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SPECIAL ISSUE 2013

SHERWIN-WILLIAMS®

®

A HARVEST OF HUES Talking organic color with California’s “Farmer John” Fendley

2014 COLOR FORECAST We’ve surveyed the swirling currents to capture a picture

CHILD’S PLAY Inside Chicago’s spectacular new Lurie Children’s Hospital

SW 6875 GLADIOLA


The Sherwin-Williams Company Director, Trade Communications: Tresa Makowski Director of Color Marketing: Jackie Jordan

Hanley Wood Marketing Creative Director: Robert Gibson Editor: Kim Palmer

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Executive Art Director: Sandy Girard Art Director: Cate Hubbard Production Director: Pam Mundstock Production Artist: James Kaump Project Manager: Julie Ollila Account Director: Martha Capps STIR® magazine is published by Hanley Wood, LLC, on behalf of The Sherwin-Williams Company, for interior designers and architects. Please direct correspondence to: Sherwin-Williams STIR magazine Hanley Wood 430 1st Ave. N., Suite 550 Minneapolis, MN 55401 Phone: (612) 338-8300 Email: contact@swstir.com Website: sherwin-williams.com Printed in the United States, © 2013 Sherwin-Williams

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THE SHAPE OF DESIGN

his year’s Sherwin-Williams colormix™ color forecast (p. 12) is bigger and better than ever — and that starts with our expanded color forecast team! Our regular

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Sherwin-Williams color experts are back, of course: product finishes expert Kathy Andersson, fashion and

trend expert Becky Ralich Spak, and international color expert Carol Derov, along with yours truly. This year, we were all thrilled to be joined for the first time by Sherwin-Williams commercial market specialist Kelly McCrone and her colleague, new residential market specialist Susan Wadden, both color experts. Your color-forecast journey is only just beginning with this issue of STIR®. You can go behind the scenes with our color forecast team by downloading our free STIR tablet edition in the Apple® App store,

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Google Play or Amazon’s Kindle store. Just search for “SherwinWilliams.” And you won’t want to miss attending our uplifting color trend presentation, which will be touring the country this fall. This event, which earns you 0.1 CEU, will deepen your understanding of this year’s forecast and global color drivers. We will post these events to our Facebook page as they’re scheduled (facebook.com/ SherwinWilliamsforDesignersArchitects). Finally, follow us on Twitter @SWDesignPros and use the hashtag #ColorThoughts to share your own ideas about this year’s colors and palettes. We can’t wait to hear what you think! Sincerely,

The trademarks and copyrights of Sherwin-Williams appearing in STIR are protected. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. *Sherwin-Williams received the highest numerical scores among paint retailers in the proprietary J.D. Power and Associates 2013 Paint Satisfaction StudySM. Study based on responses from 6,875 consumers measuring 5 brands and opinions of consumers who purchased and applied interior paint within the previous 12 months. Proprietary study results are based on experiences and perceptions of consumers surveyed January–February 2013. Your experiences may vary. Visit jdpower.com.

JACKIE JORDAN Director of Color Marketing The Sherwin-Williams Company

Find us on social media:

Exceeding Customer Expectations That's our goal every day at Sherwin-Williams, and your loyalty and support has resulted in Sherwin-Williams being ranked "Highest in Customer Satisfaction among Paint Retailers" by the J.D. Power and Associates 2013 Paint Satisfaction Study SM.*


®

SHERWIN-WILLIAMS® SPECIAL ISSUE 2013 CONTENTS

COLOR CHIPS

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Introducing the Designer Expressions Fan Deck, palettes that work in any combination to make residential color selection quick and painless.

COLOR CONVERSATION

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Explore creativity and color with software designer Matthew Chen, steampunk guru Bruce Rosenbaum and “Farmer John” Fendley.

COLORMIX

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The state of color is always fluid. Sherwin-Williams colormix™ 2014 surveys the swirling currents to capture a picture.

GOING GLAM

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Sophisticated details — and one just-right color — transformed a vintage home into a modern showplace worthy of first place in the Sherwin-Williams EmeraldTM Paint Design Challenge. COLOR TECH

SEEING IN A NEW LIGHT

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What you need to know about the ways “smart bulbs” and new LED options are changing color rendering in interior spaces.

STUDENT DESIGN CONTEST 25

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Meet the 2013 Sherwin-Williams® STIR® Student Design Contest winners, and see their award-winning work.

CHILD’S PLAY Free STIR Tablet Edition With Exclusive Content Get exclusive content you won’t find in the print edition — including behind-the-scenes videos. Download it today at swstirapp.com, or directly in the Apple® App store, Google Play or Amazon’s Kindle store.

Visit swcolor.com to: • Order color samples • Download color palettes into virtual design tools • Paint room scenes or upload your own photos in Color Visualizer • Download ColorSnap®, a free color-matching app

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The healing hues and innovative design of Chicago’s new Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital create a space that’s — dare we say it — fun. COLOR FOCUS

THE COLOR PURPLE

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For other assistance: • For product or compliance questions, call (800) 321-8194

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COLORchips WHAT'S NEW FROM SHERWIN-WILLIAMS

New Color Collections for Residential Designers Color selection can be challenging when working with residential clients, who sometimes become overwhelmed by options. New Pottery Barn and West Elm palettes and our new Designer Expressions fan deck will help make residential color selection easier for you and your clients.

Designer Expressions This handy fan deck contains nine new color collections: Whites, Naturally Neutral, Simply Sophisticated, Vintage Chic, Tuscan Warmth, Seaside Retreat, Historic Hues, Spice It Up (global and eclectic), and Kid’s Play. Each collection contains 16 colors that work together in any combination and help with color coordination in a space or from room to room. To order your Designer Expressions fan deck, log in to your myS-W.com account or ask your local account executive.

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Seasonal Color Palettes Our new partnership with Williams-Sonoma, Inc. will include seasonal palettes of SherwinWilliams paint colors that coordinate with Pottery Barn, Pottery Barn Kids, PBteen and West Elm furnishings and accessories. The color palettes will be featured within each brand’s catalogs, on their websites and in stores. To explore the Pottery Barn palette, go to sherwin-williams.com/pb.


Design Tools for Your Tablet One in three Americans now owns a tablet, according to the Pew Research Center. The percentage is even higher among design pros. To help you stay ahead of the curve, we continue to add apps and color tools to our tablet offerings. • Sherwin-Williams® STIR® tablet edition. Like what you see in this issue of STIR? A whole world of exclusive content awaits on our tablet app for iPad, Android and Kindle devices. • ColorSnap Studio™. Take a picture of a room and paint the walls virtually with a brush of your finger, tap to explore the closest matching colors in any photo, calculate paint required for a space, and more. • Enhanced Color Visualizer. Complex masking is no longer required when you upload your own photo to the SherwinWilliams Color Visualizer. Instead, the tool automatically detects surfaces and walls so you’re free to “paint” away, helping your clients explore color options and visualize final results. Available within the ColorSnap Studio app or online at swcolor.com. To download any of these free digital tools, go to swcolor.com and click on Color Tools.

New Product Roundup Introducing three new or enhanced coatings to make your next interior project outstanding. Harmony® Acrylic Paint*

Cashmere® Pearl Finish

Dry Erase Coating*

Innovative technologies you don’t expect in a paint

Great for applications that demand a smooth finish

Adds functionality to commercial and residential spaces

• Odor Eliminating Technology † helps reduce indoor odors from pets, cooking, smoking and other organic sources.

• Ultrasmooth application and silky finish.

• Turns virtually any interior substrate into a dry-erase board.

• Self-leveling formula that minimizes brush and roller marks.

• Clear gloss: apply over any paint color.

• New Formaldehyde Reducing Technology † helps reduce VOCs from sources such as insulation, carpet, fabrics and wood cabinets. Available in flat and eg-shel (and in semi-gloss by year-end).

• Outstanding coverage and hide.

• Durable finish that wipes clean with no “ghosting.”

• New pearl finish (available this fall) joins flat enamel, low-lustre and medium-lustre finishes.

• Two-part coating requires professional application — talk to your local account executive or paint contractor.

• Zero VOC formula, tinted with colorants that won’t add VOCs.

*GREENGUARD Certified products are certified to GREENGUARD standards for low chemical emissions into indoor air during product usage. For more information, visit ul.com/gg. †The length of time Harmony reduces odors and formaldehyde depends on the concentration, the frequency of exposure and the amount of painted surface area.

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COLORconversation

DIGITAL FINGER PAINTING

Software engineer Matthew Chen harnesses computer code to create interactive color. by CHARLOTTE STOUDT

After double-majoring in studio art and computer science, Matthew Chen joined the innovative New York team FiftyThree to develop their astonishing Paper app (www.fiftythree.com/paper), which turns your tablet into an artist’s studio. Chen perfected the program’s color mixer into a digital easel that everyone from the late Steve Jobs to your toddler would find irresistible. Last fall, Paper literally took center stage at Apple’s launch of the iPad mini and scooped up a design award to boot. Here, Chen discusses how he makes code speak color.

STIR: How did your team come up with the idea of a color mixer? MC: If you look at other graphics software, they all solve the problem of blending colors in the same way. They’re awkward because they reflect how the software thinks rather than how the user thinks. We wanted users to mix colors like they would in finger painting. STIR: As an engineer and an artist, how did you approach that problem? MC: In real life, if you mix blue and yellow, you get green. But digital colors don’t blend that way if your focus is on fidelity to how real-world pigments behave. If your software combines blue and yellow in a naïve way, you get gray. We had to create a system that wasn’t focused on color science but on a user’s intuition.

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STIR: What’s striking about Paper’s color mixer is how effortless it is. MC: Color is like the weather. It’s very emotional. When artists paint portraits, they don’t act like photographers. They might put red and blue in their subject’s skin. Instinctively, we all see that makes more sense, not less. Artists use a completely different vocabulary for color than scientists do … warm and cool colors … angry colors … earth-tone colors. We were trying to make a tool compatible with that sensibility. If a question is, “How can I make the sky more melancholy?” Well, you mix some brown in your blue until you get something that reminds you of the sky after sunset.

MC: Everyone at FiftyThree takes an art class every two weeks. We all sit and draw a skull for hours. If anyone sits down with a piece of paper and draws for just half an hour, they’re going to feel relaxed and open. Sometimes we’ll have live sketch events. We sit in the front row and draw as the speaker talks, illustrating their ideas in real time. Then our sketches get projected. People really respond.

STIR: Do you use Paper? MC: Compulsively. We sketch out how a new feature might look in the app’s notebooks. And when we moved offices, we used the app to help plan the arrangement of furniture in our new space.

STIR: What colors do you live with? MC: I’m half Asian, so I grew up with muted colors. My wife is from Uruguay, so our house is full of earth tones. We represent two different cultural color palettes, but somehow they blend.

STIR: As the company expands, how do you keep your creativity alive?

STIR: If you could give Paper to any artist from any era, who would it be? MC: Jean-Michel Basquiat. He took the visual language of graffiti to painting. There’s so much energy in his brush strokes.

STIR: Your mixer works. MC: Exactly. Charlotte Stoudt is a Los Angeles–based journalist who covers art and design.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ROGER TULLY

STIR: What does the average iPad user not understand about creating an app? MC: Making an iOS app is a lot like putting on a piece of theater. There are way more people behind the curtain than in front of it, but the user doesn’t need to know that. The goal is to have as little friction between people and their ideas as possible.


Artists use a completely different vocabulary for color than scientists do … warm and cool colors … angry colors … earth-tone colors.

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COLORconversation

STEAMPUNK POWER Designer Bruce Rosenbaum puts a modern spin on Victoriana, reinventing gadgets and antiques into unique statements. by KIM PALMER

GO INSIDE A STEAMPUNK HOUSE Bruce takes you on a tour in the STIR tablet edition, free in the Apple® App store, Google Play and Amazon’s Kindle store.

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Bruce Rosenbaum hadn’t even heard the term “steampunk” when he started renovating his family’s 1901 Victorian mansion in Sharon, Mass. He just liked finding unusual antiques and repurposing them — converting a pump organ into a 21st-century work station, for instance. A hobby became an obsession, and Rosenbaum’s firm ModVic (www.modvic.com) has since designed one-of-a-kind objects for a tattoo parlor, museums and restaurants. Last year, he assembled a Steampunk by Design team (www.steampunkbydesign.com), which recently created a Jules Verne–meets–Sherlock Holmes “gentleman’s quarter” at the Boston Design Center. STIR: Define “steampunk.” BR: In terms of design, steampunk takes old objects that were once highly useful and gives them new life, so it seems as if they should have always been used that way. What appeared obsolete suddenly feels like living in the future.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ROGER TULLY

STIR: You’ve compared steampunk to magic. BR: Absolutely! I was actually a professional magician by the age of 12 or 13, mostly to get girls. It didn’t work. But early in my career, I worked for a catalog company selling personal products like stockings and bras. For my presentations, I’d start out with a trick. People would walk in and see a door frame in the middle of the room. I’d open the door, and there’d be nothing behind it. Then I’d close the door, open it again, and a model wearing a bra would be standing there. Your brain on steampunk operates the same way it does during a magic trick. I’m using misdirection — making you look in another direction to see something in a new way. STIR: What colors were used for the steampunk space at the Boston Design Center? BR: We like to call it a “dapper den.” I found an industrial clothes wringer that makes an incredible TV-DVD mount, and two cast-iron stable dividers. Metal-based steampunk objects look great against rich colors, so the interior designer for our Steampunk by Design team, Linda Hentschel (of i-Design, www.idesigninteriors.biz) used Plum Brown (SW 6272) for the panel walls.

STIR: What other colors do you like for a steampunk look? BR: My favorite color is in my steampunk office. It’s a warm coppery gold that grounds and gives life to all the copper, bronzes, brasses and dark walnut objects in the office. We started out with an Arts and Crafts green, but it made the space feel too cold with all of the metal objects in the room. It now feels like I’m totally surrounded in a cozy enclosed space — 20,000 leagues under the ocean. STIR: With its industrial look, steampunk can seem very mechanistic. BR: Actually, its impact is quite the opposite. The act of repurposing is therapeutic. There’s a very strong emotional component to taking an object and giving it new life. When I do workshops, honestly, people get teary. What I’m trying to do is give them a meaningful connection to their past. STIR: How can steampunk inspire moretraditional designers? BR: Any successful design requires getting to know your client. Encourage them to look into their own past and family. Find an object with real significance, and do something creative with it. You’ll end up creating a genuinely meaningful space for people to live, work and play. STIR: What’s your steampunk inspiration? BR: My dad had to have the latest anything in technology: the latest camera, the latest gadget. So steampunk reminds me of my father. And it allows me to keep performing magic. Kim Palmer is editor of STIR.

STEAMPUNK HUES The colors that support the steampunk aesthetic are “moody and intriguing,” according to Linda Hentschel, Bruce Rosenbaum’s partner in Steampunk by Design. She chose five favorites, all from the Sherwin-Williams “Midnight Mystery” palette, part of colormix 2013, which identified steampunk as a major design influence.

Mink SW 6004

Chamois SW 6131

Plum Brown SW 6272

Outerspace SW 6251

Roycroft Bottle Green SW 2847

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COLORconversation

CULTIVATING COLOR

“Farmer John” dishes the dirt on heirloom edibles — and their amazing Technicolor hues. by KIM PALMER

Organic farmer John Fendley is committed to preserving the full palette of heirloom vegetables, from black radishes to white tomatoes. The lifelong gardener and former environmental planner had an epiphany while browsing through an heirloom seed catalog and noticing how many open-pollinated varieties had disappeared. Heirlooms aren’t just pretty on the plate — they also offer different resistance to disease. Fendley started “hoarding seeds” and started a seed company. We caught up with the president “dirt digger” of Sustainable Seed Company (www.sustainableseedco.com) on his tractor in California.

STIR: What role does color play when deciding which seeds to market? JF: It’s funny how we’ve all been conditioned by color. Colored carrots have gotten wildly successful. But colored cucumbers have not. My favorite cucumber, hands down, is Brown Russian. It has brown crackled skin, like a faux paint finish. It’s never bitter, always sweet. But I sell maybe 20 packages, because people are apprehensive. That monkey part of your brain tells you that brown means dead. You have to learn to keep an open mind, especially with heirlooms. STIR: What’s a color risk you’ve taken? JF: We just released a blue tomato. Reading the Facebook comments, some people say it’s amazing, and some say it’s disgusting. We’ve also tried white tomatoes. We can’t sell them — people

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don’t want a white tomato. But white tomatoes can taste really good. STIR: Why do you think color plays such a big part in what foods appeal to us? JF: Colors evoke memories. Most people remember visiting their grandparents in hot summer and getting a slice of watermelon. You see the bright colors, remember the juice dripping. STIR: Do different-colored veggies have different flavors and nutrients? JF: They do, to me, taste different. And we had a nutritionist come in — some of the deep-orange tomatoes are incredibly high in lycopene. STIR: What’s your favorite way to eat heirlooms? JF: Salads are always fun because the colors don’t change — they’re not cooked. Purple beans are the most amazing color, but when you cook them, they turn green. So I’d say a salad, with a mesclun mix of reds, burgundy, lime greens and deep greens. STIR: Tell us about Bloody Butcher corn. JF: We promote that around Halloween. It makes great decoration. Native

American corn is incredibly colorful. There’s one called Painted Mountain, with hundreds of colors in one cob. For some reason, we settled on yellow corn. And blue corn — we’ve all seen blue corn chips. The Hopi kept it alive, and somebody took it into the mainstream. STIR: Are some heirlooms used just for decorative purposes? JF: A lot of people grow things for colors or other ornamental reasons. One guy is growing plants, crushing them and making tubs of dye for Japanese silks. There’s an ornamental pepper with dark green leaves and red peppers that stick up like tubes of lipstick — people plant it in borders. STIR: How about you — do you grow some heirlooms for their looks? JF: I’m half farmer and half Martha Stewart. I create great fall displays of pumpkin and squash. I have an old medicine jar, and I put different colors of seed corn in it. I grow colors I like. They make me happy.

Kim Palmer is editor of STIR.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY STEVEN ROTHFELD

STIR: How did orange carrots become the norm? JF: The Dutch are credited for selecting orange. We don’t know why. Early carrots were purple. There’s a Cosmic Purple carrot with an orange-red interior, and an Atomic Red and a Lunar White carrot.


We’re attracted to color. Why did we like Froot Loops as children? It sparked your imagination, looking into that bowl.

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THE STATE OF COLOR

is always fluid, rushing forward and gathering influences from

Captured the world around us. Sherwin-Williams surveys these swirling currents to capture a picture.

by KIM PALMER photography by DON FREEMAN

We’re captivated by soft feminine hues veiled in translucent simplicity. And by mysterious tones that evoke the deepest recesses of earth and our own psyches. Authenticity resonates anew, pulling us toward vivid colors that remind us of folkloric traditions and handcraft. And to set off those hues — and give them a bit of breathing room — we’re gravitating to cool neutrals, the color of shadows and fog.

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REASONED LOGIC OR GOOD SENSE. Gray is the new black, and math is the new sexy. We’re in a global race to acquire knowledge, especially in the hard sciences. As we embrace our inner geek, we’re also celebrating the quantifiable world’s impact on design: using geometry and 3D printing to create patterns and shapes in which shadows, negative space and tone on tone are as important as the structure itself.

SW 0077 . CLASSIC FRENCH GRAY

SW 6258 . TRICORN BLACK

SW 7006 . EXTRA WHITE

SW 7019 . GAUNTLET GRAY

A line becomes truly elegant when it shows no fear of its own shadow: the negative space SW 7029 . AGREEABLE GRAY

SW 7647 . CRUSHED ICE

that gives it strength.

SW 7660 . EARL GREY

SW 7674 . PEPPERCORN

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INTRINSIC BELONGING NATURALLY, ESSENTIAL. As the global melting pot slowly blends the world into one stew, there’s growing interest in preserving individual cultural traditions — before it’s too late. Native peoples are looking inward rather than outward, with a new appreciation of their own origins and crafts. Handmade lace, embroidery, batik and other ethnic dyeing techniques lend an earthy, folkloric aesthetic to this new Bohemianism.

SW 2838 . POLISHED MAHOGANY

SW 6156 . RAMIE

SW 6727 . HOUSEPLANT

SW 6788 . CAPRI

Digital culture only makes handcrafts and tradition matter more. They are the yarn from which our ancient, authentic stories are still told.

SW 6158 . SAWDUST

SW 6382 . CEREMONIAL GOLD

SW 6841 . DYNAMO

SW 6870 . ABLAZE

GET COLORMIX COLORS • Order a colormix color deck or large-size color samples at myS-W.com. • Download these colors

SW 6509 . GEORGIAN BAY

SW 6883 . RAUCOUS ORANGE

into virtual design tools at swcolor.com. • Design with these colors using our Color Visualizer or ColorSnap® apps at swcolor.com.

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DIAPHANOUS LIGHT, DELICATE AND TRANSLUCENT. Picture a pearl veiled by chiffon: a soft gleam behind gossamer fabric. It’s a luxurious image, but luxury isn’t what lures us to it. Instead, it’s the exquisite, spiritual balance of simplicity, delicate colors and strength tempered by softness. Today we experience this gently blurred duality all around us, from the menswear influences on feminine clothes, to the soft-touch materials on electronic gadgets.

SW 2859 . BEIGE

SW 6052 . SANDBANK

SW 6337 . SPUN SUGAR

SW 7022 . ALPACA

SW 7566 . WESTHIGHLAND WHITE

SW 6057 . MALTED MILK

SW 6161 . NONCHALANT WHITE

SW 7037 . BALANCED BEIGE

SW 7554 . STEAMED MILK

SW 7666 . FLEUR DE SEL

A sheer, simple aesthetic creates the space we need to step into a dream — the place where our best ideas are waiting to be found.

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SW 0038 . LIBRARY PEWTER

SW 0045 . ANTIQUARIAN BROWN

SW 0064 . BLUE PEACOCK

SW 6018 . ENIGMA

Become what you dare: Where the elemental mingles with the ethereal, there is a new world whose reward is perpetual

SW 6132 . RELIC BRONZE

SW 6263 . EXCLUSIVE PLUM

SW 6265 . QUIXOTIC PLUM

SW 7030 . ANEW GRAY

SW 7588 . SHOW STOPPER

SW 7675 . SEALSKIN

metamorphosis.

CURIOSITY STRANGE, UNUSUAL OR WONDROUS. Something’s brewing on the spectrum. It’s a strange new elixir, where mad science meets fantasy, and sweet dreams overlap with feverish nightmares. Bio-design, inspired by nature at the molecular level, brings weirdly organic patterns, textures and colors into the mix, inviting us to see strange things in intriguing new ways. Oddities are now objects of fascination, even desire. The bizarre has never been more beautiful.

HOW DO WE FORECAST COLOR? Go behind the scenes of our color forecast in the STIR tablet edition, free in the Apple® App store, Google Play and Amazon’s Kindle store. Sherwin-Williams | stir

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Sophisticated details — and one just-right color — transformed a vintage home into a modern showplace worthy of first place in the Sherwin-Williams EmeraldTM Paint Design Challenge. by SHANNON PRATHER

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lizabeth Polanco was deeply invested in the history of her 1915 home. She’d thrown herself into the Swiss Avenue preservation movement, which focuses on her renowned Dallas street and its architecture. She felt a reverence for her home’s original features, including centuryold hardwood floors, sconces and a Rookwood art-tile fireplace. But Polanco couldn’t stop thinking about the sleek modern-glam rooms featured in glossy design magazines. Like most modern women, she wanted it all. “I am a preservationist at heart,” she says. “I feel this responsibility to maintain the integrity of this home. But my style was changing a little bit. I wanted to update what was there.” After a decade of tasteful, traditional and safe décor, she and Dallas designer Gigi Magness set out to transform Polanco’s living and dining room into a more sophisticated, modern space. Magness knew it would be a delicate dance. She’d need to add modern lines and colors while still celebrating the home’s historic features. “I was going out on a limb. Marrying a 100-yearold home with modern glam décor is a risky endeavor,” she says.

mirrors incorporate the fireplace into the design but make it less of a focal point. Magness finally pulled the whole look together using a new paint color — a warm gray that harmonized with the green and bronze tones in the tile. “It’s difficult to pull out a more neutral palette when your fireplace is an outdated green,” Magness says. She toyed briefly with a soft bronze before settling on Sherwin-Williams Mega Greige (SW 7031). Magness had attended a Sherwin-Williams color seminar in fall 2012 and was introduced to the new Emerald™ Interior Acrylic Latex Paint, which both delivers best-in-class overall performance and meets the most stringent VOC regulations. Impressed, she chose Emerald Paint for Polanco’s project. But Magness didn’t want the color to fall flat in a space already shimmering with mirrors, chandeliers, and a silver and gold drapery fabric. So she completed the jewel-box effect by choosing a Satin finish. “It reflects the light and adds to the glamour,” Magness says. At first, Polanco had reservations about the new color. Would gray create the fresh modern look she craved? But she trusted Magness. “She has a wonderful vision,” Polanco says. “We put the gray on the wall, and I immediately loved it. It’s a very clean look.” In the dining room, Magness added SherwinWilliams Faux Impressions® Latex Glaze tinted with Faux Impressions® Metallic Base in Gold, to accentuate the coffered ceilings and add even more depth to the walls. “It gives a softer, more elegant feel to the room,” she says.

“I WAS GOING OUT ON A LIMB. MARRYING A 100-YEAR-OLD

HOME WITH MODERN GLAM

DÉCOR IS A RISKY ENDEAVOR.”

COLOR CONUNDRUM The most formidable challenge was finding a new color palette that complemented the fireplace’s green tile. “The fireplace is absolutely stunning,” Polanco says. “But I was tired of the green. It limited what colors I could use.” She knew that preserving the fireplace complicated any new design plans, but she dug her heels in. “There was no way I was going to paint the original Rookwood tile to make it work with the décor. That would just deface the history,” she says. So initially, the pair set the color question aside. Instead they started the redesign by selecting furniture with modern lines and accessories that added glamour and sparkle. One of the first pieces Magness added was a mirrored steamer-trunk coffee table that set the mood for the entire design. The table felt vintage, but the mirrored finish gave it a modern edge. Instead of placing one large piece of art over the fireplace — “very traditional and very expected,” Magness says — she used a collage of mirrors with bejeweled frames. The

PRESERVING THE BEST Magness’ design didn’t just preserve the bones of the home. She also kept many of Polanco’s treasured antiques, traditional furniture and even one of her thrift-store finds. Polanco’s beloved wingback chairs were reupholstered in soft beige embroidered fabric, and her prized antique table and carved chest were positioned near the entry. “The pieces I loved were not discarded,” Polanco says. “It took a lot of work and talent to incorporate them into a new design.” Magness felt confident using Polanco’s thrift-store diningroom table to anchor the room because she knew the rich wall color and accessories made it look luxurious. “Good design doesn’t always equal high dollar,” she says. Magness created a modern vibe in the room through

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PROJECT: Swiss Avenue residence, circa 1915 LOCATION: Dallas, Texas INTERIOR DESIGNER: Gigi Magness PRINCIPAL COATING: Emerald™ Interior Acrylic Latex

Glamorous, Yet Guy-Friendly A glam look can feel a bit like a lady’s boudoir if done with a heavy hand. Glittering chandeliers, mirrored furniture and bejeweled accessories certainly speak to a feminine aesthetic. But balancing those accessories with masculine pieces can create a living room that speaks to everyone in the home. Dallas designer Gigi Magness used wooden furniture in deep, rich tones to create gender balance in the room. “It brings in a masculine element. It makes it a room for both people,” she says. Magness and homeowner Elizabeth Polanco also selected artwork that spoke to the man in Polanco’s life. One is a black canvas with the names of Dallas streets in distressed block letters. The modern lines of the furniture also help balance the room. “Clean, straight arms in a classic linen fabric speak to timeless design and marry masculine and feminine,” Magness says.

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FAUX IMPRESSIONS® LATEX GLAZE TINTED WITH METALLIC BASE IN GOLD

MEGA GREIGE SW 7031

the interplay of the wall color and white woodwork. Instead of diluting its impact with a busy accent palette, Magness used texture to create visual drama. The living-room rug is modern shag, while the couch is upholstered in woven linen with embroidered embellishments. The dining-room bench, which bridges the living and dining space, is covered in Mongolian lambskin. “It adds a ton of texture and glamour,” Magness says. She was thrilled that her project won first place in the Sherwin-Williams Emerald Paint Design Challenge, but her ultimate goal was creating a space that her client can’t wait to come home to.

“I want her to walk in there and be absolutely delighted; to say, ‘I want to spend my entire day in that room,’” Magness says. And Polanco, who was initially wary of going gray, now believes the hue is the standout feature in the design. The Mega Greige plays up the intricate detailing in the ornate wood moldings, and it feels modern, yet respectful of her home’s history. “I am just in love with the color,” she says.

Shannon Prather is a Minneapolis-area journalist.

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COLOR tech

SEEING IN A

NEW LIGHT “Smart bulbs” and other LED options are changing the game for lighting design.

by SHANNON PRATHER illustrations by ANDREW BANNECKER

Its warm, familiar glow has illuminated the spectrum of style, from the elegant to the audacious, for more than a century. But the incandescent bulb’s reign is dimming, as

I

cooler, energy-efficient LED lighting options continue to dazzle design professionals. Initially criticized for their high cost and poor color rendering, LEDs have made rapid strides. Their share of the residential lighting market will climb from 7 percent in 2011 to 73 percent by 2020, according to a 2012 market model by McKinsey & Company. Cutting-edge LED products that allow users to adjust light color are changing the nature of lighting, says Terry McGowan, director of engineering and technology for the American Lighting Association (ALA). “It’s not just functional, it’s entertainment,” McGowan says. Philips’ HUE, for example, sold exclusively at Apple stores, allows users to personalize lighting at the slide of a finger, and even to change light colors along a broad spectrum, with settings that can mimic sunrise in the morning, or raise energy levels in the afternoon.

IN A DIFFERENT LIGHT Studies show that during the day, people work more efficiently in cooler white light, but at night prefer a warm glow similar to an incandescent, according to Stacy Brown, marketing director for online LED retailer EnvironmentalLights.com. The new generation of LED fixtures allows you to have both warm and cool in one bulb — all controlled by smartphone or remote. “People do have personal preference,” McGowan says. “We are used to fixed light. But if you have a knob to turn, people will turn it and find something they prefer.” So far, LED lighting has made major inroads in cabinet lighting, recess lighting and track lighting. “It’s the sweet spot — the prices are competitive, and the light quality is quite good,” McGowan says. Other advantages: LEDs don’t generate heat or create hot spots, and they use 80 percent less electricity than incandescents.

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But while costs have fallen, by more than half in recent years, LED bulbs still run $12 to $25 a bulb vs. less than a dollar for traditional incandescents.

BULBS AS APPLIANCES “Designers and consumers need to think of the LED fixture and bulb like appliances,” McGowan says. “You will live with them for years and maybe take them with you when you move. It’s a different way of thinking about lighting.” Don’t write the obituary for the incandescent just yet, McGowan adds. Although Congress has ordered the phaseout of the traditional incandescent bulb, designers can still buy a more efficient halogen incandescent, and prefer it for some applications. Why? Incandescent bulbs still have the highest color rendering, at the lowest prices. Lower color rendering in LED bulbs means red is less visible, which can be unflattering for skin tones. That’s why incandescents are still popular for sconces and chandeliers, says architect and lighting designer Joe Ray-Barreau, education consultant for the ALA. Top-quality LED fixtures and bulbs offer higher color rendering, but their lofty prices have so far limited their use to high-end commercial projects. However, industry experts have no doubt that new lighting options will continue to emerge. “We’ve seen a lot of innovation,” McGowan says, “and we’re going to see a lot more.” Shannon Prather is a Minneapolis-area journalist.


THE NEW GENERATION OF LED FIXTURES ALLOWS YOU TO HAVE BOTH WARM AND COOL IN ONE BULB — ALL CONTROLLED BY SMARTPHONE OR REMOTE.

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The ABCs of LEDs When choosing LED lighting, forget wattage. There are other numbers to consider:

Color rendering. The Color Rendering Index (CRI) is a measure of a light source’s ability to reproduce color compared to natural light. Incandescent bulbs score high, with a CRI rating of 100. Mass-market LED bulbs often fall around 80 CRI. More energy-efficient compact fluorescents are also around 80 CRI. That’s one reason they stalled at 25 percent market share at their height of popularity, McGowan says. People don’t like the twisted look of the bulb or the light quality. “Compact fluorescents

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are being used primarily for energyefficiency,” he says. “There is no aesthetic benefit to a compact fluorescent.” Brightness or light output. This number, which refers to the amount of light produced, is measured in lumens. It’s not the same as watts, which is the amount of power needed to light a bulb, but many consumers seek comparisons. A 60-watt incandescent bulb produces about 840 lumens, while a 100-watt produces 1600 lumens.

Color temperature. This is the degree of warmness or coolness of a light source, measured in kelvins. Warm light is found in the lower temperature range and is similar to the yellow glow of an incandescent bulb. It’s preferred for living spaces because it casts a better light on skin tones. Cool light at higher temperatures provides higher contrasts for people performing visual tasks. It is often found in offices, and can appear bluish.


Student Design Contest 2013 WINNING PORTFOLIOS

Celebrate the winners of our third annual Sherwin-Williams ® STIR® Student Design Contest.

THE MOST SURPRISING THING about the third

Entries came in from design schools around the

annual Sherwin-Williams® STIR® Student Design

country, including Arizona State University, the Art

Contest may have been the sheer number of

Institute of Atlanta, the New York School of Interior

entries in the commercial category, which this year

Design, and Miami International University of Art

outpaced residential design by more than 2-to-1.

and Design.

“Overall, the quality of student work was spectacular,”

First place winners received a $2,500 cash prize,

said contest judge Jackie Jordan, Sherwin-Williams

second place winners received $1,000, and third

Director of Color Marketing. “The competition was

place winners received $500. Let’s meet the

tight all around — particularly on the commercial side

winners and their projects:

this year, where we received a high number of really strong projects.”

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1

ST PLACE | Commercial

CONCEPT: This women’s health-care facility, located in Savannah, Ga., has been designed to create an exceptionally positive, comforting and healing environment for its patients, and to DESIGNER TARA HOLLAND accommodate the needs of patients and families, as well as staff. The overall SCHOOL ABILENE CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY solution was developed from evidencebased design and reflects patients’ need for privacy and dignity. The layout expresses proper circulation along with techniques that assist in way-finding. The thematic design that is displayed throughout the space communicates prevalent regional aspects, which brings comfort and recognition to the area. Materials, finishes and proper placement of furnishings are key elements in the design. Sherwin-Williams paint colors have been carefully selected to reflect the soothing environment of Savannah. Three main colors are intertwined throughout the facility to bring unity and harmony among the space. These cool and muted colors are successful in providing patients with a calm and tranquil experience.

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“I learned that design work done in college can overlap into the professional world. It’s encouraging to get positive feedback from a new audience.“

-TARA HOLLAND SEDATE GRAY SW 6169 RETIRING BLUE SW 6763 MESCLUN GREEN SW 6724


StudentDesign Contest 2013 DESIGNER: BRITTANY CAVALLOTTI

2 ND PLACE | Commercial

CANDID BLUE SW 6953

OBSTINATE ORANGE SW 6884

ELECTRIC LIME SW 6921

SCHOOL: MARYWOOD UNIVERSITY

VERVE VIOLET SW 6979

3 RD PLACE | Commercial

AQUATINT SW 6936

BLUE BEYOND SW 6961

ARDENT CORAL SW 6874

DESIGNER: KELLEY O’LEARY SCHOOL: VIRGINIA TECH

“While working on this project, I learned how to successfully integrate concept, palette and design. Knowing that something as simple as paint color can change the entire feel of a space makes you consider all the details in your design even more.”

-KELLEY O’LEARY Sherwin-Williams | stir

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1

ST PLACE | Residential

CONCEPT: This new residence was designed to create a functional and fluid space for the Moore family. The family’s active lifestyle required an open plan that would increase DESIGNER: AQUEEL SULEIMANJI communication between family members, SCHOOL: HOUSTON COMMUNITY COLLEGE with separate zones for each person. This was done through separate wings. The central zone is the entertainment and living zone. The left side of the house is primarily for John and Melissa, and includes the master bath. On the lower level of the right side of the house is the couple’s shared office. The rest of the right side of the house is for guests and their daughter. The space has an overall feel of a spa: Fluidity and water are the main design themes throughout the house. Color, textures, organization and furniture selections create a sense of calm. Color played a very important role; it provided a backdrop for all of the natural stone and wood used in the residence, and inspired a sense of Old World aging. These are the colors you would see in antiques. Natural tones with pops of colors were placed throughout the space — a unique mixture of calm blues with warm neutrals.

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“From this competition I learned to not be afraid of color. Color talks, heals, filters, disguises, evokes and sustains.” -AQUEEL SULEIMANJI CHINESE RED SW 0057 SHADE GROWN SW 6188 UPWARD SW 6239 MAXI TEAL SW 6769 REALLY TEAL SW 6489


StudentDesign Contest 2013 DESIGNER: EMILY VESTER

2 ND PLACE | Residential

TONY TAUPE SW 7038

RED BAY SW 6321

SMOKEHOUSE SW 7040

SCHOOL: ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY

”I’m very excited that my work is being recognized, and this can help to get my name out into the design world. I learned that hard work and dedication can pay off and get you noticed.”

-EMILY VESTER 3 RD PLACE | Residential

SMOKEHOUSE SW 7040

PEACE YELLOW SW 2857

DESIGNER: VICTORIA KOMERY SCHOOL: SAVANNAH COLLEGE OF ART AND DESIGN

NAVAJO WHITE SW 6126 Sherwin-Williams | stir

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Child’s Play The healing hues and innovative design of Chicago’s new Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago create a space that’s — dare we say it — fun.

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When the $855 million Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago opened last summer in Streeterville, a couple of fifth-graders went on a tour as part of a public open house. They got all the way through the facility — the lobby, the in-patient floors, the clinics, the chapel — without realizing that the place was a hospital. They thought it was some kind of museum for kids, and wondered when they could go back to actually play and explore. “Their tour guide told them she hoped they would never have to be patients there,” says Claudia Styrsky, associate partner at ZGF Architects in Portland, Ore., who heard the story secondhand. “But the story really tickled me because it was exactly what we wanted: a place that didn’t read ‘hospital.’” The architects, designers and planners did their job so well that even grown-ups might be excused for thinking

Lurie Children’s is a children’s museum. Before they even enter the front door, visitors are greeted by a suspended sea of wavy blue and green fiber-molded plates, part of a sculpture called “Healing Waters.” These undulating “waves” carry people from the front driveway to the lobby, where a nearly life-size sculpture of a mother humpback whale swims contentedly in the air, her enormous calf by her side. Just a few steps further is a floor-to-ceiling wall image of an undersea kelp forest with moving water ripples and winking creatures that peek out occasionally from the waving arms of kelp (thanks to a timed projector system). One elevator’s ride reveals a trio of fantastical coral sculptures, from Chicago art collective Aquamoon, that look like something straight out of a Pixar movie. Just a year old, Lurie Children’s can already claim a few records. For one, it’s the tallest children’s hospital in the world, reaching up 23 floors, but sitting on just 1.8 acres of land in the Streeterville neighborhood of Chicago. It’s also the recipient of the largest-ever gift from an individual to a children’s hospital. Philanthropist Ann Lurie — a former nurse at the facility (then known as Children’s Memorial Hospital) — gifted her one-time employer $100 million. The hospital is also unique because it partnered with more than 20 cultural institutions, including the Chicago Art Institute and the Shedd Aquarium, for its interactive art collection that spans all 23 floors.

COLOR AS DISTRACTION For Styrsky, the task was formidable: develop a color palette that would make all the pieces of the project come together. She and the team at ZGF started with a very basic question: What colors will help distract the kids from the reality of being in the hospital?

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF ZGF ARCHITECTS LLP

by ALYSSA FORD


“The kids were involved early on, saw multiple presentations and participated in work groups with the designers.” — CLAUDIA STYRSKY, ASSOCIATE PARTNER AT ZGF ARCHITECTS

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PROJECT: Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago LOCATION: Streeterville neighborhood, Ill. SIZE: 1.25 million square feet DESIGN FIRMS: ZGF Architects, LLP Solomon Cordwell Buenz Anderson Mikos Architects, Ltd.

Styrsky started with a pile of design books on children’s spaces. “The team looked at pictures of kids’ bedrooms in the U.S., Britain, Scandinavia,” she says. From there, they selected more than 100 kid-friendly hues, ranging from a delicate lemon yellow to a deep terra cotta. The next step was getting feedback from the hospital’s Kids’ Advisory Board, an unpaid but very experienced committee of children in the 12- to 18-year-old range. “Most of these kids were born with chronic conditions, so they are in and out of the hospital all the time,” says Styrsky. “And they have very strong opinions about hospital décor.” This wasn’t just a rubber stamp, she adds. The kids were involved early on, saw multiple presentations and participated in work groups with the designers. One of the major messages from the kids: Ease up on the soft pastels. “They did not want anything that looked like baby colors,” says Styrsky. “They wanted it saturated, and they wanted it vibrant.” Their parents, too, “wanted colors that are warm and engaging,” says Don Camp, administrator for family services and emergency services at the hospital, who facilitated its Family Advisory Board, made up of about 20 parents of chronically ill young patients. One day, he, Styrsky and the parents took a taxi to the National Museum of Mexican Art for inspiration. “The colors were vibrant but intimate,” he says. “We talked about rich colors that could also be soothing.”

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The end result was a 20-hue color list divided into five palettes: city (vibrant, fun); park (familiar, social); lake (contemplative, spirited); woods (magical, peaceful); and prairie (quiet, tranquil). The design team then put the palettes to work to create different experiences in different spaces. A custom-mixed vibrant yellow, in Sherwin-Williams ProMar® 200 Latex Paint, was used in the psychiatric ward and the emergency department, as well as in the patient wards. This serotoninstimulating hue, close to Daffodil (SW 6091), brightened up the inside of patients’ rooms, and also the corridor in the unit. “We designed it so that if you followed the main vibrant color down the corridors, you would eventually get to the core of the building with the public elevator banks,” says Styrsky. Every pair of rooms on the in-patient floors has an “entry porch,” with a hall charting station. Each “porch” is framed by two farmhouse-inspired windows, meant to extend the homey aura into the hallways.

COLOR AS WAY-FINDER “We were really motivated by this idea of ‘home,’” says Styrsky. The porches also serve as another clever wayfinder. If a child’s room is painted a particular color, then the entry porch is accented with that color, and no two “porches” in the same area are alike.


“We’re trying to make a bad situation a little better for the parents and the kids — not emphasize it with sterile hospital décor.” — DESIGN PROFESSIONAL CLAUDIA STYRSKY

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The architects, designers and planners did their job so well that even grownups might be excused for thinking Lurie Children’s is a children’s museum. Sample Palette The design team added another smart way-finding clue: Look for the bold color that’s nowhere else on the floor. That’s where you’ll find the main care team station. On several floors, this color is a custom reddish-orange, a saturated hue in the same neighborhood as Ardent Coral (SW 6874). The hue was applied in Sherwin-Williams Duration Home® Interior Latex paint, chosen for its rugged washability, a must-have in hospitals. Styrsky and her team (which included as many as 30 interior design professionals working in three cities) spent a considerable amount of time perfecting the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) as well as the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). The palette includes several shades of watery blue, a creamy vanilla-pudding-like hue, two shades of moss green and one shade of sherbet orange, all applied in Sherwin-Williams ProMar 200 paint. The result is much more vibrant and cheerful than most people would expect in a pediatric ICU. “But that’s the whole point,” says Styrsky. “We’re trying to make a bad situation a little better for the parents and the kids — not emphasize it with sterile hospital décor.” Mission accomplished: “When the parents on the Advisory Board came to tour the hospital, they said, ‘You listened to what we told you,’” Camp says. “That was a very high compliment.”

Alyssa Ford is a journalist who specializes in architecture and design.

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The 20-hue color list divided into five palettes: city (vibrant, fun); park (familiar, social); lake (contemplative, spirited); woods (magical, peaceful); and prairie (quiet, tranquil). Representative hues:

ARDENT CORAL SW 6874

DAFFODIL SW 6901

Coatings Used • ProMar® 200 Latex Paint • Duration Home® Interior Latex


COLOR focus

The Color Purple Purple is the hue of emperors and kings — and more recently of rock’s Prince. But how did the intersection of red and blue develop its royal reputation? The word itself gives us a clue. “Purple” comes from the Latin and Greek words for the purple dye that was manufactured in ancient times using a mucus secreted by a sea snail. The process of making the dye was extremely painstaking and costly, and the color became a status symbol, attainable only by kings, nobles and high priests. Purple was so precious that Roman Emperor Nero made it punishable by death for anyone but himself to wear it. Now, centuries later, the color purple is accessible to masses at the mall — but it remains steeped in regal symbolism.

Royal Purples

PLUMMY SW 6558

CONCORD GRAPE SW 6559


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STIR 2013 Special Issue