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ST. JOSEPH’S magazine A magazine for the friends of St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center

ARIZONA’S FIRST BREATHING LUNG TRANSPLANT

Lung-in-a-box trial keeps lungs breathing en route to transplantation

IT TAKES A TEAM

Transplant coordinators are the life force behind St. Joseph’s lung transplant program

Volume 9, Issue 2, 2013


OPENING THOUGHTS Fall is a season for change. And at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, we bear witness to a growing and changing environment every day. In this issue of St. Joseph’s Magazine, you’ll learn about some of these exciting changes happening here, from the first Arizona patient to receive a lung transplant through a state-of-the-art clinical trial, to the exciting future of our new cancer center. There’s another exciting change coming to St. Joseph’s this fall. Brian Mortenson has been named vice president of Philanthropy for the Dignity Health Arizona Service Area, and president and CEO of St. Joseph’s Foundation and Barrow Neurological Foundation. He is expected to transition to his new position by mid November. For the past 14 years, Brian served as president and chief philanthropy/development officer of Sanford Health Foundation in Sioux Falls, SD, the nation’s largest rural, not-for-profit, integrated health system. Under his leadership, Sanford Health Foundation received several transformational gifts, including a $400-million contribution, the single largest philanthropic gift ever received by a healthcare system. During his tenure, the foundation’s assets increased from $8 million to $664 million, number of endowments increased from 17 to 620, and planned gifts increased from 5 to 496. We will share more about Brian in a future issue, but we are excited to have him on board and wanted to share the news with you. I sincerely appreciate all that you do to support St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center. Philanthropy is a crucial component of the work that we do here, and without your support, much of the change taking place now would not be possible. Thank you.

Patty White President/CEO, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center

P.S. Your continued support is vitally important to the work we do. Please make your gift to St. Joseph’s Foundation today. A giving envelope is enclosed for your convenience, or give online at SupportStJosephs.org.

On our cover: Estelle Ellington, Arizona’s first lung-in-a-box transplant recipient.


ST. JOSEPH’S magazine A magazine for the friends of St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center

contents

Volume 9, Issue 2, 2013

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Arizona’s First Breathing Lung Transplant Lung-in-a-box trial keeps lungs breathing en route to transplantation.

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Lung Life Support Researchers target therapies to treat lung and esophageal cancers.

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Transplant Coordinators Team matches patients and donors at lifesaving speed.

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Hello Humankindness

10 Instant Diagnosis New technology helps diagnose cancer in record time. 12 It’s a Match Match day pairs new doctors with hospital residency programs. 14 The Phoenix 84 New crop of Creighton University students arrive at St. Joseph’s. 16 Master Teachers Residents honor those who taught them best. 17 With Komen, We CAN St. Joseph’s receives breast cancer screening and treatment grant. 18 Treating Cancer with Dignity 20 There’s No Place Like Home Benefactors strive to make hospital feel as home-like as possible. 22 Why I Give 24 Benefactor Briefs 26 End-of-the-Year Gifts That Benefit Everyone Lindsey Burke Editor Lindsey.Burke@dignityhealth.org Catherine Menor Assistant editor Justin Detwiler Art director/designer

Brad Armstrong, Ford Jacobsen Photography Sara Baird, Melissa Morrison, Sarah McGrain Padilla Contributing writers

Patty White President/CEO, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center

Panoramic Press

• How to Reach Us • St. Joseph’s Magazine is published by St. Joseph’s Foundation. We welcome your comments, suggestions and requests to be added to or deleted from our mailing list. Call 602-406-1044, email Lindsey.Burke@dignityhealth.org, or send mail to St. Joseph’s Magazine, Office of Philanthropy, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix, AZ, 85013. Please include your name, address, email address and daytime telephone number in all correspondence. Visit us online at www.SupportStJosephs.org.


ARIZONA’S FIRST BREATHING LUNG TRANSPLANT LUNG-IN-A-BOX TRIAL KEEPS LUNGS BREATHING EN ROUTE TO HOSPITAL by Lindsey Burke Estelle and Henry Ellington

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stelle Ellington’s lung transplant wasn’t the first at St. Joseph’s, but it is remarkable for being the first of its kind. When Ellington, 53, first found out that she was a match for a pair of donor lungs, things moved quickly. But it had taken more than 10 years of slow deterioration to reach this crucial point. “I was coughing all the time, and I had all kinds of tests done, but doctors couldn’t determine what it was,” Ellington says. She was sent to a dermatologist for spots on her skin, to a rheumatologist and other physicians for multiple tests. The cause was lupus, a disease of the connective tissue that can affect every organ. For Ellington, lupus was wreaking havoc on her pulmonary function. Eventually she was placed on medications that controlled her cough for a short time.

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During a 2007 trip to the emergency room for pelvic pain, Ellington was put on IV morphine and Dilaudid. Her blood pressure fell dangerously low, and her lungs flooded with fluid. “After that my doctor got really concerned about what our next steps would be if my lungs got any worse, so he sent me to San Diego for a transplant evaluation.” For Ellington, the trip to San Diego from Hawaii, where she has lived for the last 20 years, proved disappointing. She didn’t qualify for transplantation at the time – she was considered too healthy. For the next several years, Ellington experienced setbacks, was put on oxygen around the clock, found everyday activities difficult to handle and didn’t leave the house often.


The Phoenix Connection Rajat Walia, MD, medical director of Thoracic Transplantation at St. Joseph’s, was attending a conference in Atlanta and was speaking with some other attendees about the hospital’s transplantation program. One of those physicians was Ellington’s doctor from Hawaii. “We talked about the program and about Estelle’s condition, and it seemed like a good fit,” said Dr. Walia. “My doctor in Hawaii came back from the conference and said, ‘I have a place for you to go,’” Ellington explains. And in December 2012, the Ellingtons came to Arizona to meet with Dr. Walia for a formal transplant evaluation. After multiple days of testing and evaluations, Dr. Walia had good news. “He told us we needed to relocate to Arizona and start the process for getting Estelle on the transplant list,” said Estelle’s husband, Henry. Going to Trial Ellington’s transplant is special because it involved an experimental organ-preservation device called the Organ Care System (OCS) by TransMedics, which keeps donor lungs “breathing” by perfusing them with oxygen and blood during transport. The lungs actually expand and contract while inside the OCS box rather than being placed on ice like in a standard transplant. OCS is the subject of a clinical trial called INSPIRE which will compare donor lungs transported using the new OCS technology with the standard icebox method. The study is also underway at lung transplant centers in Europe, Australia and Canada, and will enroll a total of 264 randomized patients. St. Joseph’s is the only center in Arizona participating in the trial. Michael Smith, MD, associate chief of Thoracic Surgery and surgical director of lung transplantation at St. Joseph’s, says that in preserving the lungs in a more natural way, the hope is to allow more lung transplant patients a greater chance at receiving lungs that function well right away. He also notes that in the future, this innovative technology could allow more lungs to be available for lung transplant recipients because they can be transported longer distances. “Instead of packing the lungs on ice, we are able to keep them warm with blood circulating through them and essentially breathing,” explains Dr. Smith, who is leading the clinical trial at St. Joseph's. “With this technology, we're not only able to keep the lungs living while outside the body, but we're also able to monitor

and potentially improve lung function prior to transplant.” Moving Right Along On May 14, Ellington was formally placed on the United Network for Organ Sharing transplant list. Two weeks later she agreed to participate in the lung-in-abox study, not knowing if she’d be randomly selected to participate or not. Coincidentally, the day after enrolling in the study, Henry received the call that a pair of lungs was available for Estelle. “Receiving that call was overwhelming,” Henry says. “There were so many mixed emotions.” He went home immediately to tell Estelle. “I said ‘I have some news,’ and she thought I had been in a car accident. Luckily the news was better than that.” Henry and Estelle packed a bag and were off to St. Joseph’s within an hour to prepare for surgery. Just before her surgery, surgeons told the Ellingtons that Estelle’s lungs had been transported via the lung-in-abox system. “I woke up two days later with a new set of lungs,” Estelle says. “It’s been an interesting experience, and I’m looking forward to the future.” ∎

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LUNG LIFE SUPPORT CANCER RESEARCHERS TARGET THERAPIES TO TREAT LUNG AND ESOPHAGEAL CANCERS by Melissa Frederick Morrison

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he whole point of our immune system is to fight against enemies such as cancer. But one of the dastardly ploys St. Joseph’s researchers have uncovered is that certain lung cancers co-opt the body’s defenses for their own purposes. Cells that are intended to defend the body against mutations actually help tumors invade it. “Tumor cells themselves subvert the immune system to help the tumor grow and to propagate,” says Landon Inge, PhD, of the Center for Thoracic Disease and Transplantation at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center. Lung cancer is the deadliest, as well as one of the most prevalent, type of cancer. Usually, by the time it is discovered, it is far advanced, limiting the effectiveness of treatment. The vast majority of lung cancers are characterized as “non-small cell,” based on the type of tissue involved, and are treated similarly. Building on previous research, Dr. Inge’s lab has found that non-small cell cancer patients who lack a certain type of tumor-suppressor gene are far more susceptible to this pirating of their immune system. The gene, called LKB1, normally rides to the rescue when cancer cells begin to multiply. But in roughly half of all non-small cell patients, the LKB1 gene is wiped out before it has a chance to work. A few years ago, Dr. Inge’s lab identified a medication that uses the lack of a tumor-suppressor gene to its advantage. The medication lures cancer cells by pretending to be edible sugar when, in fact, it is an indigestible decoy. It starves the invading cells, causing them to die off. Pre-clinical studies are underway for this drug and other potential compounds. Dr. Inge is involved in ongoing discussions for potential clinical trials. The drug may also prevent the spread of lung cancer to other organs. That’s an area for further research, and Dr. Inge says his lab is currently awaiting the results of grant applications, including to the National Institutes of Health, to do so.

Landon Inge, PhD

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Ross Bremner, MD, the thoracic surgeon who chairs St. Joseph’s Center for Thoracic Disease and Transplantation, treats the patients who suffer from this cruel disease. “The finding of LKB1 mutations promises to provide a novel way to treat the most chemoresistent of lung cancers,” he says. Dr. Inge and his collaborators at Translational Genomics Research Institute, a.k.a., TGen, are also actively pursuing new methodologies for the clinical diagnosis of lung cancer patients. The majority of patients present with metastatic disease; however, despite advances in cancer imaging technologies, many of these metastatic tumors aren’t found until the patients undergo surgery for their primary tumors. The treatment team then must forestall treatment of their metastatic tumors until they heal from surgery. By improving the clinician’s ability to find these metastatic tumors, patients could immediately start treatment, improving their chances for survival. Developing cancer-killing medications is not the only way Dr. Inge’s lab is tackling the disease. It is also growing cancer cell lines so that it, and other labs, have an unlimited supply of experimental specimens. One of its most avid customers is TGen which focuses on developing treatments targeted to specific genetic mutations in diseases such as cancer. Expanding to Other Cancers In the past two years, Dr. Inge’s lab has expanded its lines to include other lung cancers, as well as esophageal cancers.

Unlike lung cancer, whose notoriety has resulted in the development of many cell lines used to develop treatments, those for esophageal cancer are still sparse. These cell lines are especially needed, Dr. Inge says, because incidence of esophogeal cancer is rising. He cites a 400-percent increase from 1975 to 2000. Theories about why esophageal cancer is on the rise relate to dietary changes over the decades, resulting in obesity and chronic heartburn, which can eventually alter the lining of the esophagus. The result is called Barrett’s esophagus and is a known precursor to cancer. Another study conducted by Dr. Inge may help extend the lives of humans who have diseased lungs. Dr. Inge’s lab is in the early stages of replicating a large-

“The finding of LKB1 mutations promises to provide a novel way to treat the most chemoresistent of lung cancers.” Landon Inge, PhD S T.

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scale lung transplant study in which organs are kept “breathing” from harvest to transplant. Dr. Inge’s lab intends to finesse the technique. “We can do it from an experimental standpoint to see if there’s anything we can do to make lungs healthier,” he says. Lung Life Support Lung transplant is the last hope for patients who have end-stage pulmonary diseases, such as COPD. However, one out of five lung-transplant candidates dies waiting for the organ, in large part because many donor lungs cannot survive for very long outside of the body. The traditional way of preserving lungs is to cool them until they are ready for transplantation. “Even on ice, they slowly deteriorate and then end up having early dysfunction after implantation,” says Dr. Bremner, who specializes in lung transplants. “It is a major cause of morbidity and also contributes to chronic rejection, which is a cause of long-term dysfunction of the lungs.” The study, ex-vivo lung perfusion, involves placing the lungs at body temperature in a sterile plastic chamber and perfusing them with an oxygenated solution designed to minimize lung injury and even improve their function to the point that the organ can be successfully transplanted. “This new technique aims to preserve the lungs

better – essentially a ‘life-support system’ for the lungs so that they do not deteriorate while in transit,” Dr. Bremner says. “It is hoped this will lead to better early function, as well as long-term function of the lungs.” St. Joseph’s is one of five medical centers in the country participating in the study. Estelle Ellington (see story on page 2) was the first Arizona patient to undergo an ex-vivo lung transplant in June. ∎

You can support life-saving research in St. Joseph’s Center for Thoracic Disease and Transplantation by making a gift today. Use the enclosed giving envelope or visit SupportStJosephs.org.

Research technicians in the lung cancer research laboratory at TGen, from left to right: Diana Alarcon Esteban, Jacqueline Friel, Kelley O’Brien, Aaron Fowler, Emily Gable and Landon Inge, PhD.

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Lung transplant coordination team

TRANSPLANT COORDINATORS TEAM MATCHES PATIENTS, DONORS AT LIFE-SAVING SPEED by Sara Baird

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rom her office at St. Joseph’s, transplant administrator Brandi Krushelniski, RN, BSN, CCTC, plays a life-and-death role in the hospital’s lung transplant program, working round-the-clock with donor organizations throughout the nation to identify the right donor for the right patient. The mother of two has worked a lot of 24-hour shifts to get the job done. “You have to have a passion for life, for people and for the work you do every day,” she says. Krushelniski is supported by a team of four nurses, two pre- and post-transplant clinical assistants, a

social worker and financial coordinator who, together, make the transplant process as seamless as possible for the patient. Preparing for Transplant Prior to a patient’s placement on the transplant list, a whole host of steps are taken to ensure the patient is right for the complex procedure. Beginning with a referring physician’s recommendation, patients are screened by transplant coordinators and sent to financial coordinators who verify the patient’s insurance. The patient is then scheduled for

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nearly two days of preliminary tests to determine if he or she is a viable candidate. If so, the patient is scheduled for a more thorough medical work-up – one so comprehensive that it often takes seven days to complete the battery of tests and evaluations. Pending test results, patients are then placed on the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) list. UNOS is the non-profit organization that manages the nation’s organ transplant system. When Lungs are Available Krushelniski and her team of transplant coordinators are on constant alert. Once they receive notice of an available set of lungs, the coordinators must immediately evaluate it on the UNOS website based on a variety of criteria including age, blood type and size. “Our patients are the heroes in my life. They handle their lives with such grace and tenacity even while they are so sick,” Krushelniski says, also emphasizing the bravery of donor families who, while facing the death of a loved one, make the tough decision to save the life of another. The retrieval and delivery of the organs must be coordinated down to the minute. Krushelniski explains that once an offer is accepted, a St. Joseph’s lung transplant surgeon and perfusion technician are dispatched to the donor’s location to examine the lungs before procuring them. “We have to get the transplant patient to the hospital fast too,” she adds. “There have been times when I couldn’t reach the patient and had to call local police to help me track them down. There is no time to waste.” From there, Krushelniski orchestrates the complex minute-by-minute delivery of the surgeon and precious organs back to the hospital so that the receiving patient is prepped and ready in the operating room at the exact moment the lungs arrive. Once donor lungs are retrieved, surgeons have approximately six hours for transplantation. The miracles the surgeons have produced in St. Joseph’s 200-plus transplant patients would never have occurred without the unwavering determination of Krushelniski and the transplant team who will literally go to the ends of the earth to save a patient. ∎

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Top: Brandi Krushelniski, RN, BSN, CCTC. Bottom: Katherine Varsch, RN, BSN, MSN, CCTC; Deanna Kalina, RN, BSN, CCTC; Danny Draper, Jr., RN; not pictured: Carrie Bach, RN, MSN.


HELLO HUMANKINDNESS Hello Humankindness. When we open with a smile When we listen When we show each other humankindness, We become stronger people. At Dignity Health we believe Healing begins with a human connection. And that’s why we’re championing humanity In every health care conversation, Every debate, every personal experience, For every person who walks through our doors. Join us. Humanity has the power to heal. So let’s create health care as we want it to be, With a little more care.

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ast year, we introduced our new name, Dignity Health. We chose the word dignity for our name because it means we show respect for all persons, not for anything they do or any rank they hold, but because they reflect the face of God. With unwavering commitment to our founders’ intention to touch body, mind and spirit in those we serve, we have strived to live our mission and values in everything we do. We’ve also been talking to our employees, community members and patients — to understand what the name Dignity Health means to them. Out of these conversations, we have arrived at a very powerful idea—one that we believe will unite us, inspire us and help us advance our mission. We’re calling it “Hello Humankindness.” Humankindness is more than an ideal. It is at the heart of our healing mission. Acts of humankindness have been an expression of the healing ministry of Jesus since our beginning. We believe that, together, our humanity and kindness create something that this world—not just this industry— needs. By saying hello, we invite people in and open the conversation to the world outside our doors. Humankindness is surprisingly easy. It begins when we look at the world around us and take actions to make it better. Visit HelloHumankindness.org for ideas, both big and small, on how you can help create humankndness in your life and others’. ∎

The Ear health isth’s our heal th.

Whethe r it’s goo d soil, pur of our plan e water, et. Yet the or clean to environ very hea air— our mental lth care health is harm. industry deeply that’s mea connec And hum ted to the nt to hea ankindn l us is a health ess is the major con answer. By shin tributor ing the ligh t of hum to create ankindn a healthie ess on r future we’ve tran our own hos for our sitioned environ pitals and to produc power our ment and care ts centers Marian free of PVC the peo , we’re Regiona ple livin and DEH helping l Medical g in it. Tod These acti P, eliminat Center ay, we can ons may ed with met win us We’re now say hane from the use of mer recognit cury, and championi a nearby to help now ng the mod ion, but they also landfill. ensure create clou ernization the che ecosyst micals of the Tox t to take em on whi and pro on bigg ic Substan ducts we ch we all er challen ces use are depend Control I am a wom ges. . safe for Act in Con an of faith humans gres we have s , , animals, and I beli been bles eve we and the sed with In doing are call ed is so, we tap threaten to respond ed. Let’ into a grea when the s join toge And that ter pow earthly ther to er to hea ’s somethi home protect l, to insp ng we can the wor ire, and ld around all believe to love. us. in.

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INSTANT DIAGNOSIS

NEW TECHNOLOGY HELPS DIAGNOSE CANCER IN RECORD TIME by Lindsey Burke

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urprisingly, it was a knee injury that led to the discovery of esophageal cancer in 62-year-old retired police officer Jack Frye. “My story isn’t very glamorous,” he says, but his story is one of serendipity and how new technology aided in overcoming a diagnosis that is oftentimes deadly. “When I went in with my knee injury, the hospital gave me a chest X-ray, which is standard procedure on all patients over 50,” Frye says. The X-ray reveled something suspicious that led hospital staff to refer him to a gastroenterologist in Casa Grande, Ariz. The physician performed an upper endoscopy and biopsy and determined that he had Barrett’s esophagus, a serious disease that results from GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease) – a chronic form of acid reflux. Frye’s physician monitored his condition for nearly three years but over time,

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The Cellvizio microscope, used in conjunction with a traditional endoscope, helped to diagnose Jack Frye’s esophageal cancer in a matter of minutes.


there was a change in the condition of his esophagus. He was referred to Ross Bremner, MD, PhD, chief of Thoracic Surgery at St. Joseph’s. According to Dr. Bremner, GERD is extremely common with about 10 percent of the population suffering from it weekly. With prolonged GERD, the tissue lining the esophagus deteriorates into tissue that resembles the lining of the intestines, a condition known as Barrett’s esophagus. “Unfortunately the Barrett’s esophagus lining is unstable, and in some patients this will progress to cancer,” says Dr. Bremner. “There is a stepped progression of the disease from Barrett’s Jack Frye to low grade dysplasia to high grade dysplasia to invasive cancer. The risk of a patient with Barrett’s developing cancer is about half of 1 percent to 1 percent per year, or about 10 percent over a decade.” Patients with Barrett’s need to undergo periodic endoscopies to evaluate the esophagus for dysplasia. If a patient develops dysplasia, he or she can undergo an endoscopic treatment called Barrett’s ablation, which typically uses radio-frequency to destroy the lesion. This technique is very successful and enables physicians to eliminate high-grade dysplasia in most patients and prevent the progression to cancer. In Frye’s case, Dr. Bremner used a new optical probe to view internal tissues at the microscopic level instantaneously. Studies have shown that having this cellby-cell view of the lining of the GI tract and lungs can

lead to improved detection and faster treatment. Frye was one of the first patients at St. Joseph’s screened using the new technology from Cellvizio that shows microscopic images in a minimally invasive manner. During the procedure, a tiny microscope is threaded through a traditional endoscope like a catheter while the patient is having an endoscopy. The structure of the digestive tract appears in real time on the screen while the patient is given an IV contrast agent called fluorescein, allowing the physician to recognize typical features of healthy and diseased tissue. The use of the new technology enabled Dr. Bremner to determine that the tissue in Frye’s esophagus was malignant in a far faster way – within just minutes – than the traditional approach of randomly taking samples, sending them to the lab and waiting to hear results, which sometimes takes a few days or more. Frye’s biopsies confirmed stage 1 esophageal cancer. “Hearing the word ‘cancer’ is scary to everyone,” Frye says. “But I knew I was in the right place and that Dr. Bremner was the right man for the job. He explained everything and even drew pictures so I knew what he was talking about.” The surgery was complex, but Frye’s outlook is positive. “Dr. Bremner removed my esophagus and basically created a new one out of my stomach,” he says. Frye has lost some weight because of his new eating habits as a result of the April surgery. He is cancer free and now working on regaining his strength. “We will follow Jack closely,” Dr. Bremner explains, “but new and innovative technology has really helped to treat Jack. He has more than likely beaten this cancer – something that is a rare occurrence with this otherwise deadly disease.” “Over time things will get back to normal,” Frye says, “but for now, I’m just happy to be alive.” ∎

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IT’S A MATCH! MATCH DAY PAIRS NEW DOCTORS WITH HOSPITAL RESIDENCY PROGRAMS by Melissa Frederick Morrison

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good match is part alchemy, part algorithm – a matter of mutual attraction, complementary personalities and a certain je ne sais quoi. It helps to look good on paper, make a great first impression and, frankly, spend a chunk of money. But the result could determine the course of a young person’s life. And on the third Friday of every March, it all pays off, when freshly minted doctors meet the hospital where they will launch their careers as medical residents. Match Day, as it is known, is basically a nationwide arranged marriage between graduating medical students and hospitals. And on March 15 this year, 55 students found their future at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center. “Somebody always asks, ‘How do you think the match is going to go this year?’” says Charles Daschbach, MD, who oversees the process as director of Academic Affairs for St. Joseph’s. “I joke, ‘That depends on whether the grunion are running or not.’ It’s so unpredictable. However, I can say we’re always very pleased with the candidates we match. St. Joseph’s enjoys a good reputation both in our matching and in how our graduates perform when they leave.” The new residents will work at St. Joseph’s from three to seven years in their respective specialties, which include family medicine, internal medicine, general surgery, obstetrics/gynecology, radiology, neurology and neurosurgery. They come from medical schools ranging from University of Arizona, Columbia, Creighton, Mayo Medical School, Cornell and Syria’s Damascus University. For new doctors, their residency is the launch pad for their careers, whether they remain at St. Joseph’s and build a life in Phoenix or move on to opportunities elsewhere. For hospitals, each new resident is a future steward of St. Joseph’s reputation. Accordingly, each party approaches Match Day eager to impress. “It’s a highly stressful time for the students and for the program directors,” Dr. Daschbach says.

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The search begins early in the George students’ fourth and Chesteen, final year of medical MD, and his school, when they apply family at the for residencies. Thus Creighton University begins a months-long, School of Medicine Match Day in Omaha, Neb. Chesteen country-crossing, dollarwas matched with St. Joseph’s depleting ritual. Students Hospital and Medical Center. typically go on as many as 15 interviews, paying their own way. Applications are narrowed down by grades, test scores, research, community service, letters of recommendation and the student’s personal statement. About 5,300 students applied for 55 available spots at St. Joseph’s, Dr. Daschbach says. More than 700 came to Phoenix for personal interviews. “You can spot them a mile away, in their brand-new dark suits,” Dr. Daschbach says. In the interviews, program directors are looking for a resident who meshes with the faculty, other residents and the specialty. They ask about clinical experiences and personal interests and how the doctor would handle certain “What if …” patient scenarios. “Different specialties have very different lifestyles and work environments,” Dr. Daschbach says. “A radiology resident spends a lot of time in a very dark place looking at thousands of very complex images on computer screens. A family-practice resident has to collaborate with large numbers of clinical team members in the hospital and the community. “In neurosurgery, they look for some very special characteristics,” including academic excellence and varied backgrounds. (The current chief resident played


hockey in the NHL before he went to med school.) Physical stamina is also important. “If you have to stand for six hours in a row, it’s very important that you’re somewhat athletic,” he says. Every year for the last 25 years, all neurosurgery residents are expected to hike the Grand Canyon rim to rim with Barrow Neurological Institute Director, Robert F. Spetzler, MD, and the neurosurgery faculty. Discovery Day When all the interviews are done, each participant – resident and hospital – ranks its preference in descending order. A computer at the Washington, DC-based National Residency Matching Program, which has overseen the process since the 1950s, pairs doctors with hospitals. And on Match Day, the students open up their envelopes en masse, usually at a medicalschool ceremony. Cornell’s Michael Mooney, MD, opened his envelope to discover he’d be spending the next seven years at Barrow. “In neurosurgery, people typically apply 20 to 30 places,” he says, on a brief break. “I was extremely fortunate to get an interview with Barrow. I came out with the intention of impressing as much as I could.” His visit included shadowing residents and observing in the operating room. He says he felt he was culled from a very competitive pool of applicants because he developed a kinship with many of the neurosurgeons during the two-day interviewing process. He’s been a resident for nearly two months now. “They have an attitude that’s really resident-focused,” Dr. Mooney says. “There’s a lot of emphasis on the relationship between residents as well as between residents and attendings. It’s been everything I had hoped for.” Next year’s crop may be a completely different mix of backgrounds and experiences. But Dr. Daschbach says St. Joseph’s residents always have one thing in common. “We’re looking for somebody we’re going to be proud will go into the world and emulate our Dignity Health core values – that extra commitment to the humanitarian side of medicine,” he says. ∎

A wedding proposal, disguised as a Match Day envelope, was opened by Emily Yeager, MD, at the Creighton University School of Medicine in Omaha. Her finace, Drew Keyser, is a fourth-year medical student at Creighton University School of Medicine at St. Joseph’s in Phoenix. After the surprise, Yeager opened her real Match Day envelope to discover she would be joining Drew in Phoenix to begin her residency at Phoenix Children’s Hospital. She said yes.

Renovation began this summer on Norton Manor, a renovated space for Creighton students that will feature a student center and administrative offices. The project was made possible by long-time philanthropists Doris and John Norton.

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The Creighton University School of Medicine at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center class of 2015

THE PHOENIX 84

NEW CROP OF CREIGHTON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE STUDENTS ARRIVES AT ST. JOSEPH’S by Lindsey Burke

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here’s a new crop of fresh faces on St. Joseph’s campus. The faces – 42 to be exact – are those of new third-year medical students selected to attend classes at Creighton University School of Medicine at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center in Phoenix. The new students, who arrived in June, join a group of 42 now fourthyear students who were part of the inaugural Creighton class at St. Joseph’s in 2012. The class of 2015 was welcomed to Phoenix with a white coat ceremony, a culmination of orientation and a traditional rite of passage for medical students during which they receive a white coat, a medical icon. Demand for the Phoenix track was higher than expected. “The students have the choice to attend the Omaha or the Phoenix track,” says Debra Martell, Creighton program manager in Phoenix. “We had an overwhelming demand, so students were put on a waitlist to determine who was able to attend.” The affiliation between St. Joseph’s and Creighton, now in its second year, has expanded educational opportunities available to Creighton medical students while allowing the university’s School of Medicine to recruit more students. The collaboration is also designed to strengthen the medical reputations of both institutions, promote the sharing of faculty and administrative expertise, create collaborative research opportunities and enhance medical services for Arizona patients. ∎

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Catherine Nguyen receives a blessing of the hands from Sister Madonna Marie Bolton

Aaron Barrett and Patrick Baumgart

Randy Richardson, MD, shakes hands with student Matthew Stapleton

Bo Dunlay, MD, and Anna Gary

James Balducci, MD, and Andrew Craig

Front row: Jessica Chan, Shirley Chen and David Cherney, back row: Jonathan Dameworth

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MASTER TEACHERS RESIDENTS HONOR THOSE WHO TAUGHT THEM BEST by Melissa Frederick Morrison

Sandra Edwards is presented with the Honorary Intern award, complete with a white coat

Teachers have been honored almost as long as graduates. Over time, other awards have been added, including Honorary Intern, who is chosen by residents for supporting them through one of the most challenging phases of their careers. This year’s honoree is Sandra Edwards, the Contracts Specialist for St. Joseph’s Graduate Medical Education programs. The convocation program noted that her official duties include maintaining all the residents’ files and academic affiliation agreements, “but individual residents know, if all else fails, they can ‘ask Sandra.’” Edwards was helped into a white coat while accepting her Honorary Intern award. “They take somebody who’s not a physician, put a white coat on them and then jokingly tell them they cannot work more than 80 hours a week,” Dr. Daschbach says. ∎

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onvocation is the annual ceremony that recognizes physicians who have completed their residencies at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center. In turn, the residents recognize the teachers who mentored and guided them. This year’s convocation, held June 7 at Phoenix’s Comerica Theatre, honored 11 faculty in their respective specialties, including emergency medicine and neurology. In addition, all of the residents, as well as faculty, voted surgeon Raymond Shamos, MD, Master Teacher. In honoring Dr. Shamos, who is St. Joseph’s Chief of Staff, they cited his mentorship, academic record and emulation of the hospital’s core values: dignity, justice, stewardship, collaboration and excellence. “Master Teacher is probably our most prestigious award, given to one physician each year,” says Charles Daschbach, MD, director of Academic Affairs. St. Joseph’s started the first medical residency in the state, obstetrics/gynecology, in 1954, according to Dr. Daschbach. This year’s convocation recognized 65 graduates of St. Joseph’s residencies and fellowships. They will add to the legacy of the approximately 1,600 young physicians who preceded them.

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Raymond Shamos, MD, accepts the Master Teacher award


WITH KOMEN, WE CAN Komen Central and Northern Arizona awards St. Joseph’s $225,000 for breast cancer treatment and screening

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omen in need are now receiving breast cancer screening and treatment, thanks to two grants totaling $225,000 awarded to St. Joseph’s from Komen Central and Northern Arizona (Komen CAN Arizona) affiliate. Screening and diagnostic projects, which include screening mammograms, diagnostic mammograms and all other breast cancer diagnostic procedures, were funded at $75,000. Treatment projects, including further diagnostics, surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, lymphedema treatment or other treatments as indicated by a treating physician, were funded at $150,000. Komen funds are used as a funding source of last resort for men and women who are medically underserved, uninsured or underinsured. “Komen CAN Arizona support allows us to see women who are desperately in need of breast cancer screening services,” says Gail Brown, WHNP-C, nurse practitioner in St. Joseph’s Breast Evaluation Center. “In some cases, these are women who have never had a screening mammogram before, and we discover breast cancer. The Komen grant allows us to save lives by providing services to patients in need.” In April, Komen CAN Arizona gave more than $1.5 million to fund breast cancer screening, education, treatment and research. More than $1.2 million will fund 15 community grants throughout central and northern Arizona, while more than $450,000 will go toward national research efforts. Since its inception in 1993, Komen CAN Arizona has granted more than $24.2 million, making it the largest private grantor of community breast cancer funds in Arizona. The community grants program helps Komen CAN Arizona carry out its mission of saving lives and ending breast cancer forever by partnering with nonprofit organizations to fill in the critical gaps of service throughout medically underserved communities. “Part of delivering our promise is working day to day with our community partners to ensure that the women in our community do not go without vital screening and treatment services while we navigate the changing healthcare landscape, both locally and nationwide,” said Beverly Kruse, executive director for Komen CAN Arizona. “Collaboration is key to reaching our goal, and we’re fortunate to work with so many organizations whose missions align with ours.” ∎

Gail Brown, WHNP-C

Claudia Soto, patient navigator, and Lupita Villa, outreach coordinator, coordinate care for patients who come to St. Joseph’s for breast cancer screening and treatment.

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TREATING CANCER WITH DIGNITY ST. JOSEPH’S AND UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA TEAM UP TO CONQUER CANCER by Sarah McGrain

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he face of cancer care is changing – and so is the way St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center delivers it. So when the University of Arizona (UofA) Cancer Center at Dignity Health St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center opens in 2015, it will offer unique services designed to meet the needs of the next generation of cancer survivors. Earlier this year, St. Joseph’s and the UofA solidified their agreement to create one of the country’s most forward-looking, comprehensive cancer centers. While inpatient care and select services – including surgery and hematology – will continue to be provided at St. Joseph’s, outpatient care and a host of other services will be located at a state-of-the-art facility currently under construction at 7th and Fillmore streets in downtown Phoenix. While both organizations bring a long history of patient care to the relationship, it’s their innovation that will set the new center apart. “The University of Arizona Cancer Center at St. Joseph’s will offer all of the components for the entire continuum of cancer care – from educating those at an Peter Lance, MD, and Marcia Gruber, RN, MSN increased risk of getting cancer to providing cutting-edge care for those who have been diagnosed,” says Peter Plans call for the Center to conduct research on a variLance, MD, the Center’s chief cancer control officer. ety of cancers and, ultimately, to enable every patient to From extensive clinical research to an emphasis on enroll in a clinical trial. preventative care, here’s a look at how the Center will “We’ll be working side by side with world-class prohelp define the future of cancer care. grams, giving us an opportunity to put together an extensive portfolio of investigator-initiated cancer treatResearch and precision medicine ment trials,” says Marcia Gruber, the Center’s vice presThe University of Arizona Cancer Center is the only ident of Oncology Services. National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated comprehenAnother up-and-coming cancer research field is sive cancer center headquartered in Arizona. NCI facil- precision medicine, which is the ability to tailor treatities are dedicated to reducing the morbidity and mor- ment to an individual. “We’re moving into a world tality from cancer through research. where every individual’s tumor is going to be geneticalResearch will be among the Center’s top priorities. ly sequenced or imaged, marrying the particulars of the Leadership is actively exploring shared research oppor- tumor to the most appropriate treatment,” says Dr. tunities with organizations beyond St. Joseph’s and the Lance. University of Arizona College of Medicine including the The Center will offer the components needed for Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen). In designing individual courses of treatment, from the particular, blood and tissue research is expected to advanced imaging of tumors to medical genetics and surge in coming years. genetic counseling.

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Behavioral medicine and prevention While there is still much to learn about cancer, we do know that there are identifiable risk factors that increase one’s chance of getting the disease. Therefore, the Center will also place an emphasis on preventative care and behavioral medicine, working to motivate people to change lifestyle factors, such as smoking and obesity, that might lead to cancer. The building will boast a prevention clinic, as well as a support and wellness center that will offer preventative programs for the community, from health screenings to cooking lessons in a demonstration kitchen. Cancer-specific, team-based care All cancers are not alike, which is why the Center will adopt a multidisciplinary, disease-specific approach to care. Specialized teams made up of healthcare providers – medical oncologists, surgical oncologists, radiation oncologists, nurses and others – will work together to care for patients with a specific disease, for example, breast cancer. Instead of having separate nurses stations and physician offices, the team will share a workroom to encourage collaboration. Included in that team approach is working with the patient’s primary care physician or oncologist. While the Center will serve as a resource for creating a treatment plan and providing special services, patients will be encouraged to continue receiving care from their original doctors. “We look at cancer care as a shared responsibility,” says Gruber. Survivorship care With increased success in treating cancer comes another new development: survivorship care. Many people now live a long life after being diagnosed, and a certain percent will have unique psychological and physical needs that aren’t always adequately addressed. A comprehensive survivorship program would help these individuals and their families continue to lead productive lives through such resources as support groups and nutrition advice. “People are living longer with cancer now, and they need support in adapting to the changes that their diagnosis or treatment has caused,” says Marcia. “Our goal will be to provide not only prevention and treatment, but also the aftercare services that are going to be important as people learn to outlive their cancers. We want to emphasize to our patients that their quality of life is just as valuable as their quantity of life.” ∎

A state-of-the-art facility The University of Arizona Cancer Center at Dignity Health St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center anticipates opening its doors to patients in September 2015 with approximately 25-35 physicians and a staff of 200-250. An estimated 10,000 patient visits will take place in the first year alone. The new building, located in downtown Phoenix, will include: • 320,000 square feet • Five stories (the fifth floor will be left unfinished to accommodate future needs) • 70 exam rooms • 45 infusion chairs (for chemotherapy and other types of infusions) • 3 endoscopy rooms • 8-9 rooms for minor procedures • Clinical research space • Rooms dedicated to investigational drugs • Administrative offices • A support and wellness area with a boutique, meditation room, exercise room, therapy rooms, support groups and a demonstration kitchen • A healing garden. These services will be offered: • Comprehensive dermatologic, gastrointestinal, head and neck, neurologic, thoracic, urologic and women’s cancer care • Diagnostic and interventional radiology, including two linear accelerators for radiation therapy • Endoscopy • Laboratory services • Medical education and training • Medical genetics and genetic counseling • Nutrition • Pain and palliative care • Pharmacy services • Prevention clinic • Social work • Therapy, including, physical, occupational, speech/language, audiology. Over the next 10 years the Center will be staffed by: • 74 physicians • 400-450 total employees.

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THERE’S NO PLACE LIKE HOME BENEFACTORS STRIVE TO MAKE THE HOSPITAL FEEL AS HOME-LIKE AS POSSIBLE by Lindsey Burke

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Bobby Olivas, Ruben Olivas and Louis Olivas, PhD

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rom tragedy came the Olivas family’s drive to help others. In 1988, Bobby and Joann Olivas founded Angelita's Amigos Inc. to honor the memory of their daughter, Angela Grace Olivas, who passed away from leukemia just shy of her fourth birthday. “When my daughter was in the hospital, it was really stressful,” says Bobby. “We had such tight quarters, had to wait to see if there was a rollaway bed we could have in the room…it was uncomfortable.” Those sleepless nights were the inspiration for their non-profit organization. Angelita’s Amigos began helping families who have children affected by disease by funding familyfriendly rooms in the hospital. The rooms offer a respite for families who spend countless hours at the hospital with their sick children. Recently, with help from benefactors Shelby and Steve Butterfield, Angelita’s Amigos funded the remodel of five new rooms in the hospital’s Antenatal Unit, where pregnant women spend long periods of time prior to delivery. “Many of our mothers have hypertension or are pregnant with multiples and can’t be managed at home,” says Sharon Glanville, RN, MSN, NEA-BC, executive director of Women's and Children's Services. “They require a higher level of care and are often here for weeks, sometimes months. Having a comfortable space for them is so important.” The updated rooms, located on the hospital’s fifth floor, aim to provide the comforts of home with warm paint colors, wooden shutters, flat screen TVs with patient education and entertainment options, desks, sleeper sofas


Join the Olivas family and the Butterfields in the renovation of the Antenatal Unit. Return your gift in the enclosed envelope or visit SupportStJosephs.org to make a gift online.

and more. The Olivas family was instrumental in choosing the features. “Our goal was to make it family friendly,” Bobby says. “We wanted it to look like the Hilton or somewhere really comfortable and home-like for mothers while they were in the hospital.” Prior to the renovation, the Antenatal Unit had five private and five semi-private rooms, serving a total of 15 patients. Pregnant women in semi-private rooms were separated by just a curtain, making privacy difficult. The renovation makes all of the rooms private and enables each patient to have their own restroom within their room – no more shared facilities. The five formerly semi-private rooms are the first phase in the remodel – the remaining rooms will be updated when funding is available. “Funding the remodel of these rooms falls in line with the mission of Angelita’s Amigos,” Bobby says, “because even though these are the tiniest of kids, we wanted to be sure parents are comfortable while spending time here.” “The family-centered space makes it really easy for dad to stay overnight while mom is in the hospital,” Glanville adds. “And there’s no way we could have provided these beautiful rooms without philanthropy. We’re so thankful to have donors who make places like this available for our patients. I can’t thank them enough.” ∎

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WHY I GIVE A SECOND OPINION BECAME THE RHODES’ FIRST CHOICE

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To discuss your planned gift or estate plans, please call Alan Knobloch at 602-406-1025 or email Alan.Knobloch@dignityhealth.org.

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t was a search for a second opinion that led Prescott residents Joseph and Peg Rhodes to St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center. But it was the professionalism of Ross Bremner, MD, that kept them here. “Joe was all set for surgery at another hospital,” says Peg Rhodes, “but a friend recommended we come to St. Joseph’s for a second opinion.” Meeting Dr. Bremner and the St. Joseph’s staff made the couple realize they were in a place where Joe would be well taken care of. It also made them realize the treasure that was available to them right in the heart of Phoenix. “Dr. Bremner has done amazing things, and we support him for what he has done in the past and what he would like to do in the future,” Joe says. “It takes money and backing for that to happen. It doesn’t just happen by itself.” “We connect the success of Joe’s surgery with St. Joseph’s, and that’s why we decided to support it,” Peg says. The two have made St. Joseph’s a part of their estate plan. “Dr. Bremner still calls Joe his miracle man,” Peg says, “because esophageal cancer is not one that has many survivors.” ∎ Visit PlanYourLegacy.stjosephs-phx.org to watch Joe and Peg tell their story in their own words.


VALLEY FEVER

ST. JOSEPH’S RECEIVES GRANT TO HELP END ‘ARIZONA’S DISEASE’

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he Arizona Community Foundation recently awarded a three-year, $150,000 grant to St. Joseph’s Hospital for several new programs at the Valley Fever Center. The grant will fund programs that raise awareness about valley fever, improve physician training, assist in the coordination of care for valley fever patients, and improve access to specialty care for children. Valley fever is a fungal infection that develops after inhaling a spore released from dirt by wind or other disturbances. Many people experience no illness and become immune. Others develop a pneumonia-like illness, joint pains, rashes or severe fatigue that can last for many months. Some people experience a severe, even life-threatening spread of the infection from the lungs to other parts of the body. The Valley Fever Center in Phoenix was established less than a year ago as a partnership between St. Joseph’s Hospital and the University of Arizona College of Medicine in Phoenix. It is the only comprehensive program in the nation focused on this disease. “Health is one of the Arizona Community Foundation’s priority areas for funding, and two-thirds of all valley fever infections in the United States happen here in Arizona,” notes Steve Seleznow, president and CEO of the Arizona Community Foundation. “Now that the Valley Fever Center has been established in Phoenix, the time is right to help it succeed. We hope other foundations, corporations and large employers in the state will join us in support of these programs.” The grant from the Community Foundation will be paid in annual installments of $50,000 each, with the first awarded this spring. The first priorities are building awareness and better training for physicians, says John Galgiani, MD, the Center’s director, whose research into valley fever spans four decades. “Less than half of the general population know what valley fever is or the illness that it usually

causes,” he says. “This is particularly a problem for Native Americans, who die from valley fever at a rate six times that of Caucasians.” An Arizona Department of Health Services study discovered that only half of the state’s physicians felt comfortable managing patients with valley fever, and only one-fifth were able to answer factual questions about the disease. Lack of physician understanding is exacerbated by the annual influx of approximately 1,000 doctors newly licensed in Arizona, mostly from areas where valley fever is not a large problem. The grant will also support development of a patient and resource tracking system, which would serve as the basis for estimates of the medical needs that valley fever creates as well as a resource to guide further services development. “I very much appreciate the leadership that the Arizona Community Foundation is showing with respect to valley fever. This grant is a milestone in our center’s development,” says Dr. Galgiani. “These funds allow us to expand our outreach to the rest of the state. So much of the valley fever problem is in Maricopa County itself, that it makes sense that best practices be developed here. “ Dr. Galgiani adds that in addition to better patient care, the center will continue its work to find a cure and to produce a vaccine to eradicate valley fever altogether, noting that additional funding will be needed in order to deliver on those goals. ∎

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BENEFACTOR BRIEFS Employees Give Back through iGive Campaign Employees of St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center are proud to be part of a team that gives amazing care to people from throughout Arizona and the world. Many employees have shown support for the amazing work that goes on at St. Joseph’s by giving back through the iGive employee giving program. Through a one-time gift of cash or donated paid time off or through ongoing contributions via payroll deduction, these philanthropists are making a difference in clinical care, medical education and groundbreaking research. Here are just a few employees and why they have chosen to give back. Jo Crawford “I give because I believe that everyone has the right to live an active life. Barrow Neurological Foundation supports Barrow Connection, a program that helps people with a disability live active lives after they leave the hospital. I’m proud to help the foundation support this important program.” Virginia Prendergast “I give because I am passionate about what St. Joseph's Hospital and Barrow Neurological Institute do – change people's lives for the better.”

Mario Medina “I give to better myself and for the betterment of others. St. Joseph's Foundation helped build the state-ofthe-art video conferencing center at St. Joseph’s Cancer Center, giving us the opportunity to link community physicians with our oncology specialists and provide the best care for our patients.”

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Laura’s Run Raises $22,000 The Laura Hart Burdick Foundation recently presented St. Joseph’s Foundation a check for $22,000 to support lung transplant patients at St. Joseph’s Hospital. The Laura Hart Burdick Foundation was created to celebrate the life of the family’s beloved daughter, wife, sister and friend who died in 2005 at the age of 33. Laura successfully battled leukemia as a college student but later found that her lungs had been damaged during treatment. Her only option was a lung transplant. She underwent transplant surgery at Stanford University Medical Center in January 2003. In April, she returned to Arizona with her husband, Jon, to live and thrive with her gift of life. In September 2005, Laura died due to complications from infection. During her transplant experience, Laura identified needs for additional services that could reduce some of the challenges that transplant patients and their families face during their illness, surgery and recuperation. It was her desire to help provide such services to her fellow organ recipients. When St. Joseph’s introduced its lung transplant program in 2007, the board of Laura’s Foundation recognized it as an opportunity to fulfill Laura’s aspirations. In 2008, St. Joseph’s Center for Thoracic Transplantation submitted a grant proposal to the Foundation for sponsorship of the “Laura Hart Burdick Ambassador Program,” which would provide resources to help families navigate the psychological and social impact of transplant. To fund the Program, Laura’s Foundation annually sponsors Laura’s Run. This event features a 5K run, 1.5K walk, Doggie Trot and Kids’ Dash with medals for all age groups, raffle prizes, live entertainment, a silent auction, refreshments and fun for the whole family.


NEWS Foundation Board Elects New Members, Leaders St. Joseph's Board of Directors, made up of community leaders who serve on a voluntary basis, governs the foundation. Two new members were recently elected to a one-year term, and four existing members were elected to new leadership positions. New members include: Cullen Maxey, the executive vice president of business operations for the Arizona Diamondbacks. He oversees all revenue-generating departments throughout the organization including broadcasting, communications, community affairs, partnerships, special projects/fan experience, game operations/multimedia production, marketing, spring training, and ticket sales and service. The Phoenix native is a member of the Thunderbirds and serves on the board of the Boys & Girls Club of Metropolitan Phoenix. Edward Wallace, founder and board director of Puget Sound Bank in Bellevue, Washington, and board director for Star Rentals, a large family-owned equipment rental company with operations throughout Washington and Oregon. Wallace also is owner/partner of Socialot, a social media management platform for small business. He is the author of 52 Card Pick-up – How to Stack the Deck for Success in Business. Existing board members who were recently elected to leadership positions are: Hamilton Espinosa, who was recently elected chairman of the board after serving on the St. Joseph’s Foundation board since 2009. He is a graduate of Marquette University and is the healthcare core market leader for DPR Construction in Phoenix. He coaches youth sports and was a board member of Paradise Valley Little League from 2004 to 2006. Shelby Butterfield, who joined the board in 2008 and was recently elected vice chair. She is a graduate of the University of Arizona and has held various leadership

positions on boards at ASU, North Central Parenting Group, PVUMC Preschool and Scottsdale Healthcare’s pediatric advisory board. David McCaleb, who joined the board in 2010 and was elected treasurer. He has a MBA from the WP Carey School of Business at Arizona State University and an MS in biology from Marquette University. He retired several years ago from a position as senior vice president of commercial operations for the publicly traded biotech company, CV Therapeutics. Jenifer Davis Lunt, who was elected secretary of the board after joining the board in 2012. She is a graduate of the University of Arizona and has more than 15 years of commercial real estate experience. She currently works for Davis Enterprises, where she is responsible for development, asset management, and lease and sales negotiations. Jenifer is active in AZCREW, Junior League of Phoenix, Big Brothers Big Sisters and the CBRE Brokerage Advisory Board. U.S. News & World Report Names St. Joseph’s a Best Hospital St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center is Arizona’s highest nationally-ranked hospital in this year’s U.S. News & World Report Best Hospitals issue. U.S. News & World Report’s annual listing of top hospitals is the most respected of all national rankings. St. Joseph’s is ranked #16 in this year’s neurology and neurosurgery category. Barrow Neurological Institute, the neurological division at St. Joseph’s, is known throughout the world for providing cutting-edge treatment for people with brain and spine diseases, disorders and injuries; topnotch medical education and innovative research.

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NEWS Barrow performs more brain surgeries than any other hospital in the United States. The hospital has the world’s largest neurosurgery residency program. Barrow is also home to the renowned Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center. St. Joseph’s is considered a sought-after destination hospital for treating the most complex cases from throughout the world. Every day, approximately 20 percent of the hospital’s patients have traveled from outside of Arizona and the United States to seek treatment at St. Joseph’s. U.S. News & World Report ranks hospitals in 16 specialties, and only 147 U.S. hospitals scored high enough to make this year’s nationally-ranked list. The magazine selects hospitals based on a variety of criteria, including reputation, mortality rates, patient volumes and key technologies. Physicians take on New Leadership Roles Paul Steinberg, MD, was recently appointed chair of Community Practices for St. Joseph’s Medical Group. Dr. Steinberg has been a member of the St. Joseph’s team for 18 years, serving 14 years as program director for the Family Medicine Residency Program and 16 years as academic chair of Family and Community Medicine. In this new role, Dr. Steinberg will be working with the administrative team of St. Joseph’s Medical Group to build off-campus community practices. Andrea Darby-Stewart, MD, will serve as interim academic chair of Family and Community Medicine. Dr. Darby-Stewart has been with St. Joseph’s since 2011 and has vast experience in residency education and full-spectrum family medicine. Prior to joining St.

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Joseph’s, Dr. Darby-Stewart was a faculty member and program director of Mayo’s Family Medicine Residency Program. After leaving Mayo, Dr. Darby-Stewart joined the faculty at Scottsdale Healthcare and worked as a hospitalist and in the Family Medicine Residency Program. Lilia Parra-Roide, MD, has been appointed interim academic and hospital chair of Pediatrics. Dr. Parra-Roide is a pediatrician who has been with St. Joseph’s for 18 years, completing her residency here before joining our faculty. Dr. Parra-Roide served as program director of St. Joseph’s Pediatric Residency Program prior to our partnership with Phoenix Children’s Hospital. She was instrumental in facilitating the initial collaborative partnership with Phoenix Children’s and has continued to serve as the associate program director for the hospitals’ combined residency program. Internal Medicine Recognized for Excellence St. Joseph’s Internal Medicine Team is the winner of the Society for General Internal Medicine’s Quality and Practice Innovation Award. The honor is designed to recognize leaders of practice innovations who have improved care. The selection committee was impressed by Internal Medicine’s medical home pilot, and the committee recognized the team’s rapid transformation and implementation of programs to deliver outstanding medical care to underserved patients. The quality improvement projects undertaken by residents and faculty, and the development of a volunteer program were viewed as particularly innovative.


MIRACLE TOURS S

t. Joseph’s Miracle Tours offer a unique, behindthe-scenes look into some of the most fascinating areas of the hospital, including new programs that save lives. Each tour focuses on a particular area of the hospital and may include a guided tour into an area seldom seen by the public. Join us on an exploration into the future of medicine. The Right to an Active Life October 9, 2013 When a patient with paraplegia or quadriplegia leaves the hospital, the real work begins. Readjusting to home, work and school—and dealing with the emotions of a permanent disability—is difficult. Far too many people end up with alcoholism and depression. To help with this difficult transition, Barrow created Barrow Connection. In this tour, you’ll learn about Barrow’s philosophy that everyone has the right to live an active, productive life. You’ll be introduced to programs like Day on the Lake and Driving to Excel, and meet people who are living life to the fullest despite a disability. Tough to Swallow November 13, 2013 Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is increasing around the world—a result, experts say, of our modern diet, growing obesity and aging population. GERD increases the risk of Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal cancer. At this tour, experts will discuss these trends and their efforts to diagnose, treat and cure esophageal disease. You’ll also hear from St. Joseph’s lung transplant team, one of the busiest and best in the country, and meet patients who have received care from these lung and esophageal experts. Hope for the Cruelest Disease January 15, 2014 Many consider ALS—or Lou Gehrig’s disease—the cruelest disease of all. In a few dreadful years, ALS works its way toward the center of the body, extinguishing function as it goes. The brain, however, remains untouched, so patients are painfully aware of the disease’s deadly progress. Now, ALS patients and families have a place of help and hope—the new Gregory W. Fulton ALS and Neuromuscular Disorders Center at Barrow. Hear from scientists working to conquer ALS,

meet people who’ve faced the disease and tour the new state-of-the-art center. Getting Smart about Concussions March 13, 2014 Students, coaches, parents and the public are becoming increasingly aware of the dangers of concussions, thanks to the efforts of experts at Barrow. Since Brainbook was introduced two years ago, more than 160,000 high school athletes have completed the web-based course about concussion, and more teens are seeking care for concussions. Meet some of these patients along with the doctors who are helping them. The Devil in the Dust April 8, 2014 Arizona’s giant dust storms have stirred up interest in a little-known disease many call “Arizona’s disease.” Valley fever can cause a wide range of problems, including widespread, life-threatening infections. This tour will introduce you to the Valley Fever Center at St. Joseph’s, a partnership between the hospital and the University of Arizona. A New Era of Cancer Care May 7, 2014 A 220,000-square-foot, five-story building is rising in downtown Phoenix—the future home of the University of Arizona Cancer Center at St. Joseph’s. In this tour, you’ll hear from cancer experts and some of the patients whose lives they’ve touched. Learn how cancer is detected earlier and treated more precisely and less invasively—often with amazing results. It Takes a Community June 11, 2014 Since 1895 when the Sisters of Mercy opened St. Joseph’s to care for people with tuberculosis, the hospital has served our community’s most vulnerable. Today those problems include homelessness, lack of insurance, prematurity and aging. In this tour, you’ll learn how St. Joseph’s is working to address these problems. Each tour runs from 9 to 11:30 a.m. with an optional lunch afterward. Please call 602-406-1038 to reserve your space. ∎

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END-OF-YEAR GIFTS THAT BENEFIT EVERYONE by Alan Knobloch Director of Major and Planned Gifts

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hen you make a gift to St. Joseph’s today, you provide much-needed support for our important mission today and into the future. To ensure you get the most from your generosity, here are some helpful tips on different gift options, their tax benefits and gift dates: Contribute securities you have owned for more than one year. If they are worth more than what you originally paid for them, you can claim deductions for their full fair market values and eliminate any tax on the appreciation. Fund a life income gift. This type of donation provides you with payments for your lifetime and a gift to St. Joseph’s thereafter. If you use appreciated securities that you have owned for more than a year to fund the gift, you will eliminate up-front capital gains taxes and be entitled to an income tax deduction based on the charitable portion of the securities’ full value. Donate an insurance policy. You will be putting a no-longer-needed policy to good use. To qualify as a deductible gift, the policy must list St. Joseph’s as the policy owner. For most types of insurance policies, your tax deduction is usually the cost basis or the fair market value of the policy— whichever is less. Bequest. If you believe in our mission but don’t want to part with money today, a gift in your will or trust may be the donation option you’ve been looking for. It has these benefits: Simplicity. Just a few sentences in

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your will or trust are all that is needed. Contact me for wording you can share with your attorney to complete your gift. Flexibility. Because you are not actually making a gift until after your lifetime, you can change your mind at any time. Versatility. You can structure the gift to leave a specific item or amount of money, make it contingent on certain events, or leave a percentage of your estate to St. Joseph’s. Tax relief. When you make a gift to St. Joseph’s in your will or trust, your estate is entitled to an estate tax charitable deduction for the gift’s full value. Special opportunity: Make a taxfree gift from your IRA Are you 70½ or older? Your chance to make a tax-free gift from your IRA for 2013 ends December 31. You can transfer up to $100,000 directly from your IRA to a qualified charity such as St. Joseph’s. The transfer generates neither taxable income nor a tax deduction, so you don’t have to itemize to take advantage of this opportunity. As always, we urge you to consult an estate-planning attorney or other qualified advisor regarding a will, living trust or whatever else may best suit your needs. Sound professional help will contribute to your peace of mind – and that of your family. If you want to talk with me about your gift and estate plans, please contact me at 602-406-1025 or email Alan.Knobloch@dignityhealth.org. ∎


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St. Joseph's Magazine, Vol. 9, Issue 2, 2013