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S H E R W I N - W I L L I A M S® W h e r e C o l o r a n d C r e a t i v i t y C o n v e r g e V o l u m e 4 • I s s u e 2 • 2 0 0 7

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Destination:

Inspiration

colormix 08: where color knows no time zone. TM

Designer Cynthia Rowley

Environmental Branding

Working With Metallic Finishes

Editorial Advisor: Tresa Makowski Executive Editor: Bryan Iwamoto Editorial Director: Dobby Gibson Editor: Kim Palmer Executive Art Director: Sandy Rumreich Senior Designer: Cate Hubbard Senior Editor: Mara Hess Production Director: Pam Mundstock Production Artist: Neil Kresal Project Manager: Melanie Murphy Client Services: Steff Gumingo Lynda Whittle STIR® magazine (ISSN 1937-2027) is published by Hanley Wood, LLC, on behalf of The SherwinWilliams Company, for interior designers and architects. We welcome your questions and comments. Please direct correspondence to: Sherwin-Williams STIR Magazine Hanley Wood 430 1st Ave. N., Suite 550 Minneapolis, MN 55401 Phone: (612) 338-8300 Fax: (612) 338-7044 E-mail: swstir@hanleywood.com Web site: Click on Contact Us at swstir.com

STIR Advisory Board Emily Blitzer Paul Segal Associates New York, NY Kathleen Neama The S/L/A/M Collaborative Glastonbury, CT Ann Newton Spooner, IDS national president Ann Newton Spooner Interior Design Charlotte, NC Karin Schluer, Allied ASID, LEED certified Karin & Company Long Valley, NJ Leslie Shankman-Cohn, ASID Eclectic Interiors Memphis, TN Zara Stender, CID, IDS, Allied ASID, CMG vice-chair ZaraDesigns Reno, NV Kristine Stoller, NCIDQ certified KSID, LLC Sharon, MA Abby Suckle, AIA, FAIA, LEED certified Abby Suckle Architects New York, NY Denise Walton, ASID, NCIDQ certified Denise J Walton Design Scottsdale, AZ

Printed in the United States, © 2007 Sherwin-Williams, Vol. 4. Issue 2, 2007

COLOR KNOWS NO TIME ZONE

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ave you ever wondered how the color raw umber got its name? It’s named after Umbria, Italy, source of the special clay used to create the famed Renaissance pigment. Not only is this a fun bit of trivia, it’s a reminder of geography’s influence on color. In the past, pigment literally was earth.

Fortunately, thanks to today’s sophisticated synthetics, you don’t have to be Italian to have access to a rich brown, or live in South Asia to design with a stunning azure. There are gallons of each waiting at your local SherwinWilliams store! As color has become more affordable, widely available and environmentally friendly, the boundaries that governed it have faded dramatically. The result: design possibilities that cross cultures, leap oceans and stretch beyond the horizon. Think of this year’s Sherwin-Williams colormix™ 08 collection as your travel guide. These five collections will lead you in fresh directions, inspiring you to chart your own creative territory. What you’ll notice immediately: Rather than separate “themed” palettes — a cool pastel palette isolated from a hot tech palette — this year’s collection takes the fashion-forward approach of sharing inspirations and tones. Pivotal “intersecting colors” allow the palettes to blend together in the same way that you combine fabrics, prints and other materials in your own designs.

Order Sherwin-Williams color samples online at sherwin-williams.com.

Color is a map that is being constantly redrawn. Where it will take you depends only on how far you’re willing to travel. Bon voyage.

For product or compliance questions, call the Architect and Designer Answerline at (800) 321-8194.

Sincerely,

For local service and advice, please see your SherwinWilliams Architectural Account Executive or your local store. Sheri Thompson Director, Color Marketing and Design The Sherwin-Williams Company

The trademarks and copyrights of Sherwin-Williams appearing in STIR are protected. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

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ON THE COVER DESTINATION: INSPIRATION

COLOR TECH

Pack your bags. It’s time to explore new creative territory with the Sherwin-Williams colormix™ 08 collection.

New paint formulations make metallics easier to work with than ever before.

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EYE CANDY

THE LURE OF LUSTER

SELLING ‘GREEN’ How to talk to clients about the costs and benefits of green design.

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COLOR SPY

An oceanfront getaway’s playful palette is inspired by its spectacular San Diego setting.

The renowned designer talks about using high-impact color and evolving beyond trends.

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13 The new M&M’S World New York demonstrates how critical color is to environmental branding.

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CYNTHIA ROWLEY

GOING GREEN ®

PALETTE

DRAWN FROM NATURE

EARTH-FRIENDLY LUXURY Going green does not mean sacrificing style.

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FINAL TOUCH The secrets behind the magical colors of the aurora borealis.

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Palette COLOR N EWS AN D SOLUTIONS FROM SH ERWI N-WI LLIAMS

SELLING ‘GREEN’ How to change consumer perception of environment-friendly design.

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Why paint makes a difference Adding compelling, end-user-focused details to your next proposal can mean the difference between a successful pitch and a missed opportunity. Consider highlighting these points: • Health matters. Select the environmentally preferred options such as no- or low-VOC paints. Take careful precautions to avoid compromising indoor air quality and your health. • Bright equals natural light. Select paint shades that brighten indoor spaces and naturally reduce the need for artificial light, saving energy. • Durability pays off. Choose products for their durability and appeal. They will last longer and cost less to maintain in the long run. The upfront expense of high-quality paints and premium paint supplies is well worth the investment, because they can be applied more efficiently and yield better results. Durable formulations mean you’ll repaint less often, which helps minimize environmental impact.

Choosing zero-VOC or low-VOC paints Apart from being the environmentally responsible choice, no- or low-VOC paint is a contractor’s dream. The paint’s low amount of airborne chemicals makes it possible for construction crews to work alongside painting crews, reducing job time. In addition, low-VOC paints help workers and occupants avoid asthmatic and allergic reactions, and reduce VOC contributions to smog. The EPA requires manufacturers to list paint’s VOC content. In general, pick paint that meets your needs with the lowest VOC level possible. ■

ILLUSTRATION BY KEN ORVIDAS

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nvironmentally friendly building materials and designs increase worker productivity and even raise test scores in children, according to a pair of recent studies. So why don’t green projects sell themselves? The answer probably has a lot to do with consumers’ lack of green product knowledge. Misconceptions about prohibitive costs and scant information about coating options continue to hinder the adoption of green products. To close this knowledge gap, set the stage for your next project with some of the compelling research available on green products. Researchers point to an array of positive effects on people living in and using green buildings, including reduced costs, improved energy-efficiency and diminished pollutants. A study by the U.S. Green Building Council, the foremost coalition of building industry leaders promoting earth-friendly construction practices, claims that children in green schools have 20 percent better test scores, and hospitals using environmentally sound technologies discharge patients 21⁄2 days earlier than traditional hospitals do. On the retail side, the study reports that consumers linger longer and spend more money in green buildings. Green building is making real inroads into mainstream construction markets — 60 percent of U.S. property owners involved in construction used energy-efficient designs in the past year, according to data from construction consulting firm PinnacleOne, as reported in The Wall Street Journal.

“IT’S A FACT:

Air Apparent Sherwin-Williams ProGreen™ 200 meets green performance standards. Green is in, and Sherwin-Williams has the green products your customers are asking for. One of these products is ProGreen 200, a constructiongrade paint that meets clean-air and green performance standards at a competitive price. A low-VOC , low-odor formula makes ProGreen 200 ideal for painting occupied areas, while its durability and cost-effectiveness are perfect for new commercial construction applications. It’s available in Primer, Flat, Eg-Shel and Semi-Gloss sheens, allowing you to deliver an attractive, uniform finish while meeting stringent GS-11 criteria and demanding budgets. Benefits include: • Low VOC (50g/l) • Low odor • Meets or exceeds GS-11 standards • Can be applied in occupied areas • Formulated without silica

MORE GREEN RESOURCES AT SWSTIR.COM Visit swstir.com for quick links to additional green resources. • Explore Sherwin-Williams green coating solutions. Sherwin-Williams has the most green coating solutions in the industry.

Children in green schools have 20 percent better test scores.”

• Learn more about the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy Design (LEED) building certificate program. • You can also link to a helpful story on how you can “sell green” by emphasizing the documented, positive effects green materials have on productivity and wellness.

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GOOD HOUSEKEEPING SEAL

Duration Home®, a low-VOC, low-odor interior latex paint renowned for its superior washability and burnish resistance, is available in more than 1,400 colors, including bold, vivid accent colors, and has antimicrobial properties to resist mildew.

There’s more STIR Check out Sherwin-Williams® STIR® eExtra, STIR magazine’s color e-newsletter. Six times a year, STIR eExtra delivers advancements in color research, paint technology and design developments right to your e-mail account. Visit the Subscription Center of swstir.com to sign up, or complete and mail the business reply card in this magazine. The Sherwin-Williams® STIR® magazine Web site, swstir.com, also keeps color news and resources at your fingertips. You’ll find a complete archive of articles from past issues of STIR and STIR eExtra, plus additional resources and information on projects featured in STIR.

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Harmony®, a zero-VOC, low-odor interior latex product, permits immediate occupancy in newly painted spaces. It has antimicrobial properties to resist mildew and is formulated without silica. Duration® Exterior Latex Coating — the most durable exterior coating

available for resisting peeling and blistering — enables one-coat application on repaints and self-priming (two coats) on new work. Builders Solution® system is formulated especially for new residential spaces. The surfacer hides minor surface imperfections, and the topcoat permits seamless touch-ups. Good Housekeeping research indicates that a majority of consumers are more likely to purchase a product that has earned the magazine’s seal. Letting your clients know that you specify products backed by the seal can help you build a case for higher-quality coatings. ■

ILLUSTRATION BY JAMES 0’BRIEN, PHOTO BY LARS HANSEN

You’re no doubt aware that the Good Housekeeping Seal, an emblem of Good Housekeeping magazine’s focus on consumers, is a widely recognized symbol of high-quality goods. What you might not know is that four SherwinWilliams products have earned the seal.

Sherwin-Williams colormix™ 08 is your passport to today’s eclectic palettes.

Destination:

Inspiration

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olor is never static, but in today’s supersonic, hyper-linked world, it’s more fluid than ever, roaming freely across geographic borders and even defying time, thanks to the possibilities of retro. Global cultural influences swirl together; fashions morph from the runway to interiors at warp speed; technology and

the green movement intersect to forge new paths. Today’s color landscape is restless and nomadic, always moving and taking on new shadings. Designers are emboldened, and consumers have the confidence to embrace new hues and combinations. Against this backdrop, Sherwin-Williams is thrilled to present colormix 08, a travel snapshot TM

PHOTOGRAPH BY DOUG KILEY

from our collective color journey. Enjoy the view!

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Destination #1: Expand Your Horizons Technology is taking color to formerly unimaginable heights. Just as we have hybrid cars and hybrid crops, we now have complex hybrid colors. Saturated tones glow brighter, thanks to new finishes and enhanced materials. “Chameleon colors” are shape-shifters, bringing an element of change and discovery to even monochromatic palettes. And technology-enhanced patterns and textures create additional layers of nuance. It’s all about the interplay, harnessing color and light to create richer, livelier surroundings.

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Expand Your Horizons Cayenne SW 6881

Iron Ore SW 7069

Tatami Tan SW 6116

DRIVING FORCES

SUPPORTING ELEMENTS

UNEXPECTED COLORMIX

SET THE MOOD WITH …

Pioneered by the auto industry, technologydriven color is now a fashion staple, with fabrics that shimmer like fish scales or are embedded with lustrous crystals.

High-gloss lacquered finishes; lace patterns and special effects; patinas and color-washed metallics; oil-rubbed faucets and lighting fixtures; concrete tiles that produce patterns when exposed to water; cardboard furniture that flaunts its corrugation as a design element.

Deep Iron Ore (SW 7069) dramatically interplays with Tatami Tan (SW 6116) and Cayenne (SW 6881).

Techno dance music.

Wood Violet SW 6557

Marquis Orange SW 6650

Aquarium SW 6767

WORDS TO TRAVEL BY: Each color speaks individually in this palette, making a powerful statement in its own right.

GET THE NEW COLORMIX™ 08 To receive your Sherwin-Williams colormix™ 08 fan deck, order online at sherwin-williams.com, contact your Sherwin-Williams Architectural Account Executive, or call the Architect and Designer Answerline at (800) 321-8194 to have an account executive contact you.

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Destination #2: Around the World Today’s sophisticated, worldly consumers are exposed to many cultures and color traditions and feel free to mix, match and sample. This palette includes “departure colors,” ethnic-influenced hues that now feel familiar and continue to resonate; a “connection color,” Plum Brown, that bridges the gap; and “arrival colors,” reflecting cultures just beginning to emerge on the color horizon. Cultural cross-pollination adds intriguing juxtapositions, such as the Russian-influenced Relic Bronze, which evokes the treasures of the czars, appearing alongside Feverish Pink and Dynamo, which season the mix with a dash of Indian and Latin American flavor.

Departure Colors Cocoon SW 6173

Arrival Colors Relic Bronze SW 6132

Plum Brown SW 6272

Tassel SW 6369

Red Cent SW 6341

Crabby Apple SW 7592

Ceremonial Gold SW 6382

Tupelo Tree SW 6417

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Borscht SW 7578

Dynamo SW 6841

Feverish Pink SW 6859

Majestic Purple SW 6545

DRIVING FORCES

SUPPORTING ELEMENTS

UNEXPECTED COLORMIX

SET THE MOOD WITH …

Street fashion from around the world. A new generation of global citizens now has a sense of individuality and self-assurance to venture beyond the mainstream and create eclectic styles all their own.

Baroque-style furniture that celebrates the art of woodworking — carving, marquetry, decorative finishes and gilding; luxurious textiles, such as silks and cut velvets, paired with hides, such as leather and fur; folk art; tapestries; rich detailing, including fringe and semiprecious stones.

Berry-toned Dynamo (SW 6841) paired with Feverish Pink (SW 6859), balanced against the exotic earthiness of Plum Brown (SW 6272).

Calming Asian music (departure colors) or high-energy Russian folk tunes (arrival colors).

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WORDS TO TRAVEL BY: This rich palette has a ceremonial feeling that evokes the rites and rituals of distant lands and ancient cultures.

Destination #3: No Place Like Home There’s always a place for tried-and-true classics, especially when updated with a contemporary twist. This nuanced, elegant palette heralds a return to harmony, stability and practicality. There’s a balance between old and new, between our renewed appreciation for formality and our growing interest in protecting the environment. Whisper-soft “atmospheric colors” herald the return of white, with an emphasis on cool neutral and gray tones. “Grounded colors” inject an earthier note, while Classic Sand bridges the gap between interior and exterior.

WORDS TO TRAVEL BY: No longer rugged and earthy, green design is now sophisticated and elegant.

Atmospheric Colors Twinkle SW 7135

Grounded Colors Pink Shadow SW 0070

DRIVING FORCES Weakened housing markets and high consumer debt are motivating homeowners to create safe havens. Meanwhile, the green design movement is maturing and moving mainstream, putting a beautiful new spin on eco-consciousness.

SUPPORTING ELEMENTS

UNEXPECTED COLORMIX

Renewable and recycled The soft tones of Evening materials, eco-friendly Shadow (SW 7662) and products, efficient archiPink Shadow (SW 0070) tecture with smaller balanced with Agate footprints, natural-fiber Green (SW 7742) and fabrics given prewashed Bateau Brown (SW 6033). treatments and natural dyes, exposed beams, stamped sheet-metal screens, streamlined WORDS TO TRAVEL BY upholstery with tailored This rich palette has a ceremonial feeling shapes andthe menswearthat evokes rites and rituals of distant styleand detailing. lands ancient cultures.

Bateau Brown SW 6033

SET THE MOOD WITH … Classical music (atmospheric colors) or bluegrass (grounded colors).

Agate Green SW 7742

Classic Sand SW 0056

Granite Peak SW 6250

Evening Shadow SW 7662

Mountain Air SW 6224

Restful White SW 7563

Georgeous White SW 6049

Fleur de Sel SW 7666

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Destination #4: Pack your Bags A spicy mix of travel-inspired earth and jewel tones selected by fashion designer Cynthia Rowley. GETAWAY NO. 1: A New England road trip, from Connecticut to Maine. GETAWAY NO. 2: A desert escape, sun and scrubby brush, bleached-out stone and wood. GETAWAY NO. 3: Morocco, southern Spain and Moorish architecture.

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Getaway No. 1 Real Red SW 6868

Cocoon SW 6173

Tatami Tan SW 6116

Restful White SW 7563

Blackberry SW 7577

Granite Peak SW 6250

Liberty Blue SW 2942

Marquis Orange SW 6650

Twinkle SW 7135

Evening Shadow SW 7662

Iron Ore SW 7069

Plum Brown SW 6272

Ash Violet SW 6549

Majestic Purple SW 6545

Gecko SW 6719

Borscht SW 7578

Aquarium SW 6767

Fleur de Sel SW 7666

Frank Blue SW 6967

Getaway No. 2 Tupelo Tree SW 6417

Getaway No. 3 Dynamo SW 6841

INSPIRATION

DRIVING FORCES

FASHIONABLE INTERIORS

MODERN MIXING

"I find inspiration in adventure, and these Sherwin-Williams colors remind me of places I have traveled,” Rowley says. “Evening Shadow, Marquis Orange and Iron Ore remind me of the desert; Real Red, Cocoon and Liberty Blue of a New England road trip; and Aquarium and Frank Blue of architecture in southern Spain and Morocco.”

Fashion trends — including animal prints, brights, color-blocking and unexpected combinations such as natural tones paired with synthetic hues — are finding their way into interiors. Technology, combined with a growing ecological awareness, drives a push toward more natural products and materials.

“Don’t be afraid to use stronger, more masculine colors in interiors,” Rowley says. “Just as wearing dark colors makes you look slim, dark walls and floors make a room look sleek — and provide a dramatic backdrop for brightly colored accessories.”

Fashion-forward interior design is moving away from thematic palettes such as all earth tones, Rowley says. Color looks more modern when mixed in fresh ways, such as earth tones paired with techno, or retro paired with futuristic.

Cynthia Rowley

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Destination #5: Fork in the Road There is no single path to color exploration. Today’s hues reflect a crossroads with divergent choices. We can play it safe and take the color direction well-traveled, using analogous hues to create balance and sophistication. Or we can venture boldly down less-traveled paths, escaping to the fun and festivity of bright, complementary hues that evoke tropical getaways and youthful exuberance. These two distinct palettes intersect in the vivid teal of Fountain, which encourages exploration in both directions. But there are no rules, no regulations — just the joy of color freedom.

The Road Less Traveled Real Red SW 6868

The Road Well Traveled Liberty Blue SW 2942

Fountain SW 6787

Gecko SW 6719

Gladiola SW 6875

Quilt Gold SW 6696

Organic Green SW 6732

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Frank Blue SW 6967

Ash Violet SW 6549

Blackberry SW 7577

DRIVING FORCES

SUPPORTING ELEMENTS

UNEXPECTED COLORMIX

SET THE MOOD WITH …

Fashion runways, where shiny patent leather in bold hues heralds a playful, lighthearted mood, a refreshing antidote to the daily grind.

Woven furniture paired with upholstered pieces; brightly colored glass chandeliers and pendant lighting; raw silk pillows and draperies; simple geometric patterns; primary colors in adult spaces; concrete and natural stone to strike a calm, neutral note.

Inky Liberty Blue (SW 2942) paired with refreshing Fountain (SW 6787).

Smooth jazz (“well traveled” colors) or bebop (“less traveled” colors).

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WORDS TO TRAVEL BY: Whimsical, adventurous colors encourage escape into a carefree, lighthearted world.

C O L O R

The lure of Today’s enhanced metallic coatings offer new ways to add sheen.

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luster

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etallic finishes have always suggested elegance and luxury. And with good reason: Up until fairly recently, metallic coatings contained flecks of real silver or gold. But advances in paint technology have allowed new pigmentation to enter the market, making metallic paint an increasingly popular and affordable way to add shine to interior design. Today’s metallic paints are available in water-based formulations, making them more environmentally friendly, says Steve Revnew, director of residential marketing for Sherwin-Williams’ Architectural Coatings Division. Now the gold and silver is just an illusion. The paint combines flecks of metallic-like pigment, with water-based pigments to mimic the look and luster of more-precious metals. The pigment flakes capture light and refract it, giving the surface its potential for brilliance, while the pigment replicates the color of the metal. The result is a 24-karat shine in a significantly lighter, more stable and easier-touse coating that is also available for a wider range of designs. “Before, just the high-end artists used metallic,” Revnew says. “It was too expensive. Now, it’s much more accessible and easy to use.” Sherwin-Williams’ Illusions® Translucent Metallic Finish — in silver, gold, copper and pearl — can create shimmering, elegant accents without weighing down the overall look of a room. Sherwin-Williams formulations not only make the paint lighter and easier to apply, Revnew says, but more stable in the can. The pigment doesn't separate from the rest of the paint formulation. The most common application for Illusions Translucent Metallic Finish is to use it in combination with a glaze, which adds a touch of opulence to walls or accessories, such as a mantel, piece of furniture, lamp or trim. When combined with Illusions® Faux Finish Latex Glazing Liquid™, metallic coatings add luster as a top coat, sometimes enhanced by combing or another decorative-finish technique. “You can be very creative with it,” Revnew says. “It’s just a matter of what type of effect the designer and the contractor are envisioning. These are translucent in nature, however, so it’s not something you’d paint on an entire wall.” Today’s lighter, more versatile metallic coatings bring an additional dimension to designers’ palettes. Want to draw the eye to a focal point? Reflect more of a room’s natural light? Provide a subtle luminance? Anytime you want to add shine to your design, Illusions Translucent Metallic Finish is an illustrious choice, Revnew says. ■

HOW TO SHINE Metallic coatings require no different preparation than other paints, according to Steve Revnew of Sherwin-Williams. A clean, dry, uniform surface is optimal for achieving best results. Try Illusions® Translucent Metallic Finish, combined with Illusions® Faux Finish Latex Glazing Liquid™, as a translucent topcoat over a single colored base coat — either with a brush or using a faux-finish technique, such as ragging, frottage or combing. And while gold, silver, copper and pearl are the available colors, they can also be combined to achieve special looks. For instance, you can blend gold and silver to create bronze. MORE ONLINE For more information on metallic coatings and their application, go to swstir.com.

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EYE candy The new M&M’S® World New York demonstrates how critical color is to environmental branding.

By JENNIFER BLAISE KRAMER

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Color became critical to communicating the brand inside and out. The palette was restricted to the “sacred six colors” of M&M’S Brand — red, orange, yellow, green, blue and brown. The Chute Gerdeman team taped M&M’S candies on paper next to the corresponding Pantone colors and then matched the chips to Sherwin-Williams paint colors. Unlike most projects, where colors usually start from scratch, here the challenge lay in staying on brand. “It was so important that we got the right M&M’S colors,” says Gerdeman’s material and trend specialist Katie Clements. “Even with carpet and flooring, if you wanted to use red, it had to be exactly the right red.” Once they chose the exact shades, the search was on for the perfect browns to make the space all the more melt-in-your-mouth chocolaty. In fact, anywhere black paint normally would have appeared, brown was used in its place. The instantly identifiable colors created a cohesive look. Then the trick was applying a variety of finishes, including semi- and high-gloss, to achieve a candy-coated sheen on the giant threedimensional characters. “M&M’S is a singular brand with a lot of facets,” Shafley says. Therefore it was crucial to reinforce that brand all over the store. The merchandise ranges from T-shirts, housewares and collectibles to the actual candies, which are displayed in 6-foot-tall M&M’S-shaped fixtures. But that’s only part of what makes the store highly branded. Everywhere are reminders of how big the name is and how much fun you can have with it. A full-size M&M’S #38 NASCAR race car makes speedway sounds. Nearby, the Color Mood Analyzer, a machine that

The Chute Gerdeman

ow do you take an iconic candy that’s smaller than the size of a dime and blow it out into a retail store in the middle of Times Square? You use a lot of color. With a set palette and a whole lot of gloss, those tiny M&M’S candies come alive in a world where warm chocolate smells pervade and you can hear that unmistakable sound of candies falling into a bowl. Mix in a handful of interactive experiences, and you’ve got a 25,000-square-foot candy land where everyone gets a taste of the fun. For designers, it’s a textbook case study on effective environmental branding. To create a contemporary and geometric store design while letting the “spokescandies” do their own storytelling, Mars Inc., which owns M&M’S Brand, hired the Ohio-based Chute Gerdeman design firm after their award-winning work on the M&M’S Orlando store. Brian Shafley, the firm’s president and director of creative services, says the key was balancing an iconic expression of the candy’s shape, size and color with all the personalities of the “spokescandies,” M&M’S Brand’s popular advertising characters. Here, at one of the world’s busiest intersections, the project presented challenges of traffic and space, not to mention time: It had to be completed in 11 months to open for holiday shopping. The building has glass facades on three sides, making it a “gigantic fishbowl.”With minimal wall space to work with, “the inside became the storefront,” says Shafley, who served as the principal on the project. Making a statement from the street, 17 internally illuminated columns are synced with LED lighting technology, allowing the exterior to continually change color, which is most dramatic after dark. As the entire perimeter radiates light, the store shows off its vivid floor displays to passersby. Keeping up with the varieties of electronic signs on Broadway, a rotating, internally lit sign, shaped like five stacked M&M’S candies, sits beneath a 2,500-square-foot video billboard. Before you even step inside, Shafley notes, the stage is already set.

team taped M&M’S candies on

Pantone colors and then matched the chips to Sherwin-Williams paint colors.

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PHOTOGRAPH OF M&M’S BY LARS HANSEN, EXTERIOR STORE PHOTOS BY ADRIAN WILSON, INTERIOR STORE PHOTOS BY MARK STEELE

paper next to the corresponding

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A rotating sign shaped like five stacked candies sets the stage for the M&M’S store in Times Square.

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GETTING THE WHITE RIGHT A good white paint can be trickier to pick out than another color. Material and trend specialist Katie Clements of Chute Gerdeman had a hard time choosing one that would make all the M&M’S shades pop. She shares her process for nailing just the right white: 1. Go through samples and pull out any shades of whites that appear colorless and crisp. 2. Test to see if the whites take on any hues of the surrounding colors in the space. Since whites can look slightly pink, blue or yellow, usually this is when you can notice any unwanted tones.

Chute Gerdeman created, “scans” you and tells you in a comical computerized voice what M&M’S color you are. Throughout the building, color acts as a metaphor for diversity, while “the world’s biggest wall of chocolate,” measuring 50 feet by 22 feet, strengthens that message. Here, two stories display 72 M&M’S-candyfilled tubes where customers can create their own personal mix. Playing off the United Nations, a wall covered with international flags encourages customers to make a one-of-a-kind mix using their country’s colors. The price is $9 a pound, but where else can you take home a custom bag of M&M’S candies representing Italy, the Red Sox or your alma mater? “This is a chance for people to immerse themselves in all things M&M’S,” says Phil Levine, a spokesperson for the Mars Retail Group. Call it environmental branding, retail therapy or “retail-tainment,” he calls the flagship store a destination where customers can connect with their favorite M&M’S candy — and we all have one. “People are devoted to their favorite M&M’S color,” he says. “The store does its best to reflect that dedication.” ■

3. Narrow it down until you’ve found a true white paint. For this project, Clements found one in SherwinWilliams Extra White.

THE COLORS OF CANDY LAND Stop (SW 6869)

Brevity Brown (SW 6068)

Invigorate (SW 6886)

French Roast (SW 6069)

Cheerful (SW 6903)

Extra White (SW 7006)

Envy (SW 6925) Blue Chip (SW 6959)

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The color palette in this California condo was inspired by its ocean setting.

Drawn from

NATURE A spectacular setting inspires an oceanfront getaway’s colorful palette and Earth-friendly design.

B y R I TA M A N N K O N T E R S K I

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PHOTOGRAPHS BY CHRIS O’MEALLY

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usan Drawdy wanted her two-bedroom beach condo, which overlooks a neighboring pier in San Diego and the Pacific Ocean, to be colorful, but not too beach-like. No lighthouses, no shells, no netting motifs. She wanted a no-fuss, low-maintenance, highfunctioning space where she and her two boys could relax and entertain on weekends. Drawdy was too busy to be very involved with the project, so she searched the Internet for a local designer to whom she could hand it over with confidence. She chose Laura Birns, owner of Laura Birns Design (www.lbdesign.net) in Del Mar, Calif., because of her portfolio, her way with colors and her custom furniture designs. Drawdy set no color parameters. “I let her fly with it,” she says. Birns did more than fly; she soared, creating a vibrant palette with unexpected punches of color that support the condo’s spectacular view. She started with a clean, small slate: white ceramic tiles, white walls and a 1,000-square-foot footprint that could not be altered. Her challenge was making the condo look and function like a larger dwelling. But she wasn’t afraid to break up the limited space with a lot of bold hues. “I wanted the colors and the design to expand the space so you could move through it almost in a circle. I love circles,” she says. “The interaction of materials and color give the condo a natural pulse.” Birns, who is passionate about environmentally friendly design, chose Sherwin-Williams Harmony® Interior Latex, which has no volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Her green leanings are also reflected in the color palette, which was inspired by nature. The front living space, which includes the kitchen, living room and dining area, has a cheerful Papaya (SW 6661) accent wall that greets you and leads you through the space. She added a deeper

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The colors in Drawdy’s condo were chosen to inspire movement.

COLORS OF THE SEA AND SUN For paint, designer Laura Birns chose Harmony®, an environmentally preferred coating with the Sherwin-Williams GreenSure® designation. It contains no volatile organic compounds (VOCs). KITCHEN/ LIVING ROOM/ HALLWAY:

MASTER BEDROOM/ BATHROOM:

2ND BEDROOM/ BATHROOM:

Baize Green

Indulgent

Papaya

(SW 6429)

(SW 6969)

(SW 6661)

Copper

Baize Green

Rookwood

Harbor

(SW 6429)

Jade

(SW 6634)

(SW 2812)

Papaya (SW 6661) MORE ONLINE AT SWSTIR.COM There’s more online with designer Laura Birns at swstir.com.

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orange, Copper Harbor (SW 6634), and bright yellow cabinets to create a feeling of sunshine. Baize Green (SW 6429) on another wall evokes a spring meadow, while recyclable-glass floor tiles and a mosaic backsplash, both in blue, sparkle like the ocean. “The ocean view set the stage,” Birns says. “Everything else supports this natural setting.” Drawdy admits that if she had seen the whole color palette on a single board, she might have been reluctant to try so many colors. “I don’t think I have ever seen a space with all the combinations of color,” she says. “In the kitchen, three colors come together. It’s amazing that it works, but it does.” Birns continued her colorful ways in the master bedroom and bath, which feature a soft purple (Indulgent, SW 6969) and green (Baize Green) palette. “I chose purple for the bedroom because it is a good color

for sleeping and dreams. I was not aware it was my client’s favorite color,” Birns says. Flexible furniture pieces help the condo live larger than it looks. The living-room sofa pulls out as a queen-size bed so that the space can double as extra sleeping quarters at night. And a cocktail table, custom-designed by Birns, has wheels so it can easily move to accommodate sleepovers. “The success of the design, in addition to the color palette, is the condo’s ability to function and play host to so many people,” Birns says. Drawdy came to trust Birns’design instincts and asked her to design the family’s primary residence in Escondido, Calif. That home, which is much larger, has a more neutral palette, she says, noting, with a laugh, that people usually get more conservative with color as they get older. Does Birns agree? “You should have seen me when I was younger,” she says. ■

G O I N G

Seeing green’s

G R E E N

POSSIBILITIES

Style and sustainability go hand in hand in designer Laura Birns’ projects.

B y R I TA M A N N K O N T E R S K I

PHOTOGRAPHS BY LARS HANSEN

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alifornia interior designer Laura Birns loves many colors, but she’s most passionate about green. As a member of the U.S. Green Building Council and an advocate of its Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification program, she approaches all her projects through a green lens. “My philosophy is to stay true to form and function, which means maintaining a healthy environment,” she says. “I don’t know how else to design but green.” She enjoys educating clients about the wide and rapidly expanding range of environmentally friendly materials available. “Many clients want ideas about green products, but they aren’t aware of all the choices,” she says. “Technology moves so fast, it’s tough even for professionals to stay ahead of the learning curve on all the new sustainable products and solutions on the market.” “People are sometimes surprised that they can have luxury and beauty — and still be very green.” When Birns was hired to design a twobedroom oceanfront condo for client Susan Drawdy, Birns made sure her specifications from paint to lighting, from flooring to

People are sometimes surprised that they can have luxury and beauty — and still be very green. fabric, were all environmentally friendly choices, including: Bamboo flooring with a formaldehydefree, water-based sealer. (Bamboo grows faster than hardwoods. Because it is a grass, it can be harvested again and again from the same plant. It’s also harder than maple and red oak, and very beautiful, Birns notes.) A wool area rug that is certified “childlabor free,” meaning no child labor was used in manufacturing. Wool is also a good choice for avoiding petroleumor chemical based-fibers. No-VOC paints (Sherwin-Williams Harmony®). Dimmer-controlled lighting throughout the condo to conserve energy. Low-flow water fixtures and low-energy appliances throughout. Sheer weave window coverings that allow light in and block out heat, ultraviolet rays and the sun’s glare. Recyclable glass tiles in the kitchen.

• • • • •

• Natural lighting in the master bathroom through a skylight. • No PVC (polyvinyl chloride, which has been proven toxic) in upholstery fabrics. • Stainless-steel accents. (Stainless

steel is resistant to corrosion and staining, requires little maintenance, is relatively inexpensive, and is 100 percent recyclable. In fact, an average stainless-steel object is composed of about 60 percent recycled material, 25 percent from end-of-life products and 35 percent coming from manufacturing processes.) Wood that was sustainably harvested. The result was a surprised — and very pleased — client. “Green design was appealing, but it was not a priority to us,” Drawdy says. “Laura educated us about sustainable design, and she really outdid herself on our home.” ■

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C O L O R

S P Y

adventures

IN COLOR Fashion-forward designer Cynthia Rowley keeps it fresh by continually challenging her creativity.

B y C H A R LOT T E STO U DT

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ynthia Rowley made her first dress at age 7. As a senior at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, she sold her first collection to several New York department stores, and her designs have been in

high demand ever since. Known for her vivid color combinations, clean lines and playful sense of design, Rowley (cynthiarowley.com) has expanded her fashion empire to include everything from umbrellas to dishware and fragrance. The designer co-authored the Swell series of wry lifestyle books and has appeared on TV’s Project Runway and Design Star. Most recently, Rowley partnered with Sherwin-Williams to launch the Concepts in ColorTM collection, a simplified color-selection system that presents 250 of the most popular hues in easy-to-use 3" x 5" sample chips with coordinating color recommendations.

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PHOTOGRAPH BY ROGER TULLEY

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Color is a great tool, but it

CR: I was always encouraged

always needs to be evolving. Take cues from other trends

to be as creative as possible. When I was in seventh grade, my parents told me I could decorate my bedroom however I wanted. They gave me a budget. It was like one of those home design reality shows. I chose lime-green paint and multi-shades of lime-green shag carpeting. I painted the woodwork. I bought sheets and twisted them to make a canopy over my bed. I just tricked out the whole room.

like fashion and the visual arts.

STIR: How do you think about color for home design as opposed to color for your clothing line? CR: I don’t think there should be a distinction. People get so scared and want to do everything safe in home design. They have an idea that it’s more of an investment, but the way you think about your home should be the way you think about your clothes.

STIR: So you should change your home design as often as your outfits? CR: Exactly. Something starts out as a trend and people latch on to it. But then they stay with it longer than they should. That puce green color has been around for awhile. For designers, I feel like it was meant to be a shot of color. Then people ended up using it for a whole theme. You need your own style, and it should be based on classic principles of design. But you have to keep changing all the time. That’s why paint is such a great tool for that. That’s how that puce color started, someone painted one wall green. Great, but that idea needs to progress to the next one. Maybe hot pink, or a dark coffee color. Even red lacquer. Color is a great tool, but it always needs to be evolving. Take cues from other trends like fashion and the visual arts.

STIR: What colors do you use in your own interiors? CR: My office is plain old white, because it’s such a confluence of so many things. We do accessories, home collections for different people, kids’ clothes — couldn’t have anything else visually going on in the workplace. Our stores use Sherwin-Williams Potentially Purple (SW 6821), and the floors are black. My house has lots of color. I used a 1970s raspberry purple upstairs in the living room, which is actually kind of formal; there’s a gold24

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leaf grand piano in that room. I like that it’s sort of a twisted version of tradition. I use a lot of blues — there’s a lacquered blue wall around a fireplace. Then I mix that with a blackand-white zebra rug. My kitchen cabinets are Sherwin-Williams high-gloss black lacquer.

STIR: You’re definitely a big fan of lacquer. How can someone play with that idea without overdoing it? CR: How about starting with your front door? Mine is a dark teal blue. You have to be practical about using lacquer. Pick a dark shade. Small rooms like entryways are fun to play around with. If you’ve got a big room, try painting one or two pieces of old wooden furniture from a flea market a bright color, like hot pink enamel. Lacquer really transforms a traditional piece of furniture. Or do a desk and a chair in a kid’s room.

STIR: Do you paint floors? CR: Absolutely. My stores have black-lacquer-painted floors with a silver stencil. A stencil is great for creating a more interesting floor pattern. STIR: What is your favorite color in nature? CR: The blue of the sky. I like that sort of evening blue right before the sun goes down. It’s almost a military blue, with some black in it.

STIR: Name two colors that never let you down. CR: Silver and gold. STIR: You’ve recently come out with a collection of drawings and stories entitled Slim: A Fantasy Memoir. CR: Yes, it’s kind of a fun mother-daughter book. It’s about being playful and inventive. Mixing up Kool-Aid in the bathroom sink. Or the notion of luxury camping — the girl in the book thinks, well, the tent is made from canvas, so why not paint a painting on the inside? She puts her hair up with twigs. There’s a chandelier made from flashlights. I wanted the book to be a source of inspiration. Whenever you’re faced with a creative decision, in any part of your life, you want to think, “How can I make this different than anything that already exists? How can I look at this in a different way?” The bottom line is to be as inventive with as many things in life as possible. ■ Rowley’s new book, Slim: A Fantasy Memoir, is about being playful and inventive

PHOTOGRAPHBY LARS HANSEN

STIR: You’re known for your high-impact color combinations. Where did this bold style come from?

F I N A L

T O U C H

NATURE’S LIGHT SHOW The aurora borealis, or Northern Lights, those magical flickering fingers of colored light that appear in the sky, have long fascinated humankind. But there’s more science than magic behind their hue and hypnotic movement. The aurora occurs when highly charged electrons from the solar wind collide with gases in the Earth’s upper atmosphere. The color of the aurora depends on which atom is struck and the altitude of the meeting. A green aurora, the most common color, results from oxygen up to 150 miles in altitude, while red results from oxygen at higher altitudes. Nitrogen produces an aurora in blue (up to 60 miles in altitude) or purple (at more than 60 miles in altitude). All the magnetic and electrical forces react with one another in constantly shifting combinations, making the aurora appear to “dance” on the horizon.

SS H H EE RR W W II N N -- W W II LL LL II AA M M SS

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paint on joy.

SW 7707 | COPPER WIRE from the

collection

What shade of “joy”are you looking for? With our new Concepts in Color™ collection, you’re sure to find it. Of course, if you want to create an entirely different mood— from subdued to surprising — we can help you do that, too. Now, doesn’t that make you want to jump for joy? To order large size color samples and fan decks, go to sherwin-williams.com or contact your local Architectural or Designer Account Executive. sherwin-williams.com ©2007 The Sherwin-Williams Company

Sherwin-Williams 400 1st Ave. N., Ste. 200 Minneapolis, MN 55401

Architect and Designer Answerline 800-321- 8194

PRSTD STD US Postage

PAID Cenveo


STIR 4.2 2007