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GCSE Courses and Options 2018-19


Contents 04

An Introduction to GCSE

05

GCSE Core Subjects

06

The Options

07

Guidance on Choosing Optional GCSEs

08

Frequently Asked Questions

09

The Learning Support Department

09

Core Curriculum Support

10

The Compulsory Core at GCSE

12

English

14

Mathematics

16

Combined Science

17

International English as a Second Language

18

The Options

20

Art and Design

22

Business Studies

24

Creative iMedia

26

Design and Technology

28

Drama

30

Food Preparation and Nutrition

32

French

34

Geography

36

History

38

Music

40

Photography

42

Physical Education

44

Religious Education

46

Spanish

48

Triple Science (Biology, Chemistry and Physics)


An Introduction to GCSE Years 10 and 11 are a significant stage in your child’s education. GCSEs are a major transition in their school life, setting students up for A-level, Higher Education and beyond. Studying a range of subjects will naturally widen the base of options for Higher Education and career choices.

We strongly recommend selecting at least one Modern Foreign Language, as it is valued by employers and universities. However, we realise that this may not be the best option for some students.

This booklet outlines all of the courses available to students as well as highlighting potential future opportunities and links with specific careers. Please read through this options booklet carefully to be fully aware of these new qualifications and what each course entails.

Please discuss the options available with the subject teachers, form teachers and most importantly at home.

The new and revised GCSEs are graded using a scale of 9 (top) to 1 (bottom) and are more demanding and challenging. The table below shows a broad conversion between existing and new GCSE grades:

Existing GCSE Grades

If you have any questions or would like to discuss the options in more detail, please talk to your son or daughter’s Form Tutor, Subject Teacher, or the Head of Lower School, Mrs Simmonds. The deadline for students’ option choices is Friday 2 February 2018, so that these can inform the timetable for September 2018.

New GCSE Grades 9

A*

8

A

7

B

6 5 (top 1/3 of C and bottom 1/3 of B)

4

C

4

D

3

E

2

F/G

1

U

U

S Cinnamond (Mr) Academic Vice Principal


GCSE Core Subjects The curriculum is divided into a compulsory core which is common to all students and a choice of optional GCSEs. Students are required to take the core subjects of: • English Language and English Literature • Mathematics • Combined Science • Religious Education (non-examined course) • Games (non-examined course)

Subject

Learning support is provided where there is an identified special educational need (please see page 9 for further information). There is the choice between continuing the Combined Science course which leads to two GCSEs, or to study all three Sciences separately as a Triple Award leading to three GCSE passes in Physics, Chemistry and Biology. English Language, English Literature, Mathematics, and Combined Science are taught in ability sets. The exact course taken by each student may be personalised to some extent as explained below:

Topics within the section

English Language and English Literature

All students will study a GCSE qualification in English Language and a separate GCSE in English Literature.

iGCSE English as an additional Language

Students with English as an additional language will sit the iGCSE qualification with the option of also sitting the English Language paper.

Mathematics

All students will follow a GCSE qualification in Mathematics.

Combined Science

All students will follow a core programme of Science. Students will either follow Combined Science (consisting of a Dual Award of two GCSEs in Core and Additional Science) or use an option to study ‘Triple Award’ Science (separate Biology, Chemistry and Physics GCSEs – see pages 48-49). In a small number of cases, it may be desirable for students just to focus upon Core Science and obtain a single award GCSE. This decision will not be taken until Year 11.

Religious Education

All students will follow a Religious Education course covering morality, spirituality, ethics and world religions. There will be no examination in this course, however, a full GCSE in Religious Education is offered as an optional subject.

Games

All students will be timetabled two hours of games each week where a wide variety of sports, both indoor and outdoor, are rotated through the year.

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The Options The compulsory core subjects are supplemented by optional GCSE subjects. For September 2018 these are: • Art & Design • Business Studies • Creative iMedia • Design and Technology • Drama • Food Preparation and Nutrition • French • Geography • History • Music • Photography • Physical Education (PE)

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Students can choose up to four optional subjects, and one reserve. It is a good idea to think very carefully about the choice of reserve subject, as this may have to be used in certain circumstances, for example when it is not possible to timetable all of the first choices. It is recommended that most students select at least one Modern Foreign Language. Unlike many schools we do not operate a ‘fixed block’ system, rather a ‘best fit’ arrangement where we try to match our students’ preferred choices when constructing the option blocks. Students have a free choice of options subjects at this stage. Supplementary English as an additional language is available for students with English as a second language. The purpose is to provide general literacy support to aid performance in English qualifications and provide language skills applicable across the curriculum. Also included in the GCSE curriculum are:

• Religious Education

• Games

• Spanish

• Tutorial sessions, which also include PSHEE

• Triple (separate) Science

• Scheduled PSHEE sessions across the year


Guidance on Choosing Optional GCSEs We recognise that committing to a course of GCSE study can be both exciting and challenging, and represents a big change for both you and your child. The points below may be useful to bear in mind when you and your child are making these important decisions - helping you to make balanced, informed choices.

Positive reasons to choose a GCSE subject

Good reasons not to choose a GCSE subject

Your child likes it and finds it interesting

Your child’s friends are doing it

Your child is good at it

Your child feels an obligation to do it

Your child needs it, or it is useful for their future career

You think it is a good idea – but your child doesn’t

Your child can develop new skills by doing it

You or your child knows someone who has chosen that subject and they say it’s great

It will give your child satisfaction Your child’s teachers think it is a suitable choice for them It will combine well with other subjects and help your child’s general education

It is thought of as a ‘cool’ subject by most people Your child can’t think of anything else to choose Your child thinks it will be easy

Your child likes the method of assessment and teaching

It sounds ‘good’ but your child has not properly researched it

You think your child will do well in it

Your child really likes the teacher they have now

It is a subject your child would like to become good at

Your child thinks it will impress people now or later on

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Frequently Asked Questions Below are brief answers to some of the more common questions asked about options:

Why do we need to choose? During the first three years of secondary schooling a student follows a very broad curriculum – building a solid base of skills and knowledge, whilst identifying strengths, interests and areas to build on. In the final two years of secondary schooling some narrowing of subject choices is necessary, as the time given to some subject areas needs to be increased to prepare for the GCSE examinations, and also so that the individual can build on their strengths and deepen their knowledge in selected areas. This would not be possible unless a degree of specialisation takes place.

Why choose now? The timing of the choice is always something of a compromise between the student and the school. With a wide range of options, the school needs to know how many pupils are choosing which subjects as early as possible, to ensure they have adequate staff and resources available for the coming academic year. The choices have to be made during February, by which time most students in Year 9 have a fairly clear idea as to which subjects they wish to opt for.

Can my child take any subject? Four subjects can be chosen from the list on page 6. As well as these subjects each student has to follow the programme of core compulsory subjects throughout Years 10 and 11.

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Which subjects are compulsory? The compulsory core subjects are English Language and English Literature, Mathematics, Science and Religious Education (nonexamined) to GCSE level.

What is a good balance? To a great extent the balance is determined by the structure of the core curriculum together with the guided options. It is advisable to keep a balanced spread of subjects to hold as many paths open in the future as possible, particularly if your child is a little unsure of their future direction.

Where can we get advice about the future? Mr Cinnamond, Academic Vice Principal, Mrs Stimson, Head of Sixth Form and Mr Kemsley, Student Futures Co-ordinator will be able to give you any advice needed.

Will my child definitely be able to study the subjects opted for? It is usual for students to get the subjects they ask for, but with a large number of students and the variety of choices available, the number of possible combinations is very large indeed and clashes are possible in a limited number of cases. If there is an issue with choices, the College will contact you in person.


Learning Support Department

Core Curriculum Support

Those students who have been identified as having a significant need in Literacy in Years 7 to 9 and have therefore been disapplied from Modern Foreign Languages to study additional literacy, may be invited to select Learning Support at Key Stage 4.

Some students will benefit from not completing four optional subjects, but will not have a specific need to follow the Learning Support option. The Core Curriculum Support option offers students the opportunity to have increased Mathematics, English and Science time with subject specialists. There will also be a small amount of time for individual mentoring.

In the Learning Support Department, students in Years 10 and 11 will be timetabled for approximately six lessons over the two week timetable period. Students will continue to be taught additional literacy strategies, however, greater emphasis will be placed on supporting students across their core and optional subjects. Miss Cunningham, Head of The Learning Support Department, will discuss with parents the suitability of the Learning Support option for their child, and students in Year 9 who have timetabled literacy lessons in the Learning Support Department will also be guided through this process by Miss Cunningham.

Following this option will mean reducing the number of optional subjects taken from four to three. Please contact Mr Cinnamond if you have any specific questions.

Please be aware that Learning Support is not an optional subject and is offered by invitation only.

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The Compulsory Core at GCSE

10


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English Qualification GCSE English Language & English Literature Examination Board Pearson Edexcel Specification Number Language (1EN0), Literature (1ET0)

Topics Covered Year 10 Christmas Term

Lent Term

Summer Term

Language Paper 1 Section A: Unseen 19 Century Fiction 15%

Language Paper 2 Section A: Comparison of two unseen texts 20/21st Century 35%

Literature Paper 1

Section B: Creative Writing 25%

Section B: Transactional Writing 25%

Section A: Shakespeare’s Macbeth 25% Section B: An Inspector Calls 25% Spoken Language Endorsement

Year 11

12

Christmas Term

Lent Term

Summer Term

Literature Paper 2 Section A: 19th Century Fiction 25%

Revising Language Paper 1 Skills

Revising Literature Fiction and Poetry texts

Revising Language Paper 2 Skills

Examinations begin

Section B: Poetry Anthology 25%

Revising Literature Drama Texts


Skills

Support, Resources & Enrichment

• Identify and interpret themes, ideas and information in a range of literature and other high quality non-fiction writing.

Support is available for students at all times; whether it be with the class teacher, the Head of Faculty or within the College’s SEND Department. From February of Year 11 after-school revision and preparation sessions will take place – all students should attend.

• Read in different ways for different purposes and evaluate the usefulness, relevance and presentation of content.

• Explain and illustrate how vocabulary and grammar contribute to effectiveness and impact and pay attention to detail; analyse and evaluate how form and structure also contribute to effectiveness and impact of a text.

Students will be provided with a broad range of resources, however, parents are advised to purchase York Notes or a similar guide for each of the Literature texts. The English Department will order the Edexcel English Language 9-1 Work Book and Revision Guide at a reduced price – parents are asked to purchase these as the content is invaluable during the revision stage of the course. It is also essential that parents support the learning of their child by ensuring that a broad range of both fiction and non-fiction texts are available to be read at home.

• Produce clear and effective texts of their own; write accurately for different purposes and audiences; describe, narrate, explain, instruct, give and respond to information and argue, selecting vocabulary and sentence structures to reflect purpose and context.

Enrichment takes place in a number of ways. Film versions of texts will be used where appropriate and theatre trips will take place whenever possible. Students are encouraged to attend the Creative Writing and Advanced Reader sessions that take place as part of the school’s Enrichment Programme.

• Compare texts, demonstrating understanding of summary and synthesis.

Progression Opportunities

• Draw inferences and justify these with evidence; support a point of view by referring to evidence within the text; identify bias; reflect critically and evaluate texts.

Assessment Student’s classwork and homework will be continually assessed using the Edexcel 9-1 Reading and Writing criteria. There will be two formal assessments each half term. In addition to this there will be end of unit tests within the classroom and mock examinations for the whole year group, sat under timed conditions, organised by the Vice Principal, Academic.

Mastery of the English Language is essential for further study in all subject areas. Those students who read and write well are far more likely to succeed; not only in their future studies but also within the workplace. It is essential that all students strive for a level 5 and above in GCSE English Language. The College offers A Level English Literature to further enhance students’ prowess in reading for understanding and writing critically about texts. A Level English Literature is a highly regarded award and is revered by universities who readily acknowledge the academic abilities of students who do well on this course.

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Mathematics Qualification GCSE Mathematics Examination Board AQA Specification Number 8300

Topics Covered Mathematics at GCSE is characterised by the gradual development of the Mathematical reasoning and more formal procedures, building on the understanding of patterns, structures and relationships gained at earlier stages. Students also gain an insight into the power of Mathematics to solve problems through making and testing generalisations and hypotheses. Knowledge and understanding are applied to the study of increasingly complex situations, where it is necessary to

select from the range of skills taught, including those of applying appropriate Information Technology. Mathematics is diverse, engaging and essential in equipping students with the right skills to reach their final destination, whatever that may be. The table below shows an outline of the topics taught throughout Year 10 and Year 11, although the class teacher will always look to extend or consolidate topics beyond those mentioned, providing teaching materials that are tailored to the pace of learning of the group.

Year 10 Christmas Term

Lent Term

Summer Term

Calculations 1

Formulae & Functions

Circles & Constructions

Algebra - Expressions

Working in 2D

Ratio & Proportion

Angles & Polygons

Probability

Factors, Powers & Roots

Handling Data 1

Measures & Accuracy

Graphs 1

Fractions, Decimals & Percentages

Equations & Inequalities

Year 11 Christmas Term

Lent Term

Summer Term

Working in 3D

Pythagoras’ Theorem

Units & Proportionality

Handling Data 2

Trigonometry

Sequences

Calculations 2

Vectors

Revision

Graphs 2

Conditional Probability

Past Papers

GCSE Mathematics is a vitally important subject used in everyday life. Colleges, universities and employers recognise the importance of Mathematical competence, and will require a good pass at GCSE. Studying Mathematics will allow your child to master specific topics, as well as developing the following skills: • Develop fluent knowledge, skills and understanding of Mathematical methods and concepts.

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• Acquire, select and apply Mathematical techniques to solve problems, reason Mathematically, make deductions and inferences and draw conclusions. • Comprehend, interpret and communicate Mathematical information in a variety of forms appropriate to the information and context.


Assessment

Enrichment opportunities include:

Students are assessed informally through their class work and homework and more formally through topic tests that allow an individual student’s progress to be tracked. Before Christmas in Year 10, all students undertake a practice examination to review progress together with a mock examination during Year 11.

• KS4 Mathematics Clinic

All students, regardless of tier of entry, must sit three written question papers. Each paper is worth one-third of the total GCSE Mathematics assessment and the time allowed per paper is 1 hr 30 mins. Paper 1 is non-calculator whereas for papers 2 and 3, calculators are allowed. There is no coursework or controlled assessment in Mathematics.

Support, Resources & Enrichment Parents can assist their child in the following ways: • Make sure that your child has all the equipment they need – pen, pencil, ruler, rubber, compass & calculator. • Practise mental arithmetic skills with your child. • Highlight areas of everyday life where you use Mathematical skills. • Ask your child about what they learnt in class – can they explain it to you? The College subscribes to the MyMaths website (www.mymaths.co.uk) on the students’ behalf. This is an excellent site for revision, extra help, extension work or extra practice. Pupils can choose the topics they wish to practise. Additionally, direct shortcut codes appear in the homework books should pupils need extra help with assignments at home.

• UK Mathematics Challenge – Individual and Team Competitions

Progression Opportunities Mathematical competence is important in most areas of study at higher level, but particularly in Science, Engineering, Technology and Economics. A Grade 7 qualification in Mathematics is often a requirement for entry into many Higher Education courses.

Additional Information All Year 10 and 11 students are set homework twice per week. Homework tasks include consolidating and practising skills learnt in class, learning and revising for tests, research and problem solving. Each homework task should last approximately 40 minutes. A range of teaching resources are used with the main textbook being ‘AQA GCSE Maths – Higher or Foundation’ published by Oxford University Press, in conjunction with MyMaths. Throughout the books, four digit codes are provided allowing you to link to related lessons on the MyMaths website so that you can see the topic from a different perspective, work independently and revise. The Higher book stretches most academic students and contains clear explanations of key ideas, worked examples, graded exercises together with past paper questions. To facilitate progress in Mathematics, it is essential that pupils have their own scientific calculator, pencil (for use in diagrams only), ruler, compasses and angle measurer. Other resources that students might find useful are the GCSE revision guide and exam practice workbook together with a Maths Buster code, allowing student’s access to CGP online revision notes and practice questions. These can be bought from the high street or at a reduced price from the College.

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Combined Science Qualification GCSE Combined Science Examination Board AQA Specification Number 8464

Topics Covered

Skills

Biology

Practical skills: Students will carry out practical tasks throughout each course in order to develop their skills of working scientifically. The students will carry out a number of required practical activities in each area of Science which will be assessed in the written papers.

Cell biology; the organisation and systems in the body and in plants; inheritance, variation, genetics and evolution; ecological processes; health and disease. Chemistry Atomic structure; the periodic table; bonding, structure and matter; chemical reactions; predicting, monitoring, and controlling chemical reactions; earth and atmospheric science. Physics Forces; waves; energy and electricity; electricity, magnetism and radioactivity.

Mathematical skills: Each GCSE also places emphasis on students being able to use and show their mathematical skills within a science context. For example arithmetic and numerical computation, handling data, using algebra, constructing and analysing graphs.

Assessment This course has a linear structure so all six examinations will be sat in the summer of Year 11. It will be assessed on the scale 1 – 9 and the students will gain two GCSE qualifications at the end of the course.

Paper

Topics Covered

Length

Marks

Percentage of GCSE

Biology 1

Cell Biology; Organisation; Infection & Response; Bioenergetics

1hr 45min

70

16.7%

Biology 2

Homeostasis & Response; Inheritance, Variation & Evolution; Ecology

1hr 45min

70

16.7%

Chemistry 1

Atomic Structure & the Periodic Table; Bonding, Structure & Matter; Quantitative Chemistry; Chemical Changes; Energy changes

1hr 45min

70

16.7%

Chemistry 2

Atomic Structure & the Periodic Table; Bonding, Structure & Matter; Quantitative Chemistry; Chemical Changes; Energy changes

1hr 45min

70

16.7%

Physics 1

Energy; Electricity; Particle Model of Matter; Atomic Structure

1hr 45min

70

16.7%

Physics 2

Forces; Waves; Magnetism & Electromagnetism

1hr 45min

70

16.7%

Support, Resources & Enrichment Students are issued with a revision guide for the course and will have access to an online programme called Kerboodle. Through this, the students can access digital versions of the text book, PowerPoints, interactive activities and online quizzes. The Science Faculty offers support after-school during the Christmas term and KS4 revision sessions each week during both the Lent and Summer terms.

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International GCSE English as a Second Language (Only for students who have English as a second language) Qualification iGCSE English as a Second Language Examination Board Cambridge International Examinations Specification Number 0511

Topics Covered Year 10 - New Headway Pre-Intermediate Coursebook Christmas Term

Lent Term

Summer Term

Units 1-4

Units 5-8

Units 9-12

Describing friends, writing a holiday postcard, writing narrative and emails

Writing about future plans, describing your hometown, biographies, formal and informal letters and emails

Writing book and film reviews, discussing pros and cons, filling in forms, listening and notetaking

Year 11 - Cambridge iGCSE English as a Second Language Coursebook Christmas Term

Lent Term

Summer Term

Parts 1 & 2

Parts 3 & 4

Examinations

Leisure and travel Education and work

People and achievements Ideas and the modern world

Skills

Support, Resources & Enrichment

Reading, writing, listening and speaking.

Examination practice, summary and note-taking skills, presentation skills using PowerPoint and notes, self-study skills.

Assessment Mock examinations in reading, writing and listening take place at the end of Year 10 and in December Year 11. Speaking mocks take place in February of Year 11 with the final examination taking place in March. Reading, writing and listening final examinations take place in May of Year 11.

Progression Opportunities Introduction to Academic IELTS which is required for university entrance in English-speaking countries.

Additional Information Students may only be entered for this examination if their first language is not English.

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The Options

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Art and Design Qualification GCSE Art and Design Examination Board AQA Specification Number 8202

Topics Covered Year 10 Christmas Term and Lent Term

Summer Term

The course will start with students being introduced to a range of techniques and skills before starting Project 1.

Project 2: Portraiture; Leading to the Independent Project

Project 1: Organic Form/Surfaces & Patterns Year 11 Christmas Term

Lent Term

Summer Term

Independent Project

Controlled Assignment

Exhibition External Moderation

Skills

Component 1 60%

This is a broad course exploring practical, critical and contextual work through a range of 2D and 3D processes, new media and technologies. Students can work with appropriate fine art materials and processes. Students will produce practical and contextual work associated with drawing and painting, mixed media, sculpture, printmaking and photography.

The portfolio must include both:

Assessment Students will be assessed using the AQA criteria. It should be remembered that tracking progress in subjects with substantial practical and experiential learning is rarely linear. What should be seen is a ‘smooth’ upward progression over the course of a year or several projects, moving towards the key assessments points and interim targets.

• A sustained project developed in response to a subject, theme, task or brief evidencing the journey from initial engagement with an idea to the realisation of intentions. This will give students the opportunity to demonstrate, through an extended creative response, their ability to draw together different areas of knowledge, skills and understanding from across their course of study. • A selection of further work resulting from activities such as trials and experiments; skills-based workshops; mini and foundation projects; responses to gallery, museum or site visits; work placements; independent study and evidence of the student’s individual role in any group work undertaken. The work submitted for this component will be marked as a whole. Students should carefully select, organise and present their portfolio and must ensure that it provides evidence of meeting the assessment objectives.

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Component 2 40% AQA will provide a separate externally set assignment for each title, each with seven different starting points. Students must select and respond to one starting point from their chosen title. The externally set assignment provides students with the opportunity to demonstrate, through an extended creative response, their ability to draw together different areas of knowledge, skills and understanding in response to their selected starting point. The final assessment is 10 hours of sustained focused study, which realises any preparation undertaken. Question papers are issued from 1 January and are marked by St Joseph’s College and moderated by AQA.

Every student is provided with a sketchbook at the beginning of each year and is issued with another once the first is full. This sketchbook needs to be brought to every Art lesson in a folder. Students also need to bring to each lesson: • Pencils (2B, B, HB) • Rubber • An assortment of colouring pencils • Black/blue biro • Art apron/old shirt for wet media work • Ruler • Pritt Stick

Support, Resources & Enrichment

• Black fine liner

• Study days working with curators at the Fitzwilliam Museum and in London

Progression Opportunities

• Art Scholars’ Society

Art & Design Courses including A Levels, Foundation Degrees, Degrees and Diplomas. Careers include architecture, auctions, fashion, graphic design, marketing, media, publicity, restoration, the Police and specialised insurance.

• Materials for all projects during the course during curriculum time

Additional Information

• Open Art Studios

Art & Design students develop the ‘hidden’ curriculum skills which are favoured by universities and employers such as; peer reviewing; presentation skills; interpersonal skills and communication and self confidence.

• Artist workshops during the College’s annual Art Festival • Student Arts Focus Group

• Young Art Competition • State-of-the-Art Digital Arts Suite with Mac technology and the latest version of Photoshop • Opportunity for every child to have their work displayed and celebrated • Artworks to build up an independent library using Smartify

Workshops take place to allow GCSE students to work alongside professional artists and specialists from the Royal Academy of Arts. Regular trips to some of our country’s finest art galleries such as The Wallace Collection, The Tate and The Fitzwilliam provide our students with the opportunity to experience artwork first-hand. Students are also offered the opportunity to work directly from works of art as part of our unique international tours.

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Business Studies Qualification GCSE Business Studies Examination Board OCR Specification Number J204

Topics Covered Year 10 Christmas Term

Lent Term

Summer Term

Business Activity Enterprise Business Planning Business Ownership Types Business Aims and Objectives

Marketing Role of Marketing Market Research Market Segmentation The Marketing Mix

People Role of Human Resources Different Organisational Structures and Methods of Working Communication Methods Recruitment and Selection Methods Motivation and Retention Methods Training and Development Employment Law

Christmas Term

Lent Term

Summer Term

Operations Production Processes Importance of Product and Service Quality Selling Process and Customer Service Consumer Law Importance of Business Location Working with Suppliers

Finance Role of Finance Function Sources of Finance Revenue, Costs, Profit and Loss Break-even Importance of Cash and Cash-flow

Influences on Business Ethical and Environmental influences Influence of the Economic Climate Impact of Globalisation

Year 11

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Skills

Assessment

Literacy

The course is assessed by two 90 minute examinations based on case studies. There is no controlled assessment or coursework. Both papers include multi-choice questions and data response questions based on real or fictional business contexts. Some parts of the second paper are synoptic and are assessed by judgement of quantitative skills (Mathematics) and written skills (spelling, punctuation and grammar. The course follows the 9-1 grading system and marks are awarded according to the following criteria:

This is the greatest skill needed as students will be expected to prepare strong and incisive written arguments and counter arguments supported by a reasoned conclusion. There are marks awarded for spelling, punctuation and grammar in both examination papers. Numeracy Students must be confident in Mathematics and be able to work out percentage change, averages, revenue, costs and profits, gross and net profit margin ratios, average rate of return and cash-flow forecasts.

AO1 – Knowledge skills worth 35% AO2 – Application of knowledge worth 35% AO3 – Analytical and evaluation skills worth 30%

Communication

Support, Resources & Enrichment

Students must be willing to listen to and understand both sides of an argument and argue their viewpoint confidently and eloquently.

The Department will offer revision support classes in the Development Hour, specialist revision support materials and revision guides.

Quantitative Students will be required to interpret quantitative data to support, inform and justify business decisions, including:

Progression Opportunities

• Financial data

This qualification would be a very valuable, but not essential, tool in completing A Level Business Studies and associated subjects like Economics within the College. It also creates opportunities in many careers including Marketing, Accountancy, Retail, Operations and Purchasing.

• Marketing data

Additional Information

• Market data

Students are expected to read the news and business sections of quality newspapers and websites to build a wider understanding of current business and economic issues. Furthermore, they should watch business related programmes on television such as Dragons’ Den and The Apprentice to link business theory to its practical use. Additionally, students should use different interactive business websites such as tutor2u and BBC Bitesize to test themselves.

• Graphs and charts • Profitability ratios

Information Technology Students must be able to research and present confidently and clearly using PowerPoint or Google slides as required.

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Creative iMedia Qualification Cambridge Nationals Level 2 Certificate Examination Board OCR Specification Number J817

Topics Covered Year 10 Christmas Term

Lent Term

Summer Term

R081: Pre-production Skills

R082: Creating Digital Graphics

Revision for R081 Examination

Understand the purpose and content of pre-production

Understanding the purpose and properties of digital graphics

Planning pre-production

Planning the creation of a digital graphic

Production of pre-production documents

Creating a digital graphic

Reviewing pre-production documents

Reviewing a digital graphic

Year 11 - Modules 3 & 4: Optional Units (two to be chosen by teacher) Creating 2D and 3D digital characters Creating a digital sound sequence Storytelling with a comic strip Creating a digital video sequence Creating a multi-page website

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Creating a digital animation Creating interactive multimedia products Digital photography Designing a game concept Developing digital games


Skills

Support, Resources & Enrichment

The Cambridge Nationals in Creative iMedia will equip learners with a range of creative media skills and provide opportunities to develop desirable and transferable skills such as research, planning and reviewing, while working with others and communicating creative concepts effectively. Through the use of these skills, learners will ultimately be creating fit-for-purpose creative media products. It will also challenge all students, including high attaining learners, by introducing them to new material and demanding techniques; encouraging independence and creativity.

Students will be taught by a mixture of whole-class teaching, individual practical tasks and group work. The course aims to also make links with industry experts, with the possibility of field trips to relevant locations.

Assessment Module 1: Pre-production Skills External Written paper Set and marked by OCR, duration 1 hour 15 minutes 25% of the overall grade Module 2: Creating Digital Graphics Centre assessed tasks OCR moderated, duration approximately 10 hours 25% of the overall grade

Progression Opportunities The course provides students with a range of skills to progress further in their education. Progression routes include an A Level equivalent in Creative Media or IT. This qualification, if further studied, can also provide employment opportunities in the IT or Media sector.

Additional Information Creative and Digital Media plays an important part in many areas of our everyday lives and is also an vital part of the UK economy. There is a demand from employers for an increasingly skilled and technically literate workforce, as more and more media products are produced digitally. Creative iMedia provides specific and transferable skills and a solid foundation in understanding and applying this subject, whether it is in employment or Higher Education.

Optional Units Coursework - Centre assessed tasks OCR moderated, duration approximately 10 hours 50% of the overall grade

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Design and Technology Qualification GCSE Design and Technology Examination Board AQA Specification Number 8552

Topics Covered Year 10 Christmas Term

Lent Term

Summer Term

Core designing skills Sweet dispenser Garden trowel

Exclusive design Mechanism based toy

Environmental case study

Christmas Term

Lent Term

Summer Term

Themed non-examination assessment

Themed non-examination assessment

Revision and examination practice

Year 11

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Skills

Support, Resources & Enrichment

• Core technical principles

• Text books

• Specialist technical principles

• Workshop

• Designing and making principles

• ICT Suite for CAD/CAM including vinyl cutter, computer controlled router and 3D printer

Assessment Unit 1 - Written Examination (2 hours) 100 marks 50% of GCSE Section A - Core Technical Principles (20 marks) A mixture of multiple choice and short answer questions assessing a breadth of technical knowledge and understanding.

• Dedicated after-school support

Progression Opportunities This is an excellent course to aid moving on to study for an A Level in Design and Technology.

Section B – Specialist Technical Principles (30 marks) Several short answer questions (2–5 marks each) and one extended response to assess a more in-depth knowledge of technical principles. Section C – Designing and Making Principles (50 marks) A mixture of short answer and extended response questions including a 12 mark design question. Unit 2 - Non-exam assessment (NEA) 30–35 hours approximately 100 marks 50% of GCSE Practical application of: • Core technical principles • Specialist technical principles • Designing and making principles

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Drama Qualification GCSE Drama Examination Board OCR Specification Number J316

Topics Covered Year 10 Christmas Term

Lent Term

Summer Term

Applying the Work of Theatre Practitioners Dramatic Theory in Practice

Devised Drama – Exploration Presenting Textual Characters in Performance

Devised Drama – Process Devised Drama – Portfolio Responding to Set Text – Exploration

Christmas Term

Lent Term

Summer Term

Devised Drama – Performance Devised Drama – Portfolio Responding to Set Text – Mock Examination

Presenting & Performing – Extracts from ‘Two’ by Jim Cartwright Devised Drama – Portfolio

Responding to Set Text –Written Examination Responding to Live Performance – Written Examination

Year 11

Skills Students will be introduced to a range of performance skills, drama techniques and explorative strategies in order to enhance the quality and originality of their drama. They will access a range of stimuli such as play texts, poems, music, novels and works of art to inspire dramatic performances. Students also explore alternative styles of theatre and the work of influential practitioners, as well as contemporary and classic play texts. In addition, students will have the opportunity to explore topical or social issues such as racism and injustice through discussion, debate and role-play.

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Assessment

Progression Opportunities

Devising Drama 30% (internally assessed)

The study of Drama is considered to be a subject that fosters the analytical, creative and communication skills needed for many professions.

Students explore a stimulus provided by the exam board. They will work in groups to create their own devised drama based on their exploration. Students can work as either performers or designers, creating a portfolio and a final performance. Presenting and Performing Texts 30% (externally assessed) Students explore a stimulus provided by the exam board. They will Students explore a text and perform two scenes to a Visiting Examiner. Students can work as either performers or designers, completing a pro-forma and a final performance showcase. Drama: Performance and Response 40% (90 minute written examination) Section A contains questions based on the study of a text from a list set by the Examination Board. Section B contains an extended response analysing and evaluating live theatre. Students will be required to keep written notes of all the practical workshops that are delivered, in preparation for internally and externally assessed components.

Support, Resources & Enrichment

This course will help create independent students, critical thinkers and effective decision makers – all personal attributes that can make students stand out as they progress through their education and into employment. GCSE Drama is ideal preparation for A Level Drama and Theatre Studies which is one possible entry requirement for Further and Higher Education. Drama skills are instantly transferable in areas such as teaching, sales, retail, marketing and professions in the media.

Additional Information Drama students develop the ‘hidden’ curriculum skills which are favoured by universities and employers such as; researching, presentation skills, communication and negotiation. Drama also promotes interpersonal skills, raising self-esteem and building confidence. Workshops take place to allow GCSE students to work alongside professional artists and specialists from the theatre industry. Regular trips to theatres around the county and London provide our students with the opportunity to experience live theatre first-hand.

• One-to-one teacher tutorials • After-school and lunchtime rehearsals towards practical examinations • Visiting practitioners and workshops • Chromebooks and Macs to aid research, completion of portfolios and revision • Extra-curricular opportunities in performance and technical theatre • Theatrical trips to see professional performances, both locally and nationally

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Food Preparation and Nutrition Qualification GCSE Food Preparation and Nutrition Examination Board OCR Specification Number J309/01

Topics Covered Year 10 Christmas Term

Lent Term

Summer Term

• The Relationship between Diet and Health • Nutritional and Dietary Requirements of Special Populations • Energy Balance • Protein • Fat • Carbohydrates • Vitamins • Minerals • Water • Nutrients in Foods

• Food Provenance - Source and Supply • Food Provenance - Processing and Production • Food Security • Technological Developments to Support Better Health and Food Production • Development of Culinary Traditions • Factors Affecting Food Choice

• Food Science • Sensory Properties • Example Investigative Tasks and Non Examined Assessment Planning

Cookery skills are in line with the theory covered and address bread making, white sauces, pastry, cooking on a budget, retention of nutrients, knife skills, cake making, temperature control, meat handling, pasta making and dovetailing dishes.

Cookery skills are in line with the theory covered and address bread making, white sauces, pastry, cooking on a budget, retention of nutrients, knife skills, cake making, temperature control, meat handling, pasta making and dovetailing dishes.

Cookery skills are in line with the theory covered and address bread making, white sauces, pastry, cooking on a budget, retention of nutrients, knife skills, cake making, temperature control, meat handling, pasta making, dovetailing dishes and the addition of experimentation of food science.

Year 11 Christmas Term

Lent Term

Summer Term

• Non Examined Assessment 1 - Planning and Cookery • Revision of Topics from Year 10 • Food Hygiene and Safety

• Non Examined Assessment 2 - Planning and Cookery for Submission in March • Mock Cookery exam for NEA2 • Revision of all theory topics for Summer Examinations

• Revision and examinations

Cookery skills are in line with the theory covered and address bread making, white sauces, pastry, cooking on a budget, retention of nutrients, knife skills, cake making, temperature control, meat handling, pasta making and dovetailing dishes.

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Skills

Progression Opportunities

Our GCSE in Food Preparation and Nutrition equips students with the knowledge, understanding and skills to be able to feed themselves and others better. Students develop practical cookery skills and techniques as they explore the underlying principles of food science, nutrition, food traditions and food safety. Heston Blumenthal’s support will inspire students to be inquisitive, creative and confident cooks.

A GCSE in Food Preparation and Nutrition presents students with many opportunities, perhaps the most important being the ability to cook and provide for family, friends and themselves as they leave home and discover their pathway in the world.

Students will be assessed through a practical and written test each half term, with reflection and development upon the results. In Year 10, students will have multiple opportunities to practise the Non Examined Assessments that compose 50% of the GCSE in Year 11.

Students also have the opportunity to develop their interest in the Food, Hospitality and Food Science industries, with positions open to them such as New Product Development, Chef, Nutritionist, Dietician, Production Operations, Restaurant Management, Quality Control, Food Health & Safety, Engineering, Packaging, Bakery, IT, Butchery, Bakery, Finance, HR, PR, Finance, Agriculture, Supply Chain & Logistics, Marketing, Source & Supply, Aqua Culture, Research, Medicine, Sport, Fitness and Physiotherapy.

Support, Resources & Enrichment

Additional Information

Assessment

Students have the opportunity to attend a weekly enrichment session for support on any of the topics covered. They will have access to a text book, a USB of resources and Jenny Ridgwell’s Nutrition Programme.

Food Preparation and Nutrition is a comprehensive course that not only teaches students how to cook, but also the understanding of what they are eating, where food comes from, its scientific properties, nutrient breakdown and how this affects their daily lives. The course is divided into 50% Non Examined Assessment (coursework) and 50% Written Examination. Further division is a 15% weighting for an Investigative Non Examined Assessment into Food Science, with the addition of a 35% weighting for Menu Design and Evaluation on a specific task; to be cooked in a period of three hours.

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French Qualification GCSE French Examination Board AQA Specification Number 8658

Topics Covered Year 10 Christmas Term

Lent Term

Summer Term

• Relationships with family and friends • Describing your house and rooms • Talking about what you can do where you live • Talking about the amenities in your area • Giving your opinions on different subjects • Describing what you do and don’t like doing • Talking about free time • Buying food and drink • Eating out • Sport • Christmas in France

• Healthy eating • Healthy and unhealthy lifestyles • Talking about your school and daily routine • Talking about school rules and uniform • Customs and festivals in French-speaking countries • Learning about French life and routines • Learning about local customs • Talking about a French festival

• Travel and Tourism • Travelling to holiday destinations • Holiday accommodation • Education post 16 • Options at 16 • Choices at 18: work or university? • Marriage/partnership • Talking about a partner • Future plans

Christmas Term

Lent Term

Summer Term

• Reusing, reducing, recycling • Protecting the environment • Volunteering • Charities and voluntary work • Current and future study and employment – career choices and ambitions • Different jobs • Looking for and applying for work

• Keeping in touch via the Internet • Opinions about online messaging • Using a mobile • Opinions on mobile technology • Poverty • Homelessness • Revision • Exam practise

• Revision • Exam practise

Year 11

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Skills

Support, Resources & Enrichment

Throughout the GCSE course students will:

The Modern Foreign Languages Faculty offers:

• Work on skills developed during KS3 using an increased vocabulary

• GCSE French speaking Development Hour

• Recognise authentic listening and reading texts

• Bi-lingual dictionaries

• Expand knowledge of tenses to include conditional and pluperfect

• Subscription to Kerboodle website

• Consolidate knowledge of direct and indirect object pronouns

Progression Opportunities

• Develop greater complexity in spoken and written work

Assessment At the end of each term the students will be assessed in one productive skill (speaking or writing) and one receptive skill (listening and reading) by tasks that are used in GCSE Examination such as role play or describing a photo, translating from English to French or French to English, reading or listening comprehension and writing in French.

Opportunity to study French to A Level in Sixth Form.

Additional Information Parents can support their child’s learning by: • Encouraging their child to watch French TV/listen to French radio/ use French sub-titles • Taking their child to places linked to French history & culture and if possible French-speaking countries • Use the following websites online: www.languagesonline.org.uk - for practising vocabulary and grammar BBC Bitesize - there are lots of activities including short videos and games www.quizlet.com - a vocabulary learning site with flashcards and games to aid learning

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Geography Qualification GCSE Geography Examination Board CIE Specification Number 0796

Topics Covered Year 10 Christmas Term

Lent Term

Summer Term

Population & Settlement

Population & Settlement Natural World

Natural World

Christmas Term

Lent Term

Summer Term

Natural World Economic Development & Resources

Economic Development & Resources Revision

Revision

Year 11

Skills • The interpretation and analysis of geographical information including OS maps; the application of graphical and statistical techniques • Fieldwork techniques and skills

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Assessment

Progression Opportunities

Paper 1 – Geographical themes: Written paper. 1 hour 45 minutes, 75 marks (weighted to 100), 45%

The course is designed to enable pupils to progress either directly to employment, or to proceed to further qualifications. Pupils who achieve grades 6-9 are well prepared to follow courses leading to AS and A Level Geography, or the equivalent. There are many crosscurricular links between this course and other subjects, at both GCSE and A Level. The skills developed are applicable to most subjects and combined with the study of contemporary themes and issues, make the course relevant and valuable in the modern world.

Paper 2 – Geographical skills: Written paper. 1 hour 30 minutes, 60 marks, 27.5% Paper 4 – Fieldwork skills: Written paper. 1 hour 30 minutes, 60 marks, 27.5%

Support, Resources & Enrichment The Humanities Faculty provides the following support and resources for Geography: • Digimap for Schools – providing access to OS maps  • Geographical magazine – available in the library  • Copies of textbooks – available in the library  Local fieldwork is undertaken to support the development of the techniques and skills required for Paper 4. This involves elements of both human and physical geography.

Additional Information In studying Geography, pupils are encouraged to think like a Geographer. This means being aware of the places around them, how they are changing and the impact that this is having. In particular, pupils should look out for differences between places and the challenges that they face. Asking questions such as ‘how?’, ‘why?’ and ‘what if?’ is extremely valuable, as is being prepared to look at problems from a variety of viewpoints. Learning information about the places studied is important, as well as keeping knowledge up-to-date by following current events and watching relevant programmes on television.

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History Qualification GCSE History Examination Board AQA Specification Number 8145

Topics Covered Year 10 Christmas Term

Lent Term

Summer Term

Norman England: c1066-c1100

Norman England: c1066-c1100

Britain: Health and the People, c1000 to the Present Day

Britain: Health and the People, c1000 to the Present Day

America: Expansion and Consolidation of the American West, 1840–1895

Year 11 Christmas Term

Lent Term

Summer Term

America: Expansion and Consolidation of the American West, 1840–1895

Conflict and Tension: Causes and Course of the First World War, 1893 to 1918

Revision in preparation for summer exams

Conflict and Tension: Causes and Course of the First World War, 1893 to 1918

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Skills

Support, Resources & Enrichment

• Gain substantive knowledge in all of the areas covered by the topics above

The History department offers the following enrichment opportunities:

• Gain confidence in using subject-specific vocabulary

• History Club: A chance to explore history from different perspectives through music, art, food, fiction, debate, crafts and activities, re-enactments and beyond. This is largely aimed at KS3 but KS4 students are welcome to attend.

• Understand how historians answer questions about change and continuity, cause and consequence, significance, diversity, evidence and interpretations • Develop skills in extended writing; learning how to plan, structure, evidence, explain and substantiate a judgement in answer to an essay question • Learn to create and defend logical and substantiated oral and written arguments

• KS4 History Surgery in Lent and Summer Terms: This is an opportunity to drop in and receive support addressing issues with knowledge or skills. Students may attend to address a topic they are struggling with, for support with completing homework, for support in catching up on missed classwork, or for support in revision.

Assessment

The History department provides the following additional support and resources:

• Develop skills in extended reading

Formal, in-class assessments will take place at the end of each sub-section of the specification. This will generally mean at least four assessment points per topic. Exam style questions will also be occasionally set as homework. The attainment level of pupils will be established using a combination of data from formal assessments, homework marking, classwork marking and other tests as below. Assessments will take the following forms: • Exam style questions in line with the GCSE papers • Knowledge tests • Spelling and key word definition tests

• Lesson and homework resources on Google classrooms • Lists of recommended reading related to the topics covered across KS4

Progression Opportunities Pupils who achieve grades 6-9 are well prepared to follow courses leading to AS and A Level History, or the equivalent. There are many cross-curricular links between this course and other subjects, at both GCSE and A Level. The skills developed, especially of research and analytical thinking, are applicable to most subjects and are valuable in all future careers.

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Music Qualification GCSE Music Examination Board Eduqas (WJEC) Specification Number 601/8131/X

Topics Covered

Component 3: Appraising

The WJEC Eduqas specification encourages an integrated approach to the three distinct disciplines of performing, composing and appraising through four inter-related areas of study. The four areas of study are designed to develop knowledge and understanding of music through the consideration of a variety of genres and styles in a wider context. The Western Classical Tradition forms the basis of Musical Forms and Devices (Area of Study 1), and learners should take the opportunity to explore these forms and devices further in the other three areas of study. Music for Ensemble (Area of Study 2) allows learners to look more closely at texture and sonority. Film Music (Area of Study 3) and Popular Music (Area of Study 4) provide an opportunity to look at contrasting styles and genres of music.

This component is assessed via a listening examination. Eight questions in total, two on each of the four areas of study:

Component 1: Performing A minimum of two pieces, one of which must be an ensemble performance of at least one minute duration. The other piece(s) may be either solo and/or ensemble. One of the pieces performed must link to an area of study of the learner’s choice. Total duration of performances: 4-6 minutes Non-exam assessment: internally assessed, externally moderated 30% of qualification Component 2: Composing

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Area of study 1: Musical Forms and Devices Area of study 2: Music for Ensemble Area of study 3: Film Music Area of study 4: Popular Music Two of the eight questions are based on extracts set by WJEC. Written examination: 1 hour 15 minutes 40% of qualification

Skills Through the GCSE Music course pupils will be able to: • Engage actively in the process of music study • Develop performing skills individually and in groups to communicate musically with fluency and control of the resources used • Develop composing skills to organise musical ideas and make use of appropriate resources • Recognise links between the integrated activities of performing, composing and appraising and how this informs the development of music

Two compositions, one of which must be in response to a brief set by WJEC. Students will choose one brief from a choice of four, each one linked to a different area of study. The briefs will be released during the first week of September in the academic year in which the assessment is to be taken. The second composition is a free composition for which learners set their own brief.

• Broaden musical experience and interests, develop imagination and foster creativity

Total duration of compositions: 3-6 minutes Non-exam assessment: internally assessed, externally moderated 30% of qualification

• Develop awareness of music technologies and their use in the creation and presentation of music

• Develop knowledge, understanding and the skills needed to communicate effectively as musicians • Develop awareness of a variety of instruments, styles and approaches to performing and composing

• Recognise contrasting genres, styles and traditions of music and develop some awareness of musical chronology


• Develop as effective and independent learners with enquiring minds

Support, Resources & Enrichment

• Reflect upon and evaluate their own and others’ music

The Music Department within the Creative & Performing Arts Faculty offers the following enrichment opportunities:

• Engage with and appreciate the diverse heritage of music in order to promote personal, social, intellectual and cultural development

• Trips to musical theatre performances in London

Assessment Students will be assessed using the Eduqas criteria. It should be remembered that tracking progress in subjects with substantial practical learning is rarely linear. What should be seen is a ‘smooth’ upward progression over the course of a year or several projects, moving towards the key assessment points and interim targets. Component 1: Performing Learners may perform at any time during the academic year in which the assessment is to be taken. Learners do not have to perform all pieces on the same day. The performance must be recorded with the teacher present, so that the work can be authenticated. In all performances, learners will be expected to display: • Technical control • Expression and appropriate interpretation • Accuracy of rhythm and pitch • Appropriate pace and fluency • Effective use of dynamics • Stylistic awareness • Empathy (in ensemble playing)

• Numerous choirs and ensembles, rehearsing weekly • Instrumental and singing lessons • ABRSM, Trinity and LAMDA examinations • Lunchtime and end of term concerts • Annual Carol and Remembrance services, and other major services • Performances at weekly assemblies • Music theory, aural training and music technology clubs • The annual College Musical • The annual Arts Festival • Involvement in the Suffolk Festival of Performing Arts and the Colchester Rotary Festival We also provide the following support and resources: • A wide variety of acoustic and electronic instruments, amplifiers, PA equipment and microphones • A large team of peripatetic instrumental and singing staff • Practice rooms containing high quality upright pianos • An iMac Suite running GarageBand, Logic and Sibelius

Component 2: Composing

• An acoustically-treated recording studio, featuring a control room and live room

In both compositions, learners will be expected to display:

• A suite of iPads

• Creativity in response to the chosen brief • Technical control of musical elements and resources

• Subscription to Google Classroom, Music First/Rhinegold Education Online, Music Classroom, Auralia (ear training) and Musition (music theory)

• Musical coherence and understanding

Parents can support their child’s learning by:

Component 3: Appraising

• Encouraging their child to listen to a wide variety of music at home

• Development of musical ideas

The Appraising examination will consist of eight questions, two on each area of study. Of the eight questions, six will be on unprepared musical extracts and two on extracts set by WJEC which relate to two areas of study. The set extracts will be reviewed periodically. Learners are encouraged to study the scores of the set extracts in preparation for the examination. However, scores must not be taken into the examination; sections of the scores will be printed on the examination paper when required for the question. The unprepared extracts played in the examination will be from the genres, styles or periods specified within each area of study. The majority of questions in the examination will be either multiple choice or short answer questions. However, there will be one question which requires learners to write a longer response to a piece of music. In the examination candidates will: • Identify musical elements, musical contexts and musical language, and apply this knowledge to familiar and unfamiliar music • Make evaluative and critical judgements about musical elements, musical contexts and musical language, using appropriate musical terminology • Complete the rhythm or pitch of a short section of music (pitch dictation will be within the major scale)

• Encouraging their child to practise • Taking their child to live musical events • Promoting and discussing music at home • Encouraging their child to use the www.allmusic.com web site

Progression Opportunities Music, Music Technology and Performing Arts courses including A Levels, BTECs, Degrees and Diplomas. Career roles include performer, composer, class or instrumental teacher, music producer, sound engineer, author, media (radio and television).

Additional Information It is a requirement for entry to this course that students learn a musical instrument and are at a minimum standard of Grade 2 for at least one instrument at the start of the course. Students are expected to take instrumental/singing lessons throughout the duration of the course and to be actively involved in extracurricular musical activities. Beyond this, the specification builds on the subject content which is taught at Key Stage 3 and provides a suitable foundation for the study of Music at either AS, A level or BTEC. In addition, the specification provides a coherent, satisfying and worthwhile course of study for learners who do not progress to further study in this subject.

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Photography Qualification GCSE Photography: Lens-based and Light-based Media Examination Board AQA Specification Number 8206

Topics Covered Year 10 Christmas Term

Lent Term

Summer Term

Portraiture

Landscape

Still Life

Christmas Term

Lent Term

Summer Term

Independent Project

Controlled Assignment

Exhibition External Moderation

Year 11

Skills

Component 1: (8206C) 60%

The GCSE Photography course provides students with a wide range of creative, exciting and stimulating opportunities to explore their interests using lens-based media in ways that are personally relevant and truly developmental in nature.

The portfolio must include both:

Students will produce practical, critical and contextual work in one or more areas, including theme-based photography, portraiture, location photography, studio photography, experimental imagery, installation, documentary photography, photo-journalism, moving image: film, video and animation and fashion photography. During the course, students will explore overlapping and combinations of the different areas.

Assessment Students will be assessed using the AQA criteria. It should be remembered that tracking progress in subjects with substantial practical and experiential learning is rarely linear. What should be seen is a ‘smooth’ upward progression over the course of a year or several projects, moving towards the key assessment points and interim targets.

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• A sustained project developed in response to a subject, theme, task or brief evidencing the journey from initial engagement with an idea to the realisation of intentions. This will give students the opportunity to demonstrate, through an extended creative response, their ability to draw together different areas of knowledge, skills and understanding from across their course of study. • A selection of further work resulting from activities such as trials and experiments; skills-based workshops; mini-foundation projects; responses to gallery, museum or site visits; independent study and evidence of the student’s individual role in any group work undertaken. The work submitted for this component will be marked as a whole. Students should carefully select, organise and present their portfolio and must ensure that it provides evidence of meeting all assessment objectives.


Component 2: (8206X) Externally Set Assignment 40%

Progression Opportunities

AQA will provide a separate externally set assignment for each title, each with seven different starting points. Students must select and respond to one starting point from their chosen title. The externally set assignment provides students with the opportunity to demonstrate, through an extended creative response, their ability to draw together different areas of knowledge, skills and understanding in response to their selected starting point.

Art & Design Courses including A Levels, Foundation Degrees, Degrees and Diplomas, photojournalism, graphic design, animation, advertising, fashion photography, reportage, film, music videos, media, publicity, picture editing, forensic science, television, the Police and specialised insurance.

The final assessment is 10 hours of sustained focused study, which realises any preparation undertaken. Question papers are issued from 1 January and are marked by St Joseph’s College and moderated by AQA.

Support, Resources & Enrichment • Study days working with curators at the Fitzwilliam Museum and in London • Artist workshops during the College’s annual Art Festival • Student Arts Focus Group

Additional Information Practical work forms the main focus of the course. This is supported by visits to Museums and Art Galleries both nationally and internationally. Visits include Art and Photography tours. The College’s photography suite is purpose-built with specialist facilities enabling students to work on Macs and develop in the darkroom. In the first six weeks, students will be introduced to the basic skills of photography before moving on to producing coursework. For this, students will be set assignments which will be open to a wide range of interpretation and development. At the end of the course students will take part in a formal exhibition.

• Art Scholars’ Society • Materials for all projects in the course during curriculum time • Open Art Studios • Young Art Competition • State-of-the-Art Digital Arts Suite with Mac technology and the latest version of Photoshop • Opportunity for every child to have their work displayed and celebrated • Artworks to build up an independent library using Smartify Every student is provided with a sketchbook at the beginning of each year and is issued with another once the first is full. This sketchbook needs to be brought to every lesson in a folder. Students also need to bring their camera to each lesson.

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Physical Education Qualification GCSE Physical Education Examination Board AQA Specification Number 8582

Course Aims GCSE Physical Education encourages pupils to develop and maintain an active, healthy lifestyle which can help them with their creativity and decision-making in PE. The course also increases motivation for pupils, as sports interests can be followed outside of school for example, coaching and officiating.

Topics Covered • Applied Anatomy and Physiology • Movement Analysis • Physical Training • Sports Psychology • Socio-cultural Influences • Health, Fitness and Well-being • Use of Data • Practical Performance: three different physical activities in the role of player/performer (one in a team activity, one in an individual activity and a third in either a team or in an individual activity) • Analysis and Evaluation of Performance: to bring about improvement in one activity

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Skills

Progression Opportunities

• Help to promote healthy living around the College

A GCSE in Physical Education prepares students for AS and A Level Physical Education or a BTEC National award for Sport (Performance and Excellence). These can lead to university courses including sport science, sports studies, coaching and leisure and tourism. Students from the College have progressed to Loughborough, Southampton, Bath, Exeter, Brunel and Durham Universities to study Sport.

• Maintain a high level of fitness and practical performance • Be familiar with current issues within sport locally, nationally and internationally

Assessment Paper 1: The Human Body and Movement in Physical Activity and Sport This is assessed by a written examination lasting 1 hour and 15 minutes which is marked out of 78 marks. This equates to 30% of the GCSE.

Additional Information The GCSE course is designed to give opportunities for students to sample a wide range of activities as well as developing their strongest areas.

Paper 2: Socio-cultural Influences and Well-being in Physical Activity and Sport This is assessed by a written examination lasting for 1 hour and 15 minutes which is marked out of 78 marks. This equates to 30% of the GCSE and is a non-examination assessment. Practical Performance in Physical Activity and Sport This area is assessed by teachers then moderated by AQA. It is worth 100 marks and represents 40% of the GCSE.

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Religious Education Qualification GCSE Religious Studies Examination Board Edexcel Specification Number 1RBO

Topics Covered Year 10 Christmas Term

Lent Term

Summer Term

Christian Beliefs Living the Christian Life

Matters of Life and Death Jewish Beliefs

Jewish Beliefs Crime and Punishment

Christmas Term

Lent Term

Summer Term

Crime and Punishment Living the Jewish Life

Peace and Conflict Revision

Revision and exams

Year 11

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Skills

Support, Resources & Enrichment

Students who study this course will:

Revision classes will be available to all, along with revision notes and guidance. Magazines and wider reading will be encouraged and supported with additional resources available in our library.

• Be given opportunities to engage with questions of belief, value, meaning, purpose and truth and their influence on human life • Begin to understand the influence of religion on individuals, communities and societies • Develop a knowledge and understanding of religious and nonreligious beliefs, such as atheism and humanism • Apply this knowledge and understanding to analyse questions related to religious and non-religious beliefs and values • Develop their ability to construct well-argued, well-informed, balanced and structured written arguments, demonstrating their depth and breadth of understanding of the subject • Be challenged to reflect on and develop their own values, beliefs and attitudes in the light of what they have learnt which will hopefully contribute to their preparation for adult life in a pluralistic society and global community

Assessment

Given the nature of the course, it is important to take an interest in current affairs, whether by watching the news, reading newspapers or by using the internet. Some television programmes, both factual and fictional, touch upon the issues raised by the topics in the syllabus, so it would be useful to watch them to help deepen understanding.

Progression Opportunities The course encourages candidates to develop the critical and evaluative skills which will enable them to study a wide range of courses, including Religious Studies, Theology, Philosophy, Law, Sociology and the Social Sciences. It also provides good grounding for a career in many fields; including Medicine, Education, Journalism, Business, Politics, Law, Media, Government and Non-Government, Marketing and Advertising.

Paper 1 Written examination: 1 hour 45 minutes. 50% of GCSE Paper 2 Written examination: 1 hour 45 minutes. 50% of GCSE

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Spanish Qualification GCSE Spanish Examination Board AQA Specification Number 8698

Topics Covered Year 10 Christmas Term

Lent Term

Summer Term

• Relationships with family and friends • Describing your house and rooms • Talking about what you can do where you live • Talking about the amenities in your area • Giving your opinions about different subjects • Describing what you do and don’t like doing • Talking about free time • Buying food and drink • Eating out • Sport • Christmas in Spain

• Healthy eating • Healthy and unhealthy lifestyles • Talking about your school and daily routine • Talking about school rules and uniform • Learning about Spanish life and routines • Learning about local customs • Talking about a Spanish festival • Learning about Latin American culture

• Travel and Tourism • Travelling to holiday destination • Holiday accommodation • Regions of Spain • Tourist leaflets and websites • Education post 16 • Options at 16 • Choices at 18: work or university? • Marriage/partnership • Talking about a partner • Future plans

Christmas Term

Lent Term

Summer Term

• Reusing, reducing, recycling • Protecting the environment • Volunteering • Charities and voluntary work • Current and future study and employment – career choices and ambitions • Different jobs • Looking for and applying for work

• Keeping in touch via the Internet • Opinions about online messaging • Using a mobile • Opinions on mobile technology • Poverty • Homelessness • Revision • Exam practise

• Revision • Exam practise

Year 11

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Skills

Support, Resources & Enrichment

Throughout the GCSE course students will:

The Modern Foreign Languages Faculty offers:

• Continue to work on skills developed during KS3 working with an increased vocabulary

• GCSE Spanish-speaking Development Hour

• Recognise authentic listening and reading texts

• Subscription to Kerboodle website

• Produce language, both spoken and written, in a more sophisticated way

Progression Opportunities

• Consolidate present, preterite and simple future tenses • Learn imperfect, perfect and pluperfect tenses, immediate future and conditional tenses • Recognise and use some set phrases from present and imperfect subjunctives • Use direct and indirect object pronouns, the personal a • Understand and use correctly the differences between por and para and ser and estar

Assessment At the end of each term the students will be assessed in one productive skill (speaking or writing) and one receptive skill (listening and reading) by tasks that are used in GCSE examination, such as role play or describing a photo, translating from English to Spanish or Spanish to English, reading or listening comprehension and writing in Spanish.

• Bi-lingual dictionaries

Opportunity to study Spanish to A Level in Sixth Form.

Additional Information Parents can support their child’s learning by: • Encouraging their child to watch Spanish TV/listen to Spanish radio/use Spanish sub-titles • Taking their child to places linked to Spanish history & culture and if possible Spanish-speaking countries • Use the following websites online: www.languagesonline.org.uk - for practising vocabulary and grammar BBC Bitesize - there are lots of activities including short videos and games www.quizlet.com - a vocabulary learning site with flashcards and games to aid learning

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Science (Biology, Chemistry & Physics) Qualification GCSE Biology, GCSE Chemistry, GCSE Physics (Triple Award) Examination Board AQA Specification Number Biology (8461), Chemistry (8462), Physics (8463)

Topics Covered

Skills

Biology

Practical skills

Cell biology; the organisation and systems in the body and in plants; inheritance, variation, genetics and evolution; ecological processes; health, disease and the development of medicines.

Students will carry out practical tasks through each course in order to develop their skills of working scientifically. The students will carry out a number of required practical activities in each area of science which will be assessed in the written papers.

Chemistry Atomic structure; the periodic table; bonding, structure and the properties of matter; chemical reactions; predicting, monitoring, and controlling chemical reactions; Earth and atmospheric science; polymers and nanoparticles; alcohols and carboxylic acids.

Mathematical skills

Physics

Each course has a linear structure so all examinations will be sat in the summer of Year 11. It will be assessed on the scale 9-1 and the students will gain three GCSE qualifications at the end of the course.

Forces; waves; energy and electricity; electricity, magnetism and radioactivity; matter; space.

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Each GCSE also places emphasis on students being able to use and show their Mathematical skills within a science context.

Assessment

Paper

Topics Covered

Length

Marks

Percentage of GCSE

Biology 1

Cell biology; Organisation; Infection & Response; Bioenergetics

1hr 45min

100

50%

Biology 2

Homeostasis & Response; Inheritance; Variation & Evolution; Ecology

1hr 45min

100

50%

Chemistry 1

Atomic Structure & the Periodic Table; Bonding, Structure & Matter; Quantitative Chemistry, Chemical Changes; Energy Changes

1hr 45min

100

50%

Chemistry 2

The Rate & Extent of Chemical Change; Organic Chemistry; Chemical Analysis, Chemistry of the Atmosphere; Using Resources

1hr 45min

100

50%

Physics 1

Energy; Electricity; Particle Model of Matter; Atomic Structure

1hr 45min

100

50%

Physics 2

Forces; Waves; Magnetism & Electromagnetism; Space Physics

1hr 45min

100

50%


Support, Resources & Enrichment Students are issued with a revision guide for the course and will have access to an online programme called Kerboodle. Through this, the students can access digital versions of the text book, PowerPoints, interactive activities and online quizzes. The Science Faculty offers Science Support after school during the Christmas Term and KS4 revision sessions each week during both the Lent and Summer Terms.

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“I’ve been given every opportunity to discover what I’m interested in. I feel confident in choosing a career path.” Pedro Costa Coutinho

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“The amount of one-to-one support you receive from teachers is incredible.” Ben Warner

“Achievement at the school is of a really high standard. Staff nurture you; my experience has been outstanding.” Lauren Garnham

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www.stjos.co.uk St Joseph’s College, Belstead Road, Ipswich, IP2 9DR Tel: 01473 690281 Email: Admissions@stjos.co.uk

St Joseph's College GCSE Courses and Options 2018-19  

St Joseph's College GCSE Courses and Options 2018-19

St Joseph's College GCSE Courses and Options 2018-19  

St Joseph's College GCSE Courses and Options 2018-19