months. “Dan was one of the lucky few whose primary-care physician was aware of the new guidelines. But until more physicians understand the benefits of early valve

Scott Duemler with two of his three children

repair, patients need to take the time to educate themselves,” says Dr. Aklog. Mesa teacher Scott Duemler didn’t need his physician to tell him to have his heart checked. Because valve problems run in his family, he began seeing a cardiologist in his early 30s and was soon diagnosed with mitral-valve prolapse. By late 2006, his cardiologist recommended that Duemler have his valve replaced as soon as possible. Like Sierka, Duemler—also a father of three—did not want to rush into anything. He also wanted to avoid having to take blood thinners for the rest of his life, since it would mean giving up one of his favorite activities—rock climbing. He began researching the

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benefits of valve replacement versus repair, and his research led him to the St. Joseph’s team. “I was looking for two things—mainly expertise in the medical field, but also someone with a good bedside manner,”says Duemler.“Dr. Aklog and Dr. deGuzman were very personable. They were just really nice guys. I felt I was in good hands immediately.” Before his January 2007 surgery, Duemler says the blood flowing back and forth in his heart sounded like a washing machine. Today, he describes it not only as a well-tuned machine, but also a “piece of artwork.” Educating physicians and patients The St. Joseph’s team has performed dozens of valve-repair procedures since their arrival in late summer 2006. They both trained with the leading heartvalve surgeons in the world, including the legendary French surgeon Professor Alain Carpentier, who is acknowledged as the father of the field. They have published extensively and lectured worldwide on the topic. Fortunately for patients around the nation, they’re using this knowledge and expertise to step up efforts to educate both physicians and patients about the benefits of heart-valve repair.

Among their first steps in educating their peers was the establishment of the Valve Repair Educational Network, which provides intensive training and proctoring to surgeons from across the country. They developed a unique hands-on laboratory experience in which surgeons learn the procedures firsthand. Using live video links to their own teaching stations, Dr. Aklog and Dr. deGuzman mentor the visiting surgeons throughout the lesson. The St. Joseph’s team is available to proctor surgeons at their own hospitals, too. They are also launching an online component of the Valve Repair Educational Network —an internet-based tool that will feature educational materials and forums to encourage interactive communications among St. Joseph’s specialists and surgeons interested in advancing heart-valve repair. It was this combination of clinical expertise and educational endeavors that led Edward Lifesciences, one of the country’s leading heart-valve companies, to name St. Joseph’s HLI the only Center of Excellence in Heart Valve Repair in the western United States. Patients like Sierka and Duemler and their families couldn’t agree more.

“Patients whose valves are repaired live longer, have better heart function and suffer fewer complications, such as stroke, bleeding or infection.” Dr. Brian deGuzman

Dr. Brian deGuzman and Dr. Lishan Aklog

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THEIR HOME AWAY FROM HOME by Sarah Padilla

NEW PEDIATRIC CARDIOTHORACIC ICU EASES THE STRESS FOR CONGENITAL HEART PATIENTS AND THEIR FAMILIES

“I think not having to move from unit to unit and floor to floor has really made a difference in her recovery this time.” Ursala Salas

s a pediatric cardiac intensivist, Dr. Steven Choi has seen time and again how stressful heart surgery can be on young patients and their families.And as a father who’s been there himself—his own son underwent heart surgery at five months old—Dr. Choi can relate to his patients on a more personal level. It was his family’s experience that was the impetus behind the new Pediatric Cardiothoracic Intensive Care Unit (Pediatric CT ICU) in the Scott and Laura Eller Congenital Heart Center. The unit cares for congenital heart patients from infancy to adulthood. Because these patients often require multiple hospital visits and surgeries, the unit provides comprehensive care from the time they’re admitted to the time they’re discharged. “Having lived through this,I realized what it means to parents to not have to move throughout the hos-

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pital during their stay,”says Dr. Choi, chief of Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care. “I realized how difficult it can be to change units and have to get to know different staff members in every unit.” First unit of its kind in the country At the time of his son’s surgery. Dr. Choi was completing a critical-care fellowship at Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles. His friend and colleague, Dr. John Nigro, performed the successful procedure with world-renowned Dr.Vaughn Starnes.A few years later, Dr. Nigro came to St. Joseph’s, and shortly thereafter, he recruited Dr. Choi to join him. It was at St. Joseph’s that the duo began the push to create the Pediatric CT ICU, believed to be the first of its kind in the country. The 24-bed, family-friendly unit features a soothing nature theme. It has all private rooms with private bathrooms,wood floors,plantation shutters and pull-out sofas that allow family members to sleep in the room. It also includes a family lounge,a Child Life center,a multi-media conference room,a satellite pharmacy and a separate treatment room for minor procedures. State-of-the-art medical equipment includes ICU capabilities in every room, a rapid-deployment extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) machine for fast resuscitation, and a system that allows caregivers to view medical imaging studies (including cardiac CT scans and x-rays) throughout the unit. In fact, it is believed that the Pediatric CT ICU is the only unit in Phoenix with an echocardiography machine—essentially, a machine that provides cardiac ultrasounds—on standby at all times. Specially-trained staff day and night But for patients, the appeal of the unit lies within its consistent, specially-trained staff—five cardiac intensivists, two critical-care nurse practitioners, more than 40 cardiac ICU nurses, respiratory therapists, a pediatric pharmacist, a social worker, and Child Life staff. Physicians complete multidisciplinary patient rounds three times a day, helping to eliminate medical errors. “There’s a real sense of security for the families, knowing that everyone on the unit knows their child,” says Dr. Choi.“By consolidating all of our care into one unit, we’ve removed a lot of anxiety for them.” Families of children with heart problems might spend months at a time in the hospital over a series of years. Ursula Salas has been there. Her five-year-old daughter, Vianna, recently underwent her third of a three-part surgery to repair a single-ventricle congenital defect,

meaning that one of her heart’s pumping chambers was underdeveloped. Vianna also has dextrocardia,a condition The playroom of the Peds CT ICU in which the heart forms on the right side of the body. Vianna spent months in the hospital’s Neonatal ICU as an infant. Over the next several years, she would experience extended stays in the Pediatric ICU and on the acute pediatric floor.While the family’s experiences were positive, Ursula admits that transferring from unit to unit— and having to meet all new staff members—was taxing. “In the new unit, we’ve been able to get more familiar and more personal with the nurses,” she says.“We love them. Even Vianna says that she’s ready to go home, but that she’s going to miss everyone.” Vianna’s most recent stay at St. Joseph’s, and her first in the Pediatric CT ICU,was only a little over a week long, her shortest yet. Ursula credits Vianna’s quick recovery in part to the structure of the new unit. “I think that not having to move from unit to unit and floor to floor has really made a difference in her recovery this time. It really lets the patients get the extra rest they need,” she says. An extended family In addition to high-quality medical care, another advantage of the unit is that it provides families with a variety of support and networking opportunities. An outreach committee has hosted events at Arizona Diamondbacks games, and the hospital co-sponsors Heart Day at the Phoenix Zoo with Phoenix Children’s Hospital. Last spring, St. Joseph’s held its first Congenital Heart Day picnic for alumni. Photos of a handful of those success stories line the wall leading into the Pediatric CT ICU. Among them is the inspiration for the unit—Dr. Choi’s son, now a healthy 4 1/2-year-old. “For me, those photos are a daily reminder of why we are here” says Dr. Choi. And for the hundreds of patients who will call the CT ICU their home-away-from-home, the photos are a just preview of the extended family that’s waiting for them beyond the double doors down the hall.

Dr. Choi’s son, Ethan 6

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THE HEART & LUNG INSTITUTE MOVES INTO RENOVATED TOWER he Pediatric Cardiothoracic ICU is only one of many new spaces in the hospital dedicated to cardiothoracic care. In early January, the newly refurbished Heart & Lung Tower became the home of many of the hospital’s growing number of thoracic-surgery,lung-transplantation and cardiovascular patients.St.Joseph’s now offers one of the most comprehensive programs in the region. “The new Heart & Lung Tower focuses on the needs of each patient. A patient’s illness determines the unit where they receive care,” says Lisa Kelly, clinical director of the HLI. “The healthcare team on each unit has a specific area of focus. This approach allows us to provide specialized quality care for each patient and helps us implement the best safety practices.” Housed in the former Barrow Tower, the newly renovated space includes the following services on the following floors: • HLT2 - Procedure rooms • HLT4 - Four surgical suites (two dedicated to heart surgery and two dedicated to lung and esophageal surgery); CT ICU - 16 intensive care rooms (eight of which are dedicated to lung-transplant and thoracic patients) • HLT6 - Thoracic Telemetry, 18 beds • HLT7 - Cardiovascular Telemetry, 21 beds. The tower features state-of-the-art technology, not only to facilitate high-quality patient care, but also to enhance the hospital’s teaching mission. For example, the operating rooms and other rooms throughout the tower include high-definition video recording and internet streaming capabilities that allow users in different parts of the building—and even off site—to interface in real time. Such technology allows specialists at the HLI to share their expertise with colleagues around the world without leaving the hospital. “We’ve worked together not only to create a very efficient and user-friendly system for our patients and staff, but also to enlarge the footprint of our teaching capabilities,” says Dr. Ross Bremner, surgical director of the Center for Thoracic Disease and chief of General Thoracic Surgery. Benefactors’gifts to the Pushing Boundaries Campaign helped fund the new Heart & Lung Tower.

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Top, one of two surgery suites dedicated to heart procedures. Above, a nurses station in the new Heart & Lung Institute Tower.

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TAKE ME OUT TO THE BALLPARK SCOTT AND LAURA ELLER CONGENITAL HEART CENTER TREATS CHILDREN AND THEIR FAMILIES TO DIAMONDBACKS GAME

About 500 former patients, families and staff celebrated the many successes of the Scott and Laura Eller Congenital Heart Center during a Diamondbacks game on September 23.

he Arizona Diamondbacks played host to about 500 children and their families as part of the Scott and Laura Eller Congenital Heart Center Day at Chase Field on September 23. St. Joseph’s sponsored the event to celebrate its congenital heart patients and to give the hospital staff an opportunity to see how their patients have grown and flourished.

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“The day at the ballpark is an opportunity for patients and families to enjoy a day of baseball with others who have been treated for congenital heart ailments at St. Joseph’s,” says Stacy Youngkrantz, RN, event organizer. The families received free tickets, compliments of St. Joseph’s, and each child received a specially designed St. Joseph’s T-shirt. After the game, the children and


their families were able to go down to the field and run the bases. It was the final game of the regular season for the Diamondbacks. The Scott and Laura Eller Congenital Heart Center at St. Joseph’s provides lifelong care—including diagnosis, surgery, medical treatment and rehabilitation—for children, teens and adults with congenital heart defects. It is the only center of its kind in Arizona.

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A GIFT OF COMFORT ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS PITCHER BRANDON WEBB STOCKS LOCKERS FOR CHILDREN AT ST. JOSEPH’S

by Sally J. Clasen

Brandon Webb met parents and their children during the dedication of Brandon’s Lockers on December 3.

soft blanket, a cuddly toy, a cozy pair of PJs. These are basic items for most kids, but for those who are sick, badly injured or who have chronic and disabling health problems, such “everyday”possessions can be gifts of tremendous solace during stressful medical times. For children at St. Joseph’s Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) and Children’s Rehabilitative Services (CRS), the comforts of home are now just a locker away, thanks to the generosity of one major league baseball player. On behalf of his K Foundation, Brandon Webb, pitcher for the Arizona Diamondbacks, donated two Brandon’s Lockers to help ease the hospital experience

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for kids who are patients at St. Joseph’s PICU or CRS. The lockers, which bear the image of Webb, were dedicated on December 3 with the 2006 Cy Young Award winner, hospital officials and K Foundation board members in attendance. Brandon’s Lockers are continually stocked with books, blankets, stuffed animals, puzzles, coloring books, crayons and other goodies. The items are chosen to help make treatment and recovery easier for children who are receiving care at St. Joseph’s, says Jeff Ginn, president of Legacy Management Group, which oversees Webb’s K Foundation. Through Brandon’s Lockers, every child is offered a welcoming blanket and stuffed animal that they can


“I wanted to put lockers in St. Joseph’s The K Foundation

so that the kids will have things to occupy

To learn more about Brandon Webb’s charity for chronically ill children, visit his K Foundation website at www.brandonwebb.org or call toll-free 888-330-7529, ext. 14.

their time while they are in the hospital.” Brandon Webb take home.“We have themed blankets for boys and girls,” Ginn says. Children also have access to additional locker supplies while they are patients in the PICU or CRS. Eventually, educational toys, electronic games, DVD players, iPods and other interactive equipment will be added to Brandon’s Lockers for all patients to enjoy while they are in the hospital. Future plans include adding a Brandon’s Locker in the Teen Lounge, a room that is specifically designed for children ages 10 to 19. Locker supplies in the Teen Lounge will focus on decreasing the isolation for patients, with an emphasis on computers and internet access to help teens stay connected to family and social networks while they are hospitalized and receiving treatment. St. Joseph’s an easy choice for Webb While he’s famous for having one of the nastiest sinkers in baseball, Webb is equally known for his big heart. He identified St. Joseph’s as the location for his lockers after visits to the medical center on behalf of the Diamondback’s community involvement initiative. A new focus for his K Foundation—chronically ill children—as well as welcoming daughter Reagan into the world two years ago also made St. Joseph’s an ideal partner in his gift-bearing gesture. “I wanted to put lockers in St. Joseph’s so that the kids will have things to occupy their time while they are in the hospital,”Webb says.“Helping sick kids is something my wife and I feel strongly about. When you visit these hospitals and see the kids, you want to do anything you can to help make these kids’ lives more enjoyable.” Brandon Webb has donated two Brandon’s Lockers to St. Joseph’s and plans to donate a third in the future.

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HEALTH & WEALTH RAFFLE WHY I PARTICIPATE any of the prize winners in the Health & Wealth Raffle send emails to the Raffle website, explaining why they entered. But just as many people who did not win prizes email their reasons for entering—and many consider themselves to be the biggest winners of all. Here are a few examples of their stories:

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From: C. Fleckenstein Subject: Jeffrey Fleckenstein

My son Jeffrey Fleckenstein was a patient at St. Joseph’s hospital for twenty five years. He was born with a congenital heart defect called tetralogy of Fallot. When he was born I was told that his life would be short. Maybe two years. Dr. Robert Williams and Dr. Ravi Koopot teamed up to do surgery after surgery to give my beautiful son twenty five years. I cannot express the gratitude that I have in my heart for these incredible doctors and the nursing staff at St. Joseph’s. Jeffrey had a heart transplant in Tucson but only lived a little more than three weeks. He passed away on April 21, 2007. Every year during the Health & Wealth Raffle, Jeff and I would plan to buy a ticket. Every year when we counted our money, there just wasn’t enough. This year, in remembrance of Jeff, I made sure there was enough. Thank you, St. Joseph’s.

City). I took off work and stayed in a little apartment on 7th Ave within walking distance. Hopefully one of these days we can get back down to see everyone that made dealing with such a traumatic life changing injury not seem like the end of the world. We are truly blessed that Byron is still with us and he is the same guy, just gets around a little different! From: Diana Ryan Subject: Barrow saved my daughter

Jessica Aguilar suffered a Traumatic Brain Injury in April 2003 and spent 8 weeks in the hospital and 6 months at CTN. She is now attending the UofA and was selected by the NIH to do a research internship in Norway. She is conducting research to develop a learning tool for people with brain injuries. She is a miracle child, but Barrow & the grace of God made that possible. Thank you.

From: John & Teresa Subject: Our daughter

Lauren’s story is too long to type here but she was born with many problems and not expected to live. Enter Dr. Gregory Legris...we knew from the moment he evaluated her condition that she was turning a corner toward healing. Dr. Legris was instrumental in saving her life and getting her home. He and his wife, Cynthia, were and still are a blessing in Lauren’s life. Lauren is 7 yrs. old now, healthy and enjoying 2nd grade. Thank you Dr. Legris! When we have a choice, we choose St. Joseph’s Hospital, it’s the best. From: Marji Fergerson Subject: Our Story

My son was flown from Las Vegas to St Joseph’s to stay at Select Speciality until his halo came off. That was May 2003. After 88 days the Halo came off and he got moved downstairs to Barrow. He was so excited. He’s a C4/5 Quad with just shoulder movement. All the staff taught us so much. They all go way beyond what is expected. We finally came home on Dec 12, 2003. We live in Topock (between Lake Havasu and Bullhead

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Jessica Augilar was featured in St. Joseph’s Foundation’s 2002-2003 Recognition Report. She is pictured here with her Trauma ICU nurse Joanne Hartman, RN.


From: Maria Rosas Subject: St.Joseph experience

In December 2001, I was admitted to the hospital, I was 29 weeks pregnant. My baby wasn’t doing well inside my belly, so doctors decided to take her out. She was 1 pound and so tiny, but so beautiful. She was at the hospital 46 days fighting for her life. I was there every day till the day when doctor called me to let me know she wasn’t doing ok. That day, she passed away in my arms. I will never forget those days, and how doctors and nurses not only take care of their tiny patients, but also they take care of the families and make those dark days lighter. When we heard about the raffle, we knew it was for something good. We will continue to participate in every raffle, not only hoping to win, but also to support the hospital and the great job they do. From: Carie Williams Subject: Thankful

The staff at St. Joseph’s are the best, there is no other hospital in Arizona that comes close. I will continue to support a place that has treated my nephew, myself & others that I have met, w/ conditions that need the best of care, by the best of medical professionals. I cannot be thankful enough. If it wasn’t for Barrow Neurological Institute, I wouldn’t be here. It’s not about winning, it’s about helping the best, continue the best of care for those who need it. From: Kathy Beamis Subject: why we want to support Barrow

My son was born in St. Joseph’s in 1982. More recently, Oct. 25th, 2006, my husband was involved in a very bad accident, which resulted in head trauma, a broken neck, a dissected carotid artery, broken bones in his face and nose, broken bone in his hand, permanent loss of hearing in his left ear. He required a shunt to regulate his intracranial pressure. Everyone knows if it’s a head injury, the best place is Barrow. We’re fortunate to have Barrow close by. He spent 5 weeks at St. Joseph’s before being well enough to go on to a rehab facility for another 5 wks. He’s been home for almost 9 months. He has been through a great deal and has a road ahead of him. The wonderful staff at St. Joe’s Trauma ICU and Barrow did a great job at taking care of my special man! From: Susan Severson Subject: My Story

My husband and I have participated in the raffle since the beginning because of the specialized treatment his mother received at Barrow. In April of this year my husband suffered a ruptured aorta and was flown to St. Joseph’s from another hospital. I spent 5 weeks with him in intensive care and have to say that his recovery was due to the dedication and knowledge of the doctors and

“I know that my contributions to St. Joseph’s may be making it possible for some other mother to say ‘Thank you for saving my baby!’” Peggy Hertel staff at St. Joe’s. He also suffered from esophageal cancer and developed complications from the cancer. He passed away in July. Today we would be celebrating our 37th wedding anniversary so I feel a thank you is in order for the extra time given to us by your hospital. From: Debra Reynolds Subject: My Story

I buy tickets and my 80 and 84 year old parents do also - why - because St. Joseph’s saved my life! I was paralyzed from the waist down - but when I entered St. Joseph’s hospital, I was taken care of - I am here walking, and taking care of Mom and Dad - God Bless you St. Joseph’s! I had 2 back surgeries somewhere else - but St. Joseph’s Hospital made my 3rd and final surgery the one to save me! We love you! From: Vickie Subject: My Father’s Love

I give to this Raffle because my Dad had a stroke and he was sent to St. Joseph���s with a 10% chance of living. The Barrow Neurological is where he stayed for one month and I would like to thank them for their help. My Dad lived for 19 more years after that. What more could you ask for? From: Maria Funaro Subject: Thank you

Even though I have bought a ticket to support the raffle each year and have not won anything, that would never deter me from entering. My husband had a brain tumor and the doctors at St. Joe’s were the best in the country with the surgery and the care given to him.And then last year my 13 year old daughter was in a car accident and we were told at another hospital that she had a broken neck, needed surgery and would be in a neck brace for a long time. I decided to take her to St. Joe’s for a second opinion and within hours, they assured me there was nothing wrong with her outside of whiplash. If it hadn’t been for the excellent staff, my S T.

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daughter would have endured undue pain and suffering. And last, my closest friend had a brain aneurysm and had an extremely slim chance of recovery. But the fantastic team of surgeons pulled her through and she is back to herself once again. And that is why no matter, win or lose, I will always support the raffle and the staff of St. Joe’s hospital. What is not to be thankful for having one of the greatest medical facilities in this country right here in Phoenix? We are all blessed with being able to help raise funds for an excellent cause. Thank you all. From: Jill Vickerman Subject: Reason I enter Health & Wealth Raffle

In July of 2003 I had an acoustic neuroma surgery for a brain tumor removed by Dr. Spetzler. I feel that I am able to function today because of the wonderful care and concern of doctors and staff at Barrow. I appreciate all they do for the Phoenix community. I will continue to purchase tickets in order to support the wonderful facility. From: Carolyn Parker Subject: Thank You to St. Joseph’s Hospital

This grateful message stems from 1988 when my then 4 year old daughter, Gina LaMar, was air-evaced from Prescott to your hospital with a life-threatening infection. She was in Peds ICU for about a week and then in the children’s ward for several more days. I can’t praise the Peds ICU enough! The doctors and nurses were exceptional in how they worked with us. They were very informative and most caring during a very stressful time. With prayers and all their knowledgeable and kind attention, Gina was returned to us a healthy child who has since become a musically talented college graduate with honors whose beauty and warmth infects all around her. We and many others are deeply indebted to St. Joseph’s Hospital. From: Peggy Hertel Subject: Why I support St. Joseph’s

When I found out about the raffle my first year at ASU I knew I had to play. I figured that even if I didn’t ever win, I would still win. In 1983 my youngest daughter was run over in Ajo and was flown to St. Joseph’s. She was operated on immediately to close a torn artery in her arm and to close a leak in her nasal cavity that was leaking spinal fluid. Plus she had a monitor inserted to check brain pressure. They brought her back to us long enough for her to let us know that she was still here. After three months in intensive care she finally succumbed to a severe infection in the brain. The doctors

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and nurses at Barrow were with us at all times. I always knew what was going on and was allowed to help as much as possible. I knew that the personnel cared and were doing all that they could. There have been many strides made in the medical field between 1983 and now and I believe that if the same thing happened today, Lisa would have lived. I know that my contributions to St. Joseph’s may be making it possible for some other mother to say “Thank you for saving my baby!” From: Amy Pileggi Subject: Grandson born at St. Joseph’s

I participate in the Health & Wealth Raffle because over two years ago, my Grandson was born with gastroschisis. He was premature and had to have emergency surgery right after he was born. He stayed in the hospital for a month and I can’t express enough thanks to the nurses who worked around the clock to help little Steven. They were very caring and never left his side. Without the nurses and doctors there, Steven may not have been here with us today. I give because I have seen first hand where the money goes and the hope that it brings to so many. From: Peggy McEvoy Subject: Why I purchase a raffle ticket

The reasons are many, but being a nurse of 38 years and having worked at St. Joe’s in Labor and Delivery just about the time fetal monitors were first introduced, I got to see first hand the wonderful care rendered at this institution. Oh, I suppose like others, I dream of winning the big one, but regardless, I feel this is an innovative way to give St Joe’s the revenue to continue to upgrade the entire complex, including Barrow Institute. I’m thankful to have a hospital of this caliber in my own backyard, so to speak. Good luck in future campaigns. Use the money wisely and I’m sure you will have continued success! From: Terry D. Martin Subject: Raffle Ticket Purchase

My story is: even though I have never won anything from the ticket purchases over the last 6 years, I still feel like a winner knowing how St. Joseph’s and the Barrow Institute are so diligently working on the cure and treatments for my disorder—multiple sclerosis. I also purchase tickets in honor of the excellent care my father received there after his stroke. Even though he passed on I have nothing but the greatest respect and thankfulness for your excellent staff of physicians and nurses. Looking forward to hopefully being able to enter next year.


LOCAL VALUES, NATIONAL HONOR by Sally J. Clasen

ST. JOSEPH’S RECEIVES PRESTIGIOUS SPENCER FOREMAN AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING COMMUNITY SERVICE

t. Joseph’s longstanding history of addressing community needs on many levels has catapulted the center into the national spotlight. The Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) recently named St. Joseph’s the recipient of the Spencer Foreman Award for Outstanding Community Service. St. Joseph’s representatives traveled to Washington, DC, to receive the award on Nov. 3 during AAMC’s annual meeting. The AAMC presents the award to a medical institution each year, and this year St. Joseph’s was one of three finalists and the only facility west of the eastern

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seaboard to make the top list. The Spencer Foreman Award for Outstanding Community Service recognizes exceptional programs that go above and beyond the traditional role of academic medicine to reach communities whose needs are not being met through traditional health-delivery systems. Previous winners of the Spencer Foreman Award include the University of California at Los Angeles School of Medicine, Creighton University School of Medicine, the University of Washington School of Medicine and the University of Rochester Medical Center.

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Above, Linda Hunt, president of St. Joseph’s, accepts the Spencer Foreman Award for Outstanding Community Service. Right, others who attended the awards ceremony were Dr. Charles Daschbach, director of Academic Affairs; Marisue Garganta, director of Community Health Integration; and Dr. John Boyd, chief medical officer.

St. Joseph’s century-old heritage of service is apparent in real and tangible ways in many areas of the community, and is based on the powerful legacy of service created by the Sisters of Mercy in 1895. That unwavering commitment to the community continues more than a century later through programmatic, volunteer and financial support. As part of its mission, St. Joseph’s provides compassionate, high-quality healthcare, advocates for underserved populations and partners with others in the community to improve quality of life for its citizens. Last year, the medical center provided more than $60 million in unsponsored care, including $16 million in public programs, $12 million in traditional charity care and $4 million in financial donations. St. Joseph’s provides medical care and community benefits to a subset of Maricopa County; its diverse service area is predominantly Hispanic, female, and younger than 25 years old. During its most recent triennial community-needs assessment, the hospital identified four community health priorities: access to healthcare services, cardiovascular risk, chronic disabling conditions, and education and prevention. The hospital then developed a community benefit plan to address these concerns. Some examples of targeted existing and new community outreach initiatives include: • Conducting community health assessments to identify health needs.

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• Providing healthcare access through many clinics and partnerships, including the MOMobile, the Pediatric Ambulatory Care Clinic, Balsz School District Partnership and the Florence Crittenton Partnership. • Offering education and prevention programs, including Operation Fit Kids, Wake Up! Youth, Oliver Otter, Helmet Your Head and Think First for Teens. • Creating the Intercity Asthma Intervention Program for children age five to 11 who suffer from this chronic condition. • Forming more than 80 relationships with human service organizations and stage agencies to create solutions to growing health concerns. These efforts have led to new partnerships, including the recently developed Arizona Oral Health Collaborative. Many of these initiatives receive support from St. Joseph’s Foundation. “Helping the community and improving lives are integral parts of our mission,” says Linda Hunt, president of St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center.“By helping those in need, we put our values into action.” For more information about the AAMC, visit aamc.org.


GIVING BACK by Sarah Padilla

PATIENT HOSTS CUT-A-THON TO ENABLE WOMEN’S WELLNESS CLINIC TO HELP OTHERS

hen Antoinette Jaycox found a lump in her right breast in late 2003, she was shocked to learn that the out-of-pocket cost for a mammogram was nearly $1,500. Temporarily uninsured after leaving her previous job, Jaycox was prepared to pay for the procedure. What she wasn’t prepared for was the lack of resources available to women in her situation. “I figured I could just call around, but I ran into the same thing with everyone. They all said, ‘We can’t help you,’” she recalls. Jaycox was sent to a free clinic in Mesa, but it was always full. Eventually, through a series of referrals, she learned about St. Joseph’s Women’s Wellness Clinic (WWC). The WWC, which provides free gynecological care to low-income and uninsured women, was able to get her in within days. With a background in social work, Jaycox had previous experience with free clinics—and most hadn’t left a positive impression. The WWC proved to be an entirely different environment. “It was such a surprise to walk into the Women’s Wellness Clinic. I felt like I could keep my dignity,” she says.“I never had any reason to doubt that I was going to receive quality healthcare. I was always referred to by name; I was never a number.” Over the next couple of years, Jaycox returned to the clinic often for mammograms, ultrasounds and

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other routine gynecological care. Finally, in late 2005, she received the news she’d been waiting to hear— Jaycox had a clean bill of health. Impressed with and grateful for her experience at St. Joseph’s, Jaycox decided that as soon as she had an opportunity to give back—no matter how small the gift—she would do whatever she could for the hospital. She wanted to ensure that other women could continue to receive the same care she had. When she opened the JaCar Beauty Lounge with business partner Robin Corey later that year, inspiration hit. She would host a cut-a-thon, with the proceeds to benefit the WWC. Her dream became a reality this year, and on October 8, the Gilbert salon hosted the first of what Jaycox hopes will become an annual event. The inaugural Women’s Wellness Cut-a-Thon raised funds for the WWC and provided 16 women free mammograms at the Mobile Onsite Mammography unit, which was parked in front of the salon for the day. “It’s great to see one of our patients not only giving back to the hospital, but also reaching out to raise awareness of the need for more services for uninsured women in Arizona,” says Gail Brown, nurse practitioner at the WWC. “We’re extremely grateful for Antoinette’s support.”

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HOME SAFE HOME by Sarah Padilla

ST. JOSEPH’S HOSPITAL, PHOENIX FIRE DEPARTMENT AND ARIZONA CHILDPROOFERS GIVE HOME SAFETY MAKEOVERS TO SOLDIERS WITH FUNDING FROM THE ROBERT WOOD JOHNSON FOUNDATION AND ST. JOSEPH’S FOUNDATION

ergeant Erick Castro spent four years serving in the U.S. Army, including a six-month tour in Iraq where he lost his left leg. Given all that he has experienced, he never imagined that raising a toddler could be such a challenge. His two-year-old son, Xavier, is out to prove him wrong. “He’s at the learning stage, which means that he likes to push and pull on everything,” says Castro. Of particular interest to the toddler are cabinet doors, outlets and the baby gate that keeps him from going upstairs. At least, that was the case before the Castro family received a home safety makeover this summer, courtesy of the Injury-Free Coalition for Kids at St. Joseph’s, the Phoenix Fire Department and Arizona Childproofers. The Castros were one of four Arizona military families to receive the free makeovers.

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Erick, Elizabeth and Xavier Castro

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Protecting Xavier Today, the off-limits items that used to tempt Xavier’s little fingers aren’t quite as fun. The outlets have been covered with protective sliders, the toilet lids have been equipped with childproof latches, and cabinets throughout the home are locked with a unique magnetic system.Also, the wooden baby gate that Xavier used to love to push over has been replaced by a sturdier aluminum version. The Phoenix Fire Department installed high-tech fire detectors that allow users to test the devices with their television’s remote control. The detectors are useful for both smoldering and fast-burning fires. The fire department also gave the Castros fire-safety education and helped them develop a fire-escape plan, which is particularly important in the family’s two-story house. The next item on the agenda is to install a pool fence around the family’s backyard swimming pool. Four families, four sets of issues The Arizona National Guard and the Department of Veterans Affairs helped identify the four families that received home safety makeovers. “We wanted to focus on families of military personnel, helping to keep their families safe just as they help keep our families safe,” says Bridget Doherty, project coordinator for the Injury-Free Coalition.“In the end, each of the families we selected illustrated different safety issues.” For example, one of the families had three generations living together, illustrating the importance of educating every member in the household about different safety concerns. Another family had older children in the home, demonstrating that just because children are older, they aren’t necessarily safer. A third family wanted to create a safe environment for exploring for their 18-month-old son and nine-month-old twin daughters. “In the Castro family’s case, we wanted to show that physical challenges are just that—challenges,” says Doherty. “They don’t have to be a barrier to safety.” And while Castro has learned to maneuver well with his prosthetic leg, it can pose a challenge when it comes to keeping up with his curious toddler. “I can’t really get up and chase after him quickly. It takes me a few extra minutes,” says the 27-year-old. “These safety measures give me the extra time I need to catch up with him.”

Made possible by philanthropy The purpose of the makeovers is to help raise awareness about the importance of home safety and encourage community members to take steps to make their environments safer. “Arizona has the third highest rate of fatalities from home injuries in the nation,” says Pam Goslar, project director of the Injury-Free Coalition for Kids at St. Joseph’s. “Most of those injuries can be prevented by practicing simple safety tips in and around the home.” The program was funded by grants from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and St. Joseph’s Foundation. As part of the project, the team also assembled home-safety kits that include various home-safety devices, educational information and a voucher for services from Arizona Childproofers. The kits will be handed out at community events.

“We wanted to focus on families of military personnel, helping to keep their families safe just as they help keep our families safe.” Bridget Doherty, Injury-Free Coalition

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SHOP AND GIVE by Catherine Menor

ST. JOSEPH’S ALLREWARDS PROGRAM OFFERS AN EASY WAY TO SUPPORT THE HOSPITAL THROUGH EVERYDAY PURCHASES

“Everyone benefits— businesses, the hospital and its supporters.” Mary Jane Crist

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ow you can shop for everyday items and support the life-saving work of St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center. That’s the idea behind a new membership program launched in November—the St. Joseph’s allRewards program. Here’s how it works: You join St. Joseph’s allRewards online at www.StJosephsallRewards.com. Then, each time you make a purchase at an allRewards partner location, using a credit or debit card linked to allRewards, a portion of your purchase automatically goes to St. Joseph’s Foundation. And, best of all, there’s no cost to you.

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Left, 99.9 KEZ’s Marty Manning promoted St. Joseph’s allRewards, including the new gift card, at events throughout the Valley. Right, St. Joseph’s employee Mike Eimer (in blue) won a big-screen TV during an allRewards member drive. With Eimer are Dennis Sage of Dennis Sage Home Entertainment, an allRewards merchant partner; Debbie Castaldo, director of Foundation Innovation at St. Joseph’s; and Marty Manning. Below, other hospital employees won prizes during the member drive.

“This is an easy way to support the important programs at St. Joseph’s,” says Debbie Castaldo, director of Foundation Innovation at St. Joseph’s Foundation. “We already have some great businesses signed up, and more are joining every week.” By the end of 2007, about 30 businesses had joined the St. Joseph’s allRewards network or were scheduled to be on board soon. For a complete list of participating businesses as well as other information, visit www.StJosephsallRewards.com. St. Joseph’s allRewards introduced a Visa gift card just in time for holiday shopping. The new card, which

bears the St. Joseph’s allRewards logo and look, can be used anywhere Visa is accepted. It can be purchased in any amount, and with each card purchase, a donation goes to St. Joseph’s Foundation. The St Joseph’s allRewards gift card can be purchased from the allRewards team at the Concierge Desk in the Debi and Jerry Bisgrove Admitting Lobby at St. Joseph’s. Eventually, it will be available online. “Thanks to allRewards partners edatanetworks, RBS Lynk, and Visa, the holiday launch of the gift card was a huge success,” Castaldo says. December was a busy month for St. Joseph’s allRewards. Throughout the holiday season, Marty Manning and the 99.9 KEZ Radio Cheer Mobile promoted allRewards and its merchant partners at more than 15 events across the Valley. Members of St. Joseph’s allRewards enjoy ongoing opportunities to win prizes and earn special discounts at participating businesses. Best of all, they get the joy of helping a cause near and dear to their hearts. “Everyone benefits,” says Mary Jane Crist, chief executive officer of St. Joseph’s Foundation,“businesses, the hospital and its supporters.”

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ST. JOSEPH’S SANTAS GOVERNOR, LOCAL BUSINESSES MAKE HOLIDAYS BRIGHTER FOR KIDS AT ST. JOSEPH’S

Cachet Homes hosted a series of carolling events in their neighborhoods to collect toys for children at St. Joseph’s. The 99.9 KEZ holiday songbook distributed at the songfests featured beloved carols along with stories and photos of St. Joseph’s children.

EZ 99.9 Radio, Cachet Homes, Starbucks, Sleep America,Alltel, and Barnes and Noble led community efforts to collect toys and books for the Children’s Health Center at St. Joseph’s. The successful drives came just in time for Christmas. Governor Janet Napolitano launched a book drive for St. Joseph’s kids by reading to children in the Pediatrics Unit on September 14.Books were collected at Starbucks, Sleep America, Alltel, and Barnes and Noble. Starbucks sponsored a Comfy Clothes Drive for children in the Del E.Webb Emergency Department and the

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Clockwise from upper left: Families attended carolling events at Cachet Homes; Marty Manning was interviewed by FOX 10 during a carolling party; Governor Janet Napolitano read to children at St. Joseph’s to kick off a book drive for the hospital; Dr. Michael Christopher joined kids to promote a pajama drive sponsored by Starbucks and aired on Channel 3’s “Good Morning, Arizona.”

Pediatric ICU.Children who come into the ED often need clothing because theirs has been damaged during the accident or removed during treatment. The Starbucks drive, which was featured on KTVK Channel 3 during drive time, netted more than 400 pairs of pajamas and clothing items for the Children’s Health Center. Sleep America sponsored a similar drive, the Comfort Drive, collecting teddy bears,pajamas and blankets for St.Joseph’s kids. 99.9 KEZ Radio and Cachet Homes teamed up for Caroling for Kids, a holiday campaign to build awareness of and collect toys for the Children’s Health Cen-

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ter. Carolling parties were held at several Cachet developments in the Valley and broadcast by FOX 10. Special holiday songbooks—featuring favorite carols, and stories and photos of St. Joseph’s children—were available at the songfests. Segway of Scottsdale equipped Santa and his elves with Segways for transporting toys collected during the carolling parties. St. Joseph’s Foundation, St. Joseph’s staff and all the children at the Children’s Health Center thank these local businesses for making the holidays merrier at St. Joseph’s!


BENEFACTOR BRIEFS Spirit Awards recognize benefactors’ contributions John and Doris Norton, and Wick and Jill Pilcher received Spirit of Philanthropy Awards during the 23rd Annual Philanthropy Award Dinner on November 1 at the Arizona Biltmore. The couples were honored by St. Joseph’s Foundation (SJF) and Barrow Neurological Foundation (BNF) for their contributions to the hospital. The dinner was hosted by the Association of Fundraising Professionals-Greater Arizona Chapter. The Nortons are long-time supporters of St. Joseph’s. John—who was born at St. Joseph’s, along with the couple’s three children—has served on the Barrow Neurological Foundation Board of Trustees and the St. Joseph’s Foundation Board of Directors. He served as the chair of the SJF Board for five years and is currently an emeritus member of that board. Doris has been a member of the Barrow Women’s Board since 1988. She co-chaired the Grand Barrow Ball in 2000. The couple’s most recent contribution to St. Joseph’s was a $1-million gift that created the John and Doris Norton Healing Garden. The Pilchers also have had ties to the hospital for many years.Wick joined the Barrow Neurological Foundation Board of Trustees in 1990 at the urging of his father, Bill

John and Doris Norton, and Wick and Jill Pilcher received Spirit Awards for their contributions to the hospital.

Pilcher, who was a founding member of the board. The couple served as co-chairs of Major Gifts for the Pushing Boundaries Capital Campaign, which raised about $30 million for the new Barrow Neuroscience Tower and other campus renovations at St. Joseph’s. The Spirit of Philanthropy Award was created in 1991 to provide charitable organizations the opportunity to honor someone associated with their organization who truly exemplifies the spirit of philanthropy.

Brandon Lombardi Foundation donates patient amenities to St. Joseph’s cancer center The Brandon Lombardi Foundation has made a generous donation of patient amenities to the Comprehensive Cancer Center at St. Joseph’s. The donated items—combination DVD/VHS units, game systems, portable DVD players, CD players with head sets, and a huge assortment of games, movies and CDs—will provide hours of entertainment for young cancer patients. In 1998, when Brandon Lombardi was a high-school senior, he learned that he had bone cancer. While the teen was undergoing chemotherapy and surgery for the disease, he decided to help other cancer patients escape the reality of cancer treatment by providing them entertainment items, such as video games, CDs and DVDs. On June 25, 2000, Lombardi’s first charity golf event, Chip in to Fight Cancer 2000, raised $20,000. The young man then established a nonprofit foundation dedicated to providing amenities to cancer patients. For more information on Lombardi’s remarkable and inspiring journey, visit www.TheBLF.org.

Halo Foundation provides funds for special car seats The Halo Foundation has given St. Joseph’s Foundation a gift of $5,000 to provide specially designed car seats to children with disabilities from a nonfatal drowning accident. As a former pediatric nurse at St. Joseph’s, Denise Pitts, the cofounder and president of the Halo Foundation, is very familiar with the impact of near drownings on children and their families.“I feel very fortunate that the Halo Foundation is able to continue our mission and assist the amazing team at St. Joseph’s by providing families that are impacted by a drowning incident with a safe and secure means of travel for their child,” Pitts said.

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Motorcyclists deliver toys for Andrea’s Closet at St. Joseph’s Nearly 100 motorcycles roared into the Circle Drive at St. Joseph’s on June 30. The bikers, who brought 1,200 new toys for hospitalized children at St. Joseph’s, were participating in a new special event—Andrea’s Closet Christmas in June Charity Toy Run. Andrea’s Closet is a non-profit organization that sponsors closets full of toys at 17 hospitals in Arizona. Hospitalized children are able to select a toy from the closet, comforting them and distracting them during medical treatments. Kenny and Traci Brunk founded Andrea’s Closet in memory of their daughter, Andrea, who died at age 10 after an 18-month battle with leukemia. Visits to a toy closet in St. Joseph’s Pediatric Unit helped Andrea deal with the treatments she underwent. The Brunks opened the first Andrea’s Closet six years ago at St. Joseph’s Children’s Health Center. For more information, visit www.AndreasCloset.org.

Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation makes grant of $75,000 The Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation granted St. Joseph’s $75,000 for breast education, screening and treatment at the Women’s Wellness Clinic, which provides free cancer screenings for low-income, uninsured women. Since 1996, the Komen Phoenix Affiliate has distributed more than $11.1 million to medical facilities in Arizona as well as to the Komen Foundation Headquarters Research Grant Program. Gail Brown and Mariantonieta Saloman of the Women’s Wellness Clinic (center front) with Charlie Thompson, Catherine Midgette and Pat Elder of the Phoenix Affiliate of the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation

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Sally Foundation brings holiday cheer to St. Joseph's kids In the spirit of the holidays, the Sally Foundation delivered a gift of cash and hand-made blankets to St. Joseph’s Children’s Health Center the week before Christmas. Family members of the Sally Foundation delivered the blankets to children in the Pediatric ICU. The Sally Foundation was established by Hal Horcasitas in honor of his late wife, Sally.This is the second year the foundation has made a gift to St. Joseph’s Children’s Health Center.


Pilot International donates art bags to Children’s Health Center The Southwestern District of Pilot International has donated more than 100 art bags for hospitalized children at St. Joseph’s Children’s Health Center. The cloth art bags are filled with crayons, washable markers, colored pencils, paper, glue sticks and other goodies. Debbie Castaldo, director of Philanthropic Innovation at St. Joseph’s Foundation, accepted the gift at an October 6 meeting of the group.

Angelita’s Amigos presents check for room renovation in Children’s Health Center In August, Bob Olivas and Dr. Loui Olivas of Angelita’s Amigos presented a gift of $27,000 to St. Joseph’s Foundation. The funds will be used to create Angelita’s Amigos Rooms in the Children’s Health Center at St. Joseph’s. Angelita’s Amigos is a non-profit organization that has been funding family-friendly rooms for hospitalized children at St. Joseph’s for several years. The non-profit organization was established in honor of Bob and Joann Olivas’ daughter, Angela Grace, who died of leukemia when she was four.

Bob Olivas and Dr. Loui Olivas present a check to Kathleen Rodgriguez, RN, Linda Hunt and Sharon Glanville, RN.

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PUTTIN’ ON THE RITZ

ANNUAL EVENT BRINGS TOGETHER BENEFACTORS, PHYSICIANS AND RESEARCHERS

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he third annual Soiree at the Ritz once again brought together major donors to St. Joseph’s Foundation (SJF) and Barrow Neurological Foundation (BNF), and the doctors and researchers whose programs they support. The Soiree is open to members of the Heritage Society’s Circles of Value. The Circles of Value honor those Heritage Society members whose gifts to SJF and/or BNF

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1 - Webb Todd, Barbara Hawkins, Mike Birgen, Lisa Wilkinson-Fannin, Barbara Todd; 2 - Kay and Bill Baker; 3 - Dr. Ross Bremner, Sister Madonna Marie Bolton, Dick Mallory; 4 - Dr. Timothy Vollmer, Karen and Bob Hobbs; 5 - Dick Mallory, Dr. Stephen Pophal, Dr. Robert Spetzler; 6 - Dr. Stephen Macknik, Dr. John Kresl, Kathleen Norton, Dr. Susana Martinez-Conde.

total $50,000 or more. The event gives major benefactors the opportunity to become better acquainted with key Barrow and St. Joseph’s physicians and scientists. For more information about the Heritage Society and the Circles of Value, please call the Foundation office at 602-406-3041 Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

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NEWS

St. Joseph’s president named a finalist for Women of Worth Award St. Joseph’s president Linda Hunt has been named a finalist for the Women of Worth Award. Presented by The Worth Collection, Ltd., the Women of Worth Award celebrates women who have achieved extraordinary success in their professional pursuits and have worked to empower other women to achieve their personal and professional goals. Under Hunt’s leadership, St. Joseph’s has grown into the state’s largest hospital, known for quality patient care, medical education and cutting-edge research. Kathleen Norton joins Foundation Kathleen Norton has assumed the position of director of Foundation Relations at St. Joseph’s Foundation and Barrow Neurological Foundation. In her new position, Kathleen is responsible for the direction and management of all donor recognition and stewardship programs. In addition, she works with the Barrow Women’s Board and heads up an effort by the Foundations to enhance the patient experience at St. Joseph’s and Barrow. Kathleen has extensive experience in major-gift fundraising and donor stewardship, having served in similar positions at Padres Jewish Day School, the ASU Foundation and the Phoenix Symphony. She also taught special education for 11 years and directed programs at the Arizona Humane Society and the Tesseract School. Kathleen has held positions at Glenbeigh Hospital in Cleveland, OH, and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital in Ohio.

Pediatric neurologist named president of national organization Dr. John Bodensteiner was installed as the 24th president of the Child Neurology Society at the 36th annual meeting of the organization in October in Quebec, Canada. The Child Neurology Society is the national organization of Pediatric Neurology in the U.S. Nearly all the child neurologists in the country and Canada belong to this group.

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St. Joseph’s receives Medal of Honor for organ donation St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center has been presented the Medal of Honor from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for high achievement in organ donation. Nationally, the hospital has reached the 75th percentile donor conversion rate for organs. The medal was presented to St. Joseph’s team members at a ceremony in Nashville on Oct. 9. “Achieving a 75-percent conversion rate is not an easy goal, and we’ve been working with the Donor Network of Arizona to accomplish this for some time,” says Sister Margaret McBride, vice president of St. Joseph’s Mission Services.“The wonderful thing about organ donation is that it honors the memory of those who have passed away and gives organ recipients a second opportunity at life.” Superstition Paint Horses Open House to raise funds for Pediatric ICU The Superstition Paint Horses 8th Annual Open House for St. Joseph's Pediatric ICU will be held from 11 a.m.-5 p.m. on Saturday,March 22,in Queen Valley.The fundraiser will include a golf tournament, children's western events, carnival booths and a free lunch. The parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles and friends of five-year-old Cameron T. Haselhorst host the open house each year to thank St. Joseph's for the care the child received and to raise money for St. Joseph's Pediatric ICU. Cameron was born in October 2002 weighing less than three pounds; his twin brother did not survive.During his first two years,Cameron spent weeks in the Neonatal ICU and then the Pediatric ICU. Today, he is a healthy, normal little boy. For more information,including directions to the open house, call 520-463-2898. Phoenix Theatre names hospital ‘Organization of the Year’ Phoenix Theatre will honor St. Joseph’s as the “Organization of the Year” at a luncheon on March 6 at the Phoenician. Seventeen organizations were nominated for the award, which is given each year to a business, foundation or institution that demonstrates a commitment to the well-being of children.


Ted Williams elected to SJF board Ted Williams has been elected to the Board of Directors of St. Joseph’s Foundation. For much of his career, Williams has directed large and complex governmental agencies and private businesses, mainly in the areas of healthcare and environmental health. Since 1998, he has served as the president and CEO of the Arizona Behavioral Health Corporation. Earlier positions include president and CEO of the Arizona Foundation for Behavioral Health; secretary/treasurer at Williams LaSota & Miller, Ltd.; Associate County Administrator, Health Care Agency and Operations for Maricopa County; and Director of the Arizona Department of Health Services. Williams earned a bachelor’s in engineering and a juris doctorate at Arizona State University. He has served as the chairman of the Arizona Coalition for Tomorrow, the president of Arizona Senior Olympics, and as a member of Arizona Town Hall and the Maricopa County Human Rights Committee.

NIH awards researcher $1.8 million St. Joseph’s researcher Dr.Andrej Romanovsky has been awarded a five-year, $1.8-million grant from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Dr. Romanovsky was awarded the grant to continue his studies into the mechanisms of fever and hypothermia in systemic inflammation. Systemic inflammation, including sepsis and trauma disease, is the complex biological response of the body to harmful stimuli. It is accompanied by either fever (in mild cases) or hypothermia (in severe cases). The direction of the body temperature response may determine the difference between life and death for a patient with certain injuries and infections. To understand how and why systemic inflammation causes fever in some cases and hypothermia in others, Dr. Romanovsky will conduct research to identify the mechanisms involved and gain insight into the therapeutic use of some anti-inflammatory drugs. Dr. Romanovsky is a member of St. Joseph’s Level I Trauma Center, the only center in Arizona with verification from the American College of Surgeons (ACS). ACS verification requires ongoing trauma research and education. This is the fourth major grant that Dr. Romanovsky has received since joining St. Joseph’s in 2000.

Two St. Joseph’s employees win YMCA Tribute to Women Awards Debbie Castaldo, director of Philanthropic Innovation at St. Joseph’s Foundation, and Joan Rankin Shapiro, PhD, vice president of Clinical Research at St. Joseph’s Hospital, are among nine women being honored at the 2008 YWCA Tribute to Women Awards Luncheon on February 21 at the Arizona Biltmore Resort and Spa. The Tribute to Women Awards recognize Maricopa County women whose lives and accomplishments reflect the YWCA’s mission of empowering women and eliminating discrimination. Those selected reflect devotion to improving the lives of women and girls through leadership, advocacy and community service while achieving success in their career fields. Dr. Shapiro is receiving the Health and Science Leader award, and Castaldo is receiving the Philanthropy Leader award. Lou Grubb Friends Fore Golf celebrates its 35th year April 24-25 2008 is a big year for Lou Grubb Friends Fore Golf—this year, the annual fundraiser celebrates its 35th year in the Valley. To commemorate this milestone, the LGFFG committee is planning a two-day golf extravaganza that will be better than ever. The event begins on Thursday, April 24, at the Arizona Biltmore Resort and Spa where participants will congregate for an evening of fun, fellowship and food. The party will feature the Mary Jane and Warren Crist party-putt raffle, the Anne Merete Robbs Tiki Bar, a silent auction and a live auction. The highlight of the evening will be the raffling of a new smart car, donated by an anonymous donor. The golf tournament takes place on Friday at McCormick Ranch Golf Club, with a shot-gun start at noon. Golfers will enjoy goodie bags, photo sculptures and a post-tournament awards dinner. For more information, call the Foundation office at 602406-3041.

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AN ENDURING MISSION by Robert Hopkins Vice President

very nonprofit organization has a mission statement. Mission statements describe the organization’s beliefs (the why), the recipients of services (the who), and the organization’s actions (the what of mission). Most mission statements include these three elements … I believe, I serve, and therefore, I do. St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center’s mission hasn’t changed one iota since being written many decades ago. In many ways it’s a simple statement and includes language one would expect from a faithbased institution, one founded by the Sisters of Mercy 112 years ago. It says the hospital exists to enhance the quality of life by fostering a healing ministry and by providing medical services that touch the whole person, including extended family, in an environment that promotes justice and affirms the dignity of each person. Powerful words, indeed, and they have been lived and animated by the people who come to work here every day, whether caregiver, housekeeper or volunteer. St. Joseph’s is a very different place than it was when the statement of mission was first authored. But in the most important ways, it’s exactly the same. The care provided here reflects the values inherent in the

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philosophy of the Sisters of Mercy. There is nothing that could distinguish St. Joseph’s more than that.

“The care provided here reflects the values inherent in the philosophy of the Sisters of Mercy. There is nothing that could distinguish St. Joseph’s more than that.”


ST. JOSEPH’S FOUNDATION St. Joseph’s Foundation (SJF) was established in 1981 to raise funds for projects throughout the hospital. Since then, benefactors have contributed millions that have been invested in: o o o o o o

Promising new research Endowments that attract top physicians and researchers Medical education New programs and services to meet the needs of our community Construction and renovation projects The latest technology.

St. Joseph’s Foundation is governed by a board of community leaders who serve on a voluntary basis.

2007-2008

St. Joseph’s Foundation Board of Directors Christine K. Wilkinson, PhD, Chairman Judy Egan, Vice Chairman Richard A. Horn, Treasurer Jorge Quintero, Secretary Charles A. Alfano, MD Kelly J. Barr Ross Bremner, MD L. Don Brown Mary Jane Crist Timothy J. Drexler Scott Eller Michael Ford C.A. Howlett Linda Hunt Patrick Madigan Michelle M. Matiski Michael L. Medici Jacquelyn M. Michelson Gordon Murphy Jerry L. Nichols Loui Olivas, PhD Craig S. Porter Joan Rankin Shapiro, PhD Ted Williams

For more information, contact St. Joseph’s Foundation at 602-406-3041 or toll-free at 1-800-925-9514. Our office is open 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday.


Nonprofit Org. U.S. Postage PAID Permit No. 685 Phoenix, AZ

CHW Arizona St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center 350 W. Thomas Rd. Phoenix, AZ 85013

You’ve got mail! St. Joseph’s Foundation is developing more cost-effective and efficient ways of communicating with our donors and friends. One of these methods is email. Please help us by sending your email address on the enclosed postage-paid postcard. Or simply email your information to Catherine.Menor@chw.edu. Please include your name, address, email address and phone number. Thanks for your help with this project!


St. Joseph's Foundation, Volume 4, Issue 1, 2008