Issuu on Google+

JUNE 2013 NO 18


Contents 5.

STREET STYLE Some of our STITCH’s favorite looks around campus

7.

PLEASURES A few of STITCH’s favorite (dream) items

9.

FEATURE “MyStyleLit.com” by Alyssa Keller and Kelly Gonsalves

11 . FEATURE “Behind the Band” by Ben Dorfman 19. COVER SHOOT “They Were... Careless People” by Brian Chen


33. SHOOT “Catch Me If You Can” by Ina Yang 35. SHOOT “Signature Kiss” by Alaura Hernandez 37. 41.

2DO Album Review by Arabella Watters; Movie Review by Kate Geraghty; Music Review by Brenton Howland LAST WORD “All Hail Queen B” by Helen Zook


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

“Schoooool’s out for summerrrr…schoooool’s out foreverrr” As in the wise and catchy words of Alice Cooper, school is finally coming to an end and with this exciting time also comes many changes for every NU student out there. The same can be said for STITCH staffers and readers. As talented and fashionable (so we like to think!) staff members, we’ve dedicated ourselves to providing you, the reader, with relevant content that you care about. Yeah, articles about high fashion and fashion shows are interesting and can serve a purpose, but how does that help you as a Northwestern student know how to outfit yourself at Dillo Day? That’s our goal. Becoming your resource on all fashion related questions as well as bringing to light the intersecting aspects of fashion, culture, and Chicago! So welcome to STITCH’s June installment, centered around music and with its eye on the welcoming summer that awaits us. Yes, most of us are probably going to spend hours a day working at that oh-so-coveted internship, but work doesn’t have to envelop all our carefree summer days. With new releases from Vampire Weekend and (finally) The Great Gatsby movie, there are plenty of ways to pass the days and nights. And thanks to new staffer, Ben Dorfman, you’ll be getting an inside look at Northwestern’s music scene this issue. So get out your headphones, because after reading through this issue, you’re gonna have a lot to listen up on.

3| STITCH


STITCH Editor-In-Chief Alex Adeli Creative Director Nick Arcos Senior Editor Rosana Lai Photography Editor Alaura Hernandez Design Editor Rosalind Mowitt Co-Directors of PhotoShoots Samantha Brody & Carly Shapiro PHOTOSHOOTS Carly Shapiro STAff photographers Dan Hoffman, Alaura Hernandez, Christine Chang, Gina Drutz, Jalissa Gomez, Lily Allen, Marina Vernovsky Assistant Editor-Online Rachel Nussbaum Assistant Editor-PRINT Cathaleen Qiao Chen DESIGN Andrea Kang, Cree Han, Jen White, McKenzie Maxson, Arielle Miller, KK Rebecca Lai MULTIMEDIA Gemma Folari, Rachel Jones STAFF WRITERS Arielle Miller, Amy Xu, Arabella Watters, Ben Dorfman, Beth Glaser, Brenton Howland, Delia Privitera, Helen Zook, Alex Adeli, Jessica Arnold, Kate Geraghty, Kelly Gonsalves, Lakin Davis, Lily Cohen, Lily Orlan, Vicky Castro, Rebecca Liron Director of Public Relations Chelsea Ferguson Public Relations Diana Armancanqui, Grace Jaworski, Adele Kuforiji Treasurer Sonali Dasgupta Director of Fundraising and Advertising Sydney Lindsey Fundraising Rebecca Liron, Sonali Dasgupta, Sydney Lindsay Advertising Rebecca Liron, Sonali Dasgupta, Clarke Humphrey

STITCH |4


Alyssa Raiola 2016 | Cognitive Science

Brittany Parks 2013 | HDPS

Will Rice 2014 | Economics 5| STITCH

Elizabeth Wigley 2015 | Theatre

Sam Faycurry 2016 | Economics & Computer Science

Hannah Brock 2016 | Learning & Organizational Change

Vasiliki Valkanas

2015 | Comm. Studies

Erin Anderson 2015 | Undecided

STR

STY


Michelle Moses 2014 | Medill

Marine Coste 2016 | Biology

REET

YLE

Kelsey Cottingham 2015| Comm. Studies and Psychology

Jane Ko 2015 | Psychology

Alex Sayde 2014 | History

Megan McDowell 2016 | History

Kate Camarata 2016 | Piano Performance and English

Taylor Losi 2016 | Math & Economics STITCH |6


PLEASURES

DESERT ESSENCE TEA TREE OIL, $8.49, DRUGSTORE.COM

SSENSE CHEETAH SCOOPBACK SWIMSUIT, $290, SSENSE.COM

SEPHORA INSTANT AIRBRUSH FOUNDATION, $20, SEPHORA.COM

HAIM, FALLING - EP, $3.36, ITUNES

SEX & THE CITY: THE COMPLETE COLLECTION (DELUXE EDITION), $123.51, AMAZON.COM

7| STITCH


DEEPA GURNANI LIGHT GOLD PEARLIZED HEADBAND, $65, SHOPBOP.COM

LISA MARIE FERNANDEZ TERRY BIKINI, $295, NET-A-PORTER.COM

NARS VELVET MATTE LIP PENCIL IN DAMNED, $25, SEPHORA.COM

MARC BY MARC JACOBS IPHONE CASE, $48, NORDSTROM.COM

VALENTINO ROCKSTUD SLINGBACKS, $895, FORWARDFORWARD.COM

STITCH |8


MyStylit.Com BY: ALYSSA KELLER AND KELLY GONSALVES

Online shopping gives fashionistas access to literally thousands more options than their local shopping mall. Most online shoppers, however, don’t have the time to explore new sites and sort through hundreds of items, especially when there is no guarantee that they will find anything they like. Founded only a year ago (will confirm this), MyStylit.com seeks to revolutionize this time-consuming and often frustrating process of online shopping. 9| STITCH

Combining personal customer preferences with expert stylist advice, MyStylit helps find and transfer looks you love offline and into your closet.

How it works: After completing a short questionnaire, MyStylit.com sends you weekly outfits that match your style preferences, size, and budget. The outfits,


however, are not simply selected via computer-generated algorithms, but by actual professional stylists. Love an outfit? Purchasing it is easy. You simply select the individual items you like and can view it in its online store.

Comments from MyStylit.com: Maya Kramer, mystylit.com Co-Founder and Chief Stylist: MyStylit started from a closet full of clothes with “nothing to wear.” We all could use a personal stylist and MyStylit offers just that: the opportunity to have a personal stylist for free! With so many items online today, it is almost impossible to find the things you like, to mix and match them and to not have a computer breakdown from all the open tabs. Our style experts create weekly themed outfits based on your style, size and budget making shopping online a whole lot easier. The more you use our system and rate your outfits, the more personalized it becomes. And let’s face it, everyone loves the luxury of a personal stylist!

S T I T C H Opinions: Living in Evanston without a car, my shopping experience is limited to American Apparel, Urban Outfitters and the occasional great find at Crossroads. After 3 years of shopping at the same three places, my closet and I are bored. I now resort to online shopping. However, being a busy Northwestern student, I don’t have the time to scour the web and search through hundreds of items. MyStylit eases this process of online shopping and keeps my inner fashionista fresh by suggesting trendy outfits I would normall miss. Because their selections match my body type, style, and budget, I don’t waste endless hours online, at least, not on shopping. The only downside to MyStylit, however, is that I can’t get enough. Only providing two outfit suggestions per week, MyStylit often leaves me wanting more, especially if one of the suggested outfits isn’t my favorite. Additionally, if you’re a guy this service has not yet been tailored for you. MyStylit is targeted specifically at female users, although creating outfit suggestions for males is on MyStylit’s list of things-to-do. STITCH |10


Behind

t h e Band Written by Ben Dorfman; Photos by Aluara Hernandez With recent hype around the Battle of the Bands competition, Senior Ben Dorfman wanted more. He recently caught up with Nebula and Kites & Swans, two of Northwestern's hottest student bands. Here's a excerpt from his interview with them.

NEBULA It’s clear that the boys of Nebula — senior Evan Bakker, junior Stuart Babcock and sophomore Jake Besen — all come from different college niches and posses different personalities. Their music reflects this as well, blending indie rock guitar, ska drums and punk bass. Yet the boys are able to blend these genres into catchy songs that remain true to all of their backgrounds. The result is a phenomenal wave of cohesive musical energy, as proven by their rollicking success at the Dance Marathon. I sat down with the band to discuss the DM show, their musical background and inspiration and burgeoning love lives. What was your performance at Dance Marathon like? Stuart: Dance Marathon was so much fun. We were all kinda worried about

11| STITCH

it…we’re playing for…1000 people [who] had been dancing for twenty-four hours. We did “Everybody Talks” by the Neon Trees, “The Middle” by Jimmy Eat World, and “Semi-Charmed Life” by Third Eye Blind” and worked in some of our own stuff. By mixing stuff that people [are] nostalgic about and know really well with some original tunes we got an incredible response. It was just awesome all around. Jake: I also found it incredible that it was only the second show that we had ever played. Definitely the pinnacle…the biggest show that we had ever played. Evan: The show was definitely the best


that I’ve played. And I’ve played over 100 shows with bands. I remember I drank Zen green tea at Starbucks up at Norris. I went up to the cashier and said, look I’m about to play for a thousand students, can you give me the best tea you have? She gave me two bags of Zen green tea and a lot of honey and I drank that. And I remember being backstage and this guy with a headset was like you’re on in 15 seconds! And I just put down my tea and I look up and peak at the crowd and I realize how many people there are. And I’ll be honest I thought I was going to

throw up…from the sheer nervousness. I felt like everything came down to that moment. But once [I got] on stage the nerves died. The first thing I said when I got on stage was “what’s up Northwestern!” and everyone cheered. How has the reception been at Northwestern? Stuart: Dance Marathon was so much fun. We were all kinda worried about it…we’re playing for…1000 people [who] had been dancing for twenty-four hours. We did “Everybody Talks” by STITCH |12


the the Neon Trees, “The Middle” by Jimmy Eat World, and “Semi-Charmed Life” by Third Eye Blind” and worked in some of our own stuff. By mixing stuff that people [are] nostalgic about and know really well with some original tunes we got an incredible response. It was just awesome all around. Jake: I also found it incredible that it was only the second show that we had ever played. Definitely the pinnacle…the biggest show that we had ever played. Evan: The show was definitely the best that I’ve played. And I’ve played over 100 shows with bands. I remember I drank Zen green tea at Starbucks up at Norris. I went up to the cashier and said, look I’m about to play for a thousand students, can you give me the best tea you have? She gave me two bags of Zen green tea and a lot of honey and I drank that. And I remember being backstage and this guy with a headset was like you’re on in 15 seconds! And I just put down my tea and I look up and peak at the crowd and I realize how many people there are. And I’ll be honest I thought I was going to throw up…from the sheer nervousness. I felt like everything came down to that moment. But once [I got] on stage the nerves died. The first thing I said when I got on stage was “what’s up Northwestern!” and everyone cheered. How has the reception been at Northwestern? Stuart: I think in general there’s going to be a lot of people who say “Aw I really despise Nebula’s music. ” I also think people are excited that there’s a band on campus 13| STITCH

that’s

gigging…doing

interviews.

Evan: Photoshoots. Models. Jake: People have been overwhelmingly receptive. Evan: If anyone comes to our performances we engage the audience. We don’t just go up there and play… we try to have a conversation with the audience between songs. We’ll tell jokes between songs. Sometimes its toilet humor sometimes it’s bar humor. We fit the college mold really well. When was the point you knew you wanted to pursue music like this? Evan: For me it’s been a decades long project. Both my parents played in rock bands as well. When I was two years old, I’d be watching them in pretty big venues from the VIP box. I probably don’t remember it…my first show was when I was in my mother’s womb when she was pregnant with me. I’ve literally been immersed in music my whole life. But the point at which I decided to pursue rock music was when my parents bought me a guitar. My parents told me that I should get really good at songwriting because that’s what people identify with. So I started writing songs when I was twelve and it’s been ten years exactly since. It’s ingrained into my upbringing and wired into me. Jake: My older brother introduced me to all the bands I listened to all throughout high school…Blink 182, Green Day. …In ninth grade I started a band with my friends. I really liked jamming and improving. I missed


having that band experience when I came here. The second I met Evan, I [said] oh this guy plays guitar, [he’s a] pretty good singer. It made sense. Stuart: In sixth grade I got a two disc collection of The Best of Led Zeppelin from my dad for Christmas. It’s probably the best gift I’ve ever gotten because I put that on and I couldn’t believe what these guys were doing with music. Before that I enjoyed music but that really hit home for me and I knew that I…wanted to play in a band at that point. Around sophomore, junior year I decided I wanted to study music formally because I had been playing music since I was seven. So you guys are a pretty good catch huh? Are there any lovely ladies in your life.

(Laughter) Evan: At this point I do have a girlfriend. She’s awesome and that’s all I have to say about that. …Having played at the Dance Marathon you run into situations, not just with girls but with people in general. You say “oh yeah I played in the band” and they say “oh you’re that guy”. I hope that [Jake and Stuart] find the right person for them because I’m sure they have…opportunities now. Jake: my

Let me earlier

rephrase statement.

(Laughter) Evan: We all like girls. But I’m choosing to settle down for now...I can’t speak for these guys.

Evan: Oh God. Jake: Oh I gotta be political here. Nnnaw Yeah make it..Yeah Aw mmmm. Naw I’m single.

Stuart: I’m single. …We are just nice young gentlemen looking for a girl with a settlement…You can put that in. STITCH |14


KITES AND SWANS It was a beautiful day when I met Kite and Swans. Birds were chirping, the trees were bursting with green, flowers were singing. Kites and Swans turned out to be an excellent band to interview on such a day: their music is heavily influenced by nature, and part of their inspiration comes from being able to play outside and take their music anywhere. Kites and Swans, made up of senior Eric Johnson, juniors Stephen Rees and Stuart Babcock, and junior Bryce O’Tierney, who was not able to attend the interview, make indie-folk music that would appeal to any Iron and Wine or Mumford and Sons loving gal or guy. Their upbeat guitar, trilling mandolin, and intricate banjo get layered with powerful lyrical philosophy to produce a uniquely wonderful sound. What is your background in folk 15| STITCH

like? Stuart (who also happens to be in Nebula, incidentally): My folk background is a little bit different. All throughout high school Sufjan Stevens was a massive influence on me. But I really didn’t start playing folk music [until I started working] in New Mexico over the summer. There’s a huge oldtime folk scene out there with bluegrass and folk music from the turn of the century. That’s where I learned how to play banjo and that’s were I started playing folk music that translated to more poppy stuff. I come from a much older folk tradition in some sense. Eric: I think it’s a great blend of the old and the new. My great songwriting influences aren’t necessarily old time folk. When I write a song, it takes place in a different space and then when I bring it to the band it’s enriched with all this old time feel, which I love.


How did you guys decide on the name Kites and Swans? Eric: Kites and Swans is actually an early song that I wrote. It’s an Aesop’s Fable. The kite is [a type of] bird. The fable goes: once upon a time there were the kites and the swans and the swans were given the gift of singing. And the kites spent the whole time trying to learn how to sing because they were jealous of the swans. They forgot how to be a kite; their identity was…lost in the process. The story resonates [with the time] I started playing music, a time where I was finding out where I wanted to be and where music fits into that. [I tried] not to try to lose what is there. Speak about your lyrics; which are very important in indie folk music. Eric: Lyrics to me are very important. They are… at the core of the song. … Yet sometimes I can get so wrapped up in the music of it that there is a tension between what I am saying and what is being heard. I think I can be cryptic at times. I respect the meandering lyric where you are never really sure what it means but it resonates with you. What themes do you see keep on popping up in your lyrics. ? Eric: I would say that there are organic themes, nature etc. I become more or less aware of that at times. The style… draws that out of me. And I have always been a big fan of nature. Steven: He hangs out in yurts sometimes. Eric: That’s true. Spring break I spent in

Upper Peninsula, Michigan. In a yurt. How does Steven’s lyrical style resonate with you? Steven: I’m always amazed listening to Eric and the stuff that he’s writing and when it sinks in what he’s really saying… and how great some of the lyrics are: “And when you find yourself only then you’ll lose it, and when you lose yourself only then you’ll find it.” Stuart: Steve and I had to learn a chorus so we could sing harmonies on it. And it’s like, “Oh my gosh these lyrics are so incredible, I’ve never really listened to them before and now we know them.” It just makes the song that much more awesome. Stuart’s take on the band’s attractive qualities? We are sensitive, kind gentlemen.


June 2013 “They Were... Careless People”

photographed by Brian Chen

“Catch Me If You Can”

photographed by Ina Yang

“Signature Kiss”

photographed by Alaura Hernandez


photographed by: Brian Chen; starring: Iman Gulston, Sofia Troncoso, Amy Li, Shelbie Bostedt, Guanchen Liu, Javier Chapa, Kevin Kryah, and Gregory Rittiner; hair and makeup: Alaura Hernandez assisted by: Rebecca Liron and Adele Kuforiji


There was music from my neighbor’s house through the summer nights. In his blue gardens men and girls came and went like moths among the whisperings and the champagne and

the stars


what she’s wearing: Red Shock Wave Dress by Parker (Courtesy of Rent the Runway), Accessories and Shoes model’s and stylist’s own what he’s wearing: Model’s own clothes


And I like large parties “ - they’re so intimate. At small parties there isn’t any privacy. ”

what she’s wearing: Gossip Queen Dress by Mark& James by Badgley Mischka (Courtesy of Rent the Runway), Accessories and Shoes model’s and stylist’s own what he’s wearing: Model’s own clothes


what she’s wearing: Golden Leaf Teacup Dress by Radenroro (Courtesy of Rent the Runway), Accessories and Shoes model’s and stylist’s own what he’s wearing: Model’s own clothes


I hope she’ll be a fool that’s the best thing a girl can be in this world, a beautiful, little fool.


what she’s wearing: Red Shock Wave Dress by Parker (Courtesy of Rent the Runway), Accessories and Shoes model’s and stylist’s own

what she’s wearing: Accordion Tiers Dress by Erin by Erin Fetherston (Courtesy of Rent the Runway), Accessories and Shoes model’s and stylist’s own


“[Her voice] was full

of money that was the inexhaustible charm that rose and fell in it, the jingle of it, the cymbals’ song of it.


what he’s wearing: Model’s own clothes

what she’s wearing: Gossip Queen Dress by Mark& James by Badgley Mischka (Courtesy of Rent the Runway), Accessories and Shoes model’s and stylist’s own.


what she’s wearing: Golden Leaf Teacup Dress by Radenroro (Courtesy of Rent the Runway), Accessories and Shoes model’s and stylist’s own what he’s wearing: Model’s own clothes

“Ittwotakestoanmake accident.”


what she’s wearing: Golden Leaf Teacup Dress by Radenroro (Courtesy of Rent the Runway), Accessories and Shoes model’s and stylist’s own what he’s wearing: Model’s own clothes

“He knew that when he kissed this girl, and forever wed his unutterable visions to her

perishable breath, his mind

would never romp again like the mind of God.”


{

SHOOT PLAYLIST

}

“The Golden Age” by Asteroid Galaxy Tour “I Want You” by Rachael Yamagata “Wicked Games” by The Weeknd “Good Intent” by Kimbra “Love is the Drug” by Bryan Ferry

Do you always watch fo “year and then miss it? I

day in the ye


or the longest day of the always watch for the longest ear and then miss it.

what she’s wearing: Accordion Tiers Dress by Erin by Erin Fetherston (Courtesy of Rent the Runway), Accessories and Shoes model’s and stylist’s own


33| STITCH


CA N

ME CH

YO U

CAT ph

ot ma os by ke i up na y a by ca ng rly sh ap ir

o

IF

As Jaleel Reed and Natalie Lagunas demonstrate, working out with a friend is just a lot more fun! Wearing Nike clothing, Jaleel and Natalie stay cool and fashionable while they sweat. No better way to get ready for summer than to get moving! So get out and have fun!


Men’s Race Day 5” Running Shorts

Women’s Relay Running Capris, Women’s Adapt Indy Short Sports Bra

35| STITCH


Men’s Dri-Fit Touch Tailwind Short-Sleeve Running Shirt Men’s Race Day 5” Running Shorts Men’s Nike Lunarglide+ 5

ON HIM

Women’s Boxy Running Tank Top Women’s Adapt Indy Short Sports Bra Women’s Relay Running Capris Women’s Air Pegasus+ 30

ON HER

ON HER Women’s Dri-Fit Touch Breeze Running Tank Top Women’s Adapt Indy Short Sports Bra Women’s 4” Rival Stretch Woven Running Shorts Women’s Air Pegasus+ 30

ON HIM Men’s Dri-Fit Touch Tailwind Running Singlet Men’s 9-Inch SW Two-in-One Running Shorts Men’s Nike Lunarglide+ 5

STITCH |36


Men’s Dri-Fit Touch Tailwind Running Singlet Men’s 9-Inch SW Two-in-One Running Shorts Men’s Nike Lunarglide+ 5

Women’s Dri-Fit Touch Breeze Running Tank Top Women’s Adapt Indy Short Sports Bra Women’s 4” Rival Stretch Woven Running Shorts Women’s Air Pegasus+ 30

ON HIM

ON HER

37| STITCH

ON HIM

ON HER

Men’s Race Day 5” Running Shorts

Women’s Relay Running Capris, Women’s Adapt Indy Short Sports Bra


Men’s Dri-Fit Touch Tailwind Running Singlet Men’s 9-Inch SW Two-in-One Running Shorts Men’s Nike Lunarglide+ 5

Women’s Dri-Fit Touch Breeze Running Tank Top Women’s Adapt Indy Short Sports Bra Women’s 4” Rival Stretch Woven Running Shorts Women’s Air Pegasus+ 30

ON HIM

ON HER

STITCH |38


TO LISTEN

GROWING UP WITH

VAMPIRE WEEKEND BY: ARABELLA WATTERS

2

DO

Vampire Weekend will eternally remind me of high school. Maybe it’s because the release of their first selftitled album,Vampire Weekend coincided perfectly with the acquisition of my first car. My friends and I listened to “A-Punk” and its deliciously addictive thumping percussion and ambiguous chorus (“look outside the raincoats/red coats/records?” we may never know) on repeat. When Contra was released in 2010, I was a senior. I was in full-fledged college obsession mode and their siren song of New York City was too catchy to ignore —“Run” was my freedom anthem. And last week, I nearly jumped out of my chair when my friend forwarded me a bootlegged version of their new album, Modern Vampires of the City last week. That said, the new album presents a whole new Vampire Weekend, and I like it. Well, “new” might be an overstatement. But this album does have an entirely more epic sort of sound. It reminds me of the earlier work of The Strokes and a throwback to the good old days of Modest Mouse. Replacing the Afro-Caribbean influences, twangy percussion, and myriad of preppy New England college campus references is a more cohesive, grown up sound. Only with Vampire Weekend could I say that

51| STITCH

one noticeable difference is that the lyrics are just a little bit more coherent. The word play in “Diane Young” is one of my favorites on the album, poking fun at the influx of “yolo, we’re going to die young, live wild and free” lyrics that flooded the airwaves in the last few years — that and the drum line that makes it hard not to turn into the obnoxious toe-tapper with the headphones. This album is wholly more taut than its predecessors. “Ya Hey” specifically lingers with you, the hauntingly beautiful chorus, “through the fire and through the flames/you won’t even say your name/Only I am that I am,” far more nuanced than their previous work. On “Everlasting Arms” the band contemplates mortality, deeper waters than they’ve foraged into before. However, that’s not to say they’re any less fun. I like the way Vampire Weekend, now years out of Columbia University, have grown up just the way that I have. Their newfound maturity reflects in their music, which draws on the context of society, culture, and the now, giving them a signature that is refreshingly eclectic, never ordinary, and inherently modern. I still get nostalgic for high school whenever I hear the comfortable thrum of their percussion, but I have to say, growing up with Vampire Weekend isn’t really so bad.


BY: Kate Geraghty

The Great Gatsby is no fairytale, but no one seems to have let Baz Luhrmann know. Instead, He has created a world so unrealistic, you may find yourself forgetting that the novel was inspired by the real world at all. But you might not mind Lurhman’s artistic liberties even if you adore the novel, because it’s hard to be angry with him as the beautiful, vibrant scenes unfold. Sure, in afterthought, Daisy might have been too relatable or Isla Fisher might have been far too pretty to portray Myrtle, but Gatsby’s two-and-

castles, princes and a narrator who really has nothing to do with the actual plot of the story — he’s just a lens through which the audience sees the characters. Unfortunately, Tobey Maguire as Nick Caraway was probably the biggest disappointment of the film. Luhrmann’s characters are all larger than life, and Carey Mulligan and Leo DiCaprio make Daisy and Gatsby seem genuine, despite having to play the least genuine characters in the film. If anything, Maguire’s over the top acting makes the fantastical

TO WATCH

THE GREAT GATSBY

2

DO

a-half hours of magical cinematography compensates for these minor annoyances. In Gatsby, it’s impossible to forget you’re watching a movie, as everything in the film seems to serve as a reminder that the whole world is a figment of someone’s imagination, not only of Nick’s through his narration, but of Fitzgerald’s and Lurhmann’s as well. Embracing the lack of realism made the film so much more satisfying. From the very first moment Nick zooms in on the Buchanan household, your disbelief is suspended until the lights go on again. Instead, you can sit back and enjoy the ride, soaking in the beauty of the scenes without pessimistically thinking no one can live like this — that is the point, after all. As I’ve said, Gatsby is set as a fairytale, albeit a fairly dark one, complete with

setting less believable than DiCaprio’s incessant use of the phrase “old sport.” I assume there are two groups of people watching this movie — those who know how the novel ends, and those who do not. Since I’m of the first category, I can’t really speak to how the ending feels for people who are shocked by the final events. What I can say, however, is that I’ve never been in a theater so eerily quiet as the credits began to roll. Presumably, most people at the midnight showing knew how the movie would end, so the silence wasn’t out of surprise or emotion. I’d like to think it was out of satisfaction. By the time the last character left the frame, the film had established closure. I didn’t want another scene and I didn’t need to know what happened to Nick or any of the other characters; I was perfectly content.

STITCH |52


TO WATCH

2

DO

SUIT AND TIE BY: BRENTON HOWLAND

The Suit and Tie — what used to be an unassuming combination now stands out as a manifestation of music’s influence on modern style. How has this seemingly classic staple of men’s business clothing been transformed into a young trend sweeping through men’s fashion? Look no further than the man behind The 20/20 Experience. Not only has Justin Timberlake shattered records with his doubleplatinum album, selling 1.52 million copies in just a month, but he has also revived a contemporar y, sophisticated culture through his music that men cannot help but mimic. His new release certainly had a profound effect on my interpretation of sophistication and masculinity.When the album came out, I sat down with the intention to skim through it. Instead, I was captivated by what I would truly label an experience. Still, the music just scratches the surface of Timberlake’s influence. As his persona evolved from boy-band sensation to modern music’s leading male, he identifies not with frosted curls and denim jackets but with a young, Rat Pack fantasy that has

53| STITCH

taken the fashion industry by storm. Timberlake’s new fashion sense is inspired by the prominent style trends of the 40s, 50s and 60s, but with a modern twist on formal wear of the past. As a result, recent publications have been compelled to compare Justin to Hollywood icons of the past, such as Humphrey Bogart and Carey Grant. I would deem these comparisons unfair, as there’s something completely unique about his persona. Drafting the blueprint for the “Suit & Tie” look, Timberlake, with the help of designer Tom Ford, has crafted an image of Mad Men suavity with timeless suits, butterfly bow ties, Savile Row checks and spectator shoes. But quickly emerging as the most trendsetting aspect of it all, he has made this new image his own. Suave, sophisticated music figures like Timberlake and Jay-Z have reintroduced the affluential male archetype to the industry, imploring young new artists to do the same. Over the past few years, individual male artists have assumed this leading male paradigm, using fashion to infuse their own idiosyncrasies into popular culture.


Self-expression through fashion has distinguished the young careers of the contemporary crown princes of R&B—Frank Ocean and Miguel. As an icon who fearlessly breaks all the rules with grace and humility, Ocean inspires freedom, innovation, and ingenuity through his unique style and his disregard for heteronormative industry standards. What’s really special about Ocean’s image is that he has somehow managed to bypass what was previously the only two sartorial options for men in his line of music – typical hip hop bling, or faux preppy. He has created an alluring balance between sporty and smart in his clothing with a distinct ethnic twist. Ocean has a penchant for unusual or tribal prints and motifs on shirts and sweaters, but truly stamps his image with the brightly colored tie snugly wrapped around his head. Ocean, however, isn’t alone as a leading innovator in the R&B genre. Singer-songwriter-producer Miguel is a shining example of the survival of the black pop tradition. And what has kept the tradition alive but thriving is Miguel’s daring sources of inspiration and emotional directness. The psychedelic, erotic, audacious aims of his album Kaleidoscope Dream are further represented in his sense of style. If fortune does in fact favor the bold, then Miguel is on the fast track to high acclaim in the fashion world. While his sense of style is almost

too eccentric to categorize, he often gets compared to ‘80s-era Prince. These leading men are uprooting the fashion norms of the entertainment industry while simultaneously rebranding pop music. In an era in which individualism is not always at the forefront of music, these men have been recognized for their impact by TIME Magazine as three of the most influential individuals in the world. While they

2

are each trendsetters in their own respective genres, their collective acclaim provides a universal lesson for men: dress to fit your persona, and always do so with confidence. STITCH |54


LAST WORD

O

ALL HAIL QUEEN B By: Helen Zook

I have yet to meet someone who doesn’t like Beyoncé—most people love her or at least respect her. Besides, what’s there to hate? She managed to crank out hit after hit ever since her Destiny’s Child days and she brings real sass as Sasha Fierce. Her dance moves are unbelievable —the choreography she pulled off during her Super Bowl performance made her seem practically superhuman. I could go on and on. I’m not kidding — many of my conversations with my girlfriends have ended up with me expressing my aspiration to be reborn as Queen B, and more often than not, my desire is met with unanimous agreement. As Drake put it so wisely with the title of his latest single, “Girls Love Beyoncé.” Given my shameless obsession with Hova’s better half, I had her back throughout the inauguration lip-syncing scandal, and I had every reason to believe in her. Have you seen the rehearsal footage of Beyoncé belting out “1+1” in a dressing room? This girl can sing. Even when she received criticism for her costume choice at a concert in Serbia, I was still on Mrs. Carter’s side. The gold sequined skin-tight bodysuit by Emilio Pucci featured a set of embellished faux nipples, eliciting uproar from critics who described the ensemble as “vulgar”, “disrespectful” and an unsuccessful attempt to keep up with the younger crowd of pop icons. But I beg to differ. The costume was more artistic endeavor than cry for attention. I like to think she’s merely comfortable in her own skin. Sure, Bey’s costume may not have left much to the imagination, but that doesn’t mean she’s any less of an inspiration to women, because her power is in her confidence. I’ve always admired Beyoncé for 55| STITCH

her bold fashion choices, which have included an abundance of curve-hugging body suits. But just because she’s bearing some skin doesn’t mean she’s sexualizing her own image. Historically, female pop stars like Madonna and Janet Jackson have always opted for promiscuous on-stage ensembles, and while it’s undeniable that part of the reason for say, the cone bra, is sex appeal, another considerable rationale is promoting a positive body image for their young female fans. These pop stars push sartorial boundaries and wear their oftenrevealing outfits with an incredible amount of confidence. And they’re entirely unapologetic about it. At the end of the day, Beyoncé and her strong female predecessors are highlighting their personal style, wearing what they want to wear and celebrating their figures. They’re promoting female empowerment by representing themselves as strong, independent women (“Throw your hands up at me”) and ignoring the haters. I am by no means am endorsing such theatrical style for the average Northwestern student — a rhinestone-encrusted leotard isn’t exactly appropriate for a day on the Lakefill — but embracing your body, feeling confident and standing by your fashion choices will always be appropriate for all occasions.

{


{ } YOUR AD HERE

EMAIL: SYDNEYLINDSEY2016@U.NORTHWESTERN.EDU



June 2013