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Creative. Fresh. Local.

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THE SUBMARINER The quintessential divers’ watch has embodied the historic ties between Rolex and the underwater world since 1953. It doesn’t just tell time. It tells history.

OYSTER PERPETUAL SUBMARINER DATE

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oyster perpetual and submariner are

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trademarks.


table of contents

FEATURES

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NATURE’S ALCHEMIST Natural local honey is all the buzz these days.

SEACREST WOLF PRESERVE Visitors howl at the moon on over 430 acres of sanctuary set aside for wildlife, wolves in particular.

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REEF MADNESS Andy McAlexander and the South Walton Artificial Reef Association work to bring sea life closer.

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SHELL ISLAND Seven miles of natural, undeveloped beach are primed for your adventuring pleasure.

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STARS IN THE SKIES Look above and spot military aircraft weaving and streaming through Panama City Beach.

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FRONT PORCHES The perfect place to sit back, relax and stay awhile.

DEPARTMENTS

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SJCR NEWS Dive In! St. Joe Club & Resorts plans for a new pool, expanded entrance and more.

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MEMBER PROFILE The Prices knew the price was right on their St. Joe home for many reasons.

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EVENTS The coast is blooming and booming bringing music festivals, spring soirees and entertainment for all.

IN EACH ISSUE 06 WELCOME LETTER 48 HOW TO BECOME A MEMBER 50 CONTACT DIRECTORY

ON THE COVER: CAMP CREEK DUNE LAKE AT SUNSET PHOTOGRAPHY BY KANSAS PITTS STUDIOS Publication Design, Production and Management

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WELCOME Dear St. Joe Club & Resorts Member, Benjamin Franklin once said that “without continual growth and progress, such words as improvement, achievement and success have no meaning.” As we continue to see growth in membership and participation in our events and social get-togethers, our commitment to the men, women and families who comprise the membership remains steadfast. Every decision we make reflects feedback from you and your fellow members of the St. Joe Club & Resorts family. One of the changes you’ll notice as you explore this magazine is an emphasis on great content and design, which is why we partnered with Rowland Publishing, Inc. to produce our publication. They are a regional leader in turnkey publishing and we are excited to have their team on board as we take this magazine to the next level. As we begin 2017, we reflect on our recent accomplishments as a team — from growing our membership to creating the new Signature Golf membership level and adding the Beach Boardwalk Bar at WaterSound Beach Club. We live in a true golfer’s paradise. Not only have we created a new golf membership option, we’ve upped our game at Shark’s Tooth by constructing a new facility at the turn near the 9th hole with snacks, cold beverages and restrooms. We will expand our golf offerings by introducing a Spring Member/Guest golf tournament in March at Camp Creek. This new event will be our fourth major tournament for the Clubs joining the Norman-Fazio Golf Classic, The Joe Cup and the SharkFest Member/Guest Golf Tournament. Thanks to the efforts of our golf and social advisory boards and materials created by our marketing team, we’ve seen welcome growth and participation in our golf tournaments and social gatherings. Did you know that the SharkFest tournament boasted 52 teams this year? That’s a dozen more teams than we’d had in any previous year. Congratulations to all involved!

As we continue to move forward and grow as an organization, we want you to be aware that we are consistently strategizing about how to improve and make lasting memories for our membership. The future is bright at St. Joe Club & Resorts and our team looks forward to providing our members with exceptional service and experiences. Please enjoy reading this issue and discovering all of the great events we have planned for you and your family this year. Sincerely,

MIKE JANSEN DIRECTOR OF CLUB OPERATIONS | ST. JOE CLUB & RESORTS

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nature’s

ALCHEMISTS

Bees turn nectar into gold

BY MARTHA J. LAGUARDIA-KOTITE | PHOTOGRAPHY SCOTT HOLSTEIN

IN BACKYARDS, fields and gardens from Destin to South Walton honeybees do it. Buzzing in and out of hives, colonies are tended by beekeepers who harvest gallons of their honey — unprocessed local gold. Blooms, pollen and nectar are most abundant between May and October, and it is then that worker bees produce the most honey — a healthy sweet, with antibacterial and allergy relief benefits. A colony can house 50,000 to 60,000 undeveloped females who do all the work to satisfy the queen, said Ken Holman, a Destin beekeeper. Only worker bees gather nectar and pollinate the flowers of many plants. A single bee makes less than a teaspoon of honey in its lifetime.

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Opposite Page, clockwise from top: (1) Beekeeper Artie Fortner tends to what he calls “a perfect society”; The

Honey Pot (2) owned by the Waits family and The Honey Hutch (3) operated by the Wrights (Amy Wright pictured here) are two of several family-owned businesses that keep bees to make and sell homemade candles (4), soaps lotions and even face scrubs in addition to locally harvested honey.


“They are a perfect society. That’s what impresses me most. There are no welfare recipients. They all work. They have to. Out of 10,000 bees there will only be maybe 200 drones, males, in the hive. By the end of summer they are booted out of town.” — Artie Fortner

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“It can take up to 300,000 to 700,000 trips to make a pound of honey,” said Holman, who started beekeeping in his backyard four years ago. His eight hives produce 60 to 100 pounds a week when “things are really blooming. That means honey and (a little) money.” For hobbyists, there’s not much dough in making honey. “I can make enough to pay for my gas,” Holman said. Drawn to beekeeping after reading about colony collapses — bees dying — and learning about their importance as pollinators for

our food supply, Holman decided to make honey a hobby when he was semi-retired. Raised in DeFuniak Springs, he served in the U.S. Navy for 53 months during the Vietnam War. He married and worked as a construction worker in the Santa Rosa Beach area until the couple moved to Destin in 1978. Holman, a member of the Florida Beekeepers Association, harvests 200 gallons of honey a year between the peak producing spring season and the fall, when production tapers off for the winter. The

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Department of Agriculture inspects his bottling and harvesting annually. “Bees are considered agriculture, protected and inspected just like any other livestock,” he said. Customers are locals. They stop by his home on Mountain Drive to pick up a jar. “It’s an honor system — some of my customers can’t afford it. They can take (a honey jar) because they have kids who have allergies — the honey helps keep the swelling down.” Others leave cash for the 24- or 48-ounce glass jars of wildflower honey. Local beekeepers are fond of each other and people interested in their trade. “Beekeepers are not in competition with each other,” said Peter Wright, owner of The Ships Chandler, a marine supply company in Destin. He has a bookshelf of honey for sale there. Wright, who is friends with Holman, learned about taking care of bees from his father. His daughter, Amy Wright, 28, took over the family beekeeping hobby and turned it into a business, The Honey Hutch, in May 2013. The Honey Hutch produces local wildflower, red clover and Gallberry honey from 50 hives in the Destin area. Their tupelo honey comes from a beekeeper in Apalachicola. In a week, Wright can harvest 25 gallons of honey, which is then distributed to stores and restaurants. She makes honey butter, too. “Bees make three times more honey than they need to survive,” said Amy Wright. “I definitely take pride in our wildflower. It’s dark and rich.” Honey is medicinal and healing, explained Wright. While visiting her father during his recovery from openheart surgery at the University of Alabama at Birmingham Health System, she discovered the hospital used honey for wound care. This news inspired her to take the family hobby and turn it into a business. “Honey is antibacterial, helps heal a wound or burn and has many benefits for allergies, too. There are so many cool things about honey.” The Honey Hutch offers honey for purchase online, at farmer’s markets and the Destin Seafood Festival. “Bees making honey is such a beautiful process,” said Wright. “To me it’s the cycle of life.” The Honey Pot also opened up shop in

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Above: A colony can house 50,000 to 60,000 worker bees, undeveloped females who do all the work to satisfy the queen; Below: Maggie Roberts sells their “gold” harvested by Mac McFarland under the name Mermaid Maggie’s at a few shops and restaurants such as Dewey Destin’s on Highway 98.

May of 2013 in Destin. Run by father and son, Jerry and Jared Waits, the store offers jars of honey and its Bee Renewed line of honey-based soaps, candles and lotion products made while customers watch. The Honey Pot also offers a bee removal service for bees that swarm unwelcomed into yards or businesses. In the spring, colonies tend to swarm or congregate on a tree limb or side of a

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building due to overcrowding. Swarming is a natural way of creating new colonies and part of the reproductive cycle. “You have to try to prevent them from swarming,” said Artie Fortner, a backyard beekeeper. “If they do, you have to hunt them down and take care of the 10,000 bees all in one wad — bigger than a basketball.” Getting the bees back into the main hive box with the queen can include delicately sucking worker bees down with a slowspeed vacuum cleaner. “The best thing to do is put a double white sheet on the ground right under them with a couple sticks dipped in honey,” said Fortner. “Cut the tree branches below them so they can make a clear fall into the bed. Put a rope around the limb and jerk on the rope. When they fall down in the hive box, the ones not in the box will march right in there like soldiers in the army.” Fortner’s first encounter with bees captured his imagination. When he was a 20-year-old carpenter, he cut down an oak tree with a hollowed base. “There was a huge beehive in the bottom of it. I robbed their honey,” he said. Although covered in angry bees, he was not intimidated. Note: This article first appeared in the February/March 2014 issue of Emerald Coast Magazine. It was updated for this issue of Experience Magazine.


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Member News

NEW POOL

HIGHLIGHTS PLANNED IMPROVEMENT 12

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THE BEACH CLUB has become a favorite place for our members and their families and a great reflection on the WaterSound community. Its success stems from the enthusiastic support of the members, and its future will have a lot to do with the valuable recommendations that members have made for its improvement. We are committed to continuously making the facility better. To that end, we have carefully listened to and embraced your suggestions and now have exciting planned developments to share. Rest assured, 2017 will be an exceptional year at the St. Joe Club & Resorts. The most dramatic plan on the imme-

diate horizon is a proposed new pool and deck slated for the Beach Club. The rendering on this page will help you picture that plan. The idea is to double both the existing pool and surrounding deck. New landscaping will be installed and poolside furniture will be replaced. Other planned improvements include a new, expanded gate at our 30A entrance designed to provide a true measure of security. This is an important step in the right direction for us as a private club. It will be a significant improvement over the existing railroad-crossing style system, which does not prevent unauthorized people from entering the property.

From an operations standpoint, we are pleased to announce that we added 250 sets of beach chairs in 2016 to better accommodate our beach-loving guests. And, if you frequented the sand last year, we hope that you enjoyed, from the comfort of your chair, our beachside food and beverage service. We also introduced a new service bar and walk-up window, making it easier to grab something and go. The management and employees of the St. Joe Club & Resorts thank you for all that you do to make our club spectacular. Truly, it is the stuff of fabulous memories. More plans are in the works, so stay tuned.

These materials include an artist’s renderings of future improvements, amenities, facilities, and features at WaterSound Beach Club. The rendering is based on current development plans, which are subject to change without notice. Actual development may not be as currently proposed. No guarantee is made that the future improvements, amenities, facilities and features at WaterSound Beach Club depicted by artists’ renderings or described herein will be built or, if built, will be of the same type, size or nature as depicted or described. Use of the WaterSound Beach Club may be subject to payment of use fees, membership requirements, or other limitations.

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SEACREST Wolf Preserve Get your howl on at a unique wildlife sanctuary BY HANNAH BURKE | PHOTOGRAPHY BY SCOTT HOLSTEIN

ENVELOPED BY the bountiful woodlands of The Oaks Farm is the Seacrest Wolf Preserve near Chipley. Just less than an hour’s drive north of Panama City Beach, the secluded forest stretches over 430 acres that are home to wolves, foxes, raccoons and other furry residents.This wildlife sanctuary is dotted with ponds and replete with lush subtropical vegetation that lines the scenic nature trails. This winter, visitors will have the rare opportunity to participate in interactive walking tours of the preserve. Guided expeditions will immerse guests in the world of wolves as they traverse the wolves’ habitat and witness firsthand their way of living. Preserve personnel will educate tour-goers about all of the animals they meet. For most who take part, those encounters will be a first-in-a-lifetime event. The experience takes visitors on a hike through large, natural habitats that are home to gray, Arctic and British Columbian wolves. “The visitors become part of the pack,” enthuses preserve owner Cynthia Watkins. “The fall and winter seasons are excellent times to visit the preserve. Visitors enjoy the beautiful fall foliage in November and the gorgeous full blown winter coats of the wolves December through February.” A guest-favorite moment of the tour is joining the wolves in “the great howl” and visiting the creatures’ dens. There, visitors are welcome to join the denizens in a photo session with one of the photographers that Seacrest has on-site. Guests may purchase photos of their choice at the conclusion of the tour. All proceeds will go to the maintenance of the preserve’s wildlife habitat. After photos have been taken and the wolf tour ends, visitors young and old yelp with excitement during up close and personal encounters with Seacrest’s gray, silver and Arctic foxes.

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“The visitors become part of the pack ... The fall and winter seasons are excellent times to visit the preserve. Visitors enjoy the beautiful fall foliage in November and the gorgeous full blown winter coats of the wolves December through February.” Visitors literally rub noses with the breathtakingly gorgeous and curious animals, who often are joined by more familiar skunks and raccoons. Guided tours are held on Saturdays at 1 p.m. and last around 4 hours, with tour groups numbering approximately 50 to 100 people at a time. The preserve also offers VIP and special group tours on weekdays at select times. Appropriate dress is important. Fur or faux fur coats and hats or leather and suede shoes are not to be worn around the habitat’s residents. Pants, long-sleeved shirts and comfortable, closed-toed walking shoes are best suited for the trek through the nature trails of the preserve. Lunchtime concessions and rest areas are available to those who want to make a day out of their visit to Seacrest. Choose among a variety of souvenirs at the preserve’s gift shop to commemorate your visit, and consider becoming a sponsor of one of the animals you encountered during your stay. The Seacrest Wolf Preserve was founded in 1999 and is the largest nonprofit wolf preserve in the Southeastern United States. In addition to providing a refuge for each inhabitant, the preserve strives to inform its visitors of the importance of wildlife and habitat conservation. “Our mission is to educate the public about the natural world and its relationship to all living entities on planet Earth, with special focus on wolves and other wild species of North America,” Watkins said. “Our goal is to promote conservation and

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preservation of America’s wild species and wild lands through education based on science.” Specifically, Seacrest endeavors to make visitors aware of the significance of each species’ contribution to the ecosystem it inhabits. Visitors will leave substantially more knowledgeable about wolves and the stunning section of Florida they occupy. To obtain more information on the preserve, book your tour or find out what

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you can do to help Seacrest’s mission, please visit Seacrestwolfpreserve.org. Note: This article first appeared in the Winter 2015 issue of the Panama City Beach Guide. It was updated for this issue of Experience Magazine.

Founded in 1999, the Seacrest Wolf Preserve provides for extraordinary interaction between visitors and canine predators while emphasizing the importance of wildlife and habitat conservation.


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FOURTH OF JULY 2016 WATERSOUND BEACH CLUB

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happenings

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NORMAN-FAZIO

GOLF TOURNAMENT 2016

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JULY 30–AUG 1 1. Tommy Cooley (guest) and member George Covellis; 2. Members Trey Howell and Barry Greer; 3. Tracy Peel (guest), Rhonda Manous (guest) and members DeAnna Woods and Sydney Dunning;

4. Greg Gaston (guest) with members Tim Wailbanks, Dennis Mooney, Robert Valls and guest;

5. Members Kathy Parke, Gerry Lee, Kevin Parke 4

and Gillian Lee

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Reef MADNESS

Team effort brings sealife close to Walton County shore BY THOMAS J. MONIGAN PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHANDLER WILLIAMS/MODUS PHOTOGRAPHY

CONVERTING AN INSPIRED concept into reality can often be a daunting task, but that hasn’t stopped Andy McAlexander and the South Walton Artificial Reef Association. “Definitely unique,” is how Alex Fogg describes the SWARAcreated snorkel reef that was planted just off Grayton Beach in July 2015. “It’s one of those things, you have to see it to believe it and understand it.” Which is something Fogg is paid to do as part of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. And as such, his job is to help SWARA execute the plan McAlexander and his board created in 2013 for three more snorkel reefs, to be followed by nine nearshore reefs and two offshore reefs. “All the sites are major public accesses that the Walton County Tourist Development Council maintains and are of the highest use,” McAlexander said. “And we also did our very best to evenly distribute the locations across the 26-mile wide county. Our hope is that through the use and exploration of the reefs by residents and visitors, we’ll create an awareness of how unique that environment is and that we ought to take steps to preserve it.” As the owner of the Mac Farms produce business and a local Realtor who enjoys diving as a hobby, McAlexander was attending a Restore Act conference that was addressing the aftermath of the 2010 BP Oil Spill. And the idea was born. “I started thinking about if there was something I could create for Walton County that would have a positive impact for the

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Above: SWARA’s artificial reefs, located within swimming distance of shore, attract species like this green sea turtle not often seen so close to the beach. Reef structures rise to within 10 feet of the surface; Here and right: Aerial studies of fish can be conducted due in part to the presence of artificial reefs. The reefs bring research opportunities and enjoyment to residents.

community as well as the environment,” McAlexander said. “Something that had a net return for everyone — what would that be? Since Walton County does not have a pass into the Gulf of Mexico, I thought of creating a near-shore reef system because most of our visitors enjoy paddleboarding and kayaking. So if we could give them something to do that has an environmental impact, without needing a boat and motor to get there, that would be special. And it’s taken off from there.” SWARA board member Bill Horn spent 22 years as a marine fisheries biologist with the FWC Artificial Reef Program. “I’ve always wanted artificial reefs off of Walton County,” Horn said. “My family’s owned a place in Seagrove Beach since the 1950s. Locals know what our tourists probably don’t. There are no natural reefs until you get out to 100 feet deep, so there’s no place for reef fish and reef critters. What we’re doing will bring a whole different suite of fish that wouldn’t have been in that area, like snapper, grouper, butterflyfish and damsel fish. From large fish that people like to catch to tiny little fish that are just pretty to watch and enjoy.” The impact of the first reef was immediate, according to McAlexander, Horn and Fogg.

“Within hours, there were fish swarming around it,” McAlexander said. “And we’ve seen in subsequent dives that it’s alive. We’ve had documented sightings of fish not usually seen that close to the coast, plus green turtles, tunicates (similar to sponges) and all kinds of barnacle growth.” Cost of the first project was just short of $190,000, including a $150,000 grant from the Walton County Tourist Development Council. Future costs would run between $200,000 and $250,000 per project. Thanks to help from Matt Trammell and Taylor Engineering in Destin, all the necessary permits have been secured. And SWARA is working with Fogg and the FWC to obtain some of the $1.2 million Walton County is receiving as part of BP money known as Early Restoration Phase Three Funds from the Natural Resource Damage Assessment Program. “It’s been a team effort,” McAlexander said, his face lighting up with a big smile. “I’m very proud that our community and our government have embraced the reef program, and hopefully we will all reap the benefits of it for decades to come.” Note: This article first appeared in the October/November 2016 issue of Emerald Coast Magazine. It was updated for this issue of Experience Magazine.

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Ladies

SUMMERTIME SOIREE

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Meredith Hamilton, modeling a beautiful dress from Lizard Thicket.


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JULY, 7 1. Amy Giles and Sylvia Holler; 2. Member, Wendy Khan (center) with her guests; 3. Member,

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Debbie Taylor (center) with her daughter, Christi Sheffield (left) and Member Misty Smathers (right); 4. Jamie Gummere, Owner of Blush Beauty Lounge sharing makeup tips with members.; 5. Carrie Jansen, designer and owner of Carrie Rhea Designs, showing off her wide range of versatile accessories; 6. Roasted chicken pesto kabobs prepared by Shark’s Tooth Executive Chef, Christopher Waycuilis

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shell ISLAND

The best way to find fun is to lose track of time BY ZANDRA WOLFGRAM

SO, YOU ARE going to be stranded on a deserted island. What three things do you bring with you? If you are lucky enough to spend the day on Shell Island in Panama City Beach, the three most important things to bring are your family, a camera … and your sense of adventure! There is still an amazingly pristine, uninhabited island just waiting to be explored. Shell Island is a barrier island — a 7-mile stretch of undeveloped land nestled between the Gulf of Mexico and St. Andrews Bay. So if you are seeking a beach experience that will help you to reconnect with Mother Nature, this is the place for you. Here the Sunshine State is at its best — and most natural.

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Shell Island has something to offer everyone in the family. When my family of four ventured out for our first visit, it definitely offered something for all of us. I was in heaven doing my best impression of a sun-seeking, lounge-chair lizard and communing with nature. I tuned my ear in to the call of the seagulls and the crash of the waves, while my husband, son and daughter found their own personal adventures. “Fantastic fishing” was all that my husband had needed to hear to clear his schedule for the trip. He spent the day wading in and out of the surf, trying to lure the likes of red fish and whiting to his line. Though he dug up quite a few plump

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“sand fleas” to use as bait, his fish dinner still managed to elude him … this time. My son didn’t spend much time on land. He grabbed his snorkel gear, jumped in the surf and headed for the jetties. He bobbed along just below the surface, pausing only long enough to take a deep breath before diving back down to explore the sandy depths. He spotted rockfish, hogfish hiding under rocks, hermit crabs scuttling on the sandy floor and found nestled in a weed line, a very special first-time discovery: a baby seahorse. As for my daughter, she was content with a day of shelling and returned with sandy pockets loaded with free tokens from the sea and a sun-kissed nose. The


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highlight of her day? The impromptu dolphin show, just offshore. In this fast-paced world, it’s nice to know there is a place where time does seem to stand still … if you let it. We loved being “stranded” on Shell Island. In losing ourselves to the day, we found lasting memories that are true treasures — much like the coastal keepsakes for which the island is named.

Some days, water, sun and sand — and perhaps a deer or two — might be your only companions on this barrier island off Panama City Beach.

What you’ll find Shell Island lives up to its name. Sand dollars, moon snails, conch shells, pin shells, periwinkles, whelk and olive shells are just a few of the indigenous seashells found here. And as long as there are no creatures living in them, there is no limit to how many of these one-of-a-kind souvenirs you can take home with you. This unassuming island is only about three-quarters of a mile wide at its widest point and stretches seven miles from east to west. The western end is part of St. Andrews State Park and the eastern portion is the property of Tyndall Air Force Base. In its history, the island has been home to Native American settlements, seen the arrival of Spanish explorers and, very likely, hosted a few pirates! It even had a cameo appearance on the Silver Screen. Tim McCanlies’ 2003 coming-of-age film, “Secondhand Lions,” starring Michael Cane and Robert Duvall, features a scene with two horses racing along the Shell Island beach — although in the film, the beach is supposed to represent the shores of the Mediterranean Sea. From shore, the island can look like a mirage, but Shell Island’s abundant natural bounty is very real. Here, miles of undulating sugar-white sand dunes dotted with swaying sea oats, scrappy scrubs, towering pine hammocks and a serene coastal lake are a haven for hundreds of species of plants and wildlife. All kinds of critters — from docile deer, nesting shorebirds and elusive ghost crabs to a host of endangered coastal creatures such as Choctawhatchee beach mice — call Shell Island home. Sea turtles, however, are probably the most special of the island’s inhabitants. There are two kinds, both of which are endangered. The majestic loggerhead can grow up to 1,000 pounds. The graceful turtle’s shell is normally reddish brown, and its skin is a mottled caramel color. Turtle nesting season is from May to

October, but it’s important to be mindful throughout the year of markers that note nesting sites. During nesting season, these magnificent animals emerge from the surf at night to lay their eggs in nests dug into the dry sand, then return to the sea. The hatchlings are on their own to scuttle their way to the safety of the surf. How to get there Getting to Shell Island is part of the adventure, and there are several fun options to choose from: The Shell Island Shuttle, operated out of St. Andrews State Park, is the most convenient and affordable way to go. In season (spring and summer), the shuttle runs daily, on the half-hour, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. In the fall, it runs on the hour, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. There is no shuttle in the late fall and winter. Adults fares are $18.95,

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Bay Point Marina

A Hub for Water Sports and Activities Positioned on Bay County’s Grand Lagoon in close proximity to Shell Island and the pass that connects St. Andrew Bay with the Gulf of Mexico is a picturesque boater’s paradise — the Bay Point Marina — whose location, amenities and staff set it apart as the best marina in Northwest Florida. Tucked out of harm’s way, the sheltered 180-slip full-service marina offers worldclass facilities and services and provides the perfect jumping-off point for inshore and offshore fishing trips and pleasure cruises. You don’t have to own a boat to enjoy the myriad activities that originate at the marina, including snorkeling and sailing charters in addition to fishing. The marina hosts an invitational Red Snapper Tournament each year during the federal season for that prized species. Boating enthusiasts will be delighted to find that the marina offers an exhaustive list of services including: • Transient, monthly and annual docking facilities with cable television, water and 50/250 or 30/125 volt shore power connections • Yacht care services, including boat cleaning and professional maid service • Radio-dispatched marina attendants • Competitively priced diesel fuel from twin high-speed pumps • State-of-the-art weather information service featuring online Doppler Weather Radar • Emergency repair services • Luxury pool overlooking the bay and marina • CLEAN restrooms and showers, with laundry facilities • Dockside morning newspaper delivery • Holding tank pump-out service • Wi-Fi internet service Contact the Bay Point Marina at (850) 235-6911 or find out more about it by visiting baypointmarina.net. St. Joe Club & Resort members receive discounts at the marina; membership cards are required to receive discounts.

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children 12 and under are $9.95 and infants 2 and under ride free. Although you should plan on bringing what you need with you, if you visit between Memorial Day and Labor Day, the shuttle offers beach accessories and snacks for sale when you buy your tickets. If you want to make a party of it, you can pile up to 10 members of your family and friends into a pontoon boat and enjoy the island at your leisure. Just be sure the boat driver is at least 21 years old. There are several excursion outfits that offer boat rentals, but the most convenient is in St. Andrews State Park. If you want to ramp up your adventure by snorkeling or kayaking around the island, sign up for a tour package, the fee for which covers all of the equipment you’ll need as well as the roundtrip ferry service. If you do decide to captain your own “ship,” you can sail, swim, dive, snorkel and fish. And, as luck will have it, Panama City Beach has some of the best fishing along the entire Gulf Coast. You can cast a line from the shore or right from the back of your charter or pontoon boat. Getting a fishing license is easy. You can purchase it from sporting goods stores or online (myfwc.com/license) and by phone (888-FISH-FLORIDA). An annual saltwater fishing license is only $17. If you reserve a fishing charter, the license fee is typically included in the price. Fishing is for the patient, but it rewards the prepared. Selecting the appropriate equipment for the type of fish you are trying to catch, as well as the best flies, lures and bait, could mean the difference between catching dinner and

telling a story over dinner about the one that got away. If you have a boat, or a rented one, you can simply motor over, drop anchor just offshore and come and go to the island as you please. Shell Island is big on nature and low on commercial trappings: You won’t find concession stands, restroom facilities, picnic pavilions or trash receptacles. So, when you come, be prepared and plan to bring containers or bags so that you can take out everything you brought in. What to know before you go • You must be 21+ to rent a pontoon boat • You can bring a paddleboard to paddle around the island, but it’s not recommended to try to paddle to the island • No facilities available on the island • Anglers are required to possess a Florida fishing license • Please plan to leave the island the way you found it: pristine Fun in the sun forget-me-nots • Towels • Cooler or picnic basket • Snorkel gear • Fishing gear • Camera Sunscreen • Beach chairs and umbrella Note: This story and its images originally appeared in the Spring 2015 edition of Visit Panama City Beach Magazine. Reprinted with the permission of the Panama City Beach Convention & Visitor’s Bureau. It was updated for this issue of Experience Magazine.


Located on Scenic Hwy 30A WaterSoundWestBeach.com

L I V E W I T H N AT U R E !

Located on the waters of West Bay and Crooked Creek in Bay County RiverCampsFlorida.com

The St Joe Company 2016 All Rights Reserved. “JOE®”, “St. Joe®”, “St. Joe (and the Taking Flight design)®”, the “Taking Flight” design®, “WaterSoundSM”, the “WaterSound (and boat design)SM” and “RiverCamps SM” are registered service marks of The St Joe Company or its affiliates. The materials, and features and amenities described and depicted above are based upon current development plans, which are subject to change without notice. This does not constitute an offer to sell WaterSoundSM or RiverCamps SM real property in any jurisdiction where prior registration or other advance qualifications of real property is required, including, New York. Void where prohibited by law. Equal Housing Opportunity. The St Joe Company does not guarantee the obligations of, nor provide any warranties for, homes built by unaffiliated parties who build homes or offer services in the WaterSoundSM or RiverCamps SM community.

Obtain the Property Report required by Federal law and read it before signing anything. No federal agency has judged the merits or value, if any of this property.

JOE CLUB EXPERIENCE

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STARS in the SKIES

Military aircraft dot 30A’s skyscape

THE SOUND OF FREEDOM rings loud and clear in Panama City Beach: It’s the sound of military aircraft soaring overhead. There are two main sources of military flight activity in the area: the Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City Division and Tyndall Air Force Base. Both of these installations train service personnel, practice maneuvers and conduct research missions. According to Jeffrey Prather, Public Affairs Officer with the Naval Surface Warfare Center, most sky watchers in the area will notice the Navy’s MH-60S Seahawk helicopter for the Dragonmasters squadron that supports airborne mine countermeasures and search and rescue missions. This past spring, these helicopters were used for testing missions aboard the USS Independence.

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EXPERIENCE MAGAZINE

PHOTO COURTESY U.S. AIR FORCE

BY TISHA KELLER


feature

PHOTO COURTESY U.S. AIR FORCE

F-22 Raptor out of Tyndall Air Force base over the Emerald Coast

Thomas Bonifay, the civilian Chief of Community Engagement at Tyndall AFB, said the U.S. Air Force uses several aircraft in the Panama City area. Major stars in the skies are the F-22 Raptor, F-35 Lightning II and T-38 Talon. The F-22 Raptor and the F-35 Lightning II are the Air Force’s newest fighter aircrafts. Considered “Fifth-Generation Fighters,” the Raptor and Lightning II perform both air-to-air and air-to-ground missions to support ground missions of the Air Force, Army, Navy and Marine Corps. These fighters are highly regarded as the most state-of-the-art aircraft in the sky today. The T-38 Talon is a twin-engine, high-altitude, supersonic jet trainer used in a variety of roles because of its design, easy maintenance, high performance and exceptional safety record. USAF Air Education and Training Command uses the T-38C to prepare pilots in the 95th Fighter Squadron for front-line fighter and bomber aircraft such as the F-15E Strike Eagle, F15C Eagle, F-16 Fighting Falcon, B-1B Lancer, A-10 Thunderbolt and F-22 Raptor. Other aircraft in the USAF arsenal at Tyndall include the E-9 Widget, which is a twin turboprop plane used to clear the Gulf

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feature

of Mexico of civilian boaters and aircraft before live missile launches and other dangerous activity. The BQM-167 Subscale Aerial Target is a missile-like drone aircraft that provides lifelike targets for the Air Force Weapon System Evaluation Program. The remotecontrolled drone is land-launched using a rocket-assisted takeoff and launched from a rail system. The craft can be recovered by a parachute and repaired, tested and reused. The Air Force also uses the MU-2, a small turboprop aircraft that gives student pilots their first taste of controlling a plane at the beginning of flight school. The MU-2s and the nine retired military pilots that fly them at Tyndall Air Force Base provide direct flying support for the 325th Air Control Squadron’s Air Battle Management course. Now that you know a little bit more about the military aircraft that inhabit the airspace over Panama City Beach, we hope you’ll have an appreciation for the highly trained military personnel who pilot these craft and keep them maintained. Until next time … keep watching the skies!

PHOTO COURTESY U.S. AIR FORCE

Above: A formation of 325th Fighter Wing F-15 Eagles and an F/A-22 Raptor fly over Panama City Beach. The Raptor is scheduled to replace the F-15 Eagle in the Air Force inventory; Right: A crew steadies and lowers a BQM-167 sub-scale drone following a recovery demonstration; an MH-60 helicopter ferries cargo.

OUR SPECIALTY IS WATERFRONT LIVING AND ALL THAT THE GULF COAST HAS TO OFFER Vacation Homes | Primary Residences | Investment Properties

WILL PALMER

Broker/Owner St. Joe community homeowner since 2005

5365 E. Scenic Highway 30A Suite 105, Santa Rosa Beach 850.687.9988 Search the MLS at coastfla.com 30

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PHOTO COURTESY U.S. AIR FORCE

PHOTO COURTESY U.S. NAVY

Note: This story originally appeared in the Winter 2015 edition of Visit Panama City Beach Magazine. Reprinted with the permission of the Panama City Beach Convention & Visitor’s Bureau. It was updated for this issue of Experience Magazine.

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SHARKFEST

TOURNAMENT 2016

OCT 6-8 2016 Champions Danny Parrett and Kevin Opdahl

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happenings

FROSTY FROLIC HOLIDAY PARTY 2016

DEC 16

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feature

The Beauty & Tradition of

‘THE FRONT PORCH’ Cool and friendly porches offer the best seats in the house BY KAREN MOORE | PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF THE STATE ARCHIVES OF FLORIDA

FOR MANY SOUTHERNERS, the “front room” is the place for end-of-theday discussion, for stolen first kisses and reflecting on days gone by. In Tallahassee, the tradition continues in many neighborhoods. Nobody, it seems, wants to get out of the swing and go indoors. The bits of conversation one hears on a front porch are undoubtedly repeated across the South; everything from religion to politics to grandchildren is fair game for a frontporch conversation. Beautiful weather offers the perfect opportunity to enjoy a few serene moments on the porch. For many, this brings back a variety of nostalgic thoughts — vignettes of summer in the South. “Relaxing on the porch is really a Southern thing,” said Pete Piper, a longtime business owner in Tallahassee who now serves on the advisory board for the Tallahassee Senior Center Foundation. “My grandmother in Pennsylvania had a large front porch, but no one sat on it. On the other hand, my other grandmother’s porch in Virginia was where the family congregated before dinner each night. It was nice

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and cool. Everyone would relax and cool off from the day before going in to eat. “That porch was the center of activity for the neighborhood,” Piper said, fondly. “It was screened in, with a rocking chair, a glider and an old sofa. I remember the best feeling was to snuggle up with a book on that old sofa.” According to Piper, that front porch held a special place in the hearts of both young and old. “The porch was the home base for us as kids,’’ he said. “You might decide to go swimming or play tennis, but you would always meet back on the porch. … All of the kids in the neighborhood would congregate on the front porch and drink iced tea.” He laughs and adds, “And you didn’t dare do anything wrong while on the porch, because our parents or neighbors could hear or see you. However, you could plot and plan things on the porch!” For the adults, he says, the porch was also a social place. “Our porch was the place for the family and friends to congregate and talk. You could have friends over, but you didn’t

EXPERIENCE MAGAZINE

have to fluff the pillows or clean the room before anyone sat down. It was just comfortable.” The traditional Southern front porch first gained great popularity in America during the mid-19th century. Andrew Jackson Downing, a noted architect of the time, seized upon the idea of the British veranda and transplanted it to the United States. Many old farmhouses were “updated” to include porches, and almost every new home was built with a porch. The Southern porch serves a number of purposes — emotional, functional and social. As Kevin McGorty, Land Conservancy Director of the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy, said, “Porches are both aesthetic and practical. They provide a cool breeze to help in the hot, humid weather of Southern summers. … Hunting-plantation owners and tenants alike used the porch to cool off in the summer.” McGorty noted three beautiful examples of porch architecture in Tallahassee: the Brokaw-McDougall House on North Meridian, the Gladstone of Tallahassee


The traditional Southern front porch first gained great popularity in America during the mid-19th century. Andrew Jackson Downing, a noted architect of the time, seized upon the idea of the British verandah and transplanted it to the United States.

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Previous: Kate Byrd, Elizabeth Byrd (left to right, both standing) Rubie Byrd and Janet Byrd (left to right, both sitting) share time on a porch swing; Above: Porches remained popular through the latter half of the 20th century, as evidenced by these photos.

Previous generations tell many stories of budding romance on front-porch gliders. The best part of the porch, they say with sly smiles, is that it’s far enough from the rest of the house to provide a little privacy, but close enough to the house to make certain there’s not too much privacy. (formerly known as the White House) on North Monroe and the Knott House on East Park Avenue, where General McCook read the Emancipation Proclamation to the citizens of the Tallahassee area. Although most porch events are not quite as earth-shattering, today’s porches are still vital parts of Tallahasseeans’ lives. “Porches are an extension of the living area … (and they) expand the house,” McGorty said. “They’re also very social. They let people see what their neighbors are doing!” Porches also have a way of attracting those same friends and neighbors. Flecia Braswell, a fifth-generation resident of Tallahassee and a founding board member of the Community Foundation of North Florida, is a faithful fan of “porching.” “I’d never have a house without a porch,” she said. “When (my late husband and I) bought our house, it didn’t have a porch, but it did have a carport. I knew I could make that carport into a porch. We put

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up latticework around the sides and put down indoor/outdoor carpet. We got white wicker furniture and lots of plants, flowers and rabbits — it now has the feel of a real Southern porch.” The indoor/outdoor nature of the porch opens a whole new category of furnishings. The “front room” requires furnishings that are attractive, yet durable enough to stand up to scorching heat and drenching humidity. White wicker furniture and plants and flowers, of course, are all essential traditional porch items. Rocking chairs are also favorites, as are pieces of folding canvas furniture. The ultimate in front-porch furniture, however, is probably the porch swing or “glider,” as many people call them. Previous generations tell many stories of budding romance on front-porch gliders. The best part of the porch, they say with sly smiles, is that it’s far enough from the rest of the house to provide a little privacy, but close enough to the house to make certain

EXPERIENCE MAGAZINE

there’s not too much privacy. Functionally, porches are also quite effective in warding off the summer heat. A well-designed porch keeps sunshine away from lower-floor windows and reduces the heat that reaches the home’s interior during the summer. In the winter, the sun’s rays are lower-angled and are permitted to enter ground-floor windows, thus helping to heat the house. Porches also provide an indoor/outdoor area that enables people and pets to catch even the slightest cooling summer breeze in the warm twilight hours and still be sheltered from summer rain showers. All kinds of events — large weddings, small arguments, touching silent declarations of affection between family members — seem more real on the front porch. Like precious few other things, sitting on the porch is an equal-opportunity activity. And in most places in the South, when people are sitting on the porch, it’s almost impolite not to speak to them. Piper said he regrets what he sees as the diminishing popularity of the porch. “I think the demise of the front porch came about because of two things — air conditioning and people no longer talking to each other in the neighborhood. When was the last time you talked to your neighbors? People used to sit on the porch and watch the activities in their neighborhood. It was ‘crime watch’ before it was fashionable.” Note: This article first appeared in the September/October 1994 issue of Tallahassee Magazine. It was updated for this issue of Experience Magazine.


We have over 16 years of trusted experience building custom homes along Scenic Highway 30A and throughout South Walton.

2014 | 2015 | 2016 BEST CONSTRUCTION BUILDER | CONTRACTOR

chimarconstruction.com | 850-527-9054 CBC 1251639

BEST BUILDER/CONTRACTOR 2015 | 2016

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member profile

The Beer is Flowing

&

LifeisGood BY MATT ALGARIN PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY GRAYTON BEER COMPANY

AT THE AGE OF 22, Jamey Price was bitten by the entrepreneurial bug. The Mississippi native had earned an accounting degree at Ole Miss, but he knew somehow that he was not destined for a life of crunching numbers. “I knew I wanted to be independent,” he recalls. Price, who moved to South Walton from Nashville with his wife, Candace, in 2006, did spend time working in accounting and software for four years, but the career was short-lived. He opened Grayton Beer Company in 2010.

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A brewery wasn’t the goal, necessarily. While Price and his buddies were working office jobs, they came up with a long list of businesses they could operate, from limo services to grocery markets. “It was always a fascinating concept for me to go out there and try to figure out what to do,” the Rosemary Beach resident said. At one point, Price thought about a career in real estate, but the consideration was fleeting. “In deep, dark days when everybody around us was filing bankruptcy, we knew real estate might not be the answer,” he recalls. “We sat in our courtyard and we talked about our passions and what would make sense. It was like the ‘a-ha’ moment when we realized we could incorporate our passion into a business.” A lover of travel, Price has worn out a few passports. His fondness for food, wine, beer and spirits has taken him all over the world. “I know beer, love beer and have a passion for it,” Price said. “But would all of the travel, all of that love for food and everything we liked translate into products the market would like?” As a numbers guy, Price calculated that only about 3 percent of beer drinkers in the Southeast consumed the products of small craft breweries. The other 97 percent were drinking imports and familiar domestics such as Budweiser, Coors Light and Miller Lite. So, Price was deliberate about determining what Grayton Beer Company’s first product should be and reasoned that it shouldn’t be too exotic. “How do we ensure long-term viability?” he said. “When you have such a small percentage in the Southeast drinking craft beers, we knew we didn’t want to come out and

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make some tremendously hoppy double IPA (India Pale Ale) as our introductory beer.” So, Beach Blonde Ale was born. It remains Grayton Beer Company’s most popular brew. Today, the brewery’s product line is made up of six year-round beers: Beach Blonde Ale; 1890 Founder’s Ale; the Belgian-inspired White Dunes; Pale Ale; Fish Whistle IPA; and the Salt of the Gulf, a Leipzig-style gose. Four Artist Series beers — the Redneck Rye-Viera; the Franklin County Stout; the Handful of Thorns; and the Gordgeous — will soon be joined by two Barrel-Aged brews: Treble Hook, a Belgian-style Tripel Ale aged in Krutz Family Cellars chardonnay barrels, and Dubbel Barrel, a Belgian Dubbel aged on Belle Meade Bourbon barrels. With a brewery running day in and day

out, Price keeps busy. But that doesn’t mean there’s no time to relax and enjoy the Emerald Coast lifestyle. For Price, that means teeing it up at Shark’s Tooth and Camp Creek. As a member of St. Joe Club & Resorts, Price and his family take advantage of the area’s best golf, as well as the Beach Club at WaterSound Beach Club and many other amenities. “I told my wife, I’ll only move here if I can have membership to play at the area’s top courses,” Price recalls. “I’m a gambler by nature, which is why I love golf. If there is nothing on the line, even if it’s just buying a drink at the end of the round, it’s hard for me to get out there.” With an 8-year-old, a 5-year-old and 3-year-old, Price doesn’t hit the links as often as he used to. He finds that membership with St. Joe Club & Resorts helps him maximize the opportunities he does have to spend time with his wife and children. For Price, life is good. Standing behind the bar in the Grayton Beer Company’s taproom, Price said he has no desire to retire anytime soon. He plans not only to build a generational business for his family, but to give back to the community that has given so much to him. “We are just a small sliver of what makes this community great,” he said. “Everything you see right now was dust. It was just a conversation in our courtyard and now it’s this. That’s really cool to me.”

Top: Grayton Beer Companies’ Beach Permit Blond being canned for wider distribution; Above: Jamey Price worked in accounting and software when he and wife Candace moved to South Walton in 2006, but he found himself thirsting for entrepreneurship. Since 2010, his Grayton Beer Company — and his family — have been growing.

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New Phase Under Construction HOMES FROM THE MID 400’S ON US 98 ACROSS FROM C A MP CREEK G OLF CLUB

1.866.563.0070 Watersound.com The Watersound Company, LLC, a subsidiary of The St. Joe Company 2016 All Rights Reserved. “JOE®”, “St. Joe®”, “St. Joe (and the Taking Flight design)®”, the “Taking Flight” design®, “Fish Out of Water®” and “Watercolor®”are registered service marks of The St. Joe Company or its affiliates. “Watersound Origins SM”, “Origins SM” and “St. Joe Club & Resorts SM” are service marks of The St. Joe Company or its affiliates. The materials and features and amenities described and depicted herein are based upon current development plans, which are subject to change without notice. This does not constitute an offer to sell real property in any jurisdiction where prior registration or other advance qualifications of real property is required, including New York. Void where prohibited by law. Equal Housing Opportunity. St. Joe Club & Resorts is a private club, membership in which permits Watersound Origins SM owners the use of facilities designated by the Club. Use of additional Club Facilities requires purchase of a separate membership upgrade. Club membership may be subject to application and acceptance, payment of fees, membership requirements, rules or other limitations, all of which are subject to change. Club Facilities are also available to other club members and persons who stay in rental program residences. The St. Joe Company does not guarantee the obligations of, nor provide any warranties for unaffiliated parties who build homes or offer services in the Watersound Origins SM community.

Obtain the Property Report required by Federal Law and read it before signing anything. No federal agency has judged the merits or value, if any, of this property.


upcoming EVENTS

March 23–25

MEN’S INVITATIONAL MEMBER-GUEST TOURNAMENT Camp Creek Golf Course

Mark your calendars and invite your friends to the exciting Men’s Member-Guest Tournament at Camp Creek! The format will be players as two-man best-ball match play, and teams will be flighted by combined handicap. Each team will play from 5 nine-hole matches; flight winners will play in a shootout to determine the overall champion. Registration begins Jan. 1, and the deadline is March 1. Members and Guests Welcome | Registration Required: 850.231.7601

May 13

LADIES’ MEMBER-GUEST TOURNAMENT 9 a.m. | Camp Creek Golf Course

Come to Camp Creek Golf Club for the first inaugural Ladies’ Member-Guest Golf Tournament. Ladies and their guests will enjoy a two-person best-ball format. Each team will take the lowest net score on each hole to determine the champion. All pairings of the teams will be done by the tournament committee. Many prizes will be awarded! Registration begins on Mar. 1; the deadline for sign-up is May 5. Members and Guests Welcome | Registration Required: 850.231.7601

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heavpepnetns i n g s

JANUARY

Feb. 17–19

Jan. 6

Signature Event at Hilton Sandestin Beach Resort, Miramar Beach | Event Times Vary winewomenandshoes.com/sinfonia

FIRST FRIDAY FEAST – CARIBBEAN NIGHT 5:30–8 p.m. | Shark’s Tooth Golf Club

WINE, WOMEN & SHOES

Jan. 13 & 27

MARCH mar. 2

SHORT GAME SCHOOL

10 a.m.–12 p.m. | Shark’s Tooth Golf Club

FIRST FRIDAY FEAST – ITALIAN

6–8 p.m. | Shark’s Tooth Golf Club

FRIDAY NIGHT SOCIAL

4–7 p.m. | Shark’s Tooth Golf Club

mar. 3–5

TRIVIA NIGHT

EMERALD COAST BOAT & LIFESTYLE SHOW

FEBRUARY

mar. 3–5

Feb. 2–5, 9–12, 16–19

15TH ANNUAL SEASIDE SCHOOL HALF MARATHON

Jan. 20

Mar. 3 & 4: 10 a.m.–6 p.m.; March 5: 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Aaron Bessant Park, Panama City Beach gulfboatshow.com

5:30–8 p.m. | Shark’s Tooth Golf Club

BAKERSFIELD MIST presented by Emerald Coast Theatre Company

Half Marathon: 7 a.m.; 5K: 7:25 a.m. | Seaside runseasidefl.com

7:30 p.m.; Sunday Matinee at 2:00 p.m. 55560 Grand Boulevard, Miramar Beach emeraldcoasttheatre.org

feb. 3

FIRST FRIDAY FEAST – SOUTHERN COMFORT 5:30–8 p.m. | Shark’s Tooth Golf Club

Feb. 4

DOUBLE BRIDGE RUN

6:30 a.m. | Maritime Park, Pensacola pensacolasports.org/doublebridgerun

feb. 5

SUPERBOWL PARTY

5:30–9 p.m | Shark’s Tooth Golf Club

feb. 10 & 17

FRIDAY NIGHT SOCIAL

4–7 p.m. | Shark’s Tooth Golf Club

feb. 14

VALENTINE’S DINNER

5:30–8 p.m. | Shark’s Tooth Golf Club

VALENTINE’S DAY DINNER

5:30–10 p.m | Havana Beach Bar & Grill Rosemary Beach

Feb. 16

mar. 4–5

FEB 24

LE TOUR DE TOOTH 6:30 p.m. | Shark’s Tooth Golf Club

Fri., 4 p.m.; Sat., Noon–4 p.m. The Village of Baytowne Wharf, Miramar Beach sandestingumbofestival.com

mar. 8

MEMBER STAG DAY

11:30 a.m. Lunch | Camp Creek Golf Club

Mar. 10, 17 & 24

FRIDAY NIGHT SOCIAL

4–7 p.m. | Shark’s Tooth Golf Club

mar. 9–12

Club Members and Resort Guests Welcome Reservations Required: 850.249.3015

mar. 11–12

5–7 p.m. | Gulf Place, Santa Rosa Beach

28TH ANNUAL SANDESTIN GUMBO FESTIVAL

Pensacola Interstate Fairgrounds, Pensacola gcrf.us

Embark on a journey through the most famed regions of France while sampling iconic wines paired with exceptional cuisine created by Chef Christopher Waycuilis. Backpack thru Cognac and Bordeaux; make your way to Provence and the Rhone Valley; take the train to Burgundy and Chablis; voyage down the River Seine and sip champagne by the Eiffel Tower on your way to the coast of the Calvados.

GULF PLACE WINE WALKABOUT Feb. 17–18

GULF COAST RENAISSANCE FAIRE

Feb. 24–25

PANAMA CITY BEACH MARDI GRAS & MUSIC FESTIVAL

All Day | Pier Park, Panama City Beach visitpanamacitybeach.com/mardigras

6TH ANNUAL 30A WINE FESTIVAL

Alys Beach | Seminars: 1–3:30 p.m.; Grand Tasting: 3:30–7 p.m | 850.213.5500 30awinefestival.com

mar. 11

EMERALD COAST CHILDREN’S ADVOCACY CENTER GALA

5:30 p.m. | Hilton Sandestin Beach Golf Resort & Spa Miramar Beach | eccacw.org

GULF BREEZE CELEBRATES THE ARTS FESTIVAL

9 a.m.–5 p.m | Gulf Breeze High School Parking Lot, Gulf Breeze gulfbreezearts.com

mar. 17

MEMBER MEET & GREET

5–7 p.m. | Shark’s Tooth Golf Club

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mar. 18

Apr. 13–17

DEMO DAY/TWO-MAN BEST BALL EVENT

ANNUAL GOLF SHOP EASTER EGG SALE

mar. 18

apr. 14

AW SHUCKS! OYSTER EXTRAVAGANZA

GOOD FRIDAY FISH FRY

9 a.m–1 p.m. | Shark’s Tooth Golf Club

5 a.m.–8 p.m. | Havana Beach Rooftop Lounge Cabanas and Deck, Rosemary Beach thepearlrb.com

April 6

LADIES’ SPRING SOIREE

mar. 24

11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Shark’s Tooth Golf Club

mar. 31

5:30–8 p.m.; Mar. 25, 10 a.m.–2 p.m. | 560 Grand Boulevard, Miramar Beach kintera.org

mar. 24–25

UNwineD: VINES TO STEINS

Aaron Bessant Park, Panama City Beach unwinedpcb.com

Members, including Origins, and Members’ Guests Welcome | Reservations Required: 850.249.3015

Shark’s Tooth Golf Club

apr. 16

EASTER BRUNCH CELEBRATION

PURSES WITH A PURPOSE

Ladies, bring your girlfriends to the Club for a day of fashion, glamour and fun. Hors d’oeuvres and sparkling wine will be served (gratis), and a full bar will be available. Reservations for this special, girls-only event will end on Apr. 3.

Shark’s Tooth Golf Club

NINE & DINE COUPLES GOLF EVENT 4:30 p.m. Cocktails, 5 p.m. Shotgun Origins Golf Course

10 a.m., 12:30 p.m. Seatings | Shark’s Tooth Golf Club

apr. 19–23

SEABREEZE JAZZ FESTIVAL

Pier Park, Panama City Beach | 877.987.6487 seabreezejazzfestival.com

Apr. 27–29

MEN’S JOE CUP MEMBER/MEMBER TOURNAMENT

Shark’s Tooth Golf Club & Camp Creek Golf Club

MAY may 5

FIRST FRIDAY FEAST – CINCO DE MAYO FIESTA

APRIL

5:30–8 p.m. | Shark’s Tooth Golf Club

apr. 7

May 10

FIRST FRIDAY FEAST – GULF COAST SEAFOOD

MEMBER STAG DAY

5:30–8:00 p.m. | Shark’s Tooth Golf Club

11 p.m. | Shark’s Tooth Golf Club

GET MORE ON ST. JOE CLUB EVENTS ONLINE AT: stjoeclub.com/events April 16

EASTER BRUNCH CELEBRATION 10 a.m., 12:30 p.m. Seatings | Shark’s Tooth Golf Club Join friends and family at Shark’s Tooth for a scrumptious Easter brunch. Whether you’re a fan of the sweet or the savory, you’ll relish chomping down on the palate-pleasing fare. Club Members and Resort Guests Welcome | Reservations Required: 850.249.3015

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heavpepnetns i n g s

ongoing EVENTS

MEMBER MONDAY Mondays, JANUARY–DECEMBER

RED, WHITE & BREWS

Every Monday, members enjoy 50% off of the Shark’s Tooth Clubhouse dinner entrée. So go ahead — order drinks, an appetizer and a dessert, too! Your tummy and your pocketbook will thank you. Reservations are required. Call 850.249.3015 for more information.

5:30-8:30 p.m. | Shark’s Tooth Golf Club

SUNDAY FUNDAY BRUNCH

june 30

Celebrate America’s birthday early! This family-friendly gathering offers a variety of the Sunshine State’s finest craft beers, all paired with pub-style fare that will wow your taste buds. There will be live entertainment, corn hole games and children’s activities available. Members & Resort Guests | Reservations Required: 850.249.3015 May 14

Jun. 6-9

MOTHER’S DAY BRUNCH

JUNIOR GOLF CAMP WITH DAVID HANSON

10 a.m.–1 p.m. | Shark’s Tooth Golf Club

MOTHER’S DAY BRUNCH

10 a.m.–1 p.m. | WaterSound Beach Club

9 a.m. | Camp Creek Golf Club

Jun. 9

COUPLES NINE & DINE

5:30 p.m. | Shark’s Tooth Golf Club

May 27–28

MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND WaterSound Beach Club

May 28

MEMORIAL DAY GOLF EVENT

9 a.m. | Shark’s Tooth Golf Club

Jun. 18–23

FATHER’S DAY CELEBRATION

6 p.m. | WaterSound Beach Club

Jun. 20–23

JUNIOR GOLF CAMP WITH DAVID HANSON 9 a.m. | Camp Creek Golf Club

JUNE Jun. 2

FIRST FRIDAY FEAST – BARBECUE

Jun. 27–30

JUNIOR GOLF CAMP WITH DAVID HANSON 9 a.m. | Camp Creek Golf Club

5:30–8 p.m. | WaterSound Origins

Jun. 2–3

ST. JOE CLUB & RESORTS CLUB CHAMPIONSHIP Shark’s Tooth Golf Club

Jun. 30–Jul. 4

ANNUAL GOLF SHOP BALLOON SALE Shark’s Tooth Golf Club and Camp Creek Golf Club

SUNDAYS, SEASONALLY

Fabulous food, delightful drinks, the company of friends. This is what Sunday brunch was meant to be, and it’s exactly what you’ll find each Sunday at Shark’s Tooth! Members are welcome to bring accompanied guests. Reservations are required. Call 850.249.3015 for more information.

WIND DOWN WEDNESDAY Wednesdays, MARCH 8–MAY 3

Live entertainment, one of the best views on 30A, 50% off select wines, draft beer and culinary delights. If this sounds like you’re definition of mid-week relaxation, then head to WaterSound Beach Club’s Sunset Bar or Poolside Patio on Wednesday evenings. Members are welcome to bring accompanied guests. Reservations are not accepted. Call 850.534.2500 for more information.

BEACH BONFIRE Fridays, MARCH 10–APRIL 28

Celebrate the end of every week by donning your flip-flops on Friday nights and joining friends and neighbors for a bonfire at WaterSound Beach Club. Enjoy live music and come hungry, because hot dogs, s’mores and beverages will be available for purchase. Members are welcome to bring accompanied guests. Call 850.534.2500 for more information.

EXPERIENCE MAGAZINE

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mother/daughter owners Debbie Taylor & Christi Sheffield

award-winning artists coastal-inspired jewelry uplifting books creative gifts On Highway 30A in WaterColor bluegiraffe30a | BlueGiraffe30A.com

Your 30A Mortgage Lender

Walton Funding is a mortgage lender established to meet the needs of borrowers in the South Walton marketplace and surrounding areas. WaltonFunding.com | ktucker@waltonfunding.com | 850.608.3029 12805 US Highway 98 E Suite E201 | NMLS #1198715

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EXPERIENCE MAGAZINEX


three times

the brands. ThreeTimes

the shopping. SHOP . DINE . PLAY . STAY

Welcome to new, fresh style that’s GRAND. Anthropologie, Lilly Pulitzer and Vineyard Vines are what you’re looking for to enhance your sense of style and Grand Boulevard is the place to find them.

N OW OPE N

O PE N I N G S U M M E R 2017

Our exclusive retailers and restaurants include... Altar’d State Another Broken Egg Café Billabong Brooks Brothers

Cantina Laredo Mexican Gourmet Chico’s fab’rik Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse & Wine Bar Grand Fitness Grimaldi’s Pizzeria

J. Crew-at-the-beach J. Jill J. McLaughlin L’OCCITANE Mitchell’s Fish Market The Orvis Company P.F. Chang’s China Bistro Starbucks Coffeehouse

GRAND BOULEVARD | 850.837.3099 | 495 GRAND BOULEVARD, SUITE 220 MIRAMAR BEACH | FLORIDA 32550 | GRANDBOULEVARD.COM

Tommy Bahama Restaurant, Bar & Store

...and many more! #GrandBlvdFL

Don’t forget to catch the latest blockbuster at Boulevard 10!

A HOWARD GROUP | MERCHANTS RETAIL PARTNERS DEVELOPMENT EXPERIENCE MAGAZINE

SPRING/SUMMER 2017

47


membership

St. Joe Club & Resorts Member HOW TO BECOME A

Lifestyle Membership

Experience all-inclusive, unlimited golf at Camp Creek Golf Club, Shark’s Tooth Golf Club and Origins, as well as Member access to the WaterSound Beach Club. You’ll enjoy fitness facilities, tennis and other unique Member events throughout the year. There are a variety of dining options with a Member-only discount for food and beverage. Not to mention an extensive list of outdoor amenities the whole family will enjoy!

Signature Golf Membership

If golf is your passion, a Signature Golf Membership is the perfect match for you. You’ll enjoy endless rounds of golf at any of the St. Joe Clubs including Shark’s Tooth, Camp Creek and Origins Golf Clubs. To join today or for more information about each Membership, please call 850.213.5181 or send an email to memberships@stjoeclub.com.

*Information in this Membership section provides a summary of the St. Joe Club & Resorts membership program. As this information is only summary in nature, you should read the Membership Plan and Rules and Regulations for a complete understanding regarding Membership rights and privileges. Membership privileges and benefits are subject to change from time to time.

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information

St. Joe Club & Resorts Member

PHONE DIRECTORY CONTACTS

REHEARSAL DINNERS/WEDDINGS/MEETINGS

ST. JOE CLUB & RESORTS® Mike Jansen, Director of Club Operations.............................. 850.249.3045 Carly Sostheim, Director of Membership................................ 850.213.5182 Carolyn Webre, Director of Club Events & Member Relations...............................................................850.213.5179 Leigh Vandeven, Membership Coordinator .............................850.213.5181 Leanne Strickland, Membership Marketing Coordinator......... 850.213.5183 Jan Kramer, Membership Accounting ....................................850.641.0009

CAMP CREEK® GOLF CLUB Golf Shop................................................................................ 850.231.7601 19th Hole Grille.......................................................................850.231.7603 Jaxon Hardy, Director of Golf..................................................850.231.7602

SHARK’S TOOTH GOLF CLUB Golf Shop................................................................................850.249.3041 Grille/Lounge/Reservations.....................................................850.249.3015 Curtis Brooks, Club Manager................................................. 850.249.3048 Christopher Waycuilis, Executive Chef....................................850.249.3011 Mike Pazakis, Head Golf Professional.................................... 850.249.3046 Lee Moran, Assistant Golf Professional...................................850.249.3017

WATERSOUND® BEACH CLUB WaterSound Beach Club ........................................................ 850.534.2500 Club Manager ........................................................................850.534.2078 Brad Dees, Executive Chef .....................................................850.534.2076

WATERSOUND ORIGINS® GOLF CLUB AND CAFÉ Golf Shop................................................................................850.213.5090 Watersound Cafe.....................................................................850.213.5093 Rick Ayers, Club Manager.......................................................850.213.5094 WaterSound Origins Real Estate.............................................850.213.5092 WaterColor Bike Barn.............................................................850.534.5959 WaterColor BoatHouse (Canoe/Kayaks/SUPs).......................850.419.6188 Fish Out of Water Restaurant..................................................850.534.5050 The Gathering Spot................................................................850.534.5025 WaterColor InnSpa.................................................................850.534.5010 WaterColor Workout Facility...................................................850.534.5950

THE PEARL HOTEL Havana Beach Bar & Grill ..................................................... 850.588.2882 Havana Beach Rooftop Lounge ............................................. 850.588.2882 Spa Pearl................................................................................ 850.460.9041

SPRING/SUMMER 2017

CONCIERGE Concierge Service................................................................... 850.534.5008

SERVICES DINING Camp Creek 19th Hole Grille..................................................850.231.7603 Fish Out of Water...................................................................850.534.5050 Havana Beach Bar & Grill...................................................... 850.588.2882 Havana Rooftop Lounge......................................................... 850.588.2882 Shark’s Tooth Clubhouse.........................................................850.249.3015 The Gathering Spot................................................................850.534.5025 WaterSound Beach Club......................................................... 850.534.2500

WATERSOUND ORIGINS Café.........................................................................................850.213.5093

RELAX WaterColor InnSpa.................................................................850.534.5010 Spa Pearl.................................................................................850.588.2881

GOLF Camp Creek Golf Club............................................................ 850.231.7601 Shark’s Tooth Golf Club..........................................................850.249.3041 Origins Golf Club....................................................................850.213.5090

OUTDOOR

WATERCOLOR® INN

50

WaterColor Inn....................................................................... 850.231.7773 WaterSound Beach Club.......................................................... 850.231.7773 Shark’s Tooth Golf Club.......................................................... 850.231.7773 Watersound Origins................................................................ 850.231.7773 The Pearl Hotel......................................................................850.460.9040

EXPERIENCE MAGAZINE

Bay Point Marina.................................................................... 850.235.6911 WaterColor BoatHouse...........................................................850.419.6188

ACTIVITIES WaterColor Workout Facility...................................................850.534.5950 WaterColor Bike Barn.............................................................850.534.5959 Pontoon Boat Rentals.............................................................. 850.235.6911

GET MORE ST. JOE CLUB INFORMATION AT: stjoeclub.com


On Highway 98, Anchoring The East End of 30A.

NOW LEASING EXECUTIVE OFFICES, RETAIL, RESTAURANT & EVENT SPACE, 850-231-1127. DINE

AMICI 30A ITALIAN KITCHEN, BARBACOA MEXICAN GRILL, CUVEE 30A, FRESHII, GREAT AMERICAN COOKIES, MARBLE SLAB CREAMERY, OUTPOST, ROSELIE DINING & SEAFOOD BAR SHOP

30A OLIVE OIL, DESIGN, LOVE2RUN, OTIUM, OUTPOST, SHADES SUNGLASSES & CASUAL APPAREL, SHAE’S RUNWAY, SHIMMERING SEAS, V.LALA GALLERIES, WILLOW + MERCER SERVICES

30A MEDICAL SPA, 30A SMILES, 30A VENUE, A BOHEME DESIGN, CORR GROUP, CUVEE CATERING, DESIGN SERVICES, TICON TITLE, NISHAD KAHN P.L., SCENIC SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY, WALTON FUNDING 12805 US Highway 98 East, Inlet Beach, Florida 32461

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