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STIRLING HIGH SCHOOL

S5 & S6 COURSE CHOICE INFORMATION BOOKLET FOR SESSION 2014-15

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FACULTIES CITIZENSHIP: History; Modern Languages: French, German & Spanish; Modern Studies. COMMUNICATION: English, English Literacy, Religious & Moral Philosophical Studies. CREATIVE: Art & Design, Health & Food Technology, Hospitality, Music with Performing Skills, Music with Technology. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY: Administration, Business Management, Computing Science, Creative Digital Media, Design & Manufacture, Woodworking Skills. NUMERACY: Geography, Mathematics, Personal Finance, Scottish Studies. PHYSICAL EDUCATION: Physical Education, PE Performance Units. SCIENCE: Biology, Chemistry, Human Biology, Physics, Science.

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CITIZENSHIP History National 4 National 5 Higher Advanced Higher Modern Language: French National 5 Higher Advanced Higher

Modern Languages: German National 4 National 5 Higher

Modern Studies National 4 National 5 Higher Advanced Higher

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Modern Languages : Spanish National 5 Higher


Subject Level

History National 4

Unit Titles

Scottish: Migration and Empire, 1830-1939

Outline of Course

Our courses are open to all learners who have an interest in History.

British: The Making of Modern Britain, 1880-1951

European and World: Free at last? Civil Rights in the USA, 1918-1968

At the end of S.2 all pupils who opt for History will study a transition unit until October 2013. This unit will consolidate and further develop skills needed to move on to our National 5, National 4, or Access 3 courses. Learners will follow the course that best meets their needs and abilities. This transition unit will be based on a study of the Crusades, 1071-1204. This unit includes the study of the First Crusade, the People’s Crusade, the capture of Jerusalem, and the rivalry between Richard the Lionheart and Saladin. Access 3 and National 4 courses are internally assessed. There are no exams at the end of S.4. Learners who successfully complete either of these courses will be awarded a Pass at the appropriate level. National 5 courses are assessed by an external exam at the end of S.4. One component of this exam is a History project completed in school during S.4. Each learner will be awarded a grade A to C on successful completion of this course. Each of our History courses consists of three units covering Scottish, British, and European and World History. In our choice of units we intend to build on the strengths of our very successful Intermediate 1 and Intermediate 2 History courses. Our units look at themes and issues relevant to the contemporary world. These issues include immigration, emigration, racism, nationalism, and the effects of changing technology on the modern world. Learners who study History experience a variety of approaches to learning, including opportunities to work together; share learning intentions and success criteria; are involved in deciding what needs to be done next, and can identify who can give them help when they need it. Progression

National 5, Higher, and Advanced Higher History; Higher in other Social Subjects.

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Subject Level(s)

History National 5

Unit Titles

Scotland: Mary Queen of Scots and the Scottish Reformation, 1542-1587

Outline of course

We welcome candidates with an enquiring and open mind who are able to work independently. An interest in Scottish, British, European and World History would be an obvious advantage.

Britain: The Making of Modern Britain 1880-1951

European and World: Hitler and Nazi Germany, 1919-1939

Assessment Arrangements The question paper is worth 60 marks out of a total of 80 marks for the Course assessment. Candidates are given 90 minutes to complete the question paper under exam conditions. The question paper provides candidates with an opportunity to demonstrate skills, knowledge, and understanding: The question paper has three Sections: Scotland (20 marks); Britain (20 marks); European and World (20 marks). The question paper has a greater emphasis on the assessment of knowledge and understanding than the assignment. The other marks will be awarded for the demonstration of skills. The assignment is worth 20 marks out of a total of 80 marks. The purpose of the assignment is to demonstrate challenge and application by demonstrating skills, knowledge, and understanding, when answering a historical question. Candidates have an open choice of historical question or issue to be researched. Candidates are given one hour to produce evidence for assessment when each candidate is ready. Then, the evidence is submitted to SQA for external marking. Homework Regular note-making exercises; independent research; source based questions; Course content revision. Recommended minimum entry requirements

Progression

National 5 pass in another Social Subject; National 4 pass in History (negotiable) Higher History is respected by all colleges, universities, and employers.

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Subject Level(s)

History Higher

Unit Titles

Scotland: The Age of Reformation, 1542-1603

Britain: The Making of Modern Britain 1851-1951

European and World: Germany 1815-1939

Outline of course We welcome candidates with an enquiring and open mind. An interest in Scottish, British, European and World History would be an advantage. Extended writing skills are crucial. Higher History remains a very attractive qualification for colleges, universities, and employers. An understanding of History is knowledge for life. Assessment Arrangements There is one question paper. The question paper will be marked out of 60. It will be divided into three 20 mark Sections. The question paper will have a greater emphasis on the assessment of knowledge and understanding than the assignment. The other marks will be awarded for the demonstration of skills. The Scotland Section (20 marks) will assess source-handling skills. The Britain (20 marks) and European and World (20 marks) Sections will be assessed by extended response questions. Candidates will have a choice of question in each of these Sections. The assignment will be marked out of 30. Candidates will write a report on their own research into a historical issue or question of their own choice. This may be related to the Course content if they wish, but candidates are free to research any appropriate historical issue or question. Candidates may wish to use this opportunity to research areas of local history or an area which will extend their knowledge and understanding beyond the Course content, providing a wider perspective which may enhance their appreciation of the areas they have studied. Homework Regular pieces of extended writing; note-making exercises; independent research; source based questions; Course content revision.

Recommended minimum entry requirements A or B National 5 History (or in another Social Subject) or Higher pass in another Social Subject or English.

Progression

Advanced Higher History/ Higher History is respected by all colleges, universities, and employers

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Subject Level(s)

History Advanced Higher

Unit Titles Outline of course

Field of study: Germany: Versailles to the Outbreak of the Second World War. The course is designed as a "bridge" between School and Higher Education. As such, pupils are expected to work enthusiastically and also more independently than at Higher Grade. Assessment Arrangements - Dissertation not more than 4,000 words (30 marks) - One exam paper: essay writing; source based work examined (90 marks)

Homework Regular research; essays; source based exercises. Entry Requirements Higher History Pass but A or B pass highly recommended (Grade C negotiable).

Progression

University and Further Education courses

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Subject Level(s)

Modern Languages: German National 4

Unit Titles

Understanding Language Expressing Language (Reading and Listening) (Writing and Talking) Studying a language enables learners to communicate directly with people from different cultures, enhancing their understanding and enjoyment of other cultures and of their own. They gain insights into other ways of thinking and other views of the world, and therefore develop a much richer understanding of active citizenship.

Outline of course

Learners have the opportunity to continue their study of French and/ or take up a second language. The course encompasses both language and culture. Learners will develop their reading, writing, listening and talking skills through a variety of differentiated and stimulating activities which require them to work independently or as part of a group. Learners will access a variety of up-todate resources including the Internet and foreign language magazines appropriate to their level and interests. They will engage with a variety of topics including the environment, the world of work and customs and celebrations. National 4 courses are internally assessed.

Progression

National 4ďƒ National 5

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Subject Level(s)

Modern Languages: French/ German/ Spanish National 5

Entry requirements

National 5 will be taught bi-levelly with Higher. Pupils need to have a solid grasp of the language at National 4, and the ability and motivation to work independently when required. Entry will be decided on an individual basis by teacher recommendation.

Unit Titles

Understanding Language

Using Language

(Reading and Listening)

(Writing and Talking)

Contexts

Society, learning, employability and culture.

Outline of course

Studying a language enables learners to communicate directly with people from different cultures, enhancing their understanding and enjoyment of other cultures and of their own. They gain insights into other ways of thinking and other views of the world, and therefore develop a much richer understanding of active citizenship. Employers and universities are looking for applicants to have a modern foreign language in their portfolio of qualifications.

National courses encompass both language and culture. Learners will develop their reading, writing, listening and talking skills through a variety of differentiated and stimulating activities which require them to work independently or as part of a group. Learners will access a variety of up-to-date resources including the Internet and foreign language magazines appropriate to their level and interests. They will engage with a variety of topics including the environment, the world of work and customs and celebrations. Assessment

Candidates have to pass one internal assessment for each of the four skills: reading, writing, listening and talking. They also have an external exam worth 70% which tests reading, listening and writing, and a performance (presentation and follow-up conversation) worth 30%.

Progression

National 5ďƒ Higher

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Subject Level(s)

Modern Languages: French/ German/ Spanish Higher

Entry requirements

At least a B pass at National 5

Unit Titles

Understanding Language Using Language (Reading and Listening) (Writing and Talking) Society, learning, employability and culture.

Contexts Outline of course

Studying a language enables learners to communicate directly with people from different cultures, enhancing their understanding and enjoyment of other cultures and of their own. They gain insights into other ways of thinking and other views of the world, and therefore develop a much richer understanding of active citizenship. Employers and universities are looking for applicants to have a modern foreign language in their portfolio of qualifications. Higher courses encompass both language and culture. Learners will continue to develop their reading, translation, writing, listening and talking skills. They will engage with a variety of topics including the environment, the world of work and customs and celebrations.

Assessment

Progression

Candidates have to pass one internal assessment for each of the four skills: reading, writing, listening and talking. They also have an external exam worth 70% which tests reading, listening and writing, and a performance (presentation and follow-up conversation) worth 30%. Higher ďƒ Advanced Higher

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Subject Level(s)

Modern Languages: French Advanced Higher

Unit Titles

Language

Extended Reading and Viewing

Entry requirements At least a B pass at Higher Contexts Outline of course

Personal, Social and Cultural Issues; Topical and Cultural Issues; Environmental Issues Advanced Higher French takes the development of intellectual maturity, critical awareness and sound knowledge and use of language a stage further from Higher. The course is intended to be a general release of curiosity allied to a sharpening of mental and critical focus, combined with an appropriate progression in understanding, experience and use of language. Candidates are encouraged to research areas of interest and to develop their intellectual faculties by presenting a folio of pieces written during the course of study. The Language unit allows students to investigate and debate contemporary issues of relevance to them, and to see how their lives compare with their French peers. The optional 40-hour Extended Reading and Viewing unit introduces them to an in-depth study of French literature.

Assessment

Progression

Given the limited number of teacher periods and the nature of the Advanced Higher course, very many demands are made on the student's time outside the classroom and at home. Ongoing work on the preparation of a Folio, the learning of vocabulary and structures and the regular and thorough revision of class work is expected, alongside the submission of one or more pieces of written work per week. Internal (Unit) Assessment In the Language unit, the skills of Speaking, Reading and Listening will be assessed, and in the Extended Reading and Viewing unit, proficiency will be assessed by means of a Writing test: a short essay in French about one of the texts studied. Students must achieve a pass in all four assessments. External (Course) Assessment To gain the award for the course, the student must pass both the Language and Extended Reading & Viewing units, as well as the external assessment. There are five parts to the external course assessment: Oral assessment, Listening/Discursive Essay, Reading/Translation and Folio comprising two 750-word essays in English. From Advanced Higher, the student will be in a position to pursue foreign language study or to use a foreign language in a variety of ways, which might include: specialising in the study of language, literature or culture in further or higher education interacting at an appropriate level with native speakers within an employment context drawing on knowledge about language to learn a different foreign language using acquired language skills to access media in the foreign language, including TV programmes, films and magazine articles, for personal enjoyment.

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Subject Level(s)

Modern Studies National 4

Unit Titles

Democracy in Scotland and Social Issues in the International Issues the United Kingdom United Kingdom Modern Studies opens up the world of contemporary society. Learners will develop their knowledge and understanding of current political and social issues in local, Scottish, United Kingdom and international contexts.

Outline of course

Democracy in Scotland and the United Kingdom:  The impact of the Scottish Parliament  Arguments for and against Independence  Consensus and conflict between the Scottish and UK Parliament  The case for Electoral Reform  The role of Trade Unions Social Issues in the United Kingdom:  Factors which influence health and wealth inequalities  Effectiveness of government policies introduced to tackle ill-health and poverty  Examination of the extent to which the needs of families living in poverty, the unemployed, elderly, women and ethnic minorities are being met by public, private and voluntary organisations International Issues:  An in-depth study of a range of countries, such as the USA, South Africa and China. Opportunities, inequalities, human rights and contrasting types of political systems will be explored. Course Skills The course requires pupils to form and justify their opinions using evidence relating to contemporary issues and events. It also develops analytical skills using a range of text and statistical resources. Modern Studies helps to develop a variety of interdisciplinary skills including literacy, numeracy, IT, research, planning and detection of bias in both written and oral formats.

Progression

Assessment: The Access 3 and National 4 are internally assessed. Candidates sitting the National 5 Course will be expected to sit an externally assessed national examination. Common course content and skills permeate each course and, therefore, can allow further study at a more advanced level. National 4-->National 5-->Higher

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Subject Level(s)

Modern Studies National 5

Unit Titles

Democracy in Scotland and the Social Issues in the International Issues: United Kingdom United Kingdom USA

Outline of course

Modern Studies opens up the world of contemporary society for learners. The Course will develop the skills to help learners interpret and participate in the social and political processes they will encounter now and in the future. The Modern Studies Course will encourage learners to develop important attitudes including: an open mind and respect for the values, beliefs and cultures of others; openness to new thinking and ideas and a sense of responsibility and global citizenship. The purpose of Modern Studies is to develop the learner’s knowledge and understanding of contemporary political and social issues in local, national and international contexts. In these contexts, learners will develop an awareness of the social and political issues they will meet in their lives. By undertaking this course, learners will develop a wide range of important and transferable skills, including researching, understanding and using a wide range of evidence on contemporary issues; evaluating, analysing and synthesising evidence in order to: detect and explain the degree of objectivity; making and justifying decisions and drawing conclusions with supporting evidence; constructing complex arguments in a balanced and structured way; and communicating, by a variety of means, views, opinions, decisions and conclusions based on evidence. Assessment Arrangements Unit assessment is completed within school and subject to external moderation by the SQA. Additionally pupils will be required to submit an AVU on a contemporary issue(s) of their choice based on the coursework or personal interest. This will be submitted to the SQA and make up 25% of the overall award. Homework Homework will be given on a regular basis to allow candidates to develop and consolidate their understanding, and practice to further develop their skills. Entry Requirements National 4 pass in Modern Studies or other social subject. Pupils should be self motivated and display commitment to expanding their knowledge of contemporary social, political and international issues.

Progression

The course is seen as a 'bridge' between National 4 and possible Higher in S6. However, National 5 Modern Studies can be taken as an independent course. If you have any questions or doubts about whether you would be suited to national 5 Modern Studies, please approach your class teacher in the Modern Studies Department. http://www.sqa.org.uk Twitter - @shs_mods - 13 -


Subject Level(s)

Modern Studies Higher

Unit Titles

Democracy in Scotland and the Social Issues in the United Kingdom United Kingdom

Outline of course

Course Rationale

International Issues

Modern Studies opens up the world of contemporary society for learners. The Course will develop the skills to help learners interpret and participate in the social and political processes they will encounter now and in the future. The Modern Studies Course will encourage learners to develop important attitudes including: an open mind and respect for the values, beliefs and cultures of others; openness to new thinking and ideas and a sense of responsibility and global citizenship. Course Content: KnowledgeThe purpose of Modern Studies is to develop the learner’s knowledge and understanding of contemporary political and social issues in local, national and international contexts. In these contexts, learners will develop an awareness of the social and political issues they will meet in their lives. This purpose will be achieved through successful study of the three Units: Democracy in Scotland and the UK International Issues: USA Social Issues in the UK SkillsBy undertaking this Course, learners will develop a wide range of important and transferable skills, including researching, understanding and using a wide range of evidence on contemporary issues; evaluating, analysing and synthesising evidence in order to: detect and explain the degree of objectivity; making and justifying decisions and drawing conclusions with supporting evidence; constructing complex arguments in a balanced and structured way; and communicating, by a variety of means, views, opinions, decisions and conclusions based on evidence. LEARNING AND TEACHING A wide range of learning and teaching methods will be employed in the course ranging from individual/ small group work and discussion to whole class teaching. Students will have access to a wide range of resources such as newspapers, journals, the internet, DVDs, visiting speakers and excursions. They will learn to evaluate this evidence and report on a wide range of contemporary, social, economic and political issues. Students are given the opportunity to become active social researchers using a variety of methodology such as; social media, newspapers, journals, the internet, DVDs, visiting speakers and excursions. Evidence gathered is used by candidates to for both internal and external assessments. Emphasis is weighed more towards skills development than simply factual recall. - 14 -


ASSESSMENT ARRANGEMENTS Candidates sit 3 unit assessments: two essays and a report. When these have been completed and passed, the candidate will be presented for the external exam in May. The final exam consists of two papers. Paper I: 4 extended responses. Paper II – (AVU) HOMEWORK In addition to regular reading of course material students are expected to produce at least one essay or evaluating question or DME per week. PROGRESSION ROUTES/POTENTIAL FUTURE USE Students who have studied or are currently studying the course will have the opportunity to sit higher politics as the two courses have parallel course content both in terms of knowledge and skills however both have discrete value as entry requirements for university. Advanced Higher Modern Studies. Highly recommended for work/further study in law, media, police, public administration, human resource management, politics, sociology, and economics.

Progression

Common course content and skills permeate each course and, therefore, can allow further study at a more advanced level. National 3-->National 4-->National 5-->Higher

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Subject Level(s)

Modern Studies Advanced Higher

Unit Titles Outline of course

The course represents a bridge between the traditionally teacher-led courses of secondary education and the more independent learning expected at university. The field of study, Law and Order issues, has both a national and international dimension. Students will be given the opportunity to choose a dissertation topic related to the course work. Students are expected to do independent research using a range of primary and secondary resources such as textbooks, journals, newspapers, internet, guest speakers, questionnaires and visits. Participation in the Mini Trial event at Stirling Sheriff court as well as field trips to Central Police Head Quarters and Scottish Prison form an integral part of the coursework as students are required to assume the role of active social scientists. Assessment Arrangements 2/3 of course award is based on the external exam. Section A - 2 x essays on Law, Order and Society in Britain. Section B – Practical Research Dissertation – comprises 1/3 of the overall course award. Homework As well as background reading students will be expected to undertake primary research and well as submitting coursework essays and practical research questions. Entry Requirements At least a pass at Higher Modern Studies. Strong interest in contemporary law and order issues and a desire to engage as an active social researcher; analyzing evidence from a range of both primary and secondary sources.

Progression

Excellent grounding for University and Further Education courses particularly, Law, Media (broadcast and journalism), Social Sciences, Government (local and central), International Relations and many more. If you have any questions or doubts about whether you would be suited to Advanced Higher Modern Studies, please approach your class teacher in the Modern Studies Department. http://www.sqa.org.uk Twitter - @shs_mods

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COMMUNICATION English National 4 National 5 Higher Advanced Higher

English: Literacy National 4 National 5

Religious and Moral Philosophical Studies National 4 National 5 Higher

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Subject Level(s)

English National 4 / National 5 / Higher

Unit Titles

Analysis and Evaluation

Outline of course

Creation and Production

Literacy (National 4) Pupils will build upon their prior learning to develop their skills in reading, writing, talking and listening. Analysis and Evaluation This unit will provide pupils with the opportunity to develop reading and listening skills. They will engage in understanding, analysing and evaluating both fiction and non-fiction texts and will study a range of genres, from the written word to film and media texts. Creation and Production This unit will provide pupils with the opportunity to develop writing and talking skills. They will build upon their writing skills in both factual and creative pieces and they will gain confidence when talking on their own or as part of a group. Literacy Literacy is integral to the teaching and learning at all levels, helping pupils to develop the skills for learning, life and work. At National 4 level, pupils must pass the Literacy unit to gain an overall course award. Assessment National 4 is internally assessed through unit assessments and pupils completing an Added Value Unit based a topic they find interesting. National 5 and Higher are assessed through internal unit assessments, an externally marked folio of writing and a final exam. The final exam consists of close reading, a critical essay and a set of questions on a piece of Scottish literature.

Progression

National 4 → National 5 → Higher → Advanced Higher

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Subject Level(s)

English Advanced Higher

Unit Titles

Specialist Study

Outline of course

Literary Study

Creative Writing OR Textual Analysis

This course is for pupils with a passion for literature and anyone who intends to specialise in English or closely related disciplines. It involves reading widely, studying independently and writing creatively and is highly regarded by universities. While Advanced Higher English is a demanding course, it is also a rewarding one. Pupils will gain confidence in their ability to express complex ideas and will be better able to both work and think independently. Specialist Study A specialist study of between 3,500 and 4,500 words will be completed on the pupil’s own choice of literature. This is submitted by Easter and is worth 40% of the final mark. Literary Study The works of a number of writers, chosen from a list set by the SQA, will be studied throughout the year. This is worth 30% of the final mark. Creative Writing OR Textual Analysis Pupils will choose the option best suited to their skills and will submit either a folio of Creative Writing before the exam or sit an additional Textual Analysis exam. This is worth 30% of the final mark. Assessment The course is assessed through a combination of internal unit assessments, work submitted for external marking and the final exam.

Progression

Advanced Higher → Higher Education

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Subject Level(s)

Literacy Skills National 4/5

Unit Titles

Literacy

Outline of course

The course is ideal for pupils who are hoping to progress from National 3 or 4 English but who are put off by the idea of the exam element in National 5 English. Pupils will work on developing their skills in reading, writing, talking and listening in ways which will be useful to them as they move on from school into either college education or the world of work. The main focus of the course will be working towards completion of the SQA Literacy units at either National 4 or 5 level, depending upon prior achievement. There will also be opportunities for interested pupils to work towards achieving other SQA units through the tasks they complete in class.

Progression

Literacy Skills → Further Education

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Subject Level(s)

Religious, Moral and Philosophical Studies National 4 / National 5 / Higher

Unit Titles

World Religion

Outline of course

How should society treat mass murderers? Should Scotland have a nuclear deterrent? Is there a higher power and does it matter?

Morality and Belief

Religious and Philosophical Questions

If you enjoy thinking about or arguing about big questions, RMPS is the subject to choose. Skills By exploring a number of world views, pupils will gain a fuller understanding of the world and their place in it. Discussing and debating moral questions will develop confidence and the ability to articulate reasoned and well-structured arguments. Pupils will develop a questioning approach to their learning and become skilled in critically analysing the arguments and viewpoints studied. Course Content World Religion –The study of the main beliefs and practices of one world religion. Morality and Belief –The study of a moral question such as conflict or justice. Religious and Philosophical Questions –The study of a topic such as Origins of Life, Existence of God, Miracles and The Problem of Evil and Suffering. Assessment National 4 is internally assessed through unit assessments and pupils completing an Added Value Unit based on an area of the course they find particularly interesting. National 5 and Higher are assessed through internal unit assessments, an externally marked assignment and a final exam. Progression

National 4 → National 5 → Higher

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CREATIVE Art and Design National 4 National 5 Higher Advanced Higher Health and Food Technology National 5 Higher

Hospitality National 4 National 5

Music: Performing Skills National 4 National 5 Higher Advanced Higher

Music: Technology National 4 National 5 Higher

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Subject Level(s)

Art & Design National 4

Unit Titles

Expressive with Critical Design with Critical Activity Activity This Course has an integrated approach to learning, and includes a mix of practical learning and knowledge and understanding.

Outline of course

Learners will be given the opportunity to develop their creative practical skills, using materials and equipment when developing their ideas. Where appropriate, learners will be encouraged to use technologies creatively when developing their ideas and their finished art and design work. They will develop a range of problem-solving skills in the context of their expressive and design work, and learn how to appreciate the work of artists and designers, developing their understanding of the social and cultural factors influencing art and design.

Progression

National 5/Higher Art & Design Other SQA qualifications in the expressive arts, fashion and textiles and technologies.

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Subject Level(s) Unit Titles

Art and Design National 5 Expressive Activity

Outline of course

Art and Design: Expressive Activity

Design Activity

This Unit helps learners to develop their personal thoughts and ideas in visual form. In the Unit, learners will develop critical understanding of artists’ working practices and the social and cultural influences affecting their work. They will select stimuli and produce analytical drawings and studies. They will develop and refine their expressive ideas and artwork, experimenting with and using a range of materials, techniques and/or technology in 2D and/or 3D formats when responding to stimuli. Art and Design: Design Activity In this Unit learners will plan, research and develop creative design work in response to a design brief. They will develop their creativity, problem solving and critical thinking skills as they consider design opportunities, and work to resolve design issues and constraints. In the Unit, learners will develop critical understanding of designers’ working practices and the main social and cultural influences affecting their work. They will experiment with, develop and refine their design ideas, using a range of materials, techniques and/or technology in 2D and/or 3D formats. Course Assessment The learner will draw on, extend and apply the skills they have learned during the Course. This will be externally assessed through a portfolio and a question paper. In the portfolio worth 160 marks, learners will produce one piece of expressive art work and one design solution. The portfolio will be sufficiently open and flexible to allow for personalisation and choice and will focus on both the process and products of learning. The question paper worth 40 marks adds value by requiring integration and application of skills, knowledge and understanding of art and design practice from across the Units. Progression

This Course may provide progression to: Higher art and design further study, employment and/or training

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Subject Level(s) Unit Titles Outline of course

Art and Design Higher Expressive Design Activity Activity Art and Design: Expressive Activity In this Unit, evidence will be required to show that the learner can produce a range of creative ideas and art work in response to stimuli. Learners will produce a range of analytical drawings, studies and expressive development work showing visual continuity and the creative development of the stimuli. Knowledge and understanding of expressive artists and art practice will also be assessed. Art and Design: Design Activity In this Unit, evidence will be required to show that the learner can produce a range of creative design ideas in response to a complex design brief. Learners will produce investigative studies and market research and will use this when developing and refining a range of design ideas. Knowledge and understanding of designers and design practice will also be assessed. Course Assessment The learner will draw on, extend and apply the skills they have learned during the Course. This will be externally assessed through a portfolio and a question paper. In the portfolio worth 160 marks, learners will produce one piece of expressive art work and one design solution. The portfolio will be sufficiently open and flexible to allow for personalisation and choice and will focus on both the process and products of learning. The question paper worth 40 marks adds value by requiring integration and application of skills, knowledge and understanding of art and design practice from across the Units.

Progression

This Course or its Units may provide progression to: other qualifications in art and design further study, employment and/or training

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Subject Level(s)

Art and Design Advanced Higher

Unit Titles

Mandatory Unit: Art & Design: Design Enquiry 120 marks Optional Units – one selected from: Art & Design: Expressive Activity 60 marks Art & Design: Design Activity 60 marks Statement of Intent

Outline of course

20 marks

There are a total of 200 marks available for the Course Assessment. The course should recognise the learner’s personal interests and experiences and include content that reflects the following themes: The environment (human, manufactured, natural) Communication and the mass media Cultural, social and historical factors and influences. To promote breadth, depth and balance across the Course as a whole, learners’ experiences should include: Two and/or three dimensional media process(es) Technology, (mandatory requirement in at least one unit) which may include the use of computers, cameras, sewing machines etc. Contemporary issues

Progression

To achieve the course award the learner must pass the Mandatory Unit and one optional Unit. This Course or its Units may provide progression to: Further Education programmes. Higher Education programmes.

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Subject

Health & Food Technology

Level(s)

National 5

Unit Titles

Food for Health

Outline of course

This course will allow learners to develop practical and technological skills and knowledge and understanding to make informed food, lifestyle and consumer choices. Learners will use a problem solving approach to learn through practical work and apply their learning to real life situations using a range of media.

Food Product Development

Contemporary Food Issues

Food for Health Learners will be required to provide evidence of:  Making links between health issues and food choices using current dietary advice  Study of nutritional needs throughout life e.g. babies, teenagers, the elderly  Describe the relationship between food, health and nutrition  Make food products to meet dietary and health needs

Food Product Development Learners will be required to provide evidence of their ability to:  Plan, make and evaluate dishes to meet individual needs  Understand the functional properties of ingredients  Understanding the stages involved in food product development Contemporary Food Issues Learners will be required to provide evidence of their ability to:  Study of factors affecting food choices  Make food products which address factors affecting food choices Assessment  All units are internally assessed  To gain an award for the course the learner must pass all of the above units as well as the course assessment  The National 5 course will be assessed with an assignment and a written question paper, both of which will require the application of knowledge and understanding from across the units. This is set by SQA and marked externally.  The Assignment is worth 50 marks out of 100 and accounts for 50% of the overall marks for the course assessment  The Question Paper is worth 50 marks out of 100 and accounts for 50% of the overall marks for the course assessment  The course assessment will be graded A-D Progression

Higher Health and Food Technology. Careers in health, teaching, food production.

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Subject Level(s)

Health & Food Technology Higher

Unit Titles

Food for Health

Food Product Contemporary Food Development Issues Outline of course This course is aimed at learners with an interest in developing skills and knowledge about the relationships between food, health, nutrition and contemporary food issues. Learners are required to undertake independent research and apply practical skills. Possible routes for employment include health promotion, dietetics, teaching, nutrition research and the food production industry. Food for Health Learners will be required to provide evidence of their ability to:  Analyse health issues and food choices using current dietary advice and nutritional needs throughout the life cycle  Analyse the relationship between food, health and nutrition  Make and evaluate food products to meet dietary and health needs Food Product Development Learners will be required to provide evidence of their ability to:  Develop knowledge and understanding of the functional properties of ingredients  Develop an understanding of the stages involved in food product development  Use a problem-solving approach to produce dishes to meet a range of consumer needs Contemporary Food Issues Learners will be required to provide evidence of their ability to:  Investigate a range of contemporary food issues  Analyse how these issues influence consumers and communicate findings Assessment  All units are internally assessed  To gain the award, learners must pass all units as well as the course assessment  The Higher course will be assessed with an assignment and a written question paper, both of which will require application of knowledge and understanding from across the units. This is set by SQA and marked externally.  The Assignment is worth 50 marks out of 100 and accounts for 50% of the overall marks for the course assessment  The Question Paper is worth 50 marks out of 100 and accounts for 50% of the overall marks for the course assessment  The course assessment will be graded A-D Progression

Careers in health, teaching, food production. - 28 -


Subject Level(s)

Hospitality National 4

Unit Titles

Cookery Skills, Processes and Understanding and Techniques. Using Ingredients

Outline of course

This course which is practical and experiential in nature enables the learner to develop a range of cookery skills and food preparation techniques as well as planning, organisational and time management skills.

Organisational Skills for Cooking

Cookery Skills , Techniques and Processes Learners will be required to provide evidence of their: cookery skills, food preparation techniques and ability to follow cookery processes in the preparation of dishes. ability to work safely and hygienically Understanding and Using Ingredients Learners will be required to provide evidence of their ability to: apply their understanding of a range of ingredients select appropriate ingredients and use them in the preparation of ingredients work safely and hygienically Organisational Skills for Cooking Learners will be required to provide evidence of their ability to: follow recipes and implement a time plan to produce dishes carry out an evaluation of the meal work safely and hygienically Added Value Unit Learners will work through an activity brief to prepare and cook a two course meal for given number of people within a given timescale and to present it appropriately. It will require learners to demonstrate safe and hygienic working practices throughout. To achieve the National 4 Hospitality: Practical Cookery Course, learners must pass all of the required units including the Added Value Unit. Progression

National 5 Hospitality. Further study, employment or training in Hospitality.

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Subject Level(s)

Hospitality National 5

Unit Titles

Cookery Skills, Processes and Techniques.

Outline of course

This course which is practical and experiential in nature enables the learner to develop a range of cookery skills and food preparation techniques as well as planning, organisational and time management skills.

Understanding and Using Ingredients

Organisational Skills for Cooking

Cookery Skills , Techniques and Processes Learners will be required to provide evidence of their: cookery skills, food preparation techniques and ability to follow cookery processes in the preparation of dishes. ability to work safely and hygienically Understanding and Using Ingredients Learners will be required to provide evidence of their ability to: apply their understanding of a range of ingredients select appropriate ingredients and use them in the preparation of ingredients work safely and hygienically Organisational Skills for Cooking Learners will be required to provide evidence of their ability to: plan a two course meal follow recipes and implement a time plan to produce a two course meal carry out an evaluation of the meal work safely and hygienically Assessment All units are internally assessed. To gain an award for the course the learner must pass all of the above units as well as the course assessment. The course assessment will be an assessment worth 100 marks and will involve the planning, preparation and cooking of a three course meal for a given number of people. Overall grade awarded will be determined by the course assessment. Progression

National 5/Higher Health and Food Technology. Careers in the Hospitality industry.

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Subject Levels

Music: Performing Skills National 4

Unit Titles

Music: Understanding Music: Performing Skills Composing Music skills This course enables learners to develop skills in creating, understanding and performing music. Emphasis is placed on practical activities and there is considerable scope for personalisation and choice through the activities of creating, understanding and performing music. On completing the Course, learners will be able to explore and experiment to create original music and listen to a range of music with awareness, understanding and discrimination. Learners will also be able to perform a programme of music with accuracy; and reflect on and evaluate their own work and that of others to identify strategies to improve musical creativity and performance.

Outline of Course

Progression

National Five/ Higher

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Subject Levels

Music: Performing Skills National 5

Unit Titles

Music: Understanding Music: Performing Skills Composing Music skills This course enables learners to develop skills in creating, understanding and performing music. Emphasis is placed on practical activities and there is considerable scope for personalisation and choice. The aims of the Course are to enable learners to: develop performing skills on two selected instruments or on one instrument and voice (minimum ABRSM Grade 3) create original music using compositional methods and music concepts creatively when composing, arranging or improvising broaden their knowledge and understanding of music and musical literacy by listening to music and identifying a range of music signs, symbols and music concepts critically reflect on and evaluate their own work and that of others Assessment all units are internally assessed to gain an award for the course the learner must pass all the above units as well as the course assessment The course assessment will be a Performance exam on two instruments to an external examiner which is worth 60 marks and a Listening paper worth 40 marks. Overall grade awarded will be determined by the course assessment. Higher

Outline of Course

Progression

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Subject Levels

Music: Performing Skills Higher

Unit Titles

Music: Understanding Music: Performing Skills Composing Music skills This course is suitable for learners with an interest in developing and extending their applied musical skills and understanding of music. It could also provide a pathway for those who want to progress to higher levels of study. The aims of the Course are to enable learners to: develop performing skills on two selected instruments or on one instrument and voice (minimum ABRSM Grade 4) create original music using compositional methods and music concepts creatively when composing, arranging or improvising broaden their knowledge and understanding of music and musical literacy by listening to music and identifying a range of music signs, symbols and music concepts critically reflect on and evaluate their own work and that of others Assessment all units are internally assessed to gain an award for the course the learner must pass all the above units as well as the course assessment The course assessment will be a Performance exam on two instruments to an external examiner which is worth 60 marks and a Listening paper worth 40 marks. Overall grade awarded will be determined by the course assessment. Advanced Higher

Outline of Course

Progression

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Subject Level(s)

Music with Performing Advanced Higher

Unit Titles

Composing

Entry requirements

Higher music (A or B pass) or at the discretion of the department

Outline of course

The course aims to provide the student with the opportunity to experience music as performer, composer and listener. Emphasis is placed on the study of music through practical activities, which include active participation in solo performing, listening to music from a wide range of genres, styles and cultures and creative expression through composing. The course consists of three 40 hour units:

Listening

Performing

Music: Composing – composing two pieces with evidence of originality, creativity, planning and good use of compositional techniques. Music: listening – listening to music that is related to practical activities and based on a conceptual approach. Music: Performing – performing on two instruments at grade 5.

Assessment Arrangements

To achieve the course award the candidate must pass the three units as well as the course assessment. The candidate’s grade is based on the course assessment. In the music: Composing Unit candidates will be assessed throughout the unit by assessor observation of the compositional process and towards the end of the unit by assessment of the folio. In the music: Listening Unit candidates will be assessed throughout the unit by an assessor observation checklist and summatively assessed towards the end if the unit on the production of a 2000 word commentary on two musical works. In the music: Performing Unit candidates will be assessed on a performance programme on one instrument or voice lasting 15 minutes and a performance programme on another instrument or voice lasting 10 minutes. Course assessment is made up of two components, a question paper, which is externally marked (40 marks), and a practical performance which is externally marked (60 marks).

Homework

Daily practise. Homework is issued regularly for composing and listening.

Progression

Students who achieve Advanced higher may progress to a degree which uses Advanced higher music as an entry requirement.

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Subject Levels

Music: Technology National 4

Unit Titles

Music: Understanding 20th Music: Technology in Composing & 21st Century Context skills Music This course enables learners to develop skills in the use of music technology hardware and software to capture and manipulate audio and to use music technology creatively in sound production in a range of contexts. Learners will also develop skills in musical analysis in the context of a range of 20th & 21st century musical styles and genres and develop a broad understanding of the music industry, including basic awareness of implications of intellectual property rights. The practical and experiential nature of the Course gives learners opportunities to show imagination, creativity and technical problem-solving skills as they develop, review and refine their musical ideas and use music technology for specified effect.

Outline of Course

Progression

National Five/ Higher

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Subject Levels

Music Technology National 5

Unit Titles

Music Understanding 20th Music: Technology in Context Technology & 21st Century Skills Music This course is suitable for learners with an interest in developing and extending their music technology skills and understanding of music. The majority of the course is folio based and requires a high level of independent working. The aims of the Course are to enable learners to: develop skills in the use of music technology hardware and software to capture and manipulate audio develop skills in musical analysis in the context of 20th and 21st century musical styles and genres develop a broad understanding of the music industry, including an awareness of the implications of intellectual property critically reflect on their own work and that of others Assessment all units are internally assessed to gain an award for the course the learner must pass all the above units as well as the course assessment The course assessment will be a Technology folio worth 70 marks and a Listening paper worth 30 marks. Overall grade awarded will be determined by the course assessment.

Outline of Course

Progression

Higher

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Subject Levels

Music: Technology Higher

Unit Titles

Music Understanding 20th Music: Technology in Context Technology & 21st Century Skills Music This course is suitable for learners with an interest in developing and extending their music technology skills and understanding of music. It could also provide a pathway for those who want to progress to higher levels of study. The majority of the course is folio based and requires a high level of independent working. The aims of the Course are to enable learners to: develop skills in the use of music technology hardware and software to capture and manipulate audio develop skills in musical analysis in the context of 20th and 21st century musical styles and genres develop a broad understanding of the music industry, including an awareness of the implications of intellectual property critically reflect on their own work and that of others Assessment all units are internally assessed to gain an award for the course the learner must pass all the above units as well as the course assessment The course assessment will be a Technology folio worth 70 marks and a Listening paper worth 30 marks. Overall grade awarded will be determined by the course assessment.

Outline of Course

Progression

Other qualifications in Music Technology, further study or related employment Please note there is no Advanced Higher Music Technology course.

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INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Business Education: Administration Higher Computing: Computing Science National 4 National 5 Higher Technical: Design & Manufacture National 4 National 5 Higher

Business Management National 5 Higher Advanced Higher Creative Digital Media National 4

Technical: Graphic Communication National 5 Higher Advanced Higher

Technical: Practice Woodworking National 5

- 38 -


Subject Level(s)

Administration and IT Higher

Unit Titles

Administrative Practices

Outline of course

This course builds on skills, knowledge and understanding gained at National 5 Administration and IT. For those pupils wishing to do this as a “crash” Higher in S6, then a pass in Higher English is essential. The course develops learners’ advanced administrative and IT skills and enables them to contribute to the effective functioning of organisations in supervisory administrative positions.

IT Solutions for Administrators

Communication in Administration

Administrative Practices knowledge and understanding of administration in the workplace and related aspects knowledge and understanding of effective teams and time and task management knowledge and understanding of the features of good customer care and the benefits of good, and consequences of poor, customer care IT Solutions for Administrators skills in using a range of complex functions of the following IT applications — word processing, spreadsheets, databases - to solve problems in an administration-related context skills in analysing, processing and managing information in order to create and edit relatively complex business documents Communication in Administration advanced skills in using IT to communicate information with others in administration-related contexts knowledge and understanding of barriers to communication and ways of overcoming them knowledge and understanding of how to maintain the security and confidentiality of information Assessment all units are internally assessed to gain an award for the course the learner must pass all the above units as well as the course assessment the course assessment will be an assignment worth 70 marks and a question paper worth 30 marks. Progression

HNC Office Administration, HND Office and Management Information, degree courses at University. A range of employment opportunities within the business environment.

- 39 -


Subject Level(s)

Business Management National 5

Unit Titles

Understanding Business

Outline of course

This subject is suitable for all learners interested in entering the world of business, whether as a manager, employee or self-employed person as it gives learners knowledge of the business environment.

Management of People Management of and Finance Marketing and Operations

Understanding Business understanding of how entrepreneurship supports business development ability to communicate how organisations contribute to generating wealth and satisfying customers’ needs. Management of People and Finance ability to identify factors influencing human resource management and finance management and how to address issues arising from them learning activities will relate to human resource management that will demonstrate an understanding of how to manage people in order to maximise their contribution to an organisation’s success. learners will look at financial aspects of a business that will allow them to prepare and interpret information in order to solve financial issues and to ensure the survival of the organisation. Management of Marketing and Operations ability to identify factors influencing the management of marketing and operations and how to address issues arising from them learning activities will relate to how marketing can be used to communicate effectively with consumers, maximise customer satisfaction and enhance competitiveness learners will explore and identify the procedures required to produce goods or services to an appropriate standard of quality. Assessment All of the above units are internally assessed. Learners will also be assessed through a combination of a Business Management question paper (70 marks) and a business related assignment (30 marks). Progression

Higher Business Management and other SQA courses; further study, training or employment.

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Subject Level(s)

Business Management Higher

Unit Titles

Understanding Business

Outline of course

This course builds on skills, knowledge and understanding gained at National 5 Business Management. For those pupils wishing to do this as a “crash” Higher in S6, then a pass in Higher English is essential. This subject is suitable for learners interested in entering the world of business, whether as a manager, employee or self-employed person as it gives learners knowledge of the business environment.

Management of People and Finance

Management of Marketing and Operations

Understanding Business understanding of the ways in which organisations satisfy customers’ needs and contribute to generating wealth understanding of how opportunities and constraints impact upon business development understanding of key business theories and concepts, and knowledge of their application in familiar and unfamiliar contexts Management of People and Finance ability to analyse and evaluate relatively complex factors influencing both human resources and financial management and to suggest strategies for improved performance in these functional areas understanding of key business theories and concepts relating to human resource and financial management, and knowledge of their application in familiar and unfamiliar contexts Management of Marketing and Operations ability to analyse and evaluate relatively complex factors influencing the management of marketing and operations and suggest strategies for improved performance in these functional areas understanding of key business theories and concepts relating to marketing and operations management, and knowledge of their application in familiar and unfamiliar contexts Assessment All the above units are internally assessed. Learners will also be assessed through a combination of a Business Management question paper (70 marks) and a business related assignment (30 marks). Progression

Advanced Higher Business Management; degree courses at University. A range of employment or training opportunities – Management posts in human resources, marketing or advertising studies.

- 41 -


Subject Level(s)

Business Management Advanced Higher

Unit Titles

Managing Managing Researching a Organisations: Organisations: Business The External The Internal Environment Environment The course represents a bridge between the traditionally teacher-led courses of secondary education and the more independent learning expected at university. Students are expected to do independent research. All units will involve whole class and individual teaching; group work and pupil centred learning; wherever possible, an integrated approach will be adopted so that pupils will benefit by seeing the holistic nature of the subject rather than merely its component parts. Pupils will be expected to do much of the learning independently, especially the Researching a Business area of study. Staff input for this unit is in an advisory role.

Outline of course

Managing Organisations: The External Environment Analyse the activities of transnational companies Assess the impact of the European Union (EU) on UK business Analyse a current issue affecting the operation of business enterprise Managing Organisations: The Internal Environment Analyse the management of organisations Advise on the management of change RESEARCHING A BUSINESS Assess a business situation

Progression

Assessment To achieve the course, the candidate must pass the Units as well as the Course assessment. The candidate’s grade is based on the Course assessment and Business Report. There will be 3 Unit assessments each lasting one hour; Course assessment is a Question Paper lasting 2 hours 45 minutes and has 100 marks available. The business report, based on the study of an external business, should be between 2500 and 3500 words, excluding any appendices. To Higher Education. Success in Advanced Higher Business Management is very highly regarded by Universities and is an excellent introduction to further Management studies.

- 42 -


Subject Level(s)

Computing Science National 4

Unit Titles

Information Systems Design and Development

Outline of course

In today’s world, nearly every home has a computer, and most people will use it several times a week. However, its use in the home, which is largely recreational, does not provide the knowledge, understanding and skills required by today’s employers.

Software Design and Development

Computing and information science is vital to everyday life: they shape the world in which we live and its future. They play a key role in meeting society’s present and future needs in fields such as science, communications, entertainment, education, business and industry. In order for society to function, business and industry are always in need of young people with strong computing skills and an informed view of the role of the IT industry in the economy and in society in general. As well as providing pupils with computing related skills, the course also provides them with the opportunity to develop their analytical, logical and organisational skills, transferable skills which are essential in a wide range of careers.

The course will cover the following topics . . . ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Website Development Software Development including Games and Mobile App design Graphics Manipulation Computer System Hardware Computer Networks Trends in the development of information and communication technologies Computers in Business, Industry and Entertainment Social implications of new information and communication technologies

National 4 will be internally assessed. National 5 will be assessed on an internally assessed cross-unit assignment and an externally assessed end-of-course question paper. The assessment weighting is: Question Paper 60%, Assignment 40%.

Progression

National 4 to National 5 National 5 to Higher Computing

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Subject Level(s)

Computing Science National 5

Unit Titles

Information Systems Design and Development

Outline of course

In today’s world, nearly every home has a computer, and most people will use it several times a week. However, its use in the home is largely recreational, and such use does not provide the knowledge, understanding and skills required by today’s employers.

Software Design and Development

Computing Science is vital to everyday life: it shapes the world in which we live and its future. It plays a key role in meeting society’s present and future needs in fields such as science, communications, entertainment, education, business and industry. In order for society to function, business and industry are always in need of young people with strong computing skills and an informed view of the role of the IT industry in the economy and in society in general. As well as providing pupils with computing-related skills, the course also provides them with the opportunity to develop their analytical, logical and organisational skills: transferable skills which are essential in a wide range of careers. The course covers the following topics . . . Information Systems, including:  Website design and development  Database creation and manipulation  Social implications of new information and communication technologies Software Development, including:  Application design and development  Computer System Software and Hardware  Computers in Business, Industry and Entertainment

National 4 will be internally assessed. National 5 will be assessed on an internally assessed cross-unit assignment and an externally assessed end-of-course question paper. The assessment weighting is: Question Paper 60%, Assignment 40%.

Progression

National 4 to National 5 National 5 to Higher Computing

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Subject Level(s)

Computing Science Higher

Unit Titles

Information Systems Design and Development

Outline of course

Computing science is vital to everyday life — socially, technologically and economically; it shapes the world in which we live and its future. Computing is embedded in the world around us from systems and devices in our homes and places of work, to how we access education, entertainment, transportation and communication. At this level, learners will be introduced to an advanced range of computational processes and thinking, and learn to apply a rigorous approach to the design and development process across a variety of contemporary contexts. Learners will also gain an awareness of the importance that computing professionals play in meeting the needs of society today and for the future, in fields which include science, education, business and industry.

Software Design and Development

Course Construction: In addition to the Course assessment, the Course includes two mandatory Units Software Design and Development The general aim of this Unit is to develop knowledge and understanding of advanced concepts and practical problem-solving skills in software design and development through appropriate software development environments. Learners will develop programming and computational thinking skills by designing, implementing, testing and evaluating practical solutions and explaining how these programs work. They will also develop an understanding of computer architecture and the concepts that underpin how programs work. Through investigative work, learners will gain an awareness of the impact of contemporary computing technologies. Information System Design and Development The general aim of this Unit is to develop knowledge and understanding of advanced concepts and practical problem-solving skills in information system design and development through a range of practical and investigative tasks. Learners will apply their computational thinking skills to implement practical solutions using a range of development tools and to develop an understanding the technical, legal, environmental, economic and social issues related to one or more information systems. Entry Requirements: Students would normally be expected to have attained a pass in Computing Science at National 5 level. Higher Computing Science may also be a suitable choice for students with a strong Mathematics or Physics attainment that have no prior experience of Computing Science but have a strong interest in the subject. Assessment: Students will be required to sit two practical and theory based end of unit assessments. The final course assessment is made up of 2 components: a question Paper (90 marks) and an assignment, undertaken in class, (60 marks). Progression

This Course or its Units may provide progression to other qualifications in Computing Science or related areas and/or further study, employment and/or training.

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Subject Level(s) Unit Titles

Creative Digital Media National 4 Introduction to the Industry

The Creative Process

Hardware and Software

Final Project

The Course provides an introduction to, and overview of, the digital media industry and has been Outline of course designed to take candidates through an experiential learning process that highlights the key areas of aptitude and attitude for careers in the digital media sectors. A key feature of the Course is the emphasis on experiential learning. This means learning through practical experience and learning by reflecting on experience. Whist the context of the course is the Digital Media Industry the focus for learning and assessment is Skills for Work (Skills and knowledge in a broad vocational area, an understanding of the workplace, positive attitudes to learning, skills and attitude for employment, Communication, Numeracy, Information Technology, Problem Solving and working with Others). Mandatory Units Creative Digital Media: Introduction to the Industry 1 credit (40 hours) This Unit provides candidates with an introduction to the digital media industry across a range of sectors which include radio, television/DVD, digital/computer games and software, publishing and websites as well as other sectors which may increase in the light of emerging technology. Creative Digital Media: The Creative Process 1 credit (40 hours) In this Unit candidates will consider the basics of the creative process based on a given project brief, the job roles involved and the contribution of each role during the development and production process. Creative Digital Media: Hardware and Software 1 credit (40 hours) In this Unit candidates will learn about the identification, selection and use of appropriate hardware and software, the creation and capture of content, the editing and manipulation of created and captured content. Creative Digital Media: Production Project 1 credit (40 hours) This Unit provides candidates with opportunities to work individually and as part of a team in all aspects of the practical development and production of two digital media products. Starting with the development of a project brief, the team will identify two digital media products to satisfy the requirements of the brief and will then move on to the planning phase before undertaking the production of two digital media products. Progression

The course or its Units may provide progression to: National courses in Media Studies National Certificates or Units in Digital Media Relevant programmes in further education colleges Training/employment

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Subject Level(s)

Design and Manufacture National 4 and National 5

Unit Titles

Design

Outline of course

The course provides a broad practical introduction to design, materials and manufacturing processes. It provides the opportunities for learners to gain skills in both designing and in communicating design proposals. It allows learners to explore the properties and uses of materials and to make models and prototypes or products.

Materials and Manufacture

Design and Manufacture Assignment (National 4 only)

Design Identify factors that influence design and apply these in a design task Develop and communicate design concepts for a design task Evaluate an existing product Materials and manufacture Investigate materials for manufacturing tasks in a workshop context Prepare for manufacturing tasks in a workshop context Plan and implement a manufacturing sequence for a prototype Review manufacturing processes and a finished prototype Design and Manufacture Assignment (National 4 only) The aim of the Unit is to enable the learner to provide evidence of added value through the successful completion of an assignment, which will allow the learner to demonstrate challenge and application. Learners will be able to: Design and manufacture a product in response to a brief Assessment The above units will all be assessed internally. At National 5, the learners will also be assessed through an assignment (60%) and a question paper (40%) Progression

Other SQA qualifications in Design and manufacture or related areas. Further study, training or employment

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Subject Level(s)

Design and Manufacture Higher

Unit Titles

Design and Manufacture: Design.

Entry Requirements

National 5 Design and Manufacture or National 5 Art and Design or National 5 Graphic Communication National 5 English

Outline of course

The Course is practical, exploratory and experiential in nature. It combines elements of creativity and designing for visual impact with elements of practicalities and an appreciation of functionality. On completing the Course, the pupils will have developed: design skills in the context of products; practical skills in planning and making or manufacturing models and prototypes, including the selection and use of equipment, materials and software; and skills in the evaluation of design proposals, including form and function, leading to a refinement of their design ideas. Learners will also have developed: skills in building and testing in order to prove and resolve their design ideas; knowledge and understanding of manufacturing processes and materials; and an understanding of the impact of design and manufacturing technologies on our environment and society, the world of work and industry. As well as the Course assessment, the Course includes two mandatory Units:

Design and Manufacture: Materials and Manufacturing.

Design and Manufacture: Design This Unit covers the processes of product design from brief to resolved design proposals and specification. It helps learners develop skills in initiating, developing, articulating and communicating design proposals for products. It allows them to gain skills and experience in evaluating design proposals in order to refine, improve and resolve them. It allows them to develop an appreciation of design concepts and the various factors that influence the design and manufacture of products. Design and Manufacture: Materials and Manufacturing This Unit covers the processes of product design from design proposals to prototype. It allows learners to gain skills in planning and making models and prototypes. It helps learners to ‘close the design loop’ by manufacturing a set of design ideas. It allows them to develop an appreciation of manufacturing practicalities. It allows them to strengthen an appreciation of the various factors that influence the design and manufacture of products. It allows learners to consider the manufacturing techniques and processes that would apply to a design proposal in an industrial/commercial context. Design and Manufacture Assignment The Design and Manufacture assignment adds value by introducing challenge and application. Learners will draw on their range of design skills, knowledge of materials, and practical skills, in order to produce an effective overall response to the brief. The response to the brief will include a folio and model and/or a prototype. The brief for the assignment, which will cover a range of key design factors, will be sufficiently open and flexible to allow for personalisation and choice. Assessment All the above units will be assessed internally. At Higher, learners will also be assessed through a question paper (50%) and an assignment (50%). Progression

Advanced Higher Design and Manufacture and other SQA courses, further study, training or employment. - 48 -


Subject Level(s)

Graphic Communication National 5

Unit Titles

2D Graphic Communication

Outline of course

The course provides opportunity for learners to gain skills in reading, interpreting and creating graphic communications. Learners will initiate, develop and communicate ideas graphically. They will develop spatial awareness and visual literacy.

3D and Pictorial Graphic Communication

2D Graphic Communication Produce and interpret 2D sketches and drawings Produce preliminary 2D designs and illustrations for single-page promotional displays Create 2D promotional graphic layouts 3D and Pictorial Graphic Communication Produce and interpret pictorial sketches, pictorial drawings and 3D models Produce pictorial and 3D illustrations Create pictorial and 3D promotional displays Assessment All the above units will be assessed internally. At National 5, learners will also be assessed through a question paper (50%) and a project. (50%) Progression

Higher Graphic Communication and other SQA courses, further study, training or employment

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Subject Level(s)

Graphic Communication Higher

Unit Titles

2D Graphic Communication

Outline of course

The course provides opportunity for learners to gain skills in reading, interpreting and creating graphic communications. Learners will initiate, develop and communicate ideas graphically. They will develop spatial awareness and visual literacy.

3D and Pictorial Graphic Communication

2D Graphic Communication This Unit helps learners to develop their creativity and presentation skills within a 2D graphic communication context. It will allow learners to initiate, plan, develop and communicate ideas graphically, using two-dimensional graphic techniques. Learners will develop a number of skills and attributes within a 2D graphic communication context, including spatial awareness, visual literacy, and the ability to interpret given drawings, diagrams and other graphics. Learners will evaluate the effectiveness of their own and given graphic communications to meet their purpose. 3D and Pictorial Graphic Communication This Unit helps learners to develop their creativity and presentation skills within a 3D and pictorial graphic communication context. It will allow learners to initiate, plan, develop and communicate ideas graphically, using three-dimensional graphic techniques. Learners will develop a number of skills and attributes within a 3D graphic communication context, including spatial awareness, visual literacy, and the ability to interpret given drawings, diagrams and other graphics. Learners will evaluate the effectiveness of their own and given graphic communications to meet their purpose. Graphic Communication Assignment The Graphic Communication assignment adds value by introducing challenge and application. Learners will draw on their range of skills, knowledge and understanding from the Units in order to produce an effective overall response to the assignment brief. The brief for the project will be sufficiently open and flexible to allow for personalisation and choice. Assessment All the above units will be assessed internally. At Higher, learners will also be assessed through a question paper (50%) and an assignment (50%). Progression

Advanced Higher Graphic Communication and other SQA courses, further study, training or employment

- 50 -


Subject Level(s)

Graphic Communication Advanced Higher

Unit Titles

Technical Graphics

Outline of course

The course aims to allow candidates to develop both manual and computer graphic skills and understanding beyond those involved in Higher Graphic Communication. This will provide the candidate with an insight into the way in which information presented graphically is an integral part of communication throughout business and industry as well as in the consumer environment. Experience will be gained of evaluating the effectiveness of visual communication that will enable the candidate to apply principles of composition in the production of a computer produced presentation.

Computer-Aided 3D Modelling, Visualisation and Presentation

Computer-Aided Graphic Presentation

Technical Graphics (AH) 1. Apply manual techniques of geometric constructions to produce orthographic drawings. 2. Apply manual techniques of 2-point measured perspective to architectural settings. Computer-Aided 3D Modelling Visualisation and Presentation (AH) 1. Create 3D Computer-Aided Design surface models. 2. Create 3D Computer-Aided Design solid models. 3. Produce Computer-Aided drawings from a 3D Computer-Aided Design model. 4. Produce Computer-Aided rendered images from 3D Computer-Aided Design model. Computer-Aided Graphic Presentation (AH) 1. Evaluate the application of design principles in professional graphics presentations. 2. Design and produce a professional Graphic Presentation for a client group. 3. Desktop Publishing characteristics are identified and their functions described correctly. Assessment

Progression

To gain the award of the course, the candidate must pass all the unit assessments as well as the external assessment. The external assessment will consist of a paper lasting 3 hours. Each candidate will be required to produce a Thematic Presentation, incorporating manual and computer-aided graphics. This will be internally assessed. A National Certificate group programme at an appropriate level in areas such as engineering, construction or design. A degree or HND or HNC programme in areas such as engineering, architecture or graphic design. Employment in a wide range of occupations in fields such as engineering and construction - 51 -


Subject Level(s)

Practical Woodworking National 5

Unit Titles

Flat-frame Construction

Outline of course

The course provides opportunity for learners to gain skills in reading drawings and diagrams. It allows them to plan activities through to the completion of a finished artefact. The course will allow learners to use a variety of tools, equipment and materials. This course should only be undertaken by those who have not previously studied and passed Practical Woodworking at National 5.

Carcase Construction

Machining and Finishing

Making a Finished Product from Wood

Flat-frame Construction Prepare for flat-frame woodworking tasks Manufacture a range of basic flat-frame woodworking joints Manufacture a flat-frame assembly Carcase Construction Prepare for carcase construction woodworking tasks Manufacture a range of basic woodworking joints used in carcase construction Manufacture a carcase construction woodworking assembly with four joints Machining and Finishing Prepare for practical woodworking machining and finishing activities Use a range of common machine and power tools Apply a range of finishes to timber Manufacture a timber artefact comprising four or more components with the aid of machine and power tools Final Assessment - Making a Finished Product from Wood The aim of this Final Assessment is to enable learners to provide evidence for the Practical Woodworking Course through the successful completion of a practical activity, which will allow the learner to demonstrate challenge and application. Learners will be able to: Produce a finished artefact in wood Assessment At National 5, the above units and final task will be assessed internally. Progression

Other SQA qualifications in Practical Woodworking or further study, training or employment.

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NUMERACY Geography National 4 National 5 Higher Advanced Higher

Mathematics National 4 National 5 Higher Advanced Higher

Personal Finance National 4

Scottish Studies National 4 National 5

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Subject Level(s)

Geography National 4, National 5

Unit Titles

Physical Environments

Human Environments

Global Issues

Outline of course The Geography courses are designed to allow pupils to develop a knowledge and understanding of current events on both a local and global scale. The course will allow pupils to develop a range of transferable skills such as map reading, ICT skills, problem solving, and data collection. Practical fieldwork skills are an essential part of the course and allow pupils the opportunity to explore their local environment. The Geography course comprises of three elements; Physical Environments, Human Environments, and Global Issues. In Physical Environments pupils will study; The formation and use of different landscape types within the British Isles focusing on Geology, Hydrology, and Limestone. Forecasting and understanding the British weather and its impacts on people and the environment. In Human Environments topics will include; Population: a study of life in developed and less developed countries. Urban Change: a comparison of urban landscapes in the developed and less developed world. Modern agricultural methods, their impacts, and the future of farming. In Global Issues topics chosen will be chosen from; Tropical Storms/Hurricanes and Earth Forces. The impacts and sustainability of global tourism Development, Health, and Disease in developed and developing nations. Trade and Globalisation

To gain the award of the Course at National 4 level all outcomes for each individual Unit must be achieved at National 4 level. In addition pupils must pass an Added Value Unit. All elements are internally assessed throughout the year. To gain the award of the Course at National 5 level all outcomes for each individual Unit must be achieved at National 5 level. The Unit passes are internally assessed throughout the academic year. All Units must be passed to sit the final Course assessment at National 5 level. The Course assessment will have two components: a question paper and an Added Value Unit. Both will be externally assessed. The Course assessment will provide the basis for grading attainment in the Course award.

Progression

(i) National 3 (ii) National 4 (iii) National 5 (v) Advanced Higher Pupils can enter progression at any of levels (i) – (iii)

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(iv) Higher


Subject Level(s)

Geography Higher

Unit Titles

Physical Environments

Outline of course

The Higher Geography Course develops learners’ understanding of our changing world and its human and physical processes in local, national, international and global study contexts. Opportunities for practical activities including fieldwork are encouraged, so that learners can interact with their environment. A pupil who chooses to study Geography should have an enquiring mind and an enthusiastic, wide ranging interest in the inter-relationships between landscapes and people. This in turn, means that Geography as a subject of study combines well with a wide variety of other subjects in the school curriculum.

Human Environments

Global Issues

Learners will develop a wide variety of skills including map reading and interpretation, practical fieldwork, gathering and processing techniques, data analysis, and report writing. The course will include the opportunity for personlisation and choice. It should be noted that Geography is one of the few subjects that can be taken on into further study as either a science OR as an arts/social science subject. COURSE CONTENT: (a) Physical Environment (b)

Human Environment

(c)

Global Issues

-

Key topics include: atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere and biosphere. Key topics include: population, rural land use change and management, urban change and management Key topics include: river basin management, development and health, global climate change, trade, aid and geopolitics, energy.

ASSESSMENT ARRANGEMENTS To gain the award of the Course, the learner must pass all of the Units shown above as well as the Course assessment. The Units will be assessed internally throughout the academic year, all Units must be passed to sit the final Course assessment. The Course assessment will have two components: a question paper and an assignment. Both will be externally assessed. The Course assessment will provide the basis for grading attainment in the Course award. Entry Requirements Pupils who achieve a Geography National 5 pass are recommended for this course. Pupils wishing to ‘crash’ the Higher would be required to have the equivalent in another Social Subject.

Progression

Advanced Higher Geography. Geography is a broad based academic degree which is well respected by employers. Geography graduates have one of the highest rates of graduate employment.

Geographers enter a very wide range of career areas including: Environment and Sustainability, Engineering, Business, Global Development, Research, Urban Management, Recreation, Tourism and Leisure. Studying geography provides you with valuable skills and a firm base for life-long learning.

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Subject Level(s)

Geography Advanced Higher

Unit Titles

Geographical Methods and Techniques

Outline of course

The Advanced Higher Course consists of 3 units: 1) Geographical Methods and Techniques including The production and Interpretation of Maps, Diagrams and Photographs Application of Physical and Human fieldwork methods or techniques Statistical Testing, interpretation, and analysis 2) The Geographical Study (worth 40% of the overall course award). To plan, research, evaluate and present a Geographical Field Study on any Physical or Human topic in the local area. 3) The study of a Geographical Issue – This is completed in the form of a critical essay (Worth 30% of the overall course award) To identify different viewpoints of any geographical issue which was studied at Higher e.g. Urban Change, Development and Health, Rural Land Resources, Alternative sources of energy etc, and to critically analyse and evaluate resources.

Geographical Field Study

Geographical Issue

The approach to learning and teaching is markedly different from that of Higher. Whilst whole class teaching has an important role, individual research projects and use of I.T together with 'team' activities such as fieldwork and data gathering are an integral part of the course. ASSESSMENT ARRANGEMENTS There are separate Internal Assessments on the 3 areas of study in Unit 1 and there is one question on each of the units (i.e.) Map Interpretation, Statistics and Geographical Methods and Techniques in the external examination. Internal Assessment in Units 2 and 3 take the form of monitoring performance in the work carried out during the production of the final geographical study report and for the geographical essay as well as a NAB item for each. The final external exam (worth 30% of the course award) contains a choice of questions on map interpretation, statistical analysis and diagram work and geographical methods and techniques of fieldwork. HOMEWORK This is an integral part of the students' preparation of their planning, gathering, evaluation and presentation of their unit work.

Entry Requirements Geography Higher – a pass at either A or B

Progression

Geography is a broad based academic degree which is well respected by employers. Geography graduates have one of the highest rates of graduate employment. Geographers enter a very wide range of career areas including: Environment and Sustainability, Engineering, Business, Global Development, Research, Urban Management, Recreation, Tourism and Leisure. Studying geography provides you with valuable skills and a firm base for life-long learning.

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Subject Level(s)

Mathematics National 4

Unit Titles

Numeracy

Outline of course

Expressions and Relationships Formulae This course is designed to develop the learner’s skills in using mathematical language, to explore mathematical ideas, and to develop skills relevant to learning, life and work in an engaging and enjoyable way. It will build on prior learning and develop: operational skills in algebra, geometry, trigonometry and statistics reasoning skills of investigation, problem solving, analysis and modelling numeracy skills in number processes and information handling Assessment arrangements To gain the award of the course, the learner must pass all the units as well as the course assessment which will offer opportunities to demonstrate the breadth of knowledge and skills acquired from across the course in unfamiliar situations and integrated ways. At National 4 all units and the course assessment are assessed internally.

Homework Homework will be issued on a regular basis and pupils will be expected to prepare in advance for unit assessments. Additionally, students are expected to undertake continuous revision throughout the year. Recommended minimum entry requirements Pass at National 3 or 4 Lifeskills Mathematics

Progression

On successful completion of National 4 the learner could progress onto National 5 Mathematics.

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Subject Level(s)

Mathematics National 5

Unit Titles

Expressions and Relationships Applications Formulae This course is designed to develop the learner’s skills in using mathematical language, to explore mathematical ideas, and to develop skills relevant to learning, life and work in an engaging and enjoyable way. It will build on prior learning and develop:

Outline of course

operational skills in algebra, geometry, trigonometry and statistics reasoning skills of investigation, problem solving, analysis and modelling numeracy skills in number processes and information handling

Assessment arrangements To gain the award of the course, the learner must pass all the units as well as the course assessment which will offer opportunities to demonstrate the breadth of knowledge and skills acquired from across the course in unfamiliar situations and integrated ways. At National 5 units are assessed internally and the course assessment is an external exam.

Homework Homework will be issued on a regular basis and pupils will be expected to prepare in advance for unit assessments. Additionally, students are expected to undertake continuous revision throughout the year. Recommended minimum entry requirements Pass at National 4 Mathematics

Progression

On successful completion of National 5 the learner could progress to Higher Mathematics.

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Subject Level(s)

Mathematics Higher

Unit Titles

Expressions and Relationships and Applications Functions Calculus This course aims to: motivate and challenge learners by enabling them to select and apply mathematical techniques in a variety of mathematical situations develop confidence in the subject and a positive attitude towards further study in mathematics and the use of mathematics in employment deliver in-depth study of mathematical concepts and the ways in which mathematics describes our world allow learners to interpret, communicate and manage information in mathematical form; skills which are vital to scientific and technological research and development deepen the learner’s skills in using mathematical language and exploring advanced mathematical ideas

Outline of course

Assessment arrangements To gain the award of the course, the learner must pass all three units as well as the external course assessment which will offer opportunities to demonstrate the breadth of knowledge and skills acquired from across the course in unfamiliar situations and integrated ways.

Homework Homework will be issued on a regular basis and pupils will be expected to prepare in advance for unit assessments. Additionally, students are expected to undertake continuous revision throughout the year. Recommended minimum entry requirements Grade A or B at National 5 Mathematics

Progression

This Course or its Units may provide progression to: Advanced Higher Mathematics further study, employment and/or training

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Subject Level(s)

Mathematics Advanced Higher

Unit Titles

Unit 1

Outline of course

Unit 2

Unit 3

This Course is designed to enthuse, motivate, and challenge learners by enabling them to: select and apply complex mathematical techniques in a variety of mathematical situations, both practical and abstract extend and apply problem solving and logic skills extend skills in interpreting, analysing, communicating and managing information in mathematical form, while exploring more advanced techniques

Content of course Exposition by teacher, consolidation of skills and independent learning are combined with an investigative approach to learning Mathematics. Unit 1 contains further work on differentiation, integration and functions, and introduces work on matrices and complex numbers. Unit 2 contains further work on sequences and series, and introduces work on number theory. Unit 3 contains further work on vectors, and introduces work on parametric equations and 3-dimensional geometry. Assessment arrangements To gain the award of the course, the learner must pass all the units as well as the course assessment which will offer opportunities to demonstrate the breadth of knowledge and skills acquired from across the course in unfamiliar situations and integrated ways. Homework Students are required to undertake a minimum of 5 hours study per week out with the class in addition to continuous revision and preparation for unit assessments. Recommended minimum entry requirements Grade A or B at Higher Mathematics

Progression

This course offers students a broad background of Mathematics of interest to specialists and non-specialists alike and is of use to those pursuing a wide variety of post-school studies and careers including Pure Mathematics, Sciences, Computer Science and Engineering.

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Subject Level(s)

Mathematics Personal Finance with National 4 Numeracy

Unit Titles

Principles of Money

Outline of course

Money Management Numeracy

Money Management - SCQF Level 4: This Unit focuses on managing your money. It will help you to prepare to deal with bills and budgeting. You will look at costs involved with borrowing money. You will consider insurance and long term financial planning. You will look at different ways of buying goods and how to compare different deals. The Principles of Money - SCQF Level 4: This Unit focuses on opportunities to explore basic financial encounters. It will help you gain a better understanding of what ‘money’ is and where it comes from. The Unit will help you to understand sources of income and how to store and access your money. It will help you to understand how to use a budget and understand foreign exchange. National 4 Numeracy: Learners will use numerical skills to solve straightforward, real-life problems involving money/time/ measurement. They will also interpret graphical data and situations involving probability to solve straightforward, reallife problems involving money/time/measurement. Assessment arrangements The Personal Finance Award has been designed for on-line testing. The assessments are automatically marked and results given to learners immediately. The Numeracy unit will be internally assessed. Homework Candidates may be expected to investigate aspects of personal finance and present information to the class. Recommended minimum entry requirements Pass at National 3 or 4 Lifeskills Mathematics

Progression

The importance of financial education in schools is now widely recognised as an important and necessary life skill for young people. The Personal Finance award will equip candidates with the skills to cope confidently and effectively with basic financial encounters as well as managing money.

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Subject Level(s)

Scottish Studies National 4 and National 5

Unit Titles

2 Units from Society & Environment

Outline of course

1 Unit from Business,

Scotland in Focus

Industry and Employment Unit

The new Scottish Studies Award, at SCQF levels 3, 4 and 5 provides opportunities for learners to develop their skills, knowledge and understanding of Scotland — in terms of its people, languages (for example Scots and Gaelic), society, culture, natural environment and heritage — and to make connections across the curriculum. The Scottish Studies Course consists of four Units. Pupils will cover three Units from the following two subjects groups; Society and the Environment, and, Business, Industry and Employment. Each Unit will be studied within a Scottish context. Pupils will also complete a ‘Scotland in Focus Unit’ which takes the format of an individual assignment. To gain the award, pupils must pass all of the Units shown above. The Units will be assessed internally throughout the academic year and verified externally by the SQA.

Entry Requirements Pupils who have successfully achieved National awards in any curricular area at SCQF Level 3, 4, or 5.

Progression

Scottish Studies SCQF Level 6 It could also lead to vocational training or employment in a variety of sectors including tourism, hospitality and the creative, cultural and heritage industries.

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PHYSICAL EDUCATION: SPORT & FITNESS Physical Education National 5 Higher

Physical Education Performance Units National 4 National 5 Higher

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Subject Level

Physical Education National 5

Unit Titles

Performance

Outline of course

Progression

Factors Impacting on Course Assessment Performance The main purpose of this SQA Course is for pupils to develop, demonstrate and improve their practical performance skills in a variety of physical activities. They will do this by taking part in a range of Individual, Team and Water Based activities where they will also have the opportunity to demonstrate initiative, decision making and problem solving. Full participation in these activities will also develop their team building skills and their ability to cooperate, compete and collaborate with others. Whilst the emphasis is on learning the principles involved in physical activity through practical sessions, reinforcement of those principles will take place in the classroom context. This course will enable the learner to: develop and demonstrate knowledge of the principles and factors underpinning and impacting on performance describe factors which impact positively and negatively on engagement and performance in physical activities build capacity to enhance effective performance reflect on, and monitor, performance to inform and influence personal improvement

National 5 → Higher

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Subject Level(s)

PHYSICAL EDUCATION Higher

Unit Titles

Physical Education : Performance Skills Physical Education : Factors Impacting on Performance

Outline of course

Topics Four factors impacting on performance (physical, social, emotional and mental) Approaches to performance and movement skills development Planning to develop performance Analysing factors impacting on performance Approaches to develop performance Monitoring and evaluating performance development Performance in physical activities. (Basketball, Table Tennis and Swimming) To achieve the Higher course students must pass all required Units and Course assessment. Course assessment Single performance in one activity Question paper.

Progression Route

Accepted for admission to courses in Higher/Further Education. Vocational Destinations: particularly useful for the Leisure Industry

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Subject Level(s)

PHYSICAL EDUCATION Performance units National 4, National 5 & Higher

Unit Titles

Practical Performance

Outline of course

A selection of free standing units in which students will develop their performance at a recreational level. Through practical experiential learning students will also be given the opportunity to apply the principal rules of the activity and to acquire an understanding of the value of the different physical, mental, social and emotional factors which impact on their performance. The focus is on performance improvement. Assessment will be a practical performance where the student will complete a prepared plan beforehand and then a review after the performance.

Progression Route

Students will improve their awareness, knowledge and personal performance in sport with a view to developing life long learning and participation in sport and physical activity.

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SCIENCE Biology National 5 Higher Advanced Higher

Biology: Human Biology Higher

Chemistry National 5 Higher Advanced Higher

Physics National 4 National 5 Higher Advanced Higher

Science National 4

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Subject Level(s)

Biology National 5

Unit Titles

Cell Biology

Outline of course

Multicellular Life on Earth Organisms The Biology course is based on a practical approach to understanding The Living Planet and how Living Things work and are interrelated. The course also aims to show something of the contribution of Biology to the quality of everyday life eg Biodiversity and Life, Natural Selection, Respiration Pathways, Biochemistry of the Nitrogen Cycle and the use of Fertilisers in Industry.

Entry Requirements

Entry requirements: National 4 Biology – entry at the discretion of department. The 3 units of work cover topics such : Cell structure and function DNA and protein production Genetic Engineering Biochemistry of photosynthesis and respiration Stem Cells Control and Communication Reproduction and Inheritance Biodiversity and the Distribution of Life Adaptation, Evolution and Natural Selection Ethical Issues and the Impact on Humans Assignment - Here pupils have an opportunity to choose one area of the course which they find particularly interesting and complete their own research and report. This will be 20 marks towards their final course award as the final exam is 80 marks.

Progression

Progression from National 5 Level A and B to Higher – complete course pass required.

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Subject Level(s)

Biology Higher

Unit Titles

DNA and the Genome

Outline of course

The Course is a broad and up-to-date selection of concepts and ideas relevant to the central position of life science within our society. It builds on previous learning, such as the Biology (National 5) Course, and covers all of the major themes of biology (cells, evolution, genetics, energy, homeostasis and ecosystems).

Entry Requirements

Metabolism and Survival

Sustainability and Interdependance

Entry requirements: A or B at National 5 Biology or Grade A or B at Intermediate 2 Biology. The Course allows learners to develop deeper understanding of the underlying themes of biology: evolution and adaptation; structure and function; genotype and niche. Within each of the three units, the scale of topics ranges from molecular through to whole organism and beyond. In addition, to increase the relevance of the Course, within each Unit the most relevant applications of biological understanding are highlighted. The Course allows flexibility and personalisation by offering choice in the contexts studied. The Higher Biology course aims to enable learners to: develop scientific and analytical thinking skills in a biological context develop understanding of biological concepts acquire and apply knowledge of relevant applications of biology in society develop a deeper understanding of the underlying themes of biology, including evolution and adaptation; structure and function; genotype and niche develop applied problem solving skills in biological context

Mandatory Units

DNA and the Genome Metabolism and Survival Sustainability and Interdependance. Research Unit

Assessment

All Units are internally assessed against the requirements shown in the Unit Specifications. Pupils will complete an Assignment Assessment which is 30 marks (30%) of the final Course grade for the course.

Progression

Advanced Higher Biology/Higher in another Science/HND or degree in related area

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Subject Level(s)

Biology Advanced Higher

Unit Titles

Cell and Molecular Biology

Unit Titles

The course provides a broad based study of a wide range of biological topics built on the concepts developed in Higher Biology and Higher Human Biology and consists of two mandatory 40 hour units, a 20 hour investigation and one optional 20 hour unit from a choice of three. The content of the two mandatory units reflects the importance of cell and molecular and environmental biology as fundamental areas of science and is designed to develop an understanding of the way in which biological principals can be applied to the issues facing the individual in modern society. The topics emphasise the socially and economically relevant applications of biology such as DNA technology and the impact of the human species on the environment. The optional unit provides the opportunity to select an area of study of intrinsic interest and relevance to the student while the investigation is designed to further develop the student's problem solving and practical abilities in an extended piece of scientific work.

Entry Requirements

Environmental Biology Biological Investigation

A grade A or B in Higher Biology or Higher Human Biology.

Mandatory Units

Cell and Molecular Biology (1 credit): Structure, function and growth of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells; Structure and function of cell components; Molecular interactions in cell events ; Applications of DNA technology . Environmental Biology (1 credit) : Circulation in ecosystems ; Interactions in ecosystems ; Human impact on the environment. Biological Investigation (0.5 credit) : This unit is designed to provide opportunities to further develop investigative skills through the planning of an investigation and the collection and analysis of the information obtained from the investigation.

Optional Units

Animal Behaviour Physiology and Exercise

Assessment Arrangements

To gain the course award, students must achieve all the units of the course as well as the external assessment. External assessment will provide the basis for grading attainment in the course award. These will consist of end of unit tests containing a mixture of KU and PS items relating to the course content. A pass mark of 65% will be set for all such tests. In addition, students will be required to prepare a report which will involve the collection and analysis of information gained through experiment and relating to an aspect of the course content.

Biological Investigation

The investigation may relate to the planning, collection and analysis of information through experimental, observational or survey work. Both components of the investigation must be the individual work of the student and will be internally assessed.

External Examination

This will involve assessment of KU, PS and practical abilities based on the course content described for the three units of study and will include more complex items than unit assessments. The core skills of Problem Solving and numeracy (using graphical information) will be credited on successful completion of the course.

Homework

Progression Routes

On a daily basis students are expected to study and review the work done in class Regular homework exercises are given to reinforce the concepts and problem solving skills covered in class. University and College course involving Biology, such as Medicine, Veterinary Medicine, Physiotherapy , Psychology, Pharmacology, Dentistry etc. - 70 -


Subject Level(s)

Biology Higher Human

Unit Titles

Human Cells

Outline of Course

Entry Requirements

Mandatory Units

Physiology and Neurobiology and Immunology and Health Communication Public Health The course provides the opportunity for candidates to acquire a deeper understanding of cellular processes, physiological mechanisms, communication between organisms and the biology of populations as they apply to the human species. By setting these in human contexts relevant to candidates, opportunities arise naturally to develop capabilities associated with becoming successful candidates, confident individuals, responsible citizens and effective contributors. Entry requirements: A or B at National 5 Biology or Grade A or B at Intermediate 2 Biology. The Higher Human Biology course aims to enable learners to: develop scientific and analytical thinking skills in a human biological context develop understanding of human biological concepts acquire and apply knowledge of relevant applications of human biology in society develop a deeper understanding of the underlying themes of human biology, including cellular processes; physiological processes; communication between organisms; and the biology of populations as they apply to the human species develop applied problem solving skills in human biological context Human Cells Physiology and Health Neurobiology and Communication Immunology and Public Health Research Unit

Assessment

All Units are internally assessed against the requirements shown in the Unit Specifications. Pupils will complete an Assignment Assessment which is 30 marks (30%) of the final Course grade for the course.

Progression

Advanced Higher Biology/Higher in another Science/HND or degree in related area

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Subject Level(s)

Chemistry National 5

Unit Titles

Chemical Changes and Nature’s Chemistry Chemistry in Society Structures The Chemistry course is based on a practical approach to understanding chemical changes and how they impact on everyday society.

Outline of course

The course also aims to show something of the contribution of Chemistry to the quality of everyday life e.g. in searching for better fuels and medicines, in fighting against corrosion and in developing new useful materials. Entry requirements: National 4 Chemistry – entry at the discretion of department. Entry Requirements The 3 units of work cover a range of topics such as: Chemical Reactions and Rate of Reaction Atomic Structure Bonding related to properties of materials. Nuclear Chemistry Formation of elements. Fuels The study of different types of fuels and structures Chemical Reactions and Energy from Fuels Acids and Alkalis Metals – Properties of Metals and Alloys Plastics

Progression

Assignment - Here pupils have an opportunity to choose one area of the course which they find particularly interesting and complete their own research and report. This will contribute 20 marks towards their final course award as the final exam is 80 marks. . Progression from National 5 Level A and B to Higher – complete course pass required.

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Subject Level(s)

Chemistry Higher

Unit Titles

Energy Matters

Outline of Course

The study of chemistry at Higher makes an important contribution to the student's knowledge and understanding of the physical and natural world and continues the development of the problem solving and practical skills associated with scientific enquiry.

Entry Requirements

Entry requirements: A or B at National 5 Chemistry or Grade A or B at Intermediate 2 Chemistry.

Reaction Rates

The World of Carbon

The units in the 'H' Chemistry course are: Energy Matters (H) 40 hours Reaction rates; enthalpy; patterns in the Periodic Table; structure and properties; and the mole.

bonding,

The World of Carbon (H) 40 hours Feedstocks and fuels; nomenclature and structural formulae; reactions and uses of carbon compounds; polymers, and natural products. Chemical Reactions (H) 40 hours The chemical industry; Hess's Law; equilibrium; acids and bases; redox reactions; and nuclear chemistry. Research Unit (H) 20 hours Here pupils have an opportunity to choose one area of the course which they find particularly interesting and complete their own research and report. Practical investigations will be a part of completion of this unit. Homework

Homework is as would be expected in a 'H' course i.e. pupils are expected to consolidate school work regularly at home; formal exercises will be given every 3/4 weeks.

Assessment

Internal Assessment All Units are internally assessed against the requirements shown in the Unit Specifications. A pass in prescribed practical activity is also required.

Progression Routes

Completion of Higher Chemistry at Level A or B will allow progression to Advanced Higher Chemistry. Alternatively pupils can progress to another Science subject at Higher level. To Higher education: degree and HND courses in chemistry and chemistry-related subjects such as environmental science, pharmacy, medicine and chemical engineering : to employment including workbased training for SVQ Laboratory Operations.

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Subject Level(s)

Chemistry Advanced Higher

Unit Titles

Electronic Structure and the Periodic Table

Outline of the course

The study of chemistry at Advanced Higher builds on the Higher level course developing further the underlying theories of chemistry and the practical skills used in the chemical laboratory. The course also develops the skills of independent study and thought that are essential in a wide range of occupations and in higher education courses.

Entry requirements

Grade A or B pass at Higher Chemistry.

Course Units

Assessment Arrangements

Principles of Chemical Reactions

Organic Chemistry

Electronic Structure and the Periodic Table (20 hrs) Electromagnetic spectrum, spectroscopy, covalent bonding, ionic lattices, superconductors, semi-conductors, oxides, chlorides, hydrides, transition metal complexes Principles of Chemical Reactions (40 hrs) Equilibrum, Hess's Law, Enthalpy, Entropy, Free Energy. Organic Chemistry (40 hrs) Reactions and properties of hydrocarbons, halogenoalkanes, alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, amines, aromatic compounds. Structural analysis using mass spectra, I.R., NMR, X-ray. Chemical Investigation (20 hrs) The investigation is something new to the pupil but need not be a piece of original research. For example, it may arise from the course practical work for perhaps from a pupil's particular interest in a topic in the 'S' or 'H' Grade Courses. The project is designed to encourage the development of many of the skills of independent study mentioned above; it forms a very rewarding part of the course. A variety of teaching approaches are used ranging from teacher exposition to highly structured resource based individualized learning: the latter encourages students to develop the skills of independent study which will be necessary in higher education. Practical work is an important part of the course and tasks involving analysis and synthesis illustrate real life applications of chemistry. External exam covering K/U and PS Chemical investigation report

80% 20%

Internal There are tests at the end of each of the 3 theory units and passes in these are recorded on the results certificate. Homework

Progression Routes

Regular consolidation of school work is expected as is the completion of written exercises every 3/4 weeks. The course is particularly suitable for students who wish to progress to degree courses either in chemistry or in subjects of which chemistry is a major component such as medicine, chemical engineering and the environmental and health sciences. The course also provides a sound basis for direct entry into chemistry-related employment.

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Subject Level(s)

Physics National 4

Unit Titles

Electricity & Energy

Outline of course

The Physics course is based on a practical approach to understanding The Universe and how things work.

Waves & Radiation

Dynamics & Space

The course aims to show Physics contributes to everyone’s daily life. Through practical investigation pupils will discover how the Universe and everything in it works. There are 3 Units of work to complete broken in to 6 topics such as Energy Sources and Sustainability, Forces, Energy – Electrical and Radiation, as well as Space and the Planets Advantages / disadvantages of forms of energy generation & distribution Practical Electrical and Electronic systems Electrical power Electrical circuits Electromagnetism and its Practical Applications Moving molecules and gas pressure Sound, Light and other waves Electromagnetic Spectrum and Radiation Space exploration and Models of the Universe Relationship between Forces and Motion Satellites

Added Value Unit - Here pupils have an opportunity to choose one area of the course which they find particularly interesting and complete their own research and report. Progression

Progression from National 4 to alternative National 4 Science. Entry to National 5 at the discression of department.

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Subject Level(s)

Physics National 5

Unit Titles

Electricity & Energy

Outline of course

The Physics course is based on a practical approach to understanding The Universe and how Things Work.

Waves & Radiation

Dynamics & Space

The course aims to show how Physics contributes to everyone’s daily life. Through practical investigation pupils will discover how the Universe and everything in it works from electronic equipment to optical fibres. Entry Requirements

Entry requirements: National 4 Physics – entry at the discression of department. The 6 units of work shown above include: Conservation of energy & identification of ‘loss’ during transfer Practical Electrical and Electronic systems Ohm’s Law and Complex Circuits Moving molecules, gas pressure and gases at low temperatures Sound, Light and other waves Wave Behaviour Electromagnetic Spectrum Nuclear Fission and Fusion Kinematics – how things move Newtons Laws of Motion Projectiles Space Exploration Cosmology – identifying the Stars! Assignment - Here pupils have an opportunity to choose one area of the course which they find particularly interesting and complete their own research and report. This will be 20 marks towards their final course award as the final exam is 80 marks.

Progression

Progression from National 5 Level A and B to Higher – complete course pass required.

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Subject Level(s)

Physics Higher

Unit Titles

Mechanics & Properties Electricity & of Matter (1) Electronics (1/2)

Outline of course

The Physics course is based on a practical approach to understanding The Universe and how Things Work.

Light & Radiation(1)

Research Unit (1/2)

The course aims to show how Physics contributes to everyone’s daily life. Through practical investigation pupils will discover how the Universe and everything in it works from electronic equipment to particle physics. Entry Requirements

Entry requirement: Grade A or B at National 5 or Grade A or B at Intermediate 2 Physics. The 4 units of work shown above include: Practical Electrical and Electronic systems Complex components and their use in Circuits Sound, Light and other waves – how they behave Wave Behaviour Electromagnetic Spectrum Nuclear Fission and Fusion Kinematics – how things move Newtons Laws of Motion Projectiles and Momentum Space and the Big Bang Relativity

Assessment Arrangements

Internal End of Section Tests – produced internally. End of Unit SQA Assessments for each Unit (KU and PS) Experimental Report Research Outcome Prelim Examination in February. Homework – formal ink exercises, regular review of class work and completion of tutorial questions.

External Assignment - marked externally by the SQA SQA examination in May Both external marks are added to give a combined and overall grade for the course. Progression Routes

Pupils who pass Higher Physics with a Grade A or B can progress on to Advanced Higher Physics where they will experience more advanced physics which leads on to University Physics.

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External


Subject Level(s)

Physics Advanced Higher

Unit Titles

Electrical Phenomena (1)

Outline of course

The aim of the course is to complete the underlying foundations of Classical Physics with a view to further study at University. However, many references are made to rapidly developing areas of Quantum Physics, including Atomic and Nuclear Physics, Quantum Electrodynamics, Wave-Particle Duality and Einstein's Relativistic Mechanics. Students are given an insight into the implications of Cosmology and the Grand Unified Theory and the background to University courses. Learning is accomplished by a balance of teacher led and student centred approaches.

Mechanics (1)

Wave Phenomena (1/2)

Investigation (1/2)

Entry requirements: Grade A or B at Higher Physics and Higher Mathematics Entry Requirements

Course Units

Assessments

The course comprises four core Units: Mechanics Electrical Phenomena Wave Phenomena Physics Investigation The Physics Investigation Unit includes an experimental project to be undertaken. This project allows candidates to pursue their own interests, providing a valuable exercise in self-motivation, organisation and experimental design. It often involves contact with outside agencies, e.g. universities and industry, providing an opportunity to develop personal and social skills. External Investigation - marked externally by the SQA SQA examination in May Both external marks are added to give a combined and overall grade for the course. Both the Prelim and External Examination share the same format of a single theory paper (2.5 hours, which counts towards 80% of the final grade. This theory paper is biased towards Problem Solving and is worth 100 marks. The project is externally assessed and is worth 25 marks. This counts towards the remaining 20% of the final grade. Internal End of Section Tests – produced internally. End of Unit SQA Assessments for each Unit (KU and PS) Experimental Report (LO3) Prelim Examination in February.

Homework

Progression Routes

- There are formal home exercises - There is also daily homework, given out to reinforce new concepts and formulae Past experience has shown that it forms the ideal basis on which to progress to University Physics or Engineering, and students intending to study such courses are strongly advised to choose AH Physics. There is information emerging that suggests that pass in AH Physics may be considered very highly by certain Universities both as an entry qualification, and as grounds for exemption from some First Year courses in Science and Engineering. Of course there is no doubt that all successful AH Physics students will be highly desirable in the post-school job market. - 78 -

Extern


Subject Level(s)

Science National 4

Unit Titles

Biology

Outline of course

Science is an important part of our heritage and we use its applications every day in our lives at work, at leisure and in the home. In this course pupils will experience a broad range of activities covering many aspects of science.

Chemistry

Physics

Children and young people are fascinated by new discoveries and technologies and become increasingly aware of, and passionate about, the impact of science on their own health and wellbeing, the health of society and the health of the environment. The 3 units of work cover topics such as Biology, Chemistry, Physics and General Science. Pupils will investigate, perform practical investigations and discover how the world around them works. Progression

Progression to National 5 Science

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S5 6 course choice information 2014 15  
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