December 30 Real Estate Weekly

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News Press Stillwater

REALESTATE W E E K LY

December 30, 2021

3.12% Mortgage rates climbed slightly after the Fed’s rate announcement.

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131 N. Main, Stillwater 405-624-2626 www.c21global.com

$130,000

2421 N. Park Drive Sandy Blankinship 405-269-9523

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$150,000

28616 E 44th Yale, Oklahoma Virginia Cussner 405-747-7601

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$178,000

3915 W. Westbrook Drive Judy Kasso 801-824-8166

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$155,000

2608 N. Park Circle Judy Kasso 801-824-8166


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Stillwater NewsPress • Thursday, December 30, 2021

How landlord insurance works Owners who decide to rent their property out instead of selling it can’t depend on their existing homeowners policy to protect the new rental. DEAR DAVE: We are buying a new house but will rent out our current home to tenants. Do we need to buy “landlord insurance,” or would any damage be covered by our existing homeowners policy? ANSWER: The typical homeowners policy provides little or no coverage for any rental property that the policyholder owns. So yes, you’ll definitely need to buy landlord insurance. A standard landlord policy covers any physical damage to the property caused by fire, bad weather or criminal activity (such as arson). It also covers any additional buildings, like a shed or detached garage, as well any equipment that is kept there to maintain it. Importantly, if someone gets hurt while living in the rental property

or visiting it, the landlord policy can help cover the person’s medical costs, attorney fees and possible court judgments or legal settlements. Most policies also will help offset any loss of income if the property is rendered uninhabitable by tenants after a covered claim. It’s equally important to understand what the policy doesn’t cover. It won’t pay to replace, say, a broken dishwasher or worn-out roof: You would have to pay such costs out of your own pocket. In addition, most landlord policies don’t provide coverage for a tenant’s personal possessions, such as furniture or electronics. That’s why you should encourage the tenant to buy a renters insurance policy -- or, even better, insist on it in the written lease agreement that both of you will sign. ••• REAL ESTATE TRIVIA: U.S. fire departments respond to an average of 160 home fires

Good to the Last

ABOUT REAL ESTATE DAVID MYERS that start with Christmas trees each year, according to the National Fire Protection Association (www. nfpa.org). They cause an average of two deaths, 12 injuries and $10 million in direct property damage annually. ••• DEAR DAVE: Is it true that “Shark Tank” TV star Mark Cuban just bought an entire town in Texas? ANSWER: Yes. Cuban, the multibillionaire who also owns basketball’s Dallas Mavericks, recently disclosed that he purchased the entire 77-acre town of Mustang (population 23) about 60 miles southeast of “Big D,” for what one observer says was about $2 million. The town was originally put up for sale for $4 million

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about four years ago but failed to attract a buyer. Cuban, 63, told the Dallas Morning News that he simply made the purchase to help out a friend who needed to sell it. “I don’t know what, if anything, I will do with it,” he added. ••• DEAR DAVE: A few years back, you wrote about what it would be like to live in the North Pole. I wish I would have kept that column, because now my son is writing a report about the topic for his school’s English class. Can you help? ANSWER: Sure. But first you have to remember that there are actually three North Poles. The “magnetic” North Pole is the one where the Earth’s iron core makes the com-

passes we use point straight upward. It’s in the area of Ellesmere Island, part of Canada’s Northernmost territory, and has about 200 inhabitants – most of whom are either native-born persons, scientists or military personnel. The “geographic” or “true” North Pole is about 310 miles higher up, making it the northernmost spot on our planet. It’s sits on constantly shifting ice, so building a home or other permanent structure there is impossible. No one lives on the geographic North Pole. Even if you could build a house there, you wouldn’t want to because it has only one sunrise and one sunset each year. That means that you would live in various degrees of darkness 24 hours a day for six straight months at temperatures averaging 40 below zero, and then face 24 hours a day of unrelenting (but still freezing) sunshine for the following six months. Your son is probably writing about

stwnewspress.com draws 153,531 monthly unique visitors who view 219,548 pages! Stillwater

North Pole, Alaska. Sometimes called the “Christmas North Pole,” it’s toward the eastern side of the state and is home to nine flying reindeer, Mr. and Mrs. Santa Claus and roughly 2,250 other residents. Many of its citizens work in its thriving tourism industry, which is largely centered on the legend of Saint Nick. The tiny community was founded about 70 years ago by a real-estate developer, who thought that toy manufacturers would flock to the area so they could stamp “Made in North Pole” on their products. But few companies took the offer, in part because temperatures

in the winter average 9 below zero and can sometimes reach 40 below. That’s enough to freeze humans, not to mention toy-making machines. ••• Our booklet, “Straight Talk about Living Trusts,” explains how forming an inexpensive trust can help heirs quickly inherit your home and other assets after you pass away as well as settling any claims against your estate. For a copy, send $4 and a self-addresed, stamped envelope to D. Myers/Trust, P.O. Box 4405, Culver City CA, 902314405. Net proceed will be donated to the American Red Cross. (c)2021 Cowles Syndicate Inc.

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Soil testing is key to a healthy landscape ticulture Educator equal opportunity race, religion, sex, In 2012, at least in the Payne County employer, complies color, national origin, 11 states had reExtension office. with all applicable marital status, sexual strictions on the Keith can be reached federal and state orientation, gender application of phosvia email at keith. laws regarding identity/expression, phorus as a fertilreed@okstate.edu, non-discrimination disability, or veteran izer because of this phone at 405-747and affirmative status with regard problem. 8320, or in person action. Oklahoma to employment, edAs Oklahomans, at the Payne County State University is ucational programs let’s not force that Extension office, locommitted to a policy and activities, and/ restriction on ourKEITH REED cated at 315 W. 6th of equal opportunity or admissions. For selves. Unless your If you need more horticultural topic, in Stillwater. for all individuals more information, soil test says you information on soil you may contact Oklahoma State and does not disvisit http://eeo.okneed phosphorus, testing or any other Keith Reed, the Hor- University, as an criminate based on state.edu please do not apply it. Another issue we see is soil pH outside the range for optimal growing conditions. Almost all garden and landscape plants perform best in a relatively narrow range of between 6 and 7.5. In the Payne County office, we regularly see pH 3723 Washington -33 3/2 sq ft UPDATED - $154,000 - Amy 502 N.N9366 Burdick - 3 2 1623 ft Close to Sho in Move & Schools - 225 000 - Donna NE HWY - 3s1300 bed, 3 bath on .75-acre m/lIn- Ready $275,000 - Ann values between 4.2 2023EE.Kenworthy Linda -- Large corner lot with outbuilding. 3BR/2.5BA sq ft $248,000 – Tiffany 5020 Ave W 10th - 4 bdrm., Stillwater Country Club, largeOver lot - 1900 $360,000 Tiffany 322 3/1/1178 sq. ft., Detached Garage, Storage Shed, 4 Lots $152,500 - Lori K. and 8.6. 814 S. Rock Hollow Ct. - SWDr. area over 3.5 1990Bath, sq ft/SCC access $274,000 10217 S Brenna - 4 /Bed, 2,891Golf sq. Cart ft. - $490,000 - Ann – Tiffany 2206 W 23rd Ave. - 3/2/2, 1496 sq. ft. Selling As-Is - $170,000 - Lori K. At these ex9715 E. Horizon Dr.bdrm./3 - 50 x 60 livestock barn on 5 acres with Campus! no restrictions $100,000 – Lori K- PENDING 1919 Brooke Hollow Ct. - 4 bath/Large Lot/North of OSU - $343,000 - Tiffany any 2320 Timbercrest Dr. Bed, Bath, 1600 sq.Condo, ft. New Construction - Donna 0 W. 19thAve. Ave- -3#43 7.48 inside Stillwater city limits $350,000 –- $209,000 Lori K 6000 N Pennsylvania - acres 23bdrm./2.5 Bath Oklahoma City - $129,000 - Tiffany tremes, fertilizer ap801 S. - 3BR/1.5BA, 1.5 story on sq ft a $89,000 Lori C PENDING! 1408 N. M5215 Spring Creek Cir. E - 2/1 1253 sq.large ft. Property, onlot 3 1371 Lots10-acres with Barn $299,900 - Lori 3716 S.Burdick Perkins Rd. - Prime Commercial m/l --–$1,800,000 - LoriK.00 K. – Lori 4517 plication is a waste Broker Associate 1115WS.Country RichfieldClub Ct. - 3BD/2BA 1775 ft $305,000 – -Tiffany 4713 - NICE Lot for sq sale - $25,000 Donna 20 onna J Lori 10 Lori 11620 W. 100th, Coyle 4.98-acres m/l with a pond. Just minutes from major cities. $60,000 - Lori K. 405-612-6724 of resources as some 2923 N. Monroe 2321 ft $208,000 – Tiffany Shumard Oaks - 5 Nice- 3BD/2BA Lots for you tosq build your new home -PENDING! $27,000 - Donna n$249,000 - Tiffany 5607.1Scotthaven S Mehan - Addition 41.5-acres, Just North of 68th & Mehan, Ripley Schools NEW PRICE 7917 Pickles Gap Nice large lot in Perkins School District $22,500 – Lori critical nutrients - Nice Large lots in Perkins School District/starting at - $45,500 - Donna Hallies Meadow CONSTRUCTION 4BD/2BA 2347 ft $379,900 – Lori Haydans Brk.NEW - New 4/2, 2075 ft.sq - $338,500 - Lori K.y 5607 6021 S6023 Mehan Rd. - 52.5-acres forConstruction, Sale, Will Divide, Ripleysq. Schools - $349,000 - Tiffany are not available to 1408 N.PEND Mai 5005 5,900 – Lori iffanyKyle N Perkins Rd - 4000Hunting/Building/The sq ft warehouse - Oh the possibilitiesare $399,900 – -Donna 00 E 810 Rd., Tryon - 53.34-acres. possibilities endless $224,028 -- Dolores/Tiffany 5504 W Creekside Dr. GATED COMMUNITY, Radiant Luxury, 5/4.5, 5823 sq. ft. NEW PRICE $1,580,000 the plant, no matter 5706 W. Garden Pointe Dr.Lots - Gated 3BD/3BA, 2754 sq ft $550,000 – Ann 1218 W 12th - 4 Commercial in aCommunity very High Traffic area/starting at $255,000 - Ann 9001 Cedar Crest Trail -View 4 bdrm./3 Kitchen plus more!! C11 - $1,100,000 the fertilizer rate. In 3618 W. Fountain Ct. --5BD/2.5BA, in ground pool - Woodland Trails $362,900 – Tiffany - Tiffany 3000 S. Range Rd. 4bath/5-acres/Pool/Summer bed, 4.5 bath, on 3.2-acres - $845,000 -addn Tiffany/Dolores $820,000 208 N. Donaldson - 4BR/2BA 1851 sq ft - close to shopping & schools $205,000 – Donna 18575 Deer Pointe - 3/2/2 on 2.5-acres, 1917 sq. ft. - sale NEW PRICE $268,000 - Kylea 3215 S. Boomer Rd. Nice Commercial Building for $2,245,000 Tiffany these cases, pH cor719 Kar 0 - Tiffany 910 Kansas / Pawnee - 1936 farmhouse / 1inacre lot with Tiffany 211 E. Main St., St. Coyle - 64 Unit Storage Building, GREAT INVESTMENT - $165,000 - Donna 301 S. Duck St. - Beautiful Office Building the heart ofoutbuildings Stillwater -$129,999– $900,000 Lori K. rection must occur ri- -Lori 415 W. 80th - 52.65 OK, acresCute ruralhome property, no restrictions $300,000 – Lori riffan 505 S. 11 Morton Ave. - Ripley, across from the School - $75,000 K. 120 W Tyler - CALLING ALL INVESTORS, 2 Units, 12 Apts., 2 bed, 1 bath $950,000 - Dolores/Tiffany for healthy growth. 617 S. Main - Downtown Stillwater commercial plus apartment unit -$395,000 – Tiffany 2923 - 3 bdrm./2 bath/Study/Game Room.unit One block to Boomer Lake - $219,000 - Tiffany 29 N. Monroe Tiffany 830456 S. Ct. 3354 / Carney -3BR/2BA sq ft to - out $199,900 – Lori - Tiffany 3337 WGlenwood Charleston Ct. New Construction in 1468 Berry Creek, 4building bed, 2.5 bath - $397,900 - ,Donna This can be done 000 N - 9-Rd lots platted for duplexes close Boomer Lake - $420,000 719 Karen 0 - Tiffany 111 E. Tower / Perry 3BD/1BA 1118 sq ft $79,800 – Tiffany 7917 Cir. Pickles large lotsq. in Perkins School - Lori$250,000 1408Spring N. ,900 --Lori 5215 Creek E - 2Gap bed,- 1Nice bath, 1253 ft. on 3 lots with District a barn -- $22,500 NEW PRICE Lori K. relatively easily N. Burdick - 3BR/2BA sq ft Close to shopping & schools $209,000 – Donna- Lori 6021502 Hallies Meadow - NEW 1623 CONSTRUCTION 4BR/2BA, 2,347 sq. ft. - $379,900 Roka Hidden Lake 14 Beautiful Lots on the North Side $52,500-$79,000 Lori K. through the appli2923 5005 iffany 920, 920 1/2 S. Duck 2 Investment properties, -2Oh, homes, bedrooms total $160,000- Donna – Amy N Perkins Rd. .- -4,000 sq. ft. warehouse the 5possibilities - $399,900 2113 Dr. 4/2.5/2, 2439 sq. ft. and GREAT PRICE $345,000 cation of lime (if the 101Pointe W. 80th building shopLOCATION on2,754 11.5 acres $4,000,000 – Lori $495,000 57061408 W. Garden Dr.- -Commercial Gated Community 3BR/3BA, sq.-ft.NEW - NEW PRICE $510,000 - Ann N.N.MCrescent 35,900- -Ann Lori 354 Cou - Tiffany 5011 W. 10 acres of Stillwater $300,000 – Lori 910S.Kansas St. Pawnee / NW 1-acre lot outbuildings - $129,999 - Tiffany 4517 0 - Lori 9366 NE /Hwy. 33 Lakeview - -31936 bed, farmhouse 3 -bath, on .75-acre m/lwith - NEW PRICE $249,000 - ,500 Ann pH is too low) or 522 12th- 52.65-acres - Commercialrural building in downtown Stillwater -$250,000 – Lori 415 W.E.80th property, no restrictions $250,000 - Lori 354 - ffany Tiffany sulfur (if too high). N Pennsylvania Ave. #43 - 2 bdrm./2.5 Bath Condo, Oklahoma City - $129,000 - Tiffany PENDING -6000 ,900 - Tiffany 354 S. Black Oak Dr. -Stillwater 4BD/3BA, 4813 sq ft Georgian & style – Donna 6172620 S. Main - Downtown commercial unit pluselegance apartment unit$950,000 - $395,000 - Tiffany 1304354 & 11111012 45,000 - Lori While application 4713 W Country Club NICE Lot for sale $25,000 Donna iffany N. Manning St. 3BR/2BA storm shelter, outbuilding $195,000 – Tiffany PENDING! E. Tower / Perry - 3BR/1BA, 1,118 sq. ft. - NEW PRICE $70,800 - Tiffany - PENDING PENDING - $152,500 W. 3rd- 5 - Close to campus 3BR/2BA 2208 ft $239,000 – Tiffany of lime or sulfur is 920, Duck2218 - 2 Investment properties, homes, 5 bedrooms total PRICE - Amy - - ,000 -Tiffany Oaks Nice Lots for2you to build yoursq new home- NEW - $27,000 - Donna 1304 & 920½- S. Shumard - Lori 1408 N. Main / Perkins4BD/3BA 2098 sq ft NEW shop CONSTRUCTION on- $4,000,000 golf course $325,000 – Lori 101 W. 80th - Commercial building on 11.5-acres - Lori - Donna straightforward, it Scotthaven Addition - Nice large lots in and Perkins School District/starting at $45,500 4517 Jenna Ln. - 3BD/2BA 1756 sq ftNW NEW $266,900 5011 W. Lakeview - 10-acres of CONSTRUCTION Stillwater - $300,000 - Lori – Lori Tiffany 354 does take some time 1218 W115 12th - 4 Commercial in aNorth very High Traffic area/starting at- $255,000 Ann 80th - 14.5 acresLots m/l Just of 68th & Mehan - $121,075 Tiffany 354 S. Tiffany 3 522 E.E.12th - Commercial building in downtown Stillwater - $250,000 - Lori --Kyle 203 80th- -4Nice large office 33.2-acres acres m/l – Lori (months) for these 354 Cou , -700 Tiffany . S. Kyle 3000 Range Rd. bed, 4.5 bath, on -$950,000 $820,000 - Tiffany/Dolores 2620S306 S. Black Oak Dr. E - 4BR/3BA, 4,813 sq. ft.on Georgian elegance & style - $950,000 Donna 270 -- -Lori 2707. 3202 E 2nd - 4BD/2BA 1717 sq ft Split floor plan $175,000 – Ann -7 - Lori PENDING & 1306 24 ft. - $135,000 - Lori 14081304 N. Main /Perkins - 4BR/3BA, ft. NEW CONSTRUCTION golf course -sq. $325,000 $315,000 - Lori K. changes to begin 2707 W.S4S. Boomer 317 Lori 3215 Rd. -2,098 Nice sq. Commercial Building for sale - on $2,245,000 Tiffany Lori 6038 Haydans Brook 4BR/2.5BA 2183 sq ft $349,000 – Lori - Lori 4517 Jenna Ln. - 3BR/2BA, 1,756 sq. ft.- NEW CONSTRUCTION - $266,900 -Donna PENDING 202 5 to occur. In other 505 S. Morton - Ripley, OK, Cutenorth home the $69,900 - Lori K. N.Ave. Monroe - 2 Commercial buildings on & 3 from acres $600,000 – -Dolores E. 80th - 14.5-acres m/l just of across 68th Mehan - School $121,075 - Tiffany Lori K. 61152112 words, right now is 354000 S. Council saleplatted in Crescent, OK - No restrictions 33.5 acres $167,000 Tiffany N203 Glenwood - for 9large lots for3-acres duplexes to Boomer Lakem/l - $420,000 E.Rd. 80th- Land -Ct. Nice office on m/lclose - NEW PRICE $1,200,000 - Lori -–Tiffany . S. as- 801 -Ann or Burdick 3BR/2.5BA sq ftthe $87,000 – Tiffany 3202 E. 2nd 4BR/2BA, 1,717 sq. ft. Split1371 floor plan - $170,000 - Ann ---PENDING an excellent time to 5005 S0000 Perkins Rd.S.- 4,000 sq.- ft. warehouse - Oh, possibilities - $399,900 - - Donna W 6038 44th Haydans - 15.86 acres - will -divide, look for2,183 signs west $317,000 ffany Brook 4BR/2.5BA, sq. ft.of- Western $349,000 - Lori, – Lori any 474 2707 . 415 take a soil sample W. 80thOaks - 52.65-acres ruralacres property, no restrictions - $250,000 - Lori 19th - 7.48 m/l inon city3-acres limits $350,000 – Lori 2112 N.Cedar Monroe - 2&Commercial buildings - $600,000 - Dolores N. Possibilities! $2,352,900 Lori 601 fany N.101 for your garden or 0000 S. Country Club Rd. - 20forAcres onwest Paved Road - $200,000 - Ann- Lori W. 80th - Commercial building and shop onof11.5-acres $4,000,000 -Lori Lori 2707 W 44th - 15.86-acres - will divide, look signs Western -- $317,000 - PENDING Lori Crosby Donna-pleasure Rhinehart 4717 S. Turtle Pond Ct.&- Great m/lnorth Lotm/l for your - $45,000 - Tiffany Montie Stewart landscape so that it Monty Stewart Cedar Oaks 19th -.-acre 7.48-acres citybuilding $350,000 - Lori 115 E. 80th - 14.5-acres m/l just ofin 68th &limits Mehan - $121,075 - Lori K. Realtor Associate 3000 Range Rd $845,000 1-3 Dolores Lemon Realtor Realtor Associate N. Washington Rd. 151.8 acres m/l, OH the Possibilities! $2,352,900 Lori 4717 S. Turtle Pond Ct. - Great .-acre m/l lot for your building pleasure - $45,000- -Lori Tiffany PEN q. ft.$1,200,000 - $349,000 is ready to go this 405-612-4184 203 E. 80th - Nice office onm/I, 3-acres m/l - NEW PRICE - Lori 405-747-7306 405-372-5151 ngton Rd.large 151.8 acres OH the N. Washington Rd. -- 151.8-acres m/l, OH the Possibilities! Possibilities!- -$2,352,900 $2,352,900- -Lori Lori spring.

HOME GROWN

Stillwater NewsPress • Thursday, December 30, 2021

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A healthy garden soil is one of the most important factors (at least among those that the gardener has some control) in determining the potential success of a garden. A basic soil test is the best place to begin improving your garden soil. If you are a regular reader of Extension gardening information, you have seen and heard us talk about this many, many times. Not only does our office review and make recommendations on hundreds of soil test results each year, we regularly assist clients with a variety of plant problems that are caused by nutrient deficiencies. Soil testing is a local issue as soil conditions vary widely across Oklahoma. For residents of Payne County, a few trends quickly emerge when looking at all these soil test results. The majority of area gardeners do not need to be adding phosphorus to their soil. This is especially true if you have been using a garden center staple such as 10-20-10 for years. Phosphorus (the 20% in the 10-20-10) causes problems with runoff into our rivers and lakes, leading to imbalances and unhealthy moss and algae growth.


US home prices surge 18.4% in October An advertising sign for building land stands in front of a new home construction site in Northbrook, Ill., Tuesday, Dec. 28, 2021. U.S. home prices rose briskly in September, another sign that the housing market is booming in the aftermath of last year’s coronavirus recession.

By Paul Wiseman

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Stillwater NewsPress • Thursday, December 30, 2021

AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON – U.S. home prices surged again in October as the housing market continues to boom in the wake of last year’s coronavirus recession. The S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller 20-city home price index, out Tuesday, climbed 18.4% in October from a year earlier. The gain marked a slight deceleration from a 19.1% year-overyear increase in September but was about in line with what economists had been expecting. All 20 cities posted double-digit annual gains. The hottest markets were Phoenix (up 32.3%), Tampa (28.1%) and Miami (25.7%). Minneapolis and Chicago posted the smallest increases, 11.5% each. The housing market has been strong thanks to rock-bottom mortgage rates, a limited supply of homes on the market, and pent-up demand from consumers locked in last year by the pandemic. Many Americans, tired of being cooped up at home during

AP PHOTO/NAM Y. HUH

the pandemic, are looking to trade up from apartments to homes or to bigger houses. “Home price growth will slow further in the year ahead, but continue to go up,” said Danielle Hale, chief economist at Realtor.com. “As housing costs eat up a larger share of home purchaser’s paychecks, buyers will get creative. Many will take advantage of ongoing workplace flexibility to move to the suburbs where despite home price gains, many can still find a lower price per square foot than nearby cities.”

It remains unclear if that shift is permanent or an aberration, said Craig Lazzara, managing director at S&P Dow Jones Indices. “We have previously suggested that the strength in the U.S. housing market is being driven in part by a change in locational preferences as households react to the COVID pandemic,’’ Lazzara said. “More data will be required to understand whether this demand surge represents an acceleration of purchases that would have occurred over the next several years, or reflects a more

permanent secular to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 6.46 million. change.’’ Last week, mortgage rates fell – to 3.05% for the benchmark 30-year, fixed405.624.2626 rate and 2.66% for www.c21global.com the 15-year fixed131 N. MaiN, Stillwater rate home loan. The persistently low rates signal that credit markets DEFY MEDIOCRITY + DELIVER EXTRAORDINARY appear more concerned about the Linda Schmidt 405.880.3048 Bailey Williams 405.714.4037 omicron variant Broker Property Manager depressing economic growth than about Alane LeGrand 405.747.6950 Judy Kasso 801.824.8166 the highest inflation rates in nearly 40 Rosetta Heppel 405.880.0869 Virginia Cussner 405.747.7601 years. The National Beverly Carter 405.743.9618 Diana Field 405.747.4684 Association of Realtors reported last Sandy Blankinship 405.269.9523 Oscar Fortune 405.747.6042 week that sales of previously occupied Mike Branson 405.612.5347 Thomas Jenkins 405.780.3204 homes rose for the third straight Tana Rutan 405.612.1496 David Heppel 405.269.6907 month in November


Don’t be misled by myths about iBuyers By Holden Lewis NerdWallet

take advantage of the individual sellers. Another is that somehow iBuyers will drive up home prices. None of these are supported by evidence.” For iBuyers to push prices artificially high, they would need to control a big chunk of the market, and they seldom do. According to DelPrete’s research, iBuyers accounted for 1.6% of U.S. homes bought in the third quarter of 2021, or around 28,000. IBuyers are busier in some markets than others, though. They bought 10.8% of the homes purchased in the Phoenix metro area in the third quarter. MYTH 3: IBUYERS SELL LOTS OF HOMES TO LANDLORDS There’s some truth to this belief, so it’s more exaggeration than myth. Most (not all) iBuyers sell a portion of their inventory to institutional investors that rent the homes out. Take Zillow Offers. After it shut down, Bloomberg reported that Zillow planned to sell 7,000 houses to corporate investors such as real estate investment trusts, or REITs. One critic tweeted , “I strongly suspect selling 7k homes to institutional investors will hurt consumers (especially after driving up prices significantly in key markets).” It’s a bummer that the mass sale to corporate landlords will shut out 7,000 would-

be owner-occupants, but the evidence that Zillow drove up prices for anyone but Zillow is weak. Of the three biggest remaining iBuyers, two say they sell to investors and one says it doesn’t. An Offerpad spokesman said in an email that the company typically sells 10% to 20% of its homes to institutional investors. Opendoor’s head of real estate, Kerry Melcher , didn’t give percentages, but said in an email: “Some homes we purchase are resold to REITs; the vast majority are put back on the market and go to everyday consumers.” RedfinNow says it is an exception. “We haven’t sold one house to a REIT,” says Jason Aleem , RedfinNow vice president. VALUE OF AN IBUYER OFFER IBuyers don’t

lowball, they’re not responsible for runaway house prices, and they sell most of their inventory to owner-occupants and only some to landlords. They’re not a diabolical force in the housing market, but what good do they do? They can help home sellers set asking prices. It’s one thing to view an online estimate of your home’s value when you’re bored. It’s another thing to receive an iBuyer’s purchase offer. “It makes those estimates real,” Aleem says. He explains that getting an iBuyer offer can establish a baseline asking price even if you ultimately decide not to take it and opt for a traditional home listing instead. ANOTHER BENEFIT: NO LIVING IN LIMBO More substantively,

selling to an iBuyer appeals to homeowners who prize convenience, need to sell quickly, and want to be certain that the buyer will consummate the transaction and not flake out. IBuyers are especially attractive to sellers who hate showing their homes to potential buyers. If you’ve ever sold a home, you know the drill: You keep a tidy house, and then you have to go somewhere while strangers tromp through the place and judge your housekeeping proficiency. With an iBuyer, there are no showings, back-and-forth negotiations, buyer contingencies or last-minute changes to closing dates. The convenience and speed offered by iBuyers mean they are here to stay.

E BL ELY A L T AI DIA V A ME IM

1605 W LIBERTY

$325,000

Spacious one-owner home in University Estates. 4 Bedrooms, 3 Baths, 2,979 sq ft. Two living areas + sunroom and covered back patio. Backs up to tree-covered nature area. Updated kitchen and bathrooms. Granite countertops. Richmond Elementary.

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convenience of not opening the house to a parade of strangers. MYTH 2: IBUYERS ARE THE REASON HOUSES ARE EXPENSIVE As the TikToker described it, the second step of the “price manipulation” would consist of the iBuyer overpaying for one home after underpaying for dozens of other homes in a neighborhood. This, the theory goes, would set a precedent for higher prices that appraisers and subsequent buyers would follow. This hypothesis disregards human nature: When you buy a home, you’ll ignore the price paid by the only buyer who overpaid. You’ll pay attention to the prices that are consistent with fair market value. Deliberately overpaying for homes would be a disastrous strategy. In fact, Zillow Offers, the company’s iBuying division, acknowledges that it unintentionally paid too much for houses, based on faulty forecasts of future prices. Zillow lost hundreds of millions of dollars in the third quarter of 2021, laid off one-quarter of its workforce and shuttered Zillow Offers. Mariya Letdin, associate professor of real estate at Florida State University, said by email that she sees “a few ideas floating around. One is a concern that big tech will use their informational advantage to

Stillwater NewsPress • Thursday, December 30, 2021

IBuyers are one of the few true innovations to hit the real estate industry in recent years. Yet consumers haven’t fully embraced them because of misconceptions about how iBuyers work, and what types of problems they resolve for sellers and buyers. An iBuyer (for “instant buyer”) is a company that uses technology to make an automated offer on a home. After buying the house, the company fixes what’s broken, makes cosmetic repairs and sells it. IBuyers market themselves as a fast, convenient way to sell. Myths have grown around iBuyers: that they pay too little, inflate home prices and funnel owner-occupied homes to investors. A couple of those myths do have a grain of truth. Here’s what’s really going on with iBuyers. MYTH 1: IBUYERS LOWBALL HOMEOWNERS In a TikTok that went viral in September, a real estate agent implied that an iBuyer was manipulating house prices. In his hypothesis, the scheme was a twostage process. The first step consisted of lowballing home sellers. But iBuyers don’t pay significantly less than the market price, said Mike DelPrete , a real estate

tech strategist and scholar in residence at the University of Colorado Boulder. “The biggest potential misconception is that iBuyers are gonna rip you off, and they’re gonna give you a lowball offer and you’re leaving money on the table,” he said by voice memo. This misunderstanding may grow out of a belief that iBuyers are the same as house flippers. There’s a difference. Flippers buy properties that need lots of work to get them in salable condition. They buy low, spend plenty on renovations and make a profit on the difference between the amount invested and the sale price. But iBuyers buy properties that are in good shape, usually make minor repairs and make much of their profit from fees they charge to sellers. (The eventual price an iBuyer pays is the accepted offer minus the renovation costs.) DelPrete has researched prices paid by iBuyers. In 2019, iBuyers were paying about 98.5% of estimated market value; at times in 2021, they were overpaying. In contrast, house flippers often pay about 70% of value. Yes, iBuyers often pay less than buyers would get by listing conventionally. But not a lot less, and some sellers believe iBuyers are worth the financial trade-off for a quick sale and


A changed economy By Paul Wiseman and DeeAnn Durbin

C6

Stillwater NewsPress • Thursday, December 30, 2021

AP Business Writers

After years in which ultra-low inflation had become a fixture of economies across the world, prices rocketed skyward in 2021 – at the grocery store, the gasoline pump, the used-car lot, the furniture store. Chalk it up to a surprisingly swift and robust economic recovery from the pandemic recession, one that left suppliers flat-footed and hampered by COVID-19 disruptions. Propelled by vast infusions of government aid and the widespread distribution of COVID vaccines, the economic bounce-back was as startling as the fall that had preceded it. Policymakers, business owners and economists were caught off-guard by both the speed of the recovery and the new COVID variants that threatened its durability. BACK FROM THE BRINK In the spring of 2020, the global economy appeared to stand on the brink of a catastrophe. The sudden and blindingly fast spread of COVID19 infections forced lockdowns, frightened people into hunkering down at home, paralyzed travel and ordinary business activity and led employers to slash tens of millions of jobs. In June that year, the International

Monetary Fund predicted that the global economy would shrink 4.9% for the year, the first drop in worldwide economic output since the 20082009 financial crisis. But the governments of the wealthiest nations, scarred by the achingly slow recovery from the financial crisis just over a decade earlier, poured money into rescuing their economies. The United States was particularly aggressive: It supplied $5 trillion in COVID-related stimulus aid to individuals, businesses and municipalities this year and last. “The U.S. has been a total outlier globally,’’ said Robin Brooks, chief economist at the Institute of International Finance, a global trade group for financial companies. “We had the deepest pocketbook of any country. We have this exorbitant privilege’’ – the ability to run up debts to pay for COVID relief without having to pay high interest rates to do so. Global investors regard U.S. government debt as perhaps the safest investment around; their purchases of U.S bonds keep American interest rates low. So despite immense federal spending and surging inflation, the yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note – below 1.4%, as of early Friday – remains lower than it was before the

pandemic. In the US and elsewhere, stimulus aid is widely credited with helping stave off disaster. Though the global economy did shrink in 2020, it did so by a less-than-expected 3.1%. And the IMF expects growth to rebound to 5.9% for 2021. That would be the fastest calendar-year expansion in IMF records dating to 1980. OVERWHELMED Robust demand, especially for autos, appliances and other physical goods, overwhelmed global manufacturers. Factories couldn’t obtain enough raw materials and parts. Ports and freight yards were swamped. Companies grappled with shortages of everything they needed, notably workers. That was particularly true at many restaurants. At the newly re-opened Gotham restaurant in Manhattan, for instance, patrons are unable to find handcrafted chocolates, once a big draw for the holidays, or grab a burger or order oysters. Gotham couldn’t find enough employees to make the chocolates, work the grill or shuck the oysters. “We worked to bring the restaurant back to life,” said Bret Csencsitz, the new owner of the restaurant. “The demand is there. The product is superior. Yet I don’t have enough people

to make the business what it needs to be and what it should be.” The restaurant was also hampered by shortages of basic supplies like ceramic plates and glassware. Food costs fluctuated wildly. Halibut, which cost $14 a pound one day, was $24.99 a week and a half later. Across the Atlantic, MTA, an auto components manufacturer that endured Italy’s first lockdown in February 2020, reopened within a week and ended 2020 with unexpectedly healthy business. But the recovery bred new troubles. “Everything is lacking,” said Maria Vittoria Falchetti, the company’s marketing chief. “Plastic is lacking. Metals are lacking. Paper is lacking. Microchips – don’t even mention. Also, we are struggling with a big increase in prices in these materials, and also energy,” THE PAIN OF HIGH PRICES The supply chain bottlenecks have driven up costs, contributing to a problem that most rich countries hadn’t had to endure for years: Persistently high inflation. The IMF expects consumer prices in advanced economies to rise 2.8% this year. That would be the highest such rate since 2008. Soaring energy prices, a response to the brisk economic

recovery, contributed mightily to the runup in prices. The price of the U.S. benchmark crude skyrocketed 75% – to $84 a barrel – from January through October, before easing in recent weeks as the omicron variant raised the prospect of slower growth. Inflationary pressures were especially intense in the United States. In addition to energy, some of the largest cost spikes were for such necessities as food, housing, autos and clothing – goods and services that millions of Americans regularly depend upon. Especially hard hit were lower-income households with little or no cash cushions. Last month, U.S. consumer prices shot up 6.8% from 12 months earlier – the biggest year-over-year increase since 1982. Over the past year, used-car prices surged 31%, beef roast 26%, men’s suits and coats

14%. And price hikes are outpacing wage gains. After inflation, U.S. workers’ hourly earnings, despite pay increases, were actually down 1.9% last month compared with November 2020. LABOR The United States, in particular, experienced acute labor shortages. At the depths of the pandemic recession in the spring of 2002, employers had slashed 22 million jobs. As the economy recovered, they refilled more than 18 million jobs – and complained that they couldn’t find enough workers. In September and October, employers listed 1.4 job openings for every unemployed American, the most in records going back 15 years. That marked a striking reversal from April 2020, in the depths of the coronavirus recession, when there were just 0.2 openings for each unemployed person – or,

stated another way, when there were five unemployed people for every available job. A rise in early retirements, a shortage of affordable child care, the reluctance of many restaurant workers to return and a drop in immigration contributed to the labor shortage. The government also expanded unemployment aid and gave relief checks to households, bolstering their savings and allowing the jobless to be choosier about their next employer. In Europe, by contrast, governments essentially paid companies to keep workers on their payrolls. “In Europe, you didn’t have this fireand-rehire response,’’ Kirkegaard said. Keeping European workers on company payrolls, he noted, made it “much more seamless to reopen the economies in Europe because basically people just went back to their old job.’’

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Yost Rd.

To Cimarron Turnpike

McMurtry Rd.

Chateau Ct.

Topaz Ave.

Amethyst Ave.

Quartz Dr. Duncan

Nancy Lee Dr.

Evergreen

Perkins Rd.

Knoblock St.

Star Dr.

Jardot Rd. Marine Rd. Burdick St. Manning St. Briarwood St.

22nd Av.

t. is S Lew

Lowry St.

Lowry St. 37th Av.

35th Av. 36th Av.

37th Av.

44th Av.

Hunters Cr.

Dr. Deerfield

s Wild Turkey Pas

Vista Ct. Vista Ln.

Cottontail Ln.

Jardot Rd.

Perkins Rd.

Husband St.

Washington St.

Western Rd.

Sangre Rd.

Timberline Dr.

177

S. Westchester St.

Katy

Hightower St.

Henderson St.

Dr.

Mockingbird Ln. Collins Ct. Colby Lance

Villa Dr.

Drury Ln.

4th Av.

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Crestwood Dr. Crestwood Ct.

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Pennsylvania St.

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Husband Pl.

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Hartford St. Dryden St. Redbud Ct.

Star St.

Hoke St.

Hartford St. Dryden St. Benjamin St. Burdick St. Burdick St. Berry St. Arrington St. Marshall St. Doty St. Blair St. Grandview St.

West St. Duck St. West St. Duck St.

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Husband St.

Main St.

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Hester St. Knoblock St. Knoblock St. Knoblock St.

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Emma Swim Ave.

Fountain View Ct.

Red Rose Dr.

Aloysius Cr.

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Connell Av.

Connell Av.

Morrill Av.

31st Av.

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22nd Av.

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Scissortail Dr.

Stillwater NewsPress • Thursday, December 30, 2021

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Miller Av.

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Walnut St.

Reese Landing

3rd Av.

Brooke Jefferson St.

Knapp

Tyler Av.

Harned Av.

Mohawk Av.

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Swim Av.

Brooke Moore Franklin

Tyler Av.

Eastland Dr.

Wiley St.

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4th Av.

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Eskridge Av.

Windsor Cr.

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Osage Dr.

Liberty Rd. Preston Av.

Vena Ln.

3rd Pl.

Parkway Dr.

Lakeridge Av.

Rutledge Dr.

Windmill Ln.

Harned Av. Madison Ct.

Thomas Av. Frances Av.

Airport Rd.

Newman Av.

Hillcrest Av.

Tobacco Rd.

Preston Ln.

State Ln.

Lisa Ct. Lori Ct.

Av.

Dr.

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177 Airport Rd.

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There are no open houses scheduled for this weekend.

gate Dr .

Britton Ct. B Dr. ritton Greenbriar Cr. Dr. Au d Ma ene D rieD r. r. Greenvale Ct. Ct. side rook

Golf Dr.

Park

Stonecrest Ct.

Hartford

Richmond Hill Rd.

Washington St. Garfield St.

Hunters Ridge

Stonecrest Ave.

Lynn Ln.

North

Benjamin

Husband Pl. Northgate Dr.

St.

Richmond Rd.

Park Pl. Tower Park Dr.

Richmond Hill Ct.

nd Husba

• Open Houses may be canceled in the case of inclement weather. If you have questions, please call the hosting REALTOR®.

lD

Ct.

yon

Can

Chateau Dr.

Chateau Pl. Peaceable Acres Rd.

• All Open Houses are Sunday unless otherwise indicated.

il dm

Burris Rd.

Burris Rd. 177

Week of Sunday, Jan. 2, 2022

Lakeview Rd.

Jardot Rd.

OPEN HOUSEMap

Yost Rd.

Perkins Rd.

Yost Rd.


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