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S H E R W I N - W I L L I A M S® J o i n t h e C o l o r C o n v e r s a t i o n

SPECIAL ISSUE • 2012

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SEA COLOR Ocean life up close with photographer Jeff Rotman

INTRODUCING EMERALD

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Our most revolutionary paint yet

HGTV’s David Bromstad

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2013 Color Forecast

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Student Design Contest Winners


The Sherwin-Williams Company

STIR Advisory Board

Director, Trade Communications: Tresa Makowski Director of Color Marketing: Jackie Jordan

Glen Boudreaux, ASID, RID, IDEC Glen Boudreaux & Associates Dallas, Texas

Hanley Wood Marketing Creative Director: Dobby Gibson Editor: Kim Palmer Executive Art Director: Sandy Girard Art Director: Cate Hubbard Senior Editor: Mara Hess Production Director: Pam Mundstock Production Artist: John Hanka Project Manager: Tim Martinson Account Directors: Dana Brink, Martha Capps

Free STIR Tablet Edition With Exclusive Content STIR is also available for your iPad or Android tablet device. Not only is it free, it offers exclusive content you won’t find in the print edition.

Kathy Davis, CID, IACC/NA Kathy Davis Associates, Inc. Solana Beach, Calif.

From behind-the-scenes videos to interactive content exploring color and design, you won’t miss a thing with STIR, which conveniently auto-updates every time new content is available. Get it today at swstirapp.com.

Phillip Koski, AIA, LEED AP Koski Architecture Minneapolis, Minn. Michael Scott, IDS, Allied ASID Michael L. Scott Design Destin, Fla. Zara Stender, CID, IDS, Allied ASID, CMG ZaraDesigns Las Vegas, Nev. Abby Suckle, FAIA, LEED Abby Suckle Architects New York, N.Y.

STIR® magazine (ISSN 1937-2027) is published by Hanley Wood, LLC, on behalf of The Sherwin-Williams Company, for interior designers and architects. Please direct correspondence to: Sherwin-Williams STIR magazine Hanley Wood 430 1st Ave. N., Suite 550 Minneapolis, MN 55401 Phone: (612) 338-8300 Email: contact@swstir.com Website: swstir.com Printed in the United States, © 2012 Sherwin-Williams

Visit swcolor.com to: • Order color samples • Download color palettes into virtual design tools • Paint room scenes or upload your own photos in Color Visualizer • Download ColorSnap®, a free color-matching app for smartphones

To match a picture on the Web to our color palettes, visit letschipit.com

For product or compliance questions, call 800-321-8194 For green solutions, visit swgreenspecs.com

THE SHAPE OF DESIGN

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here are two major forces shaping our work as designers today. On the one hand, technology continues to open up new possibilities, from creative tools to new high-performing materials. On the other hand, the economy pushes back, challenging the business side of design. This year’s STIR® print annual explores both issues. On the innovation side, we’re thrilled to introduce you to Emerald™ zero VOC acrylic latex paints (page 3), which deliver beauty and performance second to none. Emerald is powered by our breakthrough ColorCast Ecotoner® colorant system (page 20), which doesn’t add VOCs to paint during the tinting process. On the business side, you won’t want to miss what your colleagues say in this year’s STIRvey (page 22), which explores the surprising choices designers have had to make to survive and thrive in a challenged economy. On page 14, you’ll find our annual colormix™ color trend forecast. For 2013, we’re exploring the dichotomy of influences on color and design. Once again, thanks to my team for all of their insight: color marketing expert Becky Ralich Spak, product finish specialist Kathy Andersson, and international color and design expert Carol B. Derov — all from Sherwin-Williams. At Sherwin-Williams, we continue to look for new ways to supercharge your design practice, from innovative new products and color tools to inspirational ideas. I look forward to seeing you all as I tour the country to connect you with this year’s color forecast. Visit our Facebook page for dates and times: facebook.com/SherwinWilliamsforDesignersArchitects. Sincerely,

The trademarks and copyrights of Sherwin-Williams appearing in STIR are protected. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

Jackie Jordan Director of Color Marketing The Sherwin-Williams Company


C O N T E N T S

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SPECIAL ISSUE: 2012

COLOR CHIPS

PHOTOGRAPHY OF DAVID BROMSTAD © 2012, HGTV/SCRIPPS NETWORK, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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Introducing Emerald™, our most revolutionary paint yet. Incomparable performance and zero VOCs, even after tinting.

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SHADES OF THE SOUTH Carefully chosen, locally inspired colors imbue Southern Living’s 2011 Idea House with a combination of European charm and Southern hospitality.

COLOR CONVERSATION

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Dive into color! We talk to HGTV’s David Bromstad, master weaver Silvia Heyden, and underwater photographer Jeff Rotman.

COLORMIX

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Sherwin-Williams colormix™ twothousand-thirteen explores our attraction to opposites and their influence, emerging with a diverse palette reflecting our color mood.

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COLOR TECH

GREEN GAMECHANGER New ColorCast Ecotoner® colorants produce truer, richer, more luxurious colors, without adding VOCs.

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Meet the 2012 Sherwin-Williams STIR® Student Design Contest winners, and see their awardwinning work.

30 FINAL TOUCH

STIRVEY Discover how your design colleagues have evolved to survive and thrive in the new economy.

22 CAPITOL IDEA A little detective work gives a historic theater another chance at glamour.

26 Join the Color Conversation!

STUDENT DESIGN CONTEST

FASHION FOOTNOTE

33 ON THE COVER

The tail of a spotlight parrotfish shot by Jeff Rotman near the Bahamas.

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COLOR NEWS AND SOLUTIONS FROM SHERWIN-WILLIAMS

MORE FROM HGTV® HOME BY SHERWIN-WILLIAMS New this summer: a wallpaper collection and exterior paint line Residential clients who have expressed interest in the HGTV® HOME by Sherwin-Williams line of interior paints, supplies and color collections will want to know about the new wallpaper collection. The HGTV HOME by Sherwin-Williams Wallpaper Collection features a series of eight trend-driven “mini collections,” all designed to coordinate perfectly with Sherwin-Williams exclusive HGTV HOME paint color collections. You and your clients can learn more at sherwinwilliams.com/homeowners/hgtv-homeby-sherwin-williams/wallpaper. The HGTV Home by Sherwin-Williams

New Website for Design Pros

paint line has also been expanded to

Check it out! The new sherwin-williams.com website has an entire section dedicated to your professional needs: color selection, product information, facility solutions, green specs, inspiration and education, and much more.

include an exterior coating. Visit

And by using the new “My Sherwin-Williams” functionality, you can save your color and product favorites so they’re waiting for you on your next site visit, or easily share them with your clients!

for more

the homeowners section of sherwin-williams.com information.

Explore sherwin-williams.com/architects-specifiers-designers.

Turn Web Images Into Palettes Finding color inspiration online is easy. Just Chip It! With the touch of a button, the new Chip It! interactive color tool identifies up to 10 Sherwin-Williams paint colors that correspond to the colors in any picture you find online. Try it at letschipit.com.

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EMERALD INTERIOR:

Our Most Revolutionary Paint Yet SHOWN: Emerald Interior in Independent Gold (SW 6401)

> Industry-leading performance in beauty, hide and washability with stain, burnish and block resistance. > Tinted with zero VOC ColorCast Ecotoner® colorants for outstanding color accuracy, vibrancy and thickness. > Available in all colors, including deep accents and high-reflectance pastels. > GreenGuard® Indoor Air Quality Certified, and GreenGuard Certified for Children and Schools.

INTRODUCING EMERALD™ When your clients expect exceptional quality and environmental responsibility. From performance to beauty to sustainability, there’s simply no other paint line on the market capable of thrilling clients like the new Sherwin-Williams Emerald Interior acrylic latex and Emerald Exterior acrylic latex paints. Not only is this breakthrough product zero VOC — even after colorants are added — but its performance is unsurpassed in beauty, hide and durability. To learn more about the innovative new zero VOC colorants being used in Emerald and all Sherwin-Williams latex and water-based paints, see Color Tech on page 20.

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C O L O R C O N V E R S AT I O N : J E F F R O T M A N

Photographer Jeff Rotman brings the colors of marine life to the surface.

UNDER THE SEA By KIM PALMER

has been an ambassador to a watery habitat, exploring the world’s oceans with his camera — and enlightening land-bound mammals. Rotman’s stunning images have won numerous awards and have been showcased in 20 books, from Underwater Eden (a study of coral reefs) to his latest children’s book, City Fish, Country Fish. STIR® caught up with Rotman on dry land at his home in New Jersey. STIR: What inspired you to become an underwater photographer? JR: I came from a background of photojournalism. I was a diving enthusiast in my early 20s, and my interest in nature and natural history led me underwater. I’m from Boston, and I started diving in that area. Since then I’ve been diving all over the planet. STIR: Tell us about your process. JR: You go down with a plan for the animal you’re trying to work with. At the same time, it’s a very active environment, and things happen. You can’t change lenses underneath the water, so I bring a lot of different cameras, as many as 10. I’ve had the same assistant for 25 years. He’s my right hand and responsible for many of my results. When I’m working with sharks, he makes sure two of us come out of the water. That allows me to focus on trying to take photographs.

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STIR: What kind of lighting do you use? JR: All my close-up work is done with flash, but nothing compares to natural light. STIR: What creature that you’ve photographed has been the most memorable, colorwise? JR: The octopus. It changes coloration at the cellular level. When it moves into a different location, it will try, as best it can, to match its environment, both in coloration and texture. STIR: How does the underwater color palette vary from ocean to ocean? JR: In cold temperate waters, there’s much less variety of color than in tropical waters. Temperate oceans are dark and muted. Tropical waters are a blaze of color. On a reef, you see every shade imaginable. STIR: For those of us on land, the color blue is most strongly associated with the ocean. Is that true for you? JR: No. Blue comes from the reflection of sky on the water, and whether the surf is choppy or smooth. But underwater, the ocean’s color changes from environment to environment. It could be green. It’s dark, and the deeper you go, the darker it gets.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFF ROTMAN

For almost four decades, Jeff Rotman (jeffrotman.com)


Clockwise from top left: a school of Pacific cownose rays; a sea anemone; photographer Jeff Rotman; and the tail of a spotlight parrotfish

STIR: In what other ways does the underwater environment vary from ocean to ocean? JR: The topography varies so much, from valleys and mountains, to holes and caves. The kelp forests of California are like an underwater jungle, with plants 100 feet tall. You see tremendous biodiversity. You feel the rhythms change from night to day. There are mounds of coral with 100 different species, and so many different types of sand. STIR: Colorwise, what’s the most stunning underwater environment you’ve seen? JR: I like it when there’s a lot of atmosphere, like sunlight or stormy clouds. My preference is when I shoot wide angle, and then you don’t see color underwater. STIR: Do the images you capture ever surprise you with their color? JR: When I shoot, I don’t see the real color — only for a moment when the flash goes off. It’s almost erased in my mind until I see the image. STIR: How does color influence your photo selection process? JR: When I see something striking in its coloration then I go after it and try to capture it.

STIR: What’s your favorite place to photograph? JR: I don’t have one. Each place has its own mystique and beauty. New England and the Red Sea are two places I’ve worked the most. STIR: What sea creature is the most difficult to photograph? JR: Sharks. They move so quickly — their action is so fast and unpredictable. You have to entice them with food, but when you create an environment where you’re feeding wild animals with a good set of teeth, it’s a very uncontrollable situation. We work with a cage. Sometimes we wear chain-mail suits, although that won’t protect you from a big shark that can just crush your bones. STIR: What’s been your closest call? JR: I’ve had scrapes here and there, but nothing terribly serious. I’ve been very careful — and very lucky. The funny thing is, when you have a camera, you’re so focused on getting the photograph that it releases all your fear.

Kim Palmer is the editor of STIR.

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JOIN THE COLOR CONVERSATION

Go to facebook.com/SherwinWilliamsfor DesignersArchitects.

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C O L O R C O N V E R S AT I O N : D AV I D B R O M S TA D

LIVING LA VIDA BROMSTAD By CHARLOTTE STOUDT

“Working out the gorgeous no matter what”: Bromstad in action and (opposite page) on the set of White Room Challenge.

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PHOTOGRAPHY ON LEFT BY VIKRAM PATHAK, PHOTOGRAPHY ON RIGHT © 2011, HGTV/SCRIPPS NETWORKS, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

The ‘Design Star’ unleashes his Miami-infused color mojo on plain white rooms.

STIR: Name a favorite space with a bold use of color. DB: The spa at the Icon in Miami by Philippe Starck. I walked through there, and it changed me forever. I love baroque moments: great artwork that doesn’t fit, but perfectly fits. In the middle of the spa lobby, there’s a 30-foot acid-yellow chandelier. It’s over the top. Just unbelievable.

Fresh, fearless and winning: HGTV star David

STIR: Most people don’t get to live in the tropics. How do you bring Miami sunshine into a colder climate? DB: Anyone can achieve a fresh look by keeping furniture on the lighter side. Nothing brings a room down faster than a brown leather couch. Stick to white, creams and grays. Make sure that everything is almost one tone, and then pop colors.

Bromstad (bromstad.com) has designed everything from children’s fantasy bedrooms to amusement-park installations. Since winning the first season of HGTV Design Star in 2006, the Minnesota-born Bromstad has quickly become a high-profile creative force, known for his bold sense of color. Along with endorsing HGTV® HOME by Sherwin-Williams, Bromstad is busy with multiple TV projects: hosting and mentoring contestants in a brand new season of HGTV Design Star and launching White Room Challenge, a new show based on the trickiest test for any designer — how to bring life to a bare room with four white walls. STIR caught up with the buoyant designer to catch his current color mood. STIR: What colors did you grow up with? DB: I’m a Midwestern corn-fed boy — my mom had wallpaper everywhere! Borders were huge in the 1980s. Our house was full of blues, pinks, creams and taupes. My parents actually argued over design issues. My dad insisted he wasn’t creative, but he’d always say, “I want to see it before you buy it.” When we bought things, it was important that they last and that everyone enjoy them. Everyone, that is, being my mom and dad! Kidding aside, seeing my parents work together on their home made a big impression on me. STIR: When did you know you wanted to be a designer? DB: My first love was animation. I thought that’s what I would grow up to do. The movie that made me want to go into art was Disney’s The Little Mermaid. The storm scenes were extraordinary — the detail of the rain and wind. The colors were dynamic and beautiful. I saw that movie, and boom! There were no other options. One of my first jobs was designing children’s fantasy bedrooms. I did a girl’s room where the bedframe is shaped like a clamshell, and bedding is a pink velvet tongue. I bought a plastic ball from Target and used it as a giant pearl. It’s pretty clear where my inspiration came from!

STIR: What design elements do people tend to overlook? DB: Rugs and lighting. If you don’t have them, or don’t get them right, a room feels sterile. The space will look like a corporate apartment. STIR: What colors in Miami’s vivid palette inspire you the most? DB: The crystal-clear blue water. The white and pink buildings. And the intoxicating hotel interiors.

I don’t believe in decorating regionally. You don’t need a house that “looks” Northern. You paid good money for it. Make it your dream house. STIR: What colors are in your Miami home today? DB: My house is black and white, with gray walls and pops of acid yellow, lime green and red. I also have ebony floors. Never get black floors! They’re awful. They show every single hair. My partner vacuums twice a day. STIR: Fantasy client? DB: Lady Gaga. STIR: Do you have a design motto? DB: Working out the gorgeous no matter what. STIR: In honor of your new series, let’s give you the “White Room Challenge.” Take one empty white room, and choose one paint color. Go. DB: One paint color? That’s just evil! I’d go with a mid-toned gray and do a graphic. Tape it off and play with the negative or positive space. Livable and fabulous! Charlotte Stoudt is a Los Angeles–based freelance writer.

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EXPLORE THE HGTV® HOME BY SHERWIN-WILLIAMS COLLECTION

Go to sherwin-williams.com/homeowners hgtv-home-by-sherwin-williams.

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C O L O R C O N V E R S AT I O N : S I LV I A H E Y D E N

Tapestry artist Silvia Heyden makes textiles sing.

DREAM WEAVER By CHARLOTTE STOUDT

reinvent an ancient art form. The creator of 1,000 full-scale tapestries that hang in museums, board rooms and private homes, she’s spent a lifetime exploring the links between color, rhythm and emotion. The recent documentary “A Weaverly Path” by Kenny Dalsheimer (aweaverlypath.com) explores Heyden’s singular vision and the impact of nature on her work. Now 84 and living in Durham, N.C., she continues to defy convention, constantly challenging her limits as an artist. STIR: Is it true you started off wanting to build violins? SH: Music and color were always close together for me. Babies actually have to develop the capacity to distinguish between color and sound. Some do it quickly, some not so fast. I played music from an early age — violin and piano. I was fascinated by how you can produce a sound with a box and some strings. But at that time, violin builders would not take a girl on as an apprentice. STIR: You studied with Bauhaus legend Johannes Itten at Zurich’s School of Arts. What did he teach you? SH: His class was an incredible education in color theory. We would cut squares of colored paper into strips and put one next to the other. The idea was to show that colors have a personality. Red is loud and yells

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all the time. But in a certain combination with other colors, like green, it gets quieter. Lilac is very quiet. So how can you help it come out of its shell? I began to play a theater of color. Colors transform constantly. You have to play with that change. STIR: What led you to tapestry? SH: My teachers thought I was crazy. Tapestry was seen merely as a technique to “weave” paintings — for centuries, people just copied pictures on looms. But I felt there was something I could express with it. I improvise my tapestries. Once you start, the loom somehow tells you where to go. It’s much more fun than copying an image. STIR: Your tapestries feel very dynamic. How do you imbue your colors with energy? SH: I use very thick threads, four threads per inch. Nothing synthetic, just natural yarns. Often I double my threads so they’re very coarse, and really have body. In weaving you can mix threads. In the same thread, you can use two different colors. But they don’t mix like a color in paint. When you combine yellow and blue thread, you don’t get a green. You get something that vibrates between yellow and blue.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHARLES HARRIS

Swiss-born Silvia Heyden has found striking new ways to


Clockwise from top left: A close-up of Silvia Heyden’s signature textured tapestry; Heyden at her loom; a tapestry on the reed; Heyden selecting from her thick, natural yarns.

STIR: What is the biggest mistake people make with color? SH: People stereotype colors: I hate yellow, I like blue. But there are so many yellows and so many blues! And yellow next to a red is quite different than yellow next to blue. How are you using the color? As accent or for more? Will there be light on it? How does it look in the sun, or on a gray day? Another color issue is value. Every color goes from very light to very dark. Usually when something is wrong in tapestry, it’s a value issue. The composition is OK but the color values aren’t right.

explode it. I was in a gallery in Washington, D.C., recently and spent an hour in front of a Gerhard Richter painting. It takes that long to really look at something. STIR: What keeps you going as an artist? SH: I really want to go as far as I can with what I’ve found out. And then I want to communicate it to the next generation, so they can do what I can’t anymore. There is no such thing as the perfect tapestry. There is always more to discover. n Charlotte Stoudt is a Los Angeles–based freelance writer.

STIR: What colors do you live with in your home? SH: I live in a solar house built by my son. We’re surrounded by wildlife — deer, foxes. I wanted to be in a house but not separated from nature. We have a concrete floor with radiant heat in a purplish brown. You put the color directly in the concrete. It blends inside and outside perfectly. The walls are a light yellow, which make the tapestries look natural and good. STIR: What other artists out there inspire you? SH: I love Paul Klee. He believed in finding the structure underneath something. When you get that right, your art is alive. And then you can

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VIDEO: A WEAVERLY PATH

Visit Silvia Heyden’s documentary video by Kenny Dalsheimer at aweaverlypath.com.

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SHADES OF THE

SOUTH

An architectural romance with southern Italy and France finds colorful expression in Texas.

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There’s “southern living,” the experience, and Southern Living, the magazine. Sultry summer heat, lavish gardens and outdoor entertaining characterize the former, while the latter raises a mint julep to the region’s lifestyle 13 times a year in print and once a year in actual square footage. Southern Living’s 2011 Idea House in Horseshoe Bay, Texas, occupies its shoreline along Lake Lyndon B. Johnson like a native. But its Tuscan accent and Mediterranean blues suggest a worldliness beyond. The home’s location in the Escondido golf community, about 50 miles from Austin, is similarly escapist. The Idea House was built on spec as a second home and, like its neighboring properties, is valued at $2 million to $3 million. “These Idea Houses are big-time deals,” says Frank Craige, Southern Living’s homes program manager in Birmingham, Ala., who has orchestrated more than a dozen of the magazine’s annual build-outs. “And this one was our most aspirational.”

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Architect Michael G. Imber, whose namesake firm is based in San Antonio, and his interior design partner, Marcus Mohon of Mohon-Imber Interiors in Austin, brought to the Idea House their signature modern-classical fusion. “We wanted to take European influences and be specific to those that had meaning to the South and, in particular, to Texas,” says Imber. From Mohon’s watercolor sketches — hastily drafted in his hotel room after meeting with the magazine’s editorial board — spilled local inspiration. “We started thinking color way early on because of some of the sketches I did in my notebook,” recalls Mohon. “The blue-gray tones reminded me of the lake.” The duo chose hues carefully to create a respite. “We wanted the color palette relaxed, quiet and easy so it wouldn’t compete or cause too much stimulation,” says Mohon. “This is a vacation home where people go to escape the summer heat.”

PHOTOGRAPHY BY TRIA GIOVAN, 2012 SOUTHERN LIVING IDEA HOUSE

By KITTY SHEA


Constructive destruction LIVING ROOM Color: Buff (SW 7683) Architect Michael Imber hatched the idea of the 5-foot-tall paneled wainscoting as a way to visually subdue the living room’s 18-foot ceilings and lend intimacy to seated gatherings. The first layer of coating (a basic interior wiping stain) aged the wood and put a lock on its grain so paint would “float” on the panels. Then decorative painter Nancy Coleman aged it even further, with multiple rounds of painting and scraping to create a rustic, weathered look. “When you start the process, it’s shocking. The builder completely freaked out when he saw what Nancy was doing. He thought she’d gone rogue and sabotaged the project,” says project manager Erin Schneider. (Affirms Coleman, “I won’t tell you what he said when I started scraping it down.”) Stopped several times, Coleman prevailed, producing a wrap of depth and texture that enlivens the room’s neutral palette. The builder, David Mitchell of Casa Highland Construction in Horseshoe Bay, liked the final result.

SS H H EE RR W W II N N -- W W II LL LL II AA M M SS

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Awash with color LAUNDRY / FLOWER ROOM Color: Waterscape (SW 6470) An architectural pivot angles the wall separating the kitchen and laundry, creating a beckoning wash of tranquil robin’s egg blue. “Southerners are so in love with their gardens that I wanted it to be more than just a laundry room; I wanted it to carry the romance of a flower-cutting room,” says architect Michael Imber. He contrasted rustic materials — the ceiling rafters are reclaimed barn wood, and the walls are wood planks rather than drywall — with the blue’s cool sophistication to soothing effect. The ultimate compliment comes from project manager Erin Schneider, who confides that she would like to sit in the laundry room (the laundry room!) and enjoy a glass of wine.

“More than just a laundry room, I wanted it to carry the romance of a flower cutting room.”

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Under the Texas sun EXTERIOR WINDOW/DOOR TRIM AND WINDOW SHUTTERS Color: Night Owl (SW 7061, with colorants cut by 50 percent) The blue hue on the trim and farm-style shutters was inspired by Provence, France. Assigned to cool the warm tones of the locally quarried gold sandstone, it took some trial and error to find just the right shade. After the shutters were sprayed offsite and hung, “We pulled up to the job site and all went, ‘Uh-oh,’” recalls project manager Erin Schneider. The original color was beautiful on its own, explains interior designer Marcus Mohon, but appeared washed out under Texas’ intense sun and against the stone. “It was almost not a color once we got it up on the building,” he says. His revised pick still looked fresh but more deeply, richly blue, keeping the feel light and airy for a summer-living house but strong enough to pair with the stone, unlike a pale pastel.

Waves of welcome GUEST HOUSE Color: Rainwashed (SW 6211) The 800-square-foot casita (Spanish for “guest house”) sits atop the boathouse, with interior designer Marcus Mohon’s muse — the lake — below. “Other than the laundry room, this is the most colorful room of the house,” he says, noting that its water-inspired blue leans a touch greener than the main residence’s laundry / flower room. Decorative painter Nancy Coleman enjoyed working with the shade. “It is a beautiful, soft color that could work with any décor but has enough color to make a statement,” she says. n Kitty Shea is a Minneapolis-based freelance writer.

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THE 2013 SHERWIN-WILLIAMS COLORMIX TM FORECAST

OPPOSITES

ATTRACT By KIM PALMER

OPPOSITES ATTRACT US LIKE NEVER BEFORE, exerting a magnetic pull on the spectrum. SherwinWilliams colormixTM two-thousand-thirteen puts today’s color mood under the microscope to reveal its dueling influences. Simple vs. complex … mystery vs. certainty … light vs. dark … synthetic vs. natural. Those are just a few of the opposing ideas currently competing for our attention. We gravitate to our personal preferences, yet we can’t help being shaped by the divergent energies pulsing all around us. With influences bombarding us at warp speed, how do we find our equilibrium? How do we narrow the overwhelming number of choices we have in a world where we can access virtually anything and everything with the touch of a finger?

MIX IT UP There are endless ways to put your unique, creative spin on colormix two-thousandthirteen. And Sherwin-Williams offers tools to make it easy: ORDER colormix color cards and large-size color swatches at swcolorsamples.com

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DOWNLOAD colormix colors into virtual design tools or paint room scenes in the Online Color Visualizer at swcolor.com FIND these colors on the ColorSnap® app for smartphones. Download at swcolorsnap.com


IT’S NO LONGER A PROCESS OF ELIMINATION. IT’S A PROCESS OF COMBINATION. “As forecasters, we try to filter out the noise and focus on the relevant and meaningful,” says Jackie Jordan, director of color marketing for Sherwin-Williams. “We observe, then come together to create a synthesized view of the drivers and inspirations that are having the biggest impact.” The year 2013 is “the Year of the Snake” in Chinese culture, which is appropriate given the paradoxes snakes represent, Jordan notes. Snake people are thought to be analytical, yet hypnotically seductive, calm yet exciting, with a hint of menace. They can’t be ignored.

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COLOR FORECASTING: BEHIND THE SCENES

Discover how Jackie and her team create a color forecast. See the video inside our free STIR tablet edition. Available in both iTunes and Google Play.

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DARK SHADOWS The spooky gothic soap opera captivated TV viewers in the late ’60s — and recently arose from its cultural tomb to be reborn as a film starring Johnny Depp.

SSSHH! WE’VE GOT A SECRET. It’s our dark side, and we’re irresistibly drawn to exploring its murky depths and shadows. The colors are moody, the vibe is masculine and the aesthetic is both Victorian and futuristic. Visible mechanicals intrigue us, while theatrical effects, eerie collections, and menswearinspired fabrics like tweed and houndstooth evoke Sherlock Holmes and the Prohibition era of secret doors and speakeasies.

6199 RARE GRAY

2847 ROYCROFT BOTTLE GREEN

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6251 OUTERSPACE

7593 RUSTIC RED

6131 CHAMOIS

6004 MINK

6510 LOYAL BLUE

2801 ROOKWOOD DARK RED

7700 OLDE WORLD GOLD

6272 PLUM BROWN

STEAMPUNK

EXOTIC SPIRITS

Sci-fi, fantasy and horror intertwined in this 1980s literary genre that evoked Victorian-era Britain or the American Wild West.

Absinthe, the aniseflavored “green fairy,” was the spirit of choice for 19th-century Parisian Bohemians. Banned in 1915 for its potency and reputed hallucinogenic powers, it has since enjoyed a revival.

THEATRICAL ROMANTICISM Iconic, masculine turn-of-the-century atmosphere is fresh again. Think libraries, curated artifacts and smoking jackets.


CHALKY COLOR The effects of the wind and sun create matte finishes and color gradations that result in a soothing, reassuring beauty.

TIME AND NATURE WORK HAND IN HAND to create a softened beauty that is restful and comforting. We experience it in the layered hues of mineral deposits, sea-buffed stones and the weathered shutters of a rustic farmhouse. The colors are chalky and earthy, the materials raw and organic, the finishes matte. It’s a homespun aesthetic inspired by our renewed appreciation for artisan craft, handmade quality and homemaking as a valued skill rather than a chore.

7057 SILVER STRAND

7612 MOUNTAIN STREAM

7739 HERBAL WASH

7697 SAFARI

6117 SMOKEY TOPAZ

7059 UNUSUAL GRAY

7603 POOLHOUSE

2842 ROYCROFT SUEDE

0010 WICKERWORK

7702 SPICED CIDER

HANDMADE

NATURAL TEXTURES

THE MAGIC HOUR

Handmade craftwork and earthy character come together in this sea urchin– inspired bowl by Heather Knight.

It’s about furnishings you can feel with your eyes, like the big textures of this Biknit Chaise for Moroso by Patricia Urquiola.

The minutes after sunset and before dark are the most coveted by photographers; the light is softer, the shadows longer, bathing images in a warm glow.

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SEMIPRECIOUS The colors of crystals and semiprecious stones exude glamour, but with a youthful, quirky twist.

WE FEEL PRETTY, OH, SO PRETTY, in a demure midcentury way — but with a new, modern edge. The retro glamour of pearls, florals and classic feminine silhouettes are tempered by fun and funky accents and attitude. The pastels are a bit bolder, including semiprecious gem tones like citrine, peridot and amethyst, set off by crisp neutrals. The look is still ladylike — but much more free-spirited than in your mother’s day.

6316 ROSY OUTLOOK

6771 BATHE BLUE

6464 ALOE

6815 AWESOME VIOLET

0074 RADIANT LILAC

0025 ROSEDUST

6035 GAUZY WHITE

7083 DARKROOM

6401 INDEPENDENT GOLD

6556 OBI LILAC

RETRO FUN The original waif supermodel Twiggy  revolutionized standards of beauty in 1966. Now a fresh take on her legendary look is appearing on the fashion scene.

FLIRTY AND FEMININE Both are possible with the geometric prints and kaleidoscopic color of today’s most fashionable fabrics.

A MOVE TO MOD There’s nothing more hip and elegant than a vintage Vespa that’s spent just the right number of summers in the sun.

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RARIFIED GLOW Neon started in the lab in 1898, when a scientist discovered a colorless gas that gave off a bright glow when electrically stimulated. Without it, we’d have no Vegas.

ELECTRONICS, ALTERNATIVE ROCK AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY — plug those influences into one socket and you get a blast of high-voltage look-at-me colors. We’re not shying away from them; we’re splashing them across everything from cars to appliances to upholstery. It’s consumerism as self-expression, giving the bold and the not-so-bold equal permission to be nonconformists. All those bold hues need a palette purifier, bringing black, white, gray and clear acrylics into the picture.

6875 GLADIOLA

6991 BLACK MAGIC

7006 EXTRA WHITE

6921 ELECTRIC LIME

6950 CALYPSO

6859 FEVERISH PINK

6840 EXUBERANT PINK

7018 DOVETAIL

6914 EYE CATCHING

6967 FRANK BLUE

NATURE AGLOW

ELECTRIC DECOR

Sea jellies (technically they aren’t fish) can be clear or fabulously phosphorescent. They’re found in every ocean, from the surface to great depths.

Furnishings like this Disco Chair by Kiwi & Pom are a party unto themselves, even without anyone in the room.

BOLD PERFORMANCE Big color is being embraced, not just as an accent, but as something central to self-expression and performance.

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C O L O R

T E C H

GREEN GAME-CHANGER Sherwin-Williams new industry-leading zero VOC ColorCast Ecotoner® colorant system takes quality and sustainability to the next level.

By KATE FISHER

“As of mid-2012, all SherwinWilliams latex and waterbased paints are tinted with the zero VOC colorants.” “This system will not add to the VOC content of any paint when tinted,” says Steve Revnew, vice president, product innovation, Sherwin-Williams. That means the VOC content of any base paint will remain consistent, even after tinting. That’s important to know when you’re trying to achieve green certification for your project, protect the indoor air quality of a space, and be the most environmentally responsible designer you can be. Sherwin-Williams

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ColorCast Ecotoner is the only colorant system certified by GREENGUARD®, meeting its strict indoor air quality standards.

No more color compromises And as a bonus, you and your clients no longer must compromise on color when you resolve to go green. In the past, some designers were frustrated by lost product performance when working with paints that had minimal VOCs, Revnew says. “Typically with deep bases, and conventional colorant technology, you lose viscosity, which results in a thinner paint film,” says Revnew. “You don’t get the depth of color. It will take multiple coats to develop true colors.” Sherwin-Williams new ColorCast Ecotoner colorants produce truer, richer, more luxurious colors, without adding VOCs. There’s no loss in paint film or hide, regardless of how much colorant is required. The other point of differentiation for the new tinting system is its unlimited color options. This industry-leading technology is in all Sherwin-Williams stores, which means the entire line of Sherwin-Williams water-based paints and colors are tinted with zero VOC colorants. You can choose any of the hues in the vast Sherwin-Williams color palette and still achieve the ultimate in performance and sustainability — this also includes any custom color matches. “Sherwin-Williams is committed to advancing environmentally responsible paint technology,” he says. “Now all our efforts to lower the VOCs in our products have taken another leap forward.” n Kate Fisher is on the editorial staff of STIR.

INTRODUCING EMERALD™ ZERO VOC PAINTS There’s a new best-in-class paint on the market: Sherwin-Williams Emerald Interior acrylic latex and Emerald Exterior acrylic latex. Both are zero VOC products with unsurpassed performance. These self-priming formulas offer exceptional durability and hide, as well as color accuracy. Emerald Interior prevents stains from penetrating, providing easy cleanup of surfaces, and resists water streaking and spotting. It is GREENGUARD® Indoor Air Quality Certified and GREENGUARD Certified for Children and Schools. It is low odor and has antimicrobial properties that inhibit the growth of mold and mildew on the paint film. Emerald Exterior provides excellent durability and outstanding resistance to blistering, peeling, chalking, fading, mildew and dirt pickup in a 100% acrylic formula. When your projects call for the very best, it’s an easy call: Emerald.

ILLUSTRATION BY ANNA + ELENA BALBUSSO

P

aint has come a long way since the industry began reducing its reliance on solvents and other conventional raw materials. So have we. By now you’re probably aware of VOCs (volatile organic compounds) and their impact on air quality: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulates VOCs that are photochemically reactive. The lower the VOC content, the better. But even paints that claim to be zero VOC in the lab and manufacturing plant don’t always maintain that level by the time they’re being applied to your clients’ walls. Why? Because the conventional colorants used to tint them to your desired hues often add VOCs to the finished product. The more colorant needed to achieve the preferred color, the more VOCs typically have been added to the paint. Now Sherwin-Williams Introduces the zero VOC ColorCast Ecotoner colorant system.


You and your clients no longer must compromise on color when you resolve to go green.


T R S I vey NEW REALITIE$ NEW OPPORTUNITIE$ The recession changed everything, including the design profession. But the worst appears to be over, and design professionals have demonstrated their creative mettle by retooling for tough times: picking up new skills, exploring new channels and bringing more to the table to serve today’s clients. What are those clients looking for? And where is there room for growth? Since you’re in the design trenches, we turned to you for answers to those questions. For the third year, STIR® has opened up its annual conversation to readers, inviting you to report on how the economy has impacted you and your work. This spring, we invited subscribers to our STIR eExtra e-newsletter (you can subscribe at swstir.com) to take our STIRvey. Our results represent the opinions of nearly 1,900 design professionals nationwide. About two-thirds (65 percent) of respondents were interior designers, 9 percent were architects, and the balance

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represented a combination of color consultants, decorative painters, specifiers and others. Half identified themselves primarily as residential designers, while 18 percent identified themselves as commercial and a third (32.4 percent) as both. Overall, you’re an optimistic bunch. Asked what direction you predict 2012 revenues will trend compared with 2011, two-thirds of you predicted they would rise. As for how much, one-third (32.5 percent) predicted a 1 to 5 percent rise, while nearly one-fourth predicted a 5 to 10 percent rise, and 12 percent predicted an increase of more than 10 percent. About half of you say your clients are bolder and more adventurous when it comes to color, and they’re also more demanding when it comes to paints and coatings, with 17 percent demanding greener products, 17 percent demanding a higher-quality and longer-lasting product, 19 percent demanding a more cost-effective product, and 42.5 percent demanding all of the above. Read on for revealing insights about your colleagues’ strategies for surviving and thriving in the new economy:


PROJECT SIZE How does the size, scope and revenue potential of an average project today compare with that of an average project in 2008?

39%

Slightly smaller

32%

Radically smaller No change

15% 12%

Slightly larger

3%

Radically larger

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT What has the recession inspired you to add to your professional repertoire? (Check all that apply.)

More networking and professional development

67% 45%

Color consulting services

39%

More online marketing

33%

Staging services

20%

ILLUSTRATION BY CELIA JOHNSON

Teaching experience

Art-hanging services

15%

Online design services

14%

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FEES VS. PRODUCT REVENUE Since 2008, how has your ratio of professional fees revenue changed compared with revenues generated from product sales?

44%

31% 25%

Fee revenue is up and product-sale revenue is down

Product-sale revenue is up and fee revenue is down

No change

IN YOUR WORDS What are the keys to success in the new economy? Share your thoughts or a story about how you’ve survived/thrived since 2008.

“I T’S

ALL ABOUT N E T WOR K I N G. I AM TRYING TO KEEP MY ADVERTISING BUDGET TO A MINIMUM, SO I RELY HEAVILY ON WORD OF MOUTH.”

“ S TAY CLOSE WITH HIGH-END C LI E N TS. TH E Y A R E A LW A Y S THE FIRST TO START SPENDING MONEY AND LIKE TO DO LARGE PROJECTS WHEN THE ECONOMY IS DOWN BECAUSE LABOR IS CHEAPER.”

“Don’t turn any­­one away based on the size of their project. It can turn into an ongoing relationship, and they have more friends than you know.”

“The fact that we do not have a bricks-and-mortar location was the biggest cost-saving factor for our business. People are doing more

shopping on the Internet, and you have to be prepared for that. The clients today are buying you and your designs, and they understand that they need your help. That’s why they called you to begin with.”

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MARKET POTENTIAL Where’s the most potential for a design professional in the next five years? (Check all that apply.)

17% Residential: multifamily environments

Education

Other commercial

Residential: single-family homes

29%

26%

55%

Hospitality

22% Healthcare

50% 15% Retail

TIMELINES

“DESIGNERS NEED TO CHANGE THE WAY THEY DO BUSINESS IN THE NEW ECONOMY. Dreams of

How does an average project’s timeline today compare with an average project’s timeline three years ago?

opening a beautifully decorated show­­room need to give way to web­sites and online consulting using digital photos.” “Being flexible and really educating clients / potential clients about the cost savings of hiring an interior designer. You can spend a little money and not make expensive mistakes.”

“H AVE A SPECIALTY , GET GOOD

45%

Slower* Faster** No change

29% 26%

AT IT, AND ALWAYS CALL ANYBODY AND EVERYBODY BACK WITHIN A DAY.”

*clients are more deliberate or phase projects **clients are more decisive or projects are smaller

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A decaying movie palace gets another chance at glamour

A CAPITOL IDEA A decaying movie palace gets another chance at glamour thanks to a historical palette. By ALYSSA FORD

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leak, and huge patches of wall plaster cracked open to reveal a corroded web of structural metal lathe inside. By the time architect Dave Metzger saw the theater for the first time in 2010, he was stunned. “It looked like Beirut, circa 1978,” he says.

‘Majestic’ miracle Rewind to 2004, when a miracle was getting under way. A no-nonsense CPA named Becky Anderson had taken the theater under her wing and was determined that this time would be different. She started going around Burlington with a clip from The Majestic, the 2001 feel-good flick starring Jim Carrey. In the movie, Jim Carrey’s character is incredulous when an elderly theater owner, Harry Trimble, wants to rehab his old movie palace. “This place is ready to fall down,” says Carrey’s character. “All you have to do is walk outside and give it a shove.” “You’re wrong. You are, you know,” says Trimble. “I know she doesn’t look like much now, but this place once looked like a palace.”

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ALAN STOKER

W

hen the Capitol Theater opened in 1937 with a Jane Withers comedy and a Boris Karloff thriller, the Burlington, Iowa, movie house was a modern marvel. The Hawk-eye Gazette hailed its “great beauty and comfort,” including a sound system designed for talkies and state-of-the-art airconditioning. When the theater closed in 1977, the sleek Art Deco building was so distinctive that people started trying to revive it almost immediately. One community group repainted the gold-trimmed terra cotta façade hoping that the fresh look would attract interest and dollars. It didn’t. In 1990, a local pharmaceutical salesman bought the theater with dreams of turning it into a dinner-theater, remodeled on the inside to look like Yankee Stadium. That dream died, too. Then an accountant bought the building, thinking it would make a great live-music venue. All this time, the theater fell further and further into disrepair. The original lights were stolen, and the velour-covered spring seats were stripped out. The north part of the roof began to


The paint palette inspiration: an original terrazzo floor discovered under moldy ’70s-style carpeting. Patterned in classic geometric Art Deco curves, the floor includes four vibrant hues: blueberry, grape, orange and rose.

COLORS SHOWN: Butternut (SW 6389), Cabernet (SW 1294), custom-matched ceiling.

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Historical paint analysis The Friends also brought in David Arbogast, an architectural conservator in Davenport, Iowa, to extract samples from several walls of the theater. Arbogast’s report was sent to the SherwinWilliams research laboratory in Valley View, Ohio, where his analysis was converted into custom paint samples. But the samples confounded Carol Benne, principal at Designer’s Viewpoint in Burlington. “In one room there was tan next to rose and pea green, and then in the next room there would be bright orange with muddled-gray brown and vibrant red. I mean, what is that?” Arbogast says the interior is “definitely Moderne in look and spirit” but even he — who has analyzed literally hundreds of old buildings

— says he was a little surprised at the mix of colors found in the Capitol. “It’s a very unusual palette even for the time: lots of beige and tan, and then colors like chartreuse.” Benne took a mockup of a purely historical color scheme to the Friends of the Capitol Theater board. It took them just a few minutes to authorize a historically sensitive “color interpretation” over a strict redo. Thankfully, says Benne, she already found her color inspiration: an original terrazzo floor discovered under moldy ’70s-style carpeting. Patterned in classic geometric Art Deco curves, the floor includes four vibrant hues: blueberry, grape, orange and rose. She was also inspired by a warm golden-orange hue discovered on the south wall of the stage. Armed with a new palette, Benne went to work. A rigidly periodcorrect lobby would have had tan walls, a dark brown ceiling and vibrant orange doors. Instead, the new space’s Butternut (SW 6389) walls, Cabernet (SW 1294) trim and doors, and a custom-matched ceiling bring in the grape-purple found in the terrazzo floor. When patrons walk from the lobby to the foyer, they’ll find gray-plum walls, Butternut trim and an Agreeable Gray (SW 7029) ceiling. It’s a marked difference from the 1937 foyer — tan walls, split-pea-green trim and a rose pink ceiling. ProMar® 200 Zero VOC Interior Latex was used for most of the wall surfaces, in an eg-shel finish. Benne says she’s particularly proud of the theater, which a timetraveling Depression-era moviegoer would find very familiar. The walls, made of diamond-patterned acoustic tiles, are painted golden caramel Honeycomb (SW 6375) with deep red Firewood (SW 6328) wainscoting and detail accents. Stepped forms on each wall evoke the Art Deco flavor, done up in a subtle light gray, High Society (SW 1037). The top rail has an oversized Aztec Deco motif, for which Benne selected warm Butterscotch (SW 6377) paint. When Becky Anderson toured the theater after its paint job, she was blown away. “It’s bright and inviting — everything we imagined the theater could be all those years,” she says. “I think Harry Trimble would be proud.” n Writer Alyssa Ford specializes in sustainable architecture and interior design.

PAINT DETECTIVES How a chip from an old movie palace becomes a custom color:

1

28

EXTRACT SAMPLES Architectural conservator David Arbogast extracts 21 samples from the Capitol Theater.

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2

EXAMINE SAMPLES Arbogast examines the samples with his optical Olympus microscope.

3

ASSIGN VALUES Using natural north light, Arbogast places each color on the Munsell colorimetry scale that gives a separate value for hue, lightness and purity.

For instance, the foyer ceiling becomes 5R 5/3, or a medium red, with a lightness degree of 5 and saturation degree of 6 (a medium rose pink).

PHOTO ON LEFT BY SHARON HARVEY

Trimble gives a little speech that Becky Anderson can recite by heart: “Any man, woman, child could buy their ticket, walk right in. Here they’d be, here we’d be. ‘Yes, sir … yes, ma’am. Enjoy the show.’ And in they’d come, entering a palace, like in a dream, like in heaven. Maybe you had worries and problems out there, but once you came through those doors, they didn’t matter anymore.” With a great clip, dogged determination, and an uncanny ability to write and win preservation grants, Anderson and her small band of like-minded Burlingtonians launched the most spirited campaign to date to save the Capitol. Their enthusiasm turned infectious. In a single afternoon, more than 90 townspeople paid $10 each to buy a light bulb for the marquee. A local preservation buff wrote a personal check for $28,000. An attorney offered an interest-free personal loan so the group could buy an adjacent building before an important deadline. When the money finally came together, the Friends of the Capitol Theater hired architect Mike Carter as lead designer, and Metzger and architectural designer Martin Salino-Hugg of Metzger Johnson Architects as architects of record, to handle the massive job of rehabbing the structure. Their task included not only repairing damage and removing ’70s “remodeling” like orange plastic paneling on the lobby doors and ticket booth, but also retrofitting the theater with high-definition audio and visual power.


When the theater closed in 1977, the sleek Art Deco building was so distinctive that people started trying to revive it almost immediately.

4

SEND TO LAB Arbogast sends his valuations to the Sherwin-Williams Creative Research and Development Laboratory

Environment (CRADLE), a 12,000-square-foot research facility in Valley View, Ohio (swcradle.com).

5

CREATE MIX  cientists at CRADLE S use the valuations to custom-mix paint samples.

6

TEST APPLICATION Samples are sent to Burlington, Iowa, for review by the interior designer.

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2012 STUDENT DESIGN CONTEST WINNING PORTFOLIOS

THE COMPETITION WAS INTENSE in both the residential and commercial categories again this year. Entries came in from design schools around the country, including the Art Institute of Seattle, the New School of

Celebrate the winners of our second annual Sherwin-Williams® STIR® Student Design Contest.

Architecture and Design, the New York School of Interior Design, and the Fashion Institute of Technology. “Choosing the finalists in each category was difficult with the caliber of work this year,” says Jackie Jordan, director of color marketing at Sherwin-Williams, who judged the contest. Ultimately four entries prevailed in each category. First place winners received a $2,500 cash prize,

>>

second place winners received $1,000, and third place SEE THE WINNERS’ COMPLETE PORTFOLIOS

winners received $500. This year, a “Fan Favorite” was

Download STIR for your iPad or Android

also determined in each category by Facebook voters.

tablet with exclusive content. It’s free at swstirapp.com.

Minh Tue Duong (Virginia Tech, commercial category) and Jessica Mazur (Fashion Institute of Technology, residential category) each won $250.

2ND PLACE WINNER: Residential

2ND PLACE WINNER: Commercial

3RD PLACE WINNER: Residential

3RD PLACE WINNER: Commercial

DESIGNER:: Angela Poovey SCHOOL: The Art Institute of Colorado

DESIGNER: Alice Peck SCHOOL: Iowa State University

DESIGNER: Melany Bjorkman SCHOOL:: Iowa State University

DESIGNER: Esther Ng SCHOOL: Kwantlen University

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1

ST PLACE | RESIDENTIAL

DESIGNER: Rick Stewart SCHOOL: Southern Illinois University of Carbondale CONCEPT: S P A C E [An art collector’s loft] Part of a mixed-used development in Seattle, this loft is designed for a couple who operates an art gallery on the main level. The fresh color palette and modern design combine to form a space that exudes the couple’s vibrant personality and love of art.

DAREDEVIL SW 6882 NORTH STAR SW 6246 OFFBEAT GREEN SW 6706 EXTRA WHITE SW 7006 SEAL SKIN SW 7675 FUSION SW 6919 TRICORN BLACK SW 6258

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1

ST PLACE | COMMERCIAL

2012 STUDENT DESIGN CONTEST WINNING PORTFOLIOS

DESIGNER: Alisha Dahl SCHOOL: Iowa State University CONCEPT: Southern California Assisted Living Community The design for Atria, an assisted living community in Encinitas, aspires to provide a peaceful, balanced community area. Smooth stones inspired the color palette, intended to have a calming effect while providing enough differentiation to assist in wayfinding throughout the buildings.

SNOWBOUND SW 7004 FUNCTIONAL GRAY SW 7024 SEQUIN SW 6394 COPPER MOUNTAIN SW 6356 ADVENTURE ORANGE SW 6655

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F I N A L

FASHION FOOTNOTE A shoe is just a shoe — unless it’s scarlet. Red footwear has long carried a potent message: The wearer is special. In 17th century France, Louis XIV favored red shoes, a luxury because red dye was expensive. To protect the shoes’ status, he went so far as to pass an edict that only aristocrats could sport red heels. In the fairy tale The Red Shoes, crimson-toed shoes transform a peasant girl into a ballerina, while in The Wizard of Oz, Dorothy’s ruby slippers give her magical powers. Modern-day celebrities demonstrate their wealth and glamour by slipping into red-soled heels by Christian Louboutin for red-carpet events. The designer recently waged a legal battle to protect the exclusivity of his signature scarlet soles after rival Yves Saint Laurent introduced some all-red shoes. Louboutin lost in federal court, but won the popculture battle; his sexy stilettos are immortalized in the Jennifer Lopez song “Louboutins” as the ultimate in female-power footwear. n

T O U C H


Sherwin-Williams 3500 Holly Lane N., Suite 30 Plymouth, MN 55447

PRSTD STD US Postage

PAID GAC

Ze ro. T he numbe r of paints that sur pass Eme rald .

Introducing Emerald™, the paint that’s unsurpassed when it comes to sustainable beauty. This zero VOC paint delivers rich, vibrant color with exceptional hide and durability. And thanks to our new breakthrough colorants, you can tint Emerald to any color — without adding VOCs. So when your clients want the best, there’s only Emerald. Learn more about Emerald Interior and Exterior Acrylic Latex Paints at sherwin-williams.com. Emerald Interior Acrylic Latex is GREENGUARD Indoor Air Quality Certified®


STIR 2012 PRINT ANNUAL