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2008

COMPENDIUM OF CREATIVITY

Cover Styling Make-up Hair Fashion

No. 2

Charlotte (Marilyn, N.Y) / Photographed by Brett Lloyd Jack Borkett Danielle Kahlaniis Nicole Kahlaniis Basso and Brooke dress with Linda Farrow sunglasses

I. For Immediate Release Fleet Ilyaa, Café Gigli Herman Bas, Be@rbrick/Eley Kishimoto KIND knitwear Café L’Eclaireur Noovo Festival Michel Gaubert/Longchamp Serapian Milano Space Invaders Van Cleef & Arpels Ben Onono Filep Motwary Lutz Huelle Nino Bauti Virgin Island Water, MB03 Querelle

22 24 26 28 30 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 42

II. Interviews Christophe Coppens Joseph Quartana Maria Cornejo United Bamboo Jan Nord Jean Claude Wouters Vive la Fete Jerry Bouthier Francois Sagat Brodie Neill Simon Foxton

44 48 54 58 62 64 68 72 76 80 84

III. Portfolio Trevor Jackson

90

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2008

COMPENDIUM OF CREATIVITY

No. 2

IV. Conversation Item Idem vs. AA Bronson

100

V. Fashion Feature Fashion Underground by Jared Johnson • Elliot Atkinson • Sandra Backland • Nahum Villasana • Claudia Rosa Portraits of Brazilians by Ivan Abujamra

108

118

VI. Feature Sebastien Tellier by Joe Roberts

124

VII. Fashion Come Hither by Brett Lloyd Eye Candy by Tomas Falmer Visual Trickery by Derrick Santini Modern Times by Kristiina Wilson Bookworm by Kim Jakobsen To The Final Touch by James Mountford City Slicker by Cedrick Mickael Mirande Backstage Observation by Bicefaliko

130 148 160 174 186 192 198 206

VIII. Art Art of Consumerism by Alexis Chabala & Dominic Sio Blame Canada by Bruce LaBruce & Terrence Koh Blood Simple by Ju$t Another Rich Kid & Stuart Semple Le Soiree by Laurent Desgrange

210 218 220 226

IX. Home Showtime by Mr. KIND

230

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2008

COMPENDIUM OF CREATIVITY

No. 2

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF / CREATIVE DIRECTOR Dominic Sio EDITORS Adam de Cruz Jared Johnson SPECIAL PROJECT Ninette Murk FASHION EDITORS Niki Brodie (U.K.), Vinnie Pizzingrilli (Brazil) CONTRIBUTING FASHION EDITORS Tamer Wilde, Nathalie Gubbins CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Javier Barcala (Spain/Belgium), Adrian Corsin (North America), Paul Hunwick, Robi Dutta (U.K.), Hidetaka Furuya (Japan) CONTRIBUTORS Mauricio M Larsen, Nick Chonsak, Sorrel Kinder, Yahaira, Jessica Santini, Jack Borkett , Mr.KIND, Kenneth W. Courtney, Stuart Semple, Joe Roberts, Beth Vincent, Joe Roberts, PA Aaron, Beth Vincent, Mikki Most, Item Idem vs AA Bronson PHOTOGRAPHERS Karl Lagerfeld, Nick Knight, Brett Lloyd, Tomas Falmer, Derrick Santini, Cedrick Mickael Mirande, James Mountford, Simon Wald-Lasowski, Alexis Chabala, Dominic Sio, Kristiina Wilson, Ivan Abujamra, Kim Jakobsen To, Bicefaliko, Laurent Desgrange, Monica Feudi, Sebastian Mayer, Humphrey Meng, Alasdair Mclellan, Giles Price, Jason Evans, Mark Borthwick, Francois Sagat, Ola Bergengren, Julio Torres, Gregor Titze DESIGN DIRECTOR Benjamin Thain ART DIRECTOR Dominic Sio, Jun Kit MARKETING DIRECTOR Jared Johnson jared@stimulimag.com EDITORIAL OFFICE 21, Girdlers Road, London W14 0PS, United Kingdom tel./fax : + 44 (0) 207 603 7549 S.E.ASIA OFFICE Suite 63-2, Manor 2, Jalan Perkasa 9, Taman Maluri, 55100 Cheras, Kuala Lumpur, West Malaysia tel./fax : + 6 (03) 928 763 82 WORLDWIDE COMMUNICATION www.mintred.be ADVERTISING ENQUIRIES U.S.A. Jared Johnson jared@stimulimag.com | U.K. Adam de Cruz adc@stimulimag.com S.E.Asia Dominic Sio dos@stimulimag.com SUBSCRIPTIONS subscriptions@stimulimag.com PRINTING MunSang Printers Sdn. Bhd. DISTRIBUTION Export Press www.exportpress.com (Worldwide) B. White (Brazil) Central Papers (Singapore, Malaysia) COPYRIGHT Stimuli © 2008, by the artists, the authors & photographers. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is strictly prohibited. All prices and credits are accurate at press time but are subject to changes. This magazine accepts no liability for loss or damage of manuscripts, artworks, photographic prints and transparencies.

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Cafe L’Eclaireur Launched in December 2006, L’ECLAIREUR, the bar and restaurant, is an attempt to promote the basic philosophy of L’ECLAIREUR: the admiration for history and a personalised service for each client. And it works. This classy bar/restaurant seems to offer a timeless atmosphere, and successfully make its customers feel invited so that they can simply have a good time. Attached to one of its stores at 10 Rue Boissy d’Anglais, Paris 8th, this bar/restaurant is inspired by the famous Dulciora patisserie in Milan, designed by Piero Fornasetti in the 1950s, and is the result of a brilliant collaboration between Martine and Armand Hadida, the owners of L’ECLAIREUR, and Bamaba Fornasetti, Pieroís son. Bamaba designed the playful decor paying homage to his father, decorating its wall with drunken monkeys, piles of playing cards, and a library full of books. He also went through Maison Fornasetti’s archives to bring out original self-portraits of Piero Fornasetti which he the reproduced into smaller paintings, and displayed them in gilded frames.

As far as the food and drink, the bar L’ECLAIREUR offers a wide selection of personalized drinks, ranging from classic cocktails such as Mojito and Bloody Mary to fun twists on the cocktail such as Fomaspresso and Spiced Mandarine Daiquiri. In the restaurant, you can tempt your palate with dishes such as marinated fish, finger sushi, Saint Jacques skewers with Bellota ham, lamb with boletus or celery turnip with horseradish and panna cotta with citrus fruits, just to name a few. Dishes like these that are making the bar/restaurant L’ECLAIREUR a popular destination place. It’s a laudable feat for any restaurant, particularly one that neighbors a store that’s been Parisian retail staple for nearly thirty years. To put it simply: great concept, excellent execution. — Hidetaka Furuya www.leclaireur.com

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Atlantis Found The house of VAN CLEEF AND ARPELS has plunged into the deep to reveal the beauty of the mythical island of Atlantis. They have found paradise at last — in the form of high luxury that characterises their mythical seaanimals. Expect bejeweled fairy-tale figures like nymphs, mermaids, and extraordinary deep sea creatures. Fantasy comes alive with our favourite — the Haliades bracelet which has gleaming white gold and round diamonds. The fantasy-filled repertoire continues with the nymph-like Néréides clip which consists of a yellow gold set with

yellow and white diamonds that omits a warm amber aura of light. Atlantis, a brilliant, mythical kingdom of beauty and abundance has inspired us all. So, ride along with the undercurrents and wear your best Neptune’s treasure to go with your Crab Bisque. We are sure Plato couldn’t agree more. ­— Dominic Sio www.vancleef-arpels.com

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Ben Double In a photo studio in east London, photographer Derek Santini is getting ready to take the last photos for singer/songwriter BEN ONONO’s new album. Ben is looking striking in a silver blue Dior suit matched against his dark skin and his luminous eyes. For the final frames, the make up artist daubs Ben’s face in a kind of war paint and the look’s not just striking. It gets right to the heart of what Ben’s new album is all about — duality because here is a man dressed in a designer suit yet covered with war paint; a man whose mum is English and whose dad is Nigerian; who is a classically trained pianist yet has had success with dance tracks including with Fatboy Slim and Café del Mar; and who’s new album is now mixing drum beats with film scores and great songs.

“Nowadays everybody has this sense of belonging and not belonging — it gives us a quality of yearning that makes us want and a desire for love. The music references do that too and are from everywhere and they’re all there sitting together in the songs,” says Ben. The album contains in its title the paradox Native Stranger and the result is a beautiful, intelligent and wide ranging album that’s incredibly exciting and fresh. — Robi Dutta www.benonono.com

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The New Idealist Designer by day, blogger by night, Cyprus born FILEP MOTWARY has achieved a cult following within his native island and beyond. A part of the new European avant garde, his latest collection were shown along with Maria Mastori’s accessories during the Hellenic fashion week. It referenced Swiss architecture with a detailedeye for shape and corners. Nautical elements were seen with sailor’s ropes, pearls and fishing nets which seemed to be reminiscent of his Mediterranean islander upbringing. There was a re-awakening spirit of au natural with light ethereal fabric atop a fish net fabric.

Monwary, who previously spent a stint working at John Galliano and Chloe, is still in the industry full force with his blog uN NOUvEAU iDEAL. He features interviews from great personalities such as fashion designer/illustrator Charles Anastase, art flicks director Bruce LaBruce and photographer Matthias Vriens with enough meaty content that calls for a calorie count. — Jared Lee Johnson http://filepmotwary.blog.com

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It Must Be In The Water

The Smell of Art

Call it the haute couture of parfumes if you will - the House of Creed is here to stay. Founded in 1790, and with the seventh generation of the CREED family in control, the House of Creed still ranks as a private luxury label. While many royal families and celebrities have commissioned special fragrances in the past, not everything about CREED is history and ultra exclusive. Their recent fragrance, Virgin Island Water, offers a fresh whiff of exclusivity for the public. The inspiration stems from a trip taken to Ginger Island by Olivier Creed, the company’s main nose. The appealing blue waters of the Virgin Islands thus accounts for the name, but greater focus is on the ingredients. The top notes feature copra, the inner sweet portion of coconuts, palm tree sap, and mandarin orange just to name a few. Middle notes include hibiscus flower, ginger, ylangylang and jasmine. Finally the bottom notes include sugar cane and white rum - items that are uniquely Caribbean. Available in Harrods, Harvey Nichols, Selfridges, Liberty and others fine retailers worldwide, this is one scent worth sailing for.

Hamburg-based BIEHL PARFUMKUNSTWERKE is one fragrance company to watch. Brain-childed by German purist perfume-marketeer Thorsten Biehl, son of the famous nose ­ — perfumer Henning Biehl. The younger BIEHL started a successful career stint as fragrance expert at one of the world’s leading fragrance companies H&R, now known as Symrise, BIEHL and made his mark with a unique start in the world of scent. Devoid of the usual gimmicky scent-marketing, BIEHL focuses only on the content and has commisionined six of the best perfumers in the world to create scents.

­— Jared Johnson www.creedfragrances.co.uk

Sold in an art gallery setting instead of the usual retailer’s showcase, the art of olfactory begins here with a series of well-edited scents. One of them we loved is an eau de parfum titled “mb03.” The intriguing nose behind it is Mark Buxton and those who know Mark’s work (Comme des Garcons, Ouarzazate, White, Man 2), should also give mb03 a test run. And so should everyone else. Bottled in a non-design bottle, the luxury scent plays red pepper, elemi and roman chamomile as one of a few top notes that give this a sexy, sinful aroma. It takes you straight into a temple of calmness, of languid amber and raw patchouli with a hint of leathery sensuality. Relaxed and enigmatic and never boring, mb03 truly has the whiff of a work of art. ­— Dominic Sio www.biehl-parfum.com

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Christophe Coppens Joseph Quartana MARIA CORNEJO UNITED BAMBOO Jan Nord Jean Claude WouterS Vive La Fete Jerry BoutHier Francois Sagat Brodie Neill SIMON FOXTON


All photos courtesy of Christophe Coppens

CHRISTOPHE COPPENs interviewed by Javier Barcala

Christophe Coppens’ career has been a long and winding road celebrating the quirks of life with dazzling accessories and enchanting haute couture. Since the opening of his hugely acclaimed Tokyo store, magic visionaries of almost any kind have been turning their lenses on to this Brussels-based milliner.

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All interior photos courtesy of Seven New York Portrait photo by Jared Johnson

JOSEPH QUARTANA interviewed by Jared Johnson

Albeit American retailing is fast on the brink of becoming completely mass orientated, guarantee there’s a force to stand against. Apart from opening seven days of the week, to closing at 7pm, to the actual name, SEVEN seems to be Joseph Quartana’s lucky number or in this case, boutique. As New York’s premier retailer who introduces and stocks quirky, odd, and interestingly quintessential independent brands, Joseph takes us into his world of ideal uniqueness. He spoke to us while juggling seven tasks.

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Runway photos by Monica Feudi Portrait photo by Mark Borthwick

MARIA CORNEJO interviewed by Jared Johnson

Lately an organic and easy lifestyle is branded on everyone’s minds and Zero by Maria Cornejo’s clothing is just that. At her multi-purpose Nolita boutique in New York, the front displays items from the recent collection while a team works frivolously in the back. One could assume this New York fast pace work ethic contrasts her calm English upbringing, but speed seemingly bears no effect on her as she consistently produces two innovative collections annually. We had the chance to speak to Maria about fashion, designing, and her life.

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All photos courtsey of Jan Nord / H&M

JAN NORD interviewed by Ninette Murk

Unless you’ve been living under a rock in the last couple of years, you will have heard about H&M, the Swedish retailer who changed the face of affordable, young fashion forever. Apart from the great looking clothes, the thing that springs to mind first when you think about H&M is their collaborations with famous fashion designers such as Karl Lagerfeld, Stella McCartney, Roberto Cavalli, Rei Kawakubo and Viktor & Rolf and celebrities such as Madonna and Kylie Minogue. Their latest project is ‘Fashion against AIDS’, for which H&M and AIDS awareness brand ‘Designers against AIDS’ invited 15 wellknown musicians, fashion designers and other celebrities (Rufus Wainwright, Timbaland, Katharine Hamnett, Scissor Sisters, Good Charlotte to name but a few) to create prints for T-shirts and other items, in an effort to make young people stop and think about their attitudes towards HIV/AIDS. Stimuli spoke with Jan Nord, creative director at H&M and in charge of their fashion campaigns. Jan started in advertising as a copywriter but for the last six years he has worked at the fashion retailer.

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T-shirt 9.99 DesigneD by: Ziggy MARLey

and

NM: Why did you decide to work for H&M? JN: It was such a great opportunity I did not even think twice. To work within a creative company as Creative Director of communication is a field of possibilities. The product, fashion, in itself is innovative. That in combination with the second part of the business idea of H&M — fashion and quality at the best price — is a stimulating yet challenging platform to create fashion campaigns. NM: What are some favorite campaigns/projects so far? JN: It’s hard to tell — whatever we do, needs to be created out of some wish to turn it into your favourite. But of course when we see the results of ‘Fashion Against AIDS’ we are really proud! The unbelievable combination of high end fashion designers at the prices of H&M also gives me a lot of satisfaction.

immediately and seemed to know as much about H&M and our customers as we did. But then I heard that he is like that, knows everything about everything. He is quite amazing. And the collaboration with Kylie, of course. She is so full of positive energy that it rubs off on everyone. It was a pleasure from the first meeting, through all the work and until the final big celebration in Shanghai where Kylie helped us open up our first store. It was an electric evening, absolutely fantastic. NM: How do you develop your concepts? JN: Teamwork is key. We work across borders, involve creative people from outside H&M when needed, travel all over and frame the creative process to focus on what is relevant and needed. NM: A personal question: who are your favorite fashion & product designers, artists, musicians & movie directors?

JN: I think it speaks for itself. Everyone needs to think about their own responsibilities fighting AIDS. If we can help by supporting information that highlights the problem through our channels, we think it’s a part of our responsibility.

JN: I have a soft spot for very clean design, still with a clear human touch to it. So Margiela, Comme des Garçons, Jil Sander always seem to catch my eyes. Danish 50’s/60’s furniture design is still amazing. Soul music, preferably female vocals, makes me feel good. Movie directors? I must say the dry dialogue in a Hitchcock movie or the quirkiness of Spike Jones is always refreshing.

NM: What’s it like to work with wellknown artists, photographers, designers, movie directors?

NM: What’s your opinion on ecological fashion, Fair Trade and the like?

JN: First of all we ask the photographers, directors and designers based on their skills. And 99% of the time it is just a thrill to develop ideas together with such creative people. It is all about teamwork. When we involve celebrities we really try to see them as icons in style and fashion and in that sense inspiration to our customers. What we always see — and of course love — is that everybody no matter of their iconic status, seems to enjoy shopping at H&M.

JN: A sustainable process from A to Z should be, and in the future needs to be, totally integrated in the product. It is really a shame if ecological fashion is just a ‘fashion’ and not a long term commitment. Fair trade is a part of how we produce. H&M has a strict Code of Conduct that we constantly improve.

NM: Do you have some anecdotes that you would like to share?

JN: I have no individual vision. That’s part of how we work. So my answer has to be that wherever H&M is going will be the vision of how we develop creative solutions for the future.

NM: What would you like to say about ‘Fashion Against AIDS’?

JN: Well, I was really impressed when we first met Karl Lagerfeld and discussed the idea of doing something together. He was as sharp in his mind as he is in his design. He grasped the idea

NM: What is your vision creatively for H&M towards the future?

www.hm.com

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photo by Karl Lagerfeld


All other photos courtesy of Vive la Fete

VIVE LA FETE interviewed by Javier Barcala

Thanks to them we know that dance music rocks. For unadulterated sass with sugar on top as well, here comes the glamour-hipstercool chick of Vive la Fête. With her feet on the ground together with a rebellious attitude and baffling intensity, Els Pynoo talks about her last stroke of luck and a very satisfying career.

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Portrait photo by Sam Kim Party photography by Dominic Sio

JERRY BOUTHIER interviewed by Mikki Most

Following it’s recent demise, BoomBox, has certainly left a large sparkly hole in London’s clubland. One of the most successful, colourful and creative clubs in recent years, for anyone who enjoyed it’s rather fabulous but all too brief spell as the only place to be seen on a Sunday night, it suddenly all looks rather bleak and boring down the disco in 2008. Jerry Bouthier ensured that amongst all the frills and spills the fashion kids still all managed to dance their asses off week in week out, to some of the most cutting edge music around, and from a personal perspective most of my favourite nights spent down there were when Jerry was behind the decks. Fortunately for those whose ears were tuned into the fantastic sounds being played on its dancefloor, Jerry Bouthier the club’s main resident DJ has absolutely no intention of hanging up his headphones just yet.

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>>Jerry Bouthier <<

I caught up with him on a bleak day in early January to discuss what made it all so special.... MM: So how was the final BoomBox NYE party for you?.... JB: A little sad to be honest, it felt weird… but I guess it was the right time to stop it. NYE is always a bit of an anti-climax anyway, so many expectations… still the venue looked amazing and the party went full blast til late. MM: Why do you think the club became so successful? JB: BoomBox is an experiment that blew up, it was never a business — and people recognised that from the word go. Richard Mortimer (Mr BoomBox) put a good team of people together. He had a strong vision, wouldn’t compromise and even more importantly never forgot it was about fun.” MM: Have you always played at very fashionable clubs? .Do you find the crowd understand your sound better? JB: Fashion parties are fun, maybe not so upfront, it depends, but you can really mix things up and go crazy… it’s important to adapt to situations but it’s also good to surprise. MM: You mixed the rather outstanding BoomBox-Kitsuné compilation, how did that collaboration come about? JB: I don’t know, suddenly it made total sense to all… you know, clothes, fashion, hype, electrock, pogo, Paris/London… it was nice to leave something behind, a statement of what the club represented at that point. MM: Have you been working with Kitsuné for a while then? JB: I knew of Gildas (Loaec, Kitsuné’s boss) when he was Thomas Bangalter’s right-hand man then he started doing this weird little label which soon blew me away. I so got on their case, continuously pestering him for music and info that we became very good friends (lol). MM: They certainly seem to have a knack of being one step ahead

of everyone else, what’s their secret? JB: A big passion for all kinds of music… As DJs Gildas & Masaya are always on the frontline, road-testing new tracks so they know what they’re talking about. They’re constantly on the lookout for material that’s fresh, a bit different and that looks forward to the future rather than the past… MM: Do you find the French and English music scenes very different? JB: It’s fair to say music is more deeply rooted in British culture. Rock, pop, disco, R&B, it’s simply all music here. For me it goes way back to pagans, drinking and singing, having a good time… MM: French music is pretty hot at the moment with artists like Justice, Sebastian Tellier, Brodinski and labels like Ed Banger & Kitsuné ruling the dancefloors. Why do you think this is? JB: In France the lack of roots turned into an advantage. Because there were no electronic/dance scenes until Daft Punk and Air, French musicians did their own thing without thinking too much about it. MM: So are you producing your own music as well? JB: Yes I have done for years, I used to play guitar, then worked on electro-pop projects which never quite made it… Today I’m writing and producing with Andrea Gorgerino as JBAG, we’ve just remixed the new S-Express, Kylie, Siobhan Donaghy, Rex The Dog, Riot In Belgium… we’ll be releasing our own material soon. MM: Sounds like you have a lot going on… and what are your DJ plans in 2008? JB: Keep finding music that excites me so that I can share it with others. MM: Thanks Jerry… and we look forward to dancing to your beat again very soon. www.myspace.com/jerrybouthier

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All photos coutesy of François Sagat

FRANçOIS SAGAT interviewed by Jared Johnson

Whoever said adult films and fashion don’t mix? Monsieur François Sagat is internationally acclaimed for his performance on the x-rated screen in pornos like Manifesto and Arabesque but many are unaware of his past performance in the fashion arena where he worked as stylist for the likes French Vogue and Visionaire magazine. We caught up with him to try to penetrate his innate artistic side and dabble into his past as a fashion follower. Putting the kink to one side, Francois dished the scoop on how the fashion industry has left a bad taste in his mouth.

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from the spread ‘Superbad’ i-D magazine1987. photo by Nick Knight


SIMON FOXTON interviewed by Paul Hunwick

To celebrate his 25th year in the fashion industry, Stimuli magazine pays tribute to pioneering menswear stylist, Simon Foxton, who is currently fashion director of Fantastic Man magazine. We look at some of the defining images of his career, ask what first attracted him to fashion and find out how the boy from the Scottish borders got Seal to strip naked.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 87 â&#x20AC;&#x201D;


Arena Homme Plus Photo by Alasdair Mclellan


TREVOR JACKSON by Paul Hunwick

He’s an acclaimed art director, a Dj, and a music producer. He’s also remixed records for Gossip, U2, Massive Attack and Soft Cell, created a record label thats being cited as the Factory Records of its generation, and is the man behind the music production unit, Playgroup. One wonders what Londoner Trevor Jackson, 40, puts down as occupation on insurance applications. Rejected from Central St. Martin’s School of Art, Jackson studied Art & Design in Barnet before setting up his own graphic design label, Bite It!, in the early nineties. It attracted an influential client list including Stereo MCs and Jungle Brothers. Not content with just designing the sleeves, Jackson turned his attention to the contents and created his own hip-hop record label. In 1996, Jackson set up Output Recordings with the hopes of introducing other muscical genres; after ten years, when the pressures of being an independant became too much, he boldly killed the project. His baby had become a monster. Thankfully, he continues remixing and designing. 2004 saw him produce some of his most acclaimed work to date with the Op art inspired cover for Soulwax. Jackson’s work is ubiquitous. His style is confident but without the constraint of a definite signature. “I get bored very easily and try to create something unique for each project,” he tells Stimuli. While this approach pleases his clients, he suspects it’s cost him more lucrative projects. Big corporate spenders almost always want to buy an assured ‘look’, something that leaves Jackson unphased. “For me, it’s more about creating work that I find interesting,” he says. So where does he see himself in ten years time? “We live in a world that bombards us with visual shit. I’d like to create something powerful but simple, like Anish Kapoor does,” he says. “But forget ten years, make that six months.” www.trevor-jackson.com

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Conversation

all photos courtesy of Item Idem AA Bronson portrait by Arne Svenson Item Idem portrait by Humphrey Meng Item Idem ‘Black Man’ portrait and DISPLAYSTHETICS photos by Sebastian Mayer / AEIOU MIDASPHALTARMACOAT photos by Item Idem

ITEM IDEM vs. aa bronson coversation between Cyril Duval & AA Bronson

AA Bronson is the surviving member of General Idea, a group of three Canadian artists and lovers who were together from 1969 to 1994. Since his partners, Jorge Zontal and Felix Partz, died of AIDS in the 1990s, Mr. Bronson has worked alone; that’s not to say he’s ever really alone, though. As an artist, mentor, healer and gay role model, he still collaborates, most recently with Japanese conceptualist artist and designer Item Idem. Both artists have created works for the School for Young Shaman’s exhibition in New York; Item Idem a cape made of gold Louis Vuitton bags and melted car tires, dedicated to the artist Joseph Beuys. For Stimuli, the two sit down to talk about their experience.

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>> Item Idem vs. AABronson <<

Item Idem \ 5:45pm Jan 21st Dear AA, so we are starting that ping-pong Q&A for Stimuli magazine, and I have been picked to throw the ball. Here we go! How would one — you, for instance — recognize a young Shaman? And what does it take to be one of them?

but I hesitate to say that Michael was using the fish (or Christ) as an accomplice. Perhaps he was!

AA Bronson \ 1:07pm Jan 22nd At General Idea we used to talk about battlestances disguised as dancesteps, and maybe that is the kind of person I look for; the one beyond reason, the kind of person who is totally committed to something, but it is difficult to know just what. Ultimately, they don’t care about anything except their own secret way, and yet, at the same time they, are highly ethical, even saintly. I call them artists! How about you? In your professional life, you are usually seen as a designer, artist, or stylist. How does it feel to be seen as a Shaman?

For my part I really loved Desi Santiago’s reversed neon-light pentagram. I thought this piece ending the exhibition visit helped to link all the elements together, perhaps along with the tent you produced with Scott Treleaven...

Item Idem \ 9:27pm Jan 22nd Well, since I started wearing my Shaman coat, my powers have totally increased! Actually, to a point where it almost becomes difficult to bear... People I don’t even know keep on touching my shoulder, certainly believing that as King Midas, it would bring gold to everything in their life. Surprising, isn’t it? The power of persuasion...

AA Bronson \ 7:51pm Jan 25th The coat is quite glorious, I think. We must get a really good installation photograph that shows it well. It does have that sense of the Magician’s robe; that is to say it has a kind of power to it. It is easy to think of it as a piece of fashion, but in fact, it is much much more. By the way, it is possible that I will do a version of the Shaman’s room in Hamburg in May. So I am trying to imagine how it might be possible to include the coat. Although it would be very difficult to ship!

This gimmick I am using is actually a good metaphorical explanation of the artist role; how one can stand and present his own interpretation, his own unique vision, and by that engender a process of believing and ‘followers’. I know that sounds pretty scary to speak like that, in a time when the world gives the impression of being torn apart by religious extremists of all kinds, but I guess that’s the artist role: to simply provide poetical alternatives to a potentially-pessimist reality.... So yes, if being a Shaman comes to this (being a provider of alternative), then yes, I think it feels quite good. Though, it does raise some questions, such as the use/abuse of power, that stay for me unsolved, and quite troubling. 9:44pm Jan 22nd I still cannot explain myself properly why Joseph Beuys picked a coyote for his illustrious & iconic ‘I Like America and America Likes Me’ piece. I believe that the cliche he uses to develop his anti-American irony is rooted in the legendary stupidity of the mentioned animal. But I cannot stop myself asking why... Was he maybe influenced by the 50’s cartoon Road Runner & Wile E. Coyote?? Was Joseph Beuys finally pop!?!? Somehow... AA Bronson \ 10:24pm Jan 22nd In North American aboriginal terms, the coyote is the trickster (equivalent to The Fool in the Tarot deck). So as well as feeling like a character out of an iconic American Western, he also has much deeper roots. In fact, Shamans often had as their alter ego or as their spirit guide a coyote. I was actually in New York during Beuys I like America... piece, so I saw it at the time — amazing!

Item Idem \ 2:09pm Jan 25th Maybe he was?

Now back to that tar coat. After so many mystical and almost religious symbols, how come such a materialist and paian symbol (those Louis Vuitton logotypes and products) ended up being displayed here? A new Golden veal imagery, reincarnated in today’s modern idolatry?!

Item Idem \ 2:45pm Jan 26th Excellent news! The coat and me would love Hamburg, I am pretty sure! If it happens, I would love to contribute to some kind of display shelf, like some kind of jewel case setting magnifying it... or maybe some oriflamme ornament surrounding it, to intensify the dramatic aspect... Actually I am not so sure of those chains I used... maybe it is too strong as a symbolic... I am always very interested by the relationship between the support to showcase and the product/artwork itself... Sometimes artworks makes great display support too!!! It is what I tried to push in my latest DISPLAYSTHETICS project, where finally the installation I produced was just a support to host bigger and better purposes, events, performances & interactions, which added to the sculptural elements. We’re crafting something much closer from the idea of ‘Gesamtkunstwerk’... Maybe your Shaman room was also close to that idea? With all the various formats used, I think the participants were definitely contributing to the global piece... AA Bronson \ 5:00pm Jan 26th Yes, the idea of the entire show is a kind of ‘Gesamtkunstwerk’, in which even my activity as a healer and as a teacher is implicitly part of the artwork. How did you come up with the idea for the coat?

Item Idem \ 8:45pm Jan 24th I bet it was! Finally, that coyote ended up being the mirrored image of all the philosophical questionings that Beuys is trying to introduce in that performative situation. In our situation, would you say that any of us young Shamans used a similar accomplice for this art show we produced under your patronage?

Item Idem \ 6:47pm Jan 26th I definitely follow you on this. Since the beginning of this project, I have been pretty excited about becoming a medium itself, a puzzle piece of something bigger... and I guess it all kind of came out together... This whole Shaman room gives the impression of a sophisticated assemblage of heteroclites works/structures, defining something unique and united... How did I come up with that coat??? Oh that’s a long story ! I will try to cut short and straight to the essential...

AA Bronson \ 10:33pm Jan 24th Well, there was Michael Dudeck’s fish, which he was holding through his entire performance. The fish is, of course, the symbol of Christ, and I think back to Paul Thek’s use of the Fish as well,

7:11pm Jan 26th I guess I should quickly explain the (gold & black) colour codes I used for this Shaman coat, and how I got influenced and secretly pushed to use those...

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Different locations beget different creations By Jared Johnson With so many countries boasting their own fashion weeks, the appeal of traditional runway shows is waning. Which is why indie designers are looking for new ways to showcase their collections. Some are choosing to work from home, while others conducting their business in cyber space. As technology shrinks the global landscape, the discovery of new talent has never been easier. Below are some new players with humble beginnings and bucket loads of potential. We give you The Fashion Underground. As London prevails as the playground for youthful spirit and creativity, designer ELLIOT ATKINSON finds himself centre stage amidst this raw and energetic scene. A recipient of the Betty Davis Scottish Style Award, Atkinson has acquired stockists such as Kokon To Zai in London, Best Shop Berlin in Germany and Tjallamalla in Sweden. The awkwardness of adolescence and a grunge-youth aesthetic served as inspiration for his spring collection. Stark, black, faux leather and dashes of plaid recall a rebellious spirit and youthful corruption. Be it a tight satin corset or a nylon parka with an exaggerated shoulder, the 90s references are unavoidable. We see this powerhouse designer leaping into fashion radar. While mathematically balanced, refined, and structured most easily come to mind, SANDRA BACKLUND’s creative aesthetic is still beautifully inexplicable. This emerging Swedish-born designer recently gave us her take on fashion with her collection titled, “In No Time.” Each garment is meticulously detailed with a focus on shape and precise construction. The knitwear is tucked and coiled to resemble the uniform of 13th century Japanese warrior, the raised hemlines reveal a balance masculinity and femininity. A blouse is adorned with clothing pins assembled in the shape of a fan. Sandra contrasts soft knits with wood, but it’s all heavy; heavy on the shoulders and chest. Summoned by Louis Vuitton and named winner of the Festival International De Mode and De Photographie in Hyeres, France, we would agree that this is certainly the best contemporary architectural knitwear we’ve seen thus far. A future-forward vision drives Architecture Human, a new collection of finely constructed menswear by Mexican designer NAHUM VILLASANA. His ingenious signature touch features straps of material that evoke the intricacies of a spider’s work. To the touch, however, his work evokes a feeling of pure and simple luxury. While the brand may be considered impractical against its conservative origins, the self-taught Villasana chooses to challenge social and cultural taboos. A fan of clean lines and lean cuts, CLAUDIA ROSA blends minimalism with sportswear for her latest 22-look spring collection. The collection included a sheer, leg-bearing mid-length jumpsuit, as well as blouses with cutout detailing. It all comes in a restricted palette of black, cream and charcoal grey. Rosa’s seasonal roster also included a few slogan sweaters that recall the cheekiness of the late 1980’s. Unusual patternmaking with simple cutout detailing and layering characterize her unique eveningwear. The high point of her collection is a simple black multi-tiered dress. The fabric was cut and then layered over three times, emphasizing the bottom hem. While many designers race to push the envelope each season, Rosa pushes it with moderation. This is a collection that has been meticulously carved out for the confident, self-assured woman.

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Elliot Atkinson I have been designing since I finished my exams at high school. It was shit there, so I left to do a small fashion course in a small town in the south of England. I recently finished my fall/winter collection and I plan on collaborating with an artist in Sweden who works with graphic mediums, and is like myself — a kid from the grunge era. The image of my label is directed by my own life. I am influenced by the Grunge/youth culture I was bought up in. For example for A/W ‘08, I looked at the almost tribe-like clothing people wore on the council estate in my home town. I’m only really inspired by friends and people I come across in suburbs and cities like Berlin trying to pull of this look that just fails. Berlin is the perfect city for this obsession of mine! I thus choose very carefully the environment my clothes sit in, as they reflect failure and decay in youth and westernized civilization. I make quality clothes, but sometimes you just want to not stay up all night with a couple of friends sewing on three machines and listening to George Michael. I think my label communicates an image, and I know people like the clothes for what they communicate. I guess my clothes represent my own identity. Location: London www.elliotatkinson.co.uk Email: parsnipford@hotmail.com Collection photos by Brett Lloyd


Sandra Backlund My inspiration is mostly from inside. I improvise a lot and allow myself to lose control and discover what happens if I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think so much about the practicality of trends, seasons, wearability and what people want from me. I always work on the human body when creating a garment. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m fascinated by all the ways you can highlight, distort and transform the natural silhouette of the body with clothes and accessories. When I start on a new collection I take off from some kind of diffuse idea. Then I begin to experiment with different handicraft techniques and materials to find concrete ideas to develop into garments. One thing leads to another and in the end the collection is like a three dimensional mind map. I do not sketch my pieces, but spend a lot of time to improvise and explore my own handicraft skills. I carefully pay attention to all mistakes and ideas which help me learn more than before. Location: Sweden www.sandrabacklund.com Email: info@sandrabacklund.com Collection photos by Ola Bergengren


PORTRAITS BRAZILIANS of

photographed by Ivan Abujamra

direction and introduction by Vinnie Pizzingrilli translation revised by Martin Clowes

ALEXANDRE HERCHCOVITCH Hi. How’s it going? I am doing very well, busy working on next collections for my label and Zoomp. What do you do? I am fashion designer, sometimes a DJ. Why? This is what I like to do most; I love clothing, construction and music. Who do you work for? I create for everybody in a very democratic way. If this weren’t your job, what would you do instead? Chef, architect, roller-coaster engineer.

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KARINA MOTA & SEBASTIEN ORTH Hi. How’s it going? Hi. We’re very well and busy developing our first Surface To Air Brazil clothes collection. What do you do? We both run Surface To Air shop and studio in Brazil, working with 15 contemporary Brazilian designers such as Neon, Amapo and Paula Ferber. Our art-direction studio develops fashion campaigns and video clips, and we do some kick-ass parties in Sao Paulo and Paris once in a while too. Why? We have a ceaseless need for freedom, so we organised ourselves in a way that allows us to work with every creative idea that we have. Who do you work for? We choose to work with instead of for. Lately we have collaborated on projects with Igor Cavalera and Laima Leyton from Mixhell, So Me, Tsumori Chisato, Diesel, Cacharrel, Justice, Chromeo, Goose, Scenario Rock... If this weren’t your job, what would you do instead? A sailor and a singer somewhere near the docks.

OSCAR METSAVAHT Hi. How’s it going? Very well thanks. What do you do? I experience, then create. Why? To express. To share. Who do you work for? For everybody who buys or admires my creations. If this weren’t your job, what would you do instead? I don’t see it as a job; I see it as an opportunity to express my experiences. If I weren’t doing fashion I would probably be creating in architecture, which is also very relevant to how we live.


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photography by Derrick Santini

SEBASTIEN TELLIER interviewed by Joe Roberts

Sébastien Tellier is best known for La Ritournelle, the epic orchestral masterpiece which captured the world’s attention in 2005. But his career began with ‘Fantino’, his first release seven years earlier, which led Air to sign him to Record Makers, the label he still calls home. ‘Fantino’ found its way onto the soundtrack of Sophie Coppola’s Lost in Translation, introducing him to an American film dynasty he now calls friends, and paving the way for a growing second career in soundtrack work.

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come hither photographed by Brett Lloyd styling

JACK BORKETT

make-up

DANIELLE KAHLANIIS

hair

NICOLE KAHLANIIS

model

CHARLOTTE AT MARILYN NY JOE, DAVEY, MALCOLM, RYAN


d re s s

BASSO AND BROOKE

g l a s s e s

L I N D A FA R R OW


d re s s

BASSO AND BROOKE

s h o e s

A RC H I V E V I V I E N N E W E S T W O O D S H O E S


g o l d j e a n s

J E A N - C H A R L E S D E C A S T E L B A J AC

f u r s t o l e

S T Y L I S T ’ S OW N


wh i t e j e a n s

ACNE

sho e s

N I KE AIR

seq u i n e d ve s t

M ODELS OWN


jea n s

Y EN

sho e s

D OC MARTENS

bra c e s

TOP MAN


bla c k a n d s t r i p e ve s t

AMERICAN APPAREL


photographed by Tomas Falmer styling

NATALIE GUBBINS

make-up

ADAM DE CRUZ using MAC Pro

hair

BENJAMIN MOHAPI using kiehls

stylist assistants

HANNAH MACLEOD & KATE FOLEY

make-up assistant

HOLLY SILIUS

model

ELIZA AT SELECT

special thanks to

ABSOLUTE FLOWERS WWW.ABSOLUTEFLOWERS.COM


b l a c k a n d n u d e b o d y

M A I S O N M A RT I N M A RG I E L A

s t a r c a p e t o p

VIVIENNE WESTWOOD RED LABEL


ora n g e j a c k e t

M ARNI

bla c k l e g g i n g s

A NN-SOFIE B ACK


ora n g e a n d n u d e d re s s

MARNI

wh i t e g l a d i a t o r b o o t s

STEVE & YONIP

sun g l a s s e s

B ALENCIAGA


asy m m e t r i c d re s s

SOPHIA KOKOSAL AKI


VISUAL TRICKERY

photographed by Derrick Santini


on her: b ro c a d e s i l k d re s s

N I N O B AU T I

n a v y / w h i t e s t r i p e s h i r t

EMILIO DE LA MORENA

j e we l l e r y

B E L M AC Z

h o s i e r y

FOGAL

on him: p a l e b l u e s u i t

M A I S O N M A RT I N M A RG I E L A

v - n e c k d o t j u m p e r

M A I S O N M A RT I N M A RG I E L A

w h i t e s h i r t w i t h b ow - t i e M A I S O N M A RT I N M A RG I E L A s p e c t a c l e s

CUTLER AND GROSS

s h o e s

M O D E L’ S OW N


on h i m : bea d e d t u xe d o s u i t

MAISON MARTIN MARGI E L A

wh i t e p a t c h w o rk t - s h i r t

PAULOWNIA

Bla c k a n d w h i t e s i l k s car f

STEINUNN

on h e r : gol d / o ra n g e / b l a c k g ra phic dress

TINA KALIVAS

an g l o m a n i a c r i n o l i n s kir t

VIVIENNE WEST WOOD

ho s i e r y

FOGAL

jewe l l e r y

BELMACZ

stu d s a n d a l s

SERGIO R OSSI


on h i m : bea d e d t u xe d o j a c k e t and beaded dress shir t

MAISON MA RT I N M A RG I E L A

on h e r : sil k d re s s

MAISON MA RT I N M A RG I E L A

jewe l l e r y

BELMACZ


MODERN TIMES photographed by Kristiina Wilson

stylist

YAHAIRA

make-up

CYNTHIA ROSE

hair

ELIZABETH MORACHE @ WORKGROUP NYC using rusk product

styling assistant

DARIO FORMICA

model

AMY FINLAYSON @ NEXT

producer

ERIN M.


d re s s

V I V I E N N E TA M

n e c k l a c e

S T E PH E N DW E C K

h o s i e r y

WOLFORD

b o o t s

G I U S E P PE Z A N OT T I


d re s s

JOLIBE

j a c k e t

HELMUT LANG

hosiery

WOLFORD

s h o e s

S O PH I A KO KO S A L A K I


photographed by Kim Jakobsen To

concept

DOMINC SIO

styling

KIM JAKOBSEN TO

photography & Styling Assistant

ALICE GAZIO

hair

LINE NILSEN

make-up

THOMAS DE KLUYVER

model

BETTY


cardigan ONEHUNDERED, shoes RED by WOLVES, socks UNIQLO


na v y b l u e f i t t e d Ca s h mere coat

HINGED

bla c k l e a t h e r b e l t

BURBERRY PR ORSUM

bla c k f u r g l ove s

BURBERRY PR ORSUM


black fur mittens

BU R B E R RY P R O R S U M

black leather boots

DIOR HOMME


city slicker photographed by Cedrick Mickael Mirande

styling

JESSICA SANTINI

hair & make-up

ROZENN

model

ALBAN RASSIER @ NEW MADISON


b l u e ve l ve t j a c k e t

I C E B E RG

g re y a n d w h i t e t ro u s e r s

T H I E R RY M U G L E R


backStage observation photographed by Bicefaliko


Celebrities, art and gossip are marketed up to their eyebrows now- are you buying it? Concept : Dominic Sio Photographer : Alexis Chabala Art Direction : Nick Chonsak Fashion Styling / Co-ordination : Sorrel Kinder


The Feud of Marc (inspired by recent event at IHT) Marc Jacobs Eau de Toilette, International Herald Tribune, clamp on wooden base. | Mixed Media Š Stimuli 2008


LOST STEPS OF ANDRE BRETON Handmade leather shoe by John Lobb with brooch by Asprey. | Mixed Media Š Stimuli 2008


COMPOSITION OF A COMEBACK (Bravo Donattella) Coconut shell, long blond wig on wooden stand. Lip brooch by Erickson Beamon and sunglasses by Versace. | Mixed Media Š Stimuli 2008


Blame Canada Leave it up to Terence Koh and Bruce LaBruce to serve us up something symbolic and esoteric in the form of live art. Under Javier Peres Projects, native Canadians LaBruce and Koh presented an installation and performance ironically titled Blame Canada. Exclusively shown in Berlin, the display referenced the Bang Bang bar from the 1992 movie Fire Walk with Me directed by David Lynch. “We appreciated the metaphorical notion of walking across the f loor of a bar and switching identities as easily as segueing from beer to hard liquor,” explans LaBruce. As reinterpreted by LaBruce and Koh, who were both fascinated by the bar, the installation can be interpreted as a split between their identities as polite Canadians and their close association

with Americans, and also a split between their two disciplines, art and film. The exhibition encompassed an art viewing and a wild party with a performance starring Vaginal Davis co-ordinated by LaBruce. With dildos close in grasp protruding from above and below a steel framed centre stage, the duos idea of corrupt art was realised. Combining political statements with satirical humour allowed LaBruce and Koh to get their point across as the modest bar assumes a debauched, all American vibe but then is finished off kinkily as penises hang from above — a sudden yet vivid snippet into American gay culture. Americans may point the finger at Canada, but in this case, who’s really to blame?


Boys night out

Monsieur Sandwichhead

Mr. Woman and Mrs. Man Colette / Jeremy Scott / Kitsune / Boombox photos and artworks by Laurent Desgrange


SHOWTIME

photographed by Simon Wald-Lasowski homeware selected by Mr. & Mrs. KIND all clothes by KIND

plastic cups with fac e s : Xe n o s w w w. xe n o s . n l


plate: Barbapapa sh o p

desktop waste bin:vintage - Flea market in France

bi rd nut dispencer: v i n t a g e W M F p ro d u c t

vacuum cleaner: type HENRY by Humatic Inte tiona l L t d .

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index ACNE www.acnejeans.com

Gucci www.gucci.com

Paulownia www.paulownialondon.com

American Apparel americanapparel.net

Harrods www.harrods.com

Paule Ka www.pauleka.com

Ann-Sofie Back www.annsofieback.com

Helmut Lang www.helmutlang.com

Paul Smith www.paulsmith.co.uk

April 77 www.april77.fr

Jean- Charles de Castelbajac www.jc-de-castelbajac.com

Peter Soronen www.petersoronen.com

Balenciaga www.balenciaga.com

Jeremy Scott www.jeremyscott.com

Red By Wolves www.redbywolves.com

Basso and Brooke www.bassoandbrooke.com

Jolibe www.jolibe.blogspot.com

Roberto Cavalli www.robertocavalli.it

Belmacz www.belmacz.com

Koh Samui www.kohsamui.co.uk

Sergio Rossi www.sergiorossi.com

Benjamin Cho www.showroomseven.com

LaCrasia www.lacrasia.com

Sonia Rykiel www.soniarykiel.com

Bernhard Willhelm www.totemfashion.com

Linda Farrow Vintage www.lindafarrowvintage.com

Sophia Kokosalaki www.sophiakokosalaki.com

Brittique.com www.brittique.com

Loewe www.loewe.com

Steinunn www.steinunn.com

Browns www.brownsfashion.com

London Denim www.londondenim.com

Stephen Dweck www.stephendweck.com

Chalayan by Hussein Chalayan www.husseinchalayan.com

Louise Gray www.louisegrayfashion.com

Stephen Jones www.stephenjonesmillinery.com

Cheap Monday www.cheapmonday.com

Maison Martin Margiela www.maisonmartinmargiela.com

Steve & Yonip www.steveyonistudio.com

Christian Louboutin www.christianlouboutin.fr

Manish Arora www.manisharora.ws

Tata Naka www.tatanaka.com

Cutler and Gross www.cutlerandgross.com

Marimekko www.marimekko.com

Tina Kalivas www.tinakalivas.com

Diane von Furstenberg www.dvf.com

Marni www.marni.com

Top Man www.topman.com

Dior Homme www.diorhomme.com

Matches www.matchesfashion.com

Two See www.twoseelife.com

DKNY www.dkny.com

Michael Angel michaelangel.netmain.htm

Uniqlo www.Uniqlo.com

Doc Martens www.drmartens.com

Modernist www.modernistonline.com

United Bamboo www.unitedbamboo.com

Emilio de la Morena www.emiliodelamorena.com

Nancy Pop www.nancypop.com

Vivienne Tam www.viviennetam.com

Etro www.etro.it

Nicholas Kirkwood www.nicholaskirkwood.com

Vivienne Westwood www.viviennewestwood.com

Fogal www.fogal.com

Nike www.nike.com

Wendy Nichol wendynicholnyc.com

GAP www.gap.com

Nino Bauti www.ninobauti.com

Wolford www.wolford.com

Giuseppe Zanotti www.giuseppe-zanotti-design.com

Noir www.noir-illuminati2.com

Yen Jeans www.yenjeans.net

Givenchy www.givenchy.com

Nomination www.nomination.com

Yves Saint Laurent www.ysl.com

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Now presenting: Models against AIDS — 235 —


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