Page 1


STIG MAGAZINE

Edition8: IN MOTION

by: Mardy Co


DESIRE. ACHIEVE. INSPIRE. Individuals from across the globe who are breaking barriers by sharing their story and works, to instigate change, fuel DESIRE, that we may dare to ACHIEVE our dreams, and in turn INSPIRE others to do the same. It’s a cycle. It’s infectious. It’s what STIG Magazines are made of… page per page.


State of Mind

___________

STIG

State of Mind

Page 3 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Looking beyond with no great expectation As the sun will rise & set before your eyes You’ll see that all is a gift of life That every turn & road leads to a discovery That every season is a different view of a journey & if by chance you’ll see a shoreline nearby Turn the wheel, set it aside & drop by Take that much desired walk and be calmed by each wave In life’s unconventional beauty be saved Nothing but your being simmering down through the ocean breeze Up to a soothing point of silence be seized Where there is nothing left but the sea & the sound of you breathing Lavish in it & feel your life unraveling & for the first time in a brink of innocence Open yourself up for something new...

- Mardy-

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 4

State of Mind

Pack light for an endless road & horizon


Table of Contents

___________

STIG

Table of Contents

Page 5 visit www.StigMagazine.com


The Truth Be Told p.7

MEET THE GENIUSES BEHIND ART IN MOTION Exclusive Interview On Award-Winning Filmakers: Brian Curtin p.13 Chicatronic p.33 Meg Pinsonneault p.71 Pepe Diokno p.103

STIG DIARY Sequel 8: Transformation p.29

MODELS W/ SUBSTANCE EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW:

Cover Girl Frances Parsons p.125 The Male Model To Watch Out For: Tim Arpin p.149

LOST IN PARADISE Going Local

Find Out The Mystery Place No.8 p.233

DAT TRAN Hair Stylist: Hair That Speaks Volumes p.197

BREATHING LIFE THROUGH PORTRAITS Exclusive Interview: Juan Bautista Nieto p.169

COLORFUL STROKES Exclusive Interview Of Award Winning Makeup Artist: Nelly Recchia p.219

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 6

Table of Contents

STIG REVEALED


Truth be Told

Truth be Told You have every right to be here No matter where you are, what you’ve become and who you are You are born a part of and in perfect alignment with the universe You are made in the image and likeness of a creator And that makes you a creator yourself. You are gifted with free will in your life’s creative process … seize it You are made a little higher than angels You are without wings so you can walk the land and rule your own reality You are carving your way into a masterpiece You are a proof of heaven and hell on earth Because you are what you make of it Your purpose is what you say it is You call your own calling Your uniqueness exemplifies the greatest story ever told

S

T

I G

You are a oul’s ale of the nner od. You are...

STIG

Page 7 visit www.StigMagazine.com


visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 5

BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Table of Contents


Order Here >

Order Here >

Order Here >

Order Here >

Order Here >

Order Here >


Filmakering

___________

film

Art In Motion

Page 11 visit www.StigMagazine.com


a

story

that

That is how powerful films can be. And

normally tackles political, social

many ask what the formula is in producing

and economic circumstances,

successful films both commercially and

the beauty of filmmaking is its ability

critically. Many filmmakers will tell you

to deliver an audio visual presentation

that there is no exact formula for this. Just

to audiences on a global platform. With

know that if talent is present; if passion

a wide range of selection pertaining to

is alive and the drive never subsides, the

cinematic techniques and technologies, it

opportunity to create an “Obra Maestra�

allows ideas to come alive with a goal to

is neither impossible nor hard.

stir the emotions of its viewers. This is why we have interviewed

The very essence of films have allowed

internationally acclaimed, independent

us to catch a glimpse of certain cultures

and multi-award-winning film directors

and to understand how some people live

whose independent films will undeniably

- realizing their truth and their reality. It

inspire, educate and make you realize that

helps to open our minds to possibilities.

there is nothing better in this world than

It entertains us – educates us. It affects

following your dreams; making things

us in so many ways both positively and

happen and eventually seeing beyond the

negatively. We cry, we laugh - we get

ordinary and aspiring to be the best you

inspired and even relate to it at times.

can be.

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 12

Filmakering

with

BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

E

quipped


Filmaker

art in motion

Award Winning Filmmakers

________________________________________________________________

Exclusive Interview w/

brian curtin United States

All images are © 2015, Brian Curtin

They are released for reproduction in STIG, online magazine .

B

rian Curtin is an award winning filmmaker; producer, writer, graphic designer, film actor and video editor. He directed “Concrete Hustle” which was nominated at the Sidewalk Moving Picture Festival as well as the fan film “Beyond Black Mesa” which was inspired by the Half-Life video game. The independent film BBM won the “BEST SCIENCE FICTION” Award at the 2010 AOF Festival. Upon the initial release of BBM, it immediately went viral with more than 200,000 views in the first day and a half. The film was also favored by Valve Software (creator of Half-Life) on their official YouTube channel.

Page 13 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Filmaker BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 14


Filmaker

art in motion

Award Winning Filmmakers

________________________________________________________________

Exclusive Interview Brian Curtin Who are you as a person and as a Filmmaker? How did you get into filmmaking and how long have you been doing this? I was introduced to illustration by my parents when I was younger, which lead to diving into fine arts all through high school. The influences of everything from the original Star Wars trilogy to Disney animated movies pushed me to further my artistic skills through Graphic Design. In college, with the cheap accessibility of video cameras, I began to really enjoy filmmaking. I was able to exhaust my creativity in every aspect to visually compose a story while keeping it entertaining. It started as stupid music videos shot on my camera phone and fight scenes in reverse. After gaining more experience at Big Communications, the films became more refined with an infusion of motion graphics and special effects. I would say I’ve been making films for about 7 years...as a hobby. As a filmmaker, I would say I’m a very weak writer, but I do know how to entertain.

What is it about your craft that calls on you to continuously make films and what are your main inspirations as well as influences? Also, what is your preferred style in filmmaking and what are the techniques that you use when it comes to your craft? I think as an artist, you constantly have to get your thoughts and ideas out. That’s my deal; I have to constantly be creating something. Unfortunately, my girlfriend would say that this is not always my best quality. Finding inspiration is a must. I find that most of my inspirations come from the iconic movies of my childhood like Goonies, Indiana Jones, Star Wars, Sand lot and Army of Darkness. I like what J.J. Abrams is doing nowadays. He still keeps some of that nostalgia alive. I guess my encompassing style leans towards scifi action themes. I like action and I like special effects, but ironically I don’t like any of the Transformer movies.

Continuation On The Next Page >

Page 15 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Filmaker I mentioned before, the theme I prefer is sci-fi action and post-apocalyptic to be specific. Can you walk us through the process when you feel the urge to make a film? What do you normally do to make that happen? How do you choose the sound, music, people, etc.? Also, how do you feel about screenings?

Next is storyboarding - setting up the flow and layout. After a good storyboard, all the details begin to get plugged in. The only screenings I’ve done are at film festivals and they are not as nerve racking as I imagined. By then, I’ve put so much time and effort into the project that I could care less if someone didn’t enjoy it, but I always file away the feedback.

Continuation On The Next Page >

I will have a lot of ideas all the time, but usually one will surface and stay there until I do something about it. Then I figure out how to execute it with the resources that is available to me. I often listen to music that I feel is appropriate for the film and I let the music develop shots and scenes in my mind.

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 16

BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

What is the theme or essence of most of the films that you have created?


Filmaker

© Brian Curtin

What is your secret in making great films that are timeless? What do you always keep in mind when you make films? Well, I don’t know if any of my films have reached “timeless” status. I believe when you put passion into your work it will show. I don’t expect my films to change anyone’s life, but I do want the viewer to be entertained. Personally, what is the most challenging part for you as a filmmaker? Were you able to overcome it? If so, how? Saying the film is “finished.” I’m a little bit of a perfectionist and I’m never completely satisfied with my product as it always could be better. I’m working on it as we speak.

Continuation On The Next Page >

Page 17 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Like all artists, I believe that filmmakers should tell stories that they are passionate about and are inspired to do. My goal for each short film is to pull the audience in and leave them fully entertained at the end. Since all of my films have been completely independent, I hope young and talented viewers can see what is possible with an idea and a lot of hard work. What specific film/s have you created that is especially close to your heart and why? I guess Concrete Hustle will always be very special. It was our first real short film. There are so many things wrong with it, but I feel like that’s part of its charm.

You’ll have to compromise sleep and you’ll need to find some really good friends. I work full time at a great ad agency Big Communications by day and work on my films at night and in between. Unfortunately, my films don’t bring in hardly any money; they’re more of a big hobby. I also really enjoy my job too, so I’m pretty fortunate. At this point in your life, what are you most proud of? Beyond Black Mesa is my baby. Continuation On The Next Page >

What was the first film that you made and how did you feel after you were done with it? What emotions did you feel and what was that experience like? Concrete Hustle. I felt exhausted and wasn’t sure if it was worth the time. It was brutal tracking light sabers frame by frame for 5 months in between a full time job. Looking back now, it was totally worth it. I’d like to do another....some day.

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 18

Filmaker

For independent filmmakers who are currently starting out, how do you think they can sustain themselves with their art? What have you done that allowed you to continue to do what you love without much compromises but still earn a living doing what you are passionate about?

BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

What do you think is the role of filmmakers? Also, what do you want your audience to take from each film that you create? What kind of impact do you want your works to make?


Filmaker

Page 19 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Filmaker BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 20


Filmaker If you could change the realm of filmmaking at this very moment -what would you change? I would travel back in time to prevent the making of Star Wars: Episodes 1,2,3. In your opinion, what do you believe is your greatest contribution to the world today? It’s sad when my mind goes blank after reading this question. It’s a stretch, but the most rewarding thing about our films would be all the viewers who are inspired by our projects.

Continuation On The Next Page >

Page 21 visit www.StigMagazine.com


What can we expect from you in the coming weeks or months? Months. I wish I could pop things out every week, but my reasoning is “Quality over quantity.” There will definitely be more coming. End >

BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

If you have a camera, you can make a film. It sounds cliché, but you’ll never have all the resources, abilities or money you think you need. You’ve got to make a plan, play to your strengths and commit to finishing it. You’ll learn a lot and be proud of it in the end.

Filmaker

Advice to those who wish to follow in your footsteps?


Filmaker


BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Filmaker


Filmaker

THOUGHTS ON FILMS: What films do you consider to be life changing? Star Wars, Indiana Jones, E.T., Aliens, Wizard of Oz, Requiem for a Dream, Mad Max Underrated films Willow Your favorite film of all time Star Wars: Return of the Jedi Filmmaker that inspires you the most and why J.J. Abrams. He just does really good work.

Page 25 visit www.StigMagazine.com


BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Filmaker


Order Here

Order Here

Order Here

Order Here

Order Here

Order Here


___________

stig diary

Sequel 8:

Transformation


seize to live when you die a little. Of course this is an

butterflies. It can even be the most painful

exaggerated version, but the point is, we take risks.

road one could ever go through life. It’s about

So sometimes, transformation, may keep you up all

moving forward and letting go of the old so you can

night. Stir you up inside. Shake you to your very core. It

make way for the new. It’s taking chances and risking

can be crazy. Nothing less of intense, but when it’s done,

your comfort zone in hopes of growth. It’s letting you

your view of life will perceive to be the most beautiful,

free from the expectations of others and finally listening

not for anyone else to be pleased, but beautiful for you, or

to your own inner voice. It’s letting you flow deliberately

at least we hope it could be. No matter what, our instinct

to anything and anyone that resonates with you. And

says, it is worth it. Finding YOU, is worth it.

when you witness your life dramatically change, it’s true

Now I’m trying to always let go of anger. Trying to

that you’ll realize the things and people that matter, and

overcome my fears. Trying to follow my dreams and my

those that don’t. You’ll see the people who were only

goals. Trying to convince myself every time I fall to get

there through good times, and you will also see those

up. Telling myself that I am worth it when people make

who left because their misery loss its company when you

you feel otherwise. I’ve let go of competition with others,

are finally emerging to be happy. This is a true story.

because honestly, my worst competitor is ME. I have

It’s like riding a big bike in the freeway where in you

never been pounded so hard by anyone but myself. I have

let yourself fall in love with the speed. Feeling the

always been my worst critic. I have learned to listen, and

wind brush through your face, and your hair. Not over

from listening I have learned. I read books to help myself

thinking of the danger that lies ahead. No buts, no ifs, just

improve. Every day is part of a process. Everyday can be

the accelerating feeling of that moment. The thrill that

a part of a transformation. One realization to the other.

ignites your bones, and the blood that flows through your

Until such a time that you can say, you have come full

veins suddenly become so relevant. In that moment, you

cirlce.

End >

BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

T

ransformation is not all rainbows and


Filmaker

art in motion

Award Winning Filmmakers

________________________________________________________________

Exclusive Interview w/

patricia chicatronic United States

All images are © 2015, Patricia Chicatronic

They are released for reproduction in STIG, online magazine .

P

atricia Chica is a multi-award-winning film director, writer, visual artist, film producer and videographer who is proficient in the English, French and Spanish language. She has been directing movie actors since 1990 and specializes in Film Drama (Fiction & Non-Fiction); High-End Film Documentary & Factual Entertainment; Strong Story telling; Character Driven Stories; World Travel and Stylized Imagery. With over 25 international awards including the awardwinning feature documentary “ROCKABILLY 514” which she co-directed with Mike Wafer and the director of the 10-times award-winning short film “DAY BEFORE YESTERDAY” which was presented in over 30 film festivals in 14 countries, you can find the complete list of Patricia Chica’s awards and recognitions here.

Page 33 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Filmaker BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 34


Filmaker

Page 35 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Filmaker BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 36


Filmaker

art in motion

Award Winning Filmmakers

________________________________________________________________

Exclusive Interview Patricia Chicatronic Who are you as a person and as a Filmmaker? How did you get into filmmaking and how long have you been doing this? I consider myself an artist first before being a filmmaker; I’m a visual storyteller. I use the camera as my instrument to express myself. I love to tell empowering, thought-provocative and inspiring stories through the use of the audiovisual medium. When I was four, I was given my first set of color pencils and a blank piece of paper. It changed my life! I knew from that day, that this is something that I would be doing all my life. I always knew that I was an artist. It was only in my teens that I discovered my most powerful tool: the camera. And it’s only when I saw the French New Wave films of Godard and Truffaut; “À bout de souffle” (Breathless) in particular that I knew I wanted to become a filmmaker. It is the youthful and rebellious spirit, the sense of artistic liberty and the visual aesthetics that emanated from those films really appealed to me. I thought to myself: “WOW! A film can be an artwork, serve as a political statement, tell a story, transmit a message and move people all at once… That’s what I want to do for the rest of my life!” That was in 1990. I have never looked back since that day… Continuation On The Next Page >

Page 37 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Filmaker BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 38


Filmaker

Page 39 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Filmaker BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 40


Filmaker


What are your main inspirations as well as influences? I’m strongly inspired by the real-life experiences and psychosocial issues that shape people’s lives because in my films, I like to convey an authentic and realistic portrayal of emotions and situations. The films of Hitchcock and the French New Wave directors influence me. I also loved Fellini and Antonioni’s films. The 1960’s film era was one that really inspired me to become a film director.

Also, what is your preferred style in filmmaking and what are the techniques that you use when it comes to your craft? I don’t have a preferred style of filmmaking. I think that the subject matter is the one that determines the style of the film. However, my visual style has been described as aesthetic and poetic within a humanistic setting. I constantly juggle between two genres, fiction and documentary. I have a genuine interest in exploring thought-provoking themes and hybrid forms of storytelling. Continuation On The Next Page >

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 42

Filmaker

I have an urge to tell stories that inspire me. I also have a lot to say about the world we live in. I’m always looking for compelling stories to tell that will change mentalities and challenge the status quo. Thanks to the power of film, I want to tell stories that are engaging, political and emotional - with a bold and irreverent attitude. I like to use memory, music, identity and sexuality to address serious subjects in a way that would make the viewers think.

Rock stars and guitar players are great influences in my life as well. I’m seduced by their skills and inspired by their creative process and sense of rebelliousness. I wanted to be a rock guitarist myself as a teenager, but I took the paintbrush and the camera instead. Even though I’m not a musician, I feel that I have a musical sensibility when I shoot. I just use another type of instrument to express myself.

BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

What is it about your craft that calls on you to continuously make films?


Filmaker


BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Filmaker


Filmaker

That being said, no matter what style or format I’m using, I always aim for a strong character-driven story. One of my principles is to always depict solid characters, with mood and tone, and exhibit visual ingenuity while delivering an engaging and entertaining story. Over the years, I have developed the ability to bring a strong visual sense to my work by using the potential of images and actors’ performances to express a powerful emotion. What is the theme or essence of most of the films that you have created? I want to make the type of films that I would like to watch myself: clever, thought provoking and unconventional! That’s why the characters in my films are always heroes and heroines of the darker side of life who come out strong at the end.

I then meet with my key collaborators (writers, producers, creators) to brainstorm the idea further and capture their interest. Most of the time, I have a producer interested in developing the project with me. They send an option deal memo to my agent. It all becomes official from there. I always surround myself with key creative collaborators who will contribute in a constructive way to my ideas by bringing them further. Each project is different, so I always bring together the best candidates possible for that particular project. I encourage a harmonious creative collaboration where every team player feels at ease with the process and who will also respect my vision and style. Continuation On The Next Page >

My films often serve as eye-openers and a discussion triggers to talk about taboo subjects that question the definitions of memory, sexuality and identity. Can you walk us through the process when you feel the urge to make a film? What do you normally do to make that happen? How do you choose the sound, music, people, etc.? As soon as I have an idea for a film, I immediately write it down. I also do some in-depth research on the subject matter and make my vision clear enough to explain it in a one-pager. When this is done, I register my idea with the WGC and the WGA for copyright.

Page 45 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Filmaker BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 46


Filmaker


BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Filmaker


Filmaker Page 49 visit www.StigMagazine.com


I’m always excited to attend my screenings at film festivals and to be able to do a Q & A afterwards. For me, it’s a great way to connect and communicate directly with the audience. Each screening is very rewarding and I learn a lot about what works and what doesn’t by observing the viewers’ reactions. To me, filmmaking is a process; a learning process… I’m always eager to learn in order to improve myself.

Personally, what is the most challenging part for you as a filmmaker? Were you able to overcome it? If so, how? I’m a perfectionist and sometimes there is no time or space to perfect a shot on set. That is what I find the most challenging: time and budget restrictions.

As I grew older and wiser and gained more and more experience, I have I also do test screenings of my films learned to make the right decisions that before the final cut. That allows me would not compromise my vision, the to survey the audience’s reaction and film’s integrity or artistic value. I have improve the film in the edit, if needed, learned how to make a quick decision before its release. about what are the priorities to be covered before the end of each day’s What is your secret in making great shoot. films that are timeless? What do you always keep in mind when you I’m always well prepared before a make films? shoot. To me it’s all about being ready to improvise on set if ever something I don’t follow trends, that is why my doesn’t go as planned. films are usually timeless and age well in the festival circuit. Continuation On The Next Page >

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 50

Filmaker

I love the exchange with the public!

I ask my art director, costume designer and cinematographer to always create a timeless feel on screen so the viewers aren’t able to tell what year the film was made.

BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Also, how do you feel about screenings?


Filmaker

What do you think is the role of It tells the story of a young twelve year old girl who wrote a letter to herself filmmakers? when she would turn 25 in the future The role of filmmakers is to tell a good and asking the adult-her to keep her story with images, sounds and a unique childhood promises, and to make her dreams come true. When the 25-year vision of his/her own. old gets the letter, the young woman that Being able to show your film is a she has become realizes that none of her privilege and one should take it as a dreams have become a reality. responsibility towards society. The film is about believing in your Films are powerful tools that can change dreams, never giving up despite the the world. I always keep that in mind obstacles and challenges. when I’m writing a screenplay. Since I finished that film, I always keep Also, what do you want your the promises that I made to myself audience to take from each film that throughout my life. I also don’t promise you create? What kind of impact do anything that I cannot fulfill. After all, a promise is a promise. you want your works to make? I want my films to inspire people and to empower them - especially young women; marginal people and cultural minorities. I like to think that films can change the world and that they have the power to make an improvement in someone’s life.

Continuation On The Next Page >

What specific film/s have you created that is especially close to your heart and why? The Promise was my first film after graduating from film school and it changed my life as a filmmaker. Even though it’s not by far my best work, and I have evolved a lot artistically since then, it’s one that is close to my heart.

Page 51 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Filmaker BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 52


Filmaker

Page 53 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Filmaker My first film The Promise was quite a roller coaster of an experience. I produced it by getting into debt, with my own personal economies. I had to put together a team of dedicated and experienced people (crew and cast) who were willing to work for free… After the last day of shoot I was 60,000$ in debt… and I had just been out of University… It took me 3 years to pay back the debt. I felt extremely relieved and proud of myself for completing such an ambitious project. But of course, it would never have been possible without the contributions of everyone involved.

For independent filmmakers who are currently starting out, how do you think they can sustain themselves with their art? What have you done that allowed you to continue to do what you love without many compromises but still earn a living doing what you are passionate about? It’s not easy to earn a living by just directing when you are starting out. There is no shame whatsoever to start from the bottom of the ladder… you can only move up. It’s better to make mistakes on an internship and to make them when you have already been hired. Learn from your mistakes and improve your craft. Learn your craft and gain experience by watching or assisting other directors. Learn how to use a camera, how to edit, how to design, how to direct actors. Any of those skills and knowledge will come in handy when you’re directing your own team of collaborators. Continuation On The Next Page >

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 54

BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

With regards to the first film that you made, how did you feel after you were done with it? What emotions did you feel and what was that experience like?


Filmaker

At this point in your life, what are you most proud of? I’m very proud that as a young woman, I can live off my passion. I have been working really hard for the last 15 years, building up my own identity as a filmmaker, and it’s now starting to pay off. Every day, I wake up with a smile on my face because I know that I’m fulfilling my dream. Don’t get me wrong, it’s not always easy to be a filmmaker. I experience ups and downs like everyone else, but I always keep a positive attitude about any undesirable situation that comes across my path. I overcome my obstacles by just doing what I have to do, and always do the best I can to achieve my goals. Discipline and perseverance are the guarantee of success! If you could change the realm of filmmaking at this very moment -what would you change? I think that filmmaking has expanded to a multitude of platforms in the last 10-15 years (web, interactive, mobile, video games, 3D, etc.) and is continuing to adapt itself to its era and to all the new technologies coming out.

I like to see my films become a further multimedia experience, with interactive forms of storytelling that would co-exist on various platforms that complement each other. I’m not here to change the realm of filmmaking, but I really think of a larger concept for my films than just the film itself. In your opinion, what do you believe is your greatest contribution to the world today? I think that my greatest contribution as an artist and a filmmaker is to give a voice to the rebels and marginal people of this world. Characters who have non-conventional lifestyles and who have philosophies that are not in the norm always attract me. For example, in the rockumentary Rockabilly 514, my co-director Mike Wafer and I documented the lives of people leaving a life influenced by the 1950’s rock n’ roll music.

Continuation On The Next Page >

Page 55 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Filmaker BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 56


Filmaker

Page 57 visit www.StigMagazine.com


I think that filmmaking has expanded to a multitude of platforms in the last 10-15 years (web, interactive, mobile, video games, 3D, etc.) and is continuing to adapt itself to its era and to all the new technologies coming out.

Continuation On The Next Page >

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 58

Filmaker BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

At this point in your life, what are I like to see my films become a you most proud of? further multimedia experience, with interactive forms of storytelling that I’m very proud that as a young woman, would co-exist on various platforms I can live off my passion. I have been that complement each other. working really hard for the last 15 years, building up my own identity as I’m not here to change the realm of a filmmaker, and it’s now starting to filmmaking, but I really think of a larger concept for my films than just pay off. the film itself. Every day, I wake up with a smile on my face because I know that I’m In your opinion, what do you fulfilling my dream. Don’t get me believe is your greatest contribution wrong, it’s not always easy to be a to the world today? filmmaker. I experience ups and downs like everyone else, but I always keep a I think that my greatest contribution as positive attitude about any undesirable an artist and a filmmaker is to give a situation that comes across my path. I voice to the rebels and marginal people overcome my obstacles by just doing of this world. Characters who have what I have to do, and always do the non-conventional lifestyles and who best I can to achieve my goals. have philosophies that are not in the norm always attract me. Discipline and perseverance are the guarantee of success! For example, in the rockumentary Rockabilly 514, my co-director Mike If you could change the realm of Wafer and I documented the lives of filmmaking at this very moment -- people leaving a life influenced by the what would you change? 1950’s rock n’ roll music.


Filmaker

Fans have told me on MySpace and Facebook that my films (specially Rockabilly 514 and The Promise) have given them hope in their life and that it encouraged them to pursue their dreams. To me, this is the best reward I could get. Advice to those who wish to follow in your footsteps? Work hard, always be eager to learn and never give up! What can we expect from you in the coming weeks or months? I’m presently developing various featurelength film projects. One of them is a story that I dreamt about when I was 18 years old. The story is being developed with my friend screenwriter Stéphanie Larrue. It’s entitled “My Life with V”. Here is a brief synopsis. It’s 1988. Virginia, an introverted female rock guitarist in her 20’s, overdoses by accident during the party of her 21st birthday and wakes up in the decadent rock era of 1967 in the body of a teenage cheerleader Veronica – months before the death of her mother who died giving birth to her. Will she save her mother from the attack that caused the pregnancy, thus preventing her own birth, even though she has fallen in love with the would-be attacker, her biological father, a sexy French painter? You will certainly hear about me in 2012… Some surprises are coming up!

Continuation On The Next Page >

Page 59 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Filmaker BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 60


Filmaker

THOUGHTS ON FILMS What films do you consider to be life changing? Le fabuleux destin d’Amélie Poulin - Director: Jean-Pierre Jeunet Y Tu Mamá También - Director: Alfonso Cuaron La vita è bella - Director: Roberto Benigni La belle histoire - Director: Claude Lelouch Forrest Gump - Director: Robert Zemeckis À Bout de Souffle - Director: Jean-Luc Godard Jules et Jim - Director: François Truffaut Avatar - Director: James Cameron Vertigo - Director: Alfred Hitchcock The Killing - Director: Stanley Kubrick The Doors - Director: Oliver Stone 8 1/2 - Director: Federico Fellini L’Avventura - Director: Michelangelo Antonioni All of these films have confirmed my passion for cinema and the types of movies that I want to make! Underrated films Y Tu Mamá También - Director: Alfonso Cuaron La belle histoire - Director: Claude Lelouch Underrated film directors Claude Lelouch Jean-Luc Godard Continuation On The Next Page >

Page 61 visit www.StigMagazine.com


BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Filmaker


Filmaker Your favorite film of all time Le fabuleux destin d’Amélie Poulin Director: Jean-Pierre Jeunet This film has all the ingredients that I wish to possess in my own recipe for storytelling: the fantasy, the dream, the music, the tone, the laughs, the cries, the romance, the imagination and creativity. I saw it in Montmartre, Paris and felt like Amélie when I got out of the cinema. I have rarely felt that way for any other film. Filmmaker that inspires you the most and why? Alfred Hitchcock. I’m always mesmerized every time that I watch a film by Hitchcock. He’s totally a great visual storyteller and the master of suspense and mystery. End >

Page 63 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Filmaker BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 64


Order Here>

Order Here>

Order Here>

Order Here>

Order Here>

Order Here>


Wherever You Are

___________

Email Us

In The World

email us

Tell Us

Your Story

Email us at: desire@stigmagazine.com


Wherever You Are

I

t is our pleasure to know about people’s dreams and ambitions as well as their share of fears and

inhibitions. You are welcome to send us your story and open up about your journey. We would love to get to know you more. Write to us by sending us an email, and we guarantee that we will respond to you on a personal note.

Email us at: desire@stigmagazine.com

BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Email Us

In The World


Filmaker

art in motion

Award Winning Filmmakers

________________________________________________________________

Exclusive Interview w/

Meg pinsonNeault United States All images are © 2015, Meg Pinsonneault

They are released for reproduction in STIG, online magazine .

M

eg Pinsonneault is multi-awardwinning, festival screened director and screenwriter with numerous awards, recognitions and honors. For the complete list of her awards and recognitions, please go here: http://www.artworksbymeg. com/Artworks_By_Meg_Pinsonneault/ Biography.html.

Also an award-winning photographer and art director as well as a published poet, she has been featured in numerous websites and volunteers at the Writer’s Guild of America and the Central Pennsylvania Film Commission.

Meg is based in L.A., California, USA and is the founder of Thirsty Girl Films which won the 2010 Filmmaker of the Year award from RAW: Natural Born Artists apart from other numerous awards. Currently, she’s in post production for a compelling feature documentary movie, Gwapa (Beautiful), about a Filipino family’s journey to help their three children with facial deformities.

Page 71 visit www.StigMagazine.com


BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Filmaker


Filmaker

Page 73 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Filmaker BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 74


Filmaker

art in motion

Award Winning Filmmakers

________________________________________________________________

Exclusive Interview Kristina Akheeva Who are you as a person and as a Filmmaker? How did you get into filmmaking and how long have you been doing this? As a person, I’ll always be a kid at heart. I love to get lost in my imagination now; just as much as I did when I was a child. That’s what I find most appealing about the process of filmmaking. It’s a clean canvas where your wildest dreams can come true. As a filmmaker, I think my inner child shines through - though serious and thought provoking at times, I always seek to find the mysticism behind the subject at hand. I believe it’s crucial to never stop dreaming. Like many little girls, I first dreamed of being an actress. It all started in 5th grade when I played the lead role of Tom Sawyer in the musical by the same name. After that, I was hooked. Around the same time, it was the first time I picked up a VHS camera, taping anything and everything I could. That very camera was glued to my hands all the way through high school. Once I outgrew my small hometown in Central Pennsylvania, I ventured to New York City every weekend to take acting classes in Manhattan and I attended an amazing acting program at Boston University for high school kids.

I immediately fell in love with the city and eventually gained acceptance into Emerson College’s acting program. Unfortunately, my training there wasn’t what I expected. My head was so full of ideas and I found myself yearning to make the films instead of just acting in them. I switched my major to filmmaking my sophomore year with an emphasis on directing and screenwriting. I haven’t looked back since. Although I miss acting, the filmmaking process is like no other monster. It is kind, cruel, and everything in between. It’s certainly not for the weak of heart. I think it’s the ever-changing challenge of this industry that keeps me coming back. looked back since. Although I miss acting, the filmmaking process is like no other monster. It is kind, cruel, and everything in between. It’s certainly not for the weak of heart. I think it’s the ever-changing challenge of this industry that keeps me coming back.

Continuation On The Next Page >

Page 75 visit www.StigMagazine.com


BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Filmaker


Filmaker


Filmmaking is a lifelong calling for me. Most people have a disconnect between their work, hobbies, and life in between. Filmmakers, like other artists, get the opportunity to combine all these worlds because art is all consuming. Sometimes this can be overwhelming. But most of the time, it’s wonderful and extremely rewarding. My inspirations stem from compelling stories that move me. Whether it’s a film or song or campfire tale; I get goose bumps any time I hear something that inspires me. I’m a very visual person too, so I immediately create visual interpretations in my head for pretty much everything. It gets a little hectic up there sometimes. Naturally, I’m also inspired by stunning aesthetics and stylized pieces. My major influences include filmmakers like Tim Burton, Michel Gondry, Guillermo del Toro, Quentin Tarantino, Jean-Pierrs Jeunet, Darren Aronofsky and The Coen Brothers. Each of these directors continues to create wonderful films that have compelling stories with uniquely stylized visuals. Likewise, I generally prefer stylized pieces. But as an independent filmmaker, you have to remain open to whatever crosses your path. When you’re making a documentary, your control over the aesthetics is much more limited than with a film set. From my experience, I’ve realized being flexible is the easiest way to be creative. Continuation On The Next Page >

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 78

Filmaker BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

What is it about your craft that calls on you to continuously make films and what are your main inspirations as well as influences? Also, what is your preferred style in filmmaking and what are the techniques that you use when it comes to your craft?


Filmaker


BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Filmaker


Filmaker

What is the theme or essence of most of the films that you have created? I’m inspired by films that are thrilling, compelling, and though provoking. Therefore, I try to create the same type of essence with my own work. Whether it’s stop motion or documentary. I want the viewer to continue thinking about my film even after it’s finished. I seek to inspire others like and unlike me all the same. Can you walk us through the process when you feel the urge to make a film? What do you normally do to make that happen? How do you choose the sound, music, people, etc.? Also, how do you feel about screenings? When I’m inspired to make something, it starts with will. I’m a firm believer that where there’s a camera, there’s a way to make that film. In this day and age, there’s no excuse not to make the films you’re dying to make.

“When I’m inspired to make something, it starts with will. I’m a firm believer that where there’s a camera, there’s a way to make that film. In this day and age, there’s no excuse not to make the films you’re dying to make.”

At this point in my career, I’ve really embraced the level at which I’m creating films, meaning micro or no budget projects. It’s important to choose a concept that is doable with resources you have at your disposal. Once I’m excited about a new project, I pitch it to my closest filmmaking pals, Carlos Espinoza, Sabina Padilla, and Daisy Mullen, among others. If they’re pumped on the concept too, then we start the process of getting it done. Most of my crew members are dear friends or friends of friends. The indie filmmaking world is tough. It’s crucial to have a reliable team of people you know and trust. I believe screenings are very important. If you have the opportunity to do a test screening, then you should definitely snatch it up. As a filmmaker, getting good, critical feedback can be exhausting. But screenings allow the audience to interact with each other and start a natural discussion about the film. This can be valuable when approaching your final cuts.

Continuation On The Next Page >

Page 81 visit www.StigMagazine.com


BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Filmaker


Filmaker


BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Filmaker


Filmaker


I think it’s important to create films that are unique, but still clean and classy. That way, the piece can inspire generations to come, without alienating itself because it’s outdated. I always try to remain positive, even when the process isn’t working out as you planned. Mostly, it never goes as planned. Again, it’s imperative to approach the filmmaking process with flexibility and an open mind. That’s when the real creativity will shrine through.

It’s the filmmakers’ role to compel and inspire the viewer. When audience members fall asleep in the theater, then that film clearly didn’t do its job. The viewer’s suspension of disbelief is one of the most important factors of a successful film. Likewise, I hope to achieve this suspension with my works as well. I’d like my audience to take away something thought provoking and compelling from my work; whether it’s comedy, thriller, or Personally, what is the most challenging documentary. part for you as a filmmaker? Were you able to overcome it? If so, how? The most challenging part is wearing all the hats at the same time. Like any indie filmmaker, I’m versed in everything from shooting to editing to animation. But when you have a handful of projects on your plate, it can be tough juggling all the positions on just one of those films. However, I find that it’s extremely rewarding when the finished product is something to be proud. Having complete control over project can be a curse and a blessing. I’ve learned to roll with the punches. But when I do get to work with a full crew, it’s incredibly refreshing and I’ve vowed to only pursue projects that are collaborations. I firmly believe that filmmaking is a collaborative process and is best executed when there are many talented people involved.

Continuation On The Next Page >

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 86

Filmaker

What do you think is the role of filmmakers? Also, what do you want your audience to take from each film that you create? What kind of impact do you want your works to make?

BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

What is your secret in making great films that are timeless? What do you always keep in mind when you make films?


Filmaker


BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Filmaker


Filmaker

For independent filmmakers who are currently starting out, how do you think they can sustain themselves with their art? What have you done that allowed you to continue to do what you love without many compromises but still earn a living doing what you are passionate about? Independent filmmaking is not for the weak of heart. It is a calling; an ever-changing beast, a love – hate relationship. And don’t get me wrong. Most of us have paid gigs as well. I’m a freelance editor, videographer, and sometimes photographer by trade. You got to pay the bills somehow. But eventually, the need to create your own films is too much to bear and the beast takes over. Dedicating a large portion of time to your own projects is incredibly crucial to independent filmmakers. It’s all about balancing the time between your paid work and your own films; most of the time it means that you sacrifice your weekends and work for many days in a row. But again, the pay off is worth it in the end.

At this point in your life, what are you most proud of? I’m most proud of my ability to get stuff done, regardless of the issues that may arise. Creative problem solving is a must-have skill for the independent filmmaker. It’s tough to see a project all the way through from concept to complete product. I’m sure there are millions of attempts that turn up fruitless every year. But if you stick with it, it’s incredibly rewarding. I think any experience where you’re creating something is a useful endeavor. Trick is, you need to finish it first. If you could change the realm of filmmaking at this very moment -what would you change? I wish I could lower the wall between indie filmmakers and the immense access to resources that studios possess. This has always been an issue; one that I don’t think will ever be fully resolved. But that doesn’t mean indie filmmakers aren’t making waves. Especially with extensive social media and crowd funding platforms, like Twitter, Facebook, Kickstarter, and Indiegogo, films and filmmakers have the potential to get really big, really fast. Its exciting to be an indie filmmaker. The studios are watching now, even if they don’t want to.

Continuation On The Next Page >

Page 89 visit www.StigMagazine.com


BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Filmaker


Filmaker


visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 92

Filmaker BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

In your opinion, what do you What can we expect from you in the believe is your greatest contribution coming weeks or months? to the world today? Look out for “Feast of the Foolish,” a I think my greatest contributions so far short period thriller shot on the RED, have been through my documentaries, in which we crowd funded the entire specifically the feature I’m working budget on Indiegogo. We are hitting the on now. Gwapa (Beautiful) is a festival circuit hard, excited to share compelling story that follows a poor this unique piece with the filmmaking Filipino family’s struggle for a healthy community. It’s about a Depression future and a mother’s remarkable Era outlaw lost in the desert who seeks journey to help her three kids with answers about his future from a dark facial deformities. The Filipino culture enchantress, but it’s his past he should is wonderfully rich. Its people are as be worried about. For more information beautiful and caring as the stories they and to view the trailer, please visit share. Gwapa (Beautiful) is a powerful www.feastofthefoolish.com. tale of strength, love, determination, and hope. This film is near and dear Be sure to check out Gwapa (Beautiful), to our hearts at Thirsty Girl. We are a feature documentary about a Filipino currently seeking sponsorship and family’s struggle for a healthy future. funding to complete the film. For Thirsty Girl has completed filming on more information, please visit www. the first part of the documentary.For gwapafilm.com. more information and to view the teaser, please visit www.gwapafilm.com Advice to those who wish to follow in your footsteps? End > Dream. Believe. Create. Never stop trying.


For inquiries, email us at: realestate@stigmagazine.com


For inquiries, email us at: realestate@stigmagazine.com


For inquiries, email us at: realestate@stigmagazine.com


For inquiries, email us at: realestate@stigmagazine.com


For inquiries, email us at: realestate@stigmagazine.com


Filmaker

art in motion

Award Winning Filmmakers

________________________________________________________________

Exclusive Interview w/

pepe diokno Philippines All images are © 2011, Pepe Diokno

They are released for reproduction in STIG, online magazine .

A

23-year-old actor, writer, film producer, film editor and a multi-award winning filmmaker, Pepe Diokno’s first film “Engkwentro” won the “Venice Film Festival’s Orizzonti Prize” and “Lion of the Future Award” in 2009. He was also awarded the “NETPAC Award for Best Asian Film” and the “Gawad Urian for Editing.” In 2010, he was awarded with an “Ani ng Dangal Award” by the President of the Philippines and is profiled in the book “Take 100: The Future of Film,” a list of the world’s 100 most exceptional emerging filmmakers.

Page 103 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Filmaker BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 104


Filmaker


BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Filmaker


Filmaker

art in motion

Award Winning Filmmakers

________________________________________________________________

Exclusive Interview Pepe Diokno Who are you as a person and as a What is the most predominant Filmmaker? How did you get into theme or essence of the films that filmmaking and how long have you you have created? been doing this? Humanity. I guess. I started making films in high school. From the start, I knew this is what I want to do. Can you walk us through the process when you feel the urge to make a What is it about your craft that film? What do you normally do to calls on you to continuously make make that happen? How do you films and what are your main choose the sound, music, people, inspirations as well as influences? etc.? Also, how do you feel about Also, what is your preferred style screenings? in filmmaking and what are the techniques that you use when it For me, the process takes about two comes to your craft? years, from script to screen. It’s like running a marathon. But it’s fun I get inspiration from random places. because I don’t do it alone. I have a I blog about these things at http:// great team with whom I work with. I pepediokno.com/inspiration love collaborating with everyone; from the stars to the cinematographer to the sound recordist – all of them have a free hand in the process.

Continuation On The Next Page >

Page 107 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Filmaker BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 108


Filmaker

Page 109 visit www.StigMagazine.com


And I’m my worst critic. I think the least of everything I do. Personally, what is the most challenging part for you as a filmmaker? Were you able to overcome it? If so, how? Writer’s block. A creative drought. This happens to me a lot and I try to overcome it by stopping whatever I’m doing — sometimes for months — getting out, doing research, and reading. What do you think is the role of filmmakers? Also, what do you want your audience to take from each film that you create? What kind of impact do you want your works to make? It depends. Some films entertain, some films provoke. I don’t think filmmakers should put themselves in a box and say, “For my entire career, I’m only going to entertain,” or “I’m only going to provoke.” You can’t really tell what impact your work is going to have, so I don’t think about it. I try to just think about the story I’m telling.

Continuation On The Next Page >

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 110

BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

You can never tell if the film you’re making is going to turn out great. Robert De Niro once said, “You do the best you can when making movies, and at a certain point, you just have to let it go and hope for the best. It’s up to the audience to decide if it’s entertainment; the critics to decide if it’s good and ultimately, posterity to decide if it’s art.”

Filmaker

What is your secret in making great films that are timeless? What do you always keep in mind when you make films?


Filmaker


BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Filmaker


Filmaker

What specific film/s have you created that is especially close to your heart and why? “Engkwentro” was my first film. It was very challenging to make, very difficult to bring around, and the topic of extra-judicial killings is something that really moves me. With that first film that you made, how did you feel after you were done with it? What emotions did you feel and what was that experience like? I made a lot of terrible mistakes while making the film, and so it was a giant learning experience. I’m incredibly grateful for it, and for everyone who helped out. For independent filmmakers who are currently starting out, how do you think they can sustain themselves with their art? What have you done that allowed you to continue to do what you love without much compromises but still earn a living doing what you are passionate about? Most people think that once you’ve finished editing your film, you’re done. That’s not true — you’re only 50% done. The other 50% is in distributing your film. So, try to find good partners who know about distribution, and be prepared to fail. The competition in the theaters and festivals are stiff. So if you’re starting out, make do with what you have. Don’t borrow money to make your film. Whatever money you spend on your film should be money you’re prepared to lose. Without debt, you’re free to concentrate on your story and have fun.

At this point in your life, what are you most proud of? I really don’t know. If you could change the realm of filmmaking at this very moment -what would you change? I hope government scraps the amusement tax on film. There’s a big myth that Filipino cinema died because “Pinoys” (Filipinos) started making crappy films. That’s not entirely true. What really happened was, in 1990, our government imposed a 30% amusement tax on movies. This, on top of 12% VAT. So, imagine, out of every ticket, a max of 42% would already go to taxes. The remaining 58% would then be divided with the theaters, so a producer would be left with 29%. “29%!!!” That means that in order to break even, films would have to gross over 3x their budget. That’s why Pinoy (Filipino) producers started banking on crappy “formula movies” because they weren’t making enough money to take creative risks. Thankfully, in 2009, government lowered amusement taxes to 10% (still on top of 12% VAT). That’s why, since then, we’ve seen a resurgence in film production. This year, we’re seeing a Filipino movie opening every other week. Many of these films are really good — “Ang Babae Sa Septic Tank” and “Zombadings” come to mind. Continuation On The Next Page >

Page 113 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Filmaker BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 114


Filmaker But we can increase production even more if we scrap the amusement tax on Pinoy (Filipino) movies. Besides, film companies already pay corporate income tax, and filmmakers pay personal income tax, ad increased production contributes more to the economy. In your opinion, what do you believe is your greatest contribution to the world today? Each film that’s made employs tens to hundreds of people, feeding hundreds of families, sending children to school, and boosting our economy. Continuation On The Next Page >

Page 115 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Filmaker BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 116


Filmaker In the US, Hollywood is among the few industries staying strong. In Thailand, film and their creative industries accounted for 12% of their gross domestic product in 2010. Film has the power to build countries. Look at South Korea. They protect their industry, and that’s why today, we buy their movies, TV shows, and music. What we don’t realize that because we consume their media. We also buy Korean electronics, Korean fashion, and even book vacations there. So with every film I do, I want to help the Philippines grow, and make lives better for Filipinos. Continuation On The Next Page >

Page 117 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Filmaker Share. What can we expect from you in the coming weeks or months? I start shooting my second film next year. It’s about a little boy who loses his parents in a flood, and is sent to live with his grandfather on a mountain above the clouds. It’s about their relationships, and about love and loss. I tear up every time I read the script. After that, I move on to some action movies. Very excited for all of these. End >

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 118

BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Advice to those who wish to follow in your footsteps?


Order Here>

Order Here>

Order Here>

Order Here>

Order Here>

Order Here>


For inquiries email us at:

contact@3dprint.ph


Cover Girl

models

with Substance

________________________________________________________________

Exclusive Interview w/ Cover Girl

frances parsons

United States

All images are Š 2015, Frances Parsons

They are released for reproduction in STIG, online magazine .

W

ith fiery locks of auburn hair and clear blue eyes as bright as the sky; you instantly feel that there is something special about our cover girl Frances Parsons; already an international model who has just begun her career in the world of fashion. With her fine porcelain skin and slender physique, she captures you with her hypnotic gaze that easily draws you in her space. Indeed, she is a show stopper and scene stealer whose outlook in life is sure to get her far in an industry packed with thousands of hopefuls who wishes to use modeling as an avenue to do greater things.

A lady who lures you in with her wit and sharp mind, it is hard not to be mesmerized by her. More so, this American model is equipped with physicality so distinct that it can easily become her signature style; producing a highly memorable look in the industry of high fashion. Mastering her skills in creating graceful and subtle movements, she is able to deliver heart-stealing images that’ll stop you in your tracks. Armed with the ability to light up a room with her mere presence, Frances is a budding hot actress who is making her mark in the modeling scene as one of those unforgettable faces whose existence is etched forever in your mind.

Page 125 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Photo by: Allen Martin BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Cover Girl


Cover Girl Photo by: Yosi Michaeli


Exclusive Interview Frances Parsons Can you tell us something personal about yourself and who you are as a model?

As a model, what feature of yours gets noticed the most? Red hair and very blue eyes.

I’m a museum junkie and love to wander around cities and take In your opinion, what do you in new landscapes. Whether think is your best asset and personally or professionally, I’m your worst? always trying to learn and grow. My best asset is likely my How did you get started in ambitious attitude and my worst the modeling business? What would be whatever physical made you want to get into attribute doesn’t go along with this profession? someone’s accepted ideal of a model. I don’t define myself I actually got started by driving based on what other people think a friend to a photoshoot. The I should look like; I’m happy with photographer insisted that I get in who I am and where I am going. front of the camera and convinced me I could be a model. It presented a path that made sense; I could see where I wanted to go and how Continuation On The Next Page > to work hard to get there. For me, modeling has never been an end in itself, but a means to other goals.

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 128

Cover Girl

________________________________________________________________

BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

models

with Substance


Cover Girl Photo by: Jonathan Ellis


BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Cover Girl


Cover Girl

Photo by: Taekyoung Kim

Page 131 visit www.StigMagazine.com


BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Cover Girl

Photo by: Jonathan Ellis


Cover Girl

Photo by: Allan Martin


visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 134

BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Cover Girl


Cover Girl

Photo by: Jonathan Ellis


BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Cover Girl


Cover Girl

Who are the people in the fashion industry that you admire/look up to and why? I admire people who break the mold despite the odds. Kate Moss is always a source of inspiration. She is a beacon of versatility without the height or conventional beauty of a traditional supermodel. She brings “it” to the table.

You have stated that you like to create art. What kind of art works do you produce and where did this passion stem from? It seems “art” is part of human nature, in the way we use image, storytelling, movement, and music to help navigate our experience through the world. Great art is a means of connecting people across culture and time, and I love being part of any creative project that is questioning, appreciating, or exploring the experience of being alive. It isn’t always that deep, but that is the overarching thought I try to keep in mind.

Continuation On The Next Page >

Page 137 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Photo by: Jonathan Ellis BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Cover Girl


Cover Girl Photo by: Jonathan Ellis


Modeling has absolutely opened many doors with regards to acting. Acting is an exciting avenue that I really want to pursue. Creating a character in motion, actively collaborating with other people, and performing for an audience is satisfying in an indescribable way.

Is there anything from your modeling experience that you think has been helpful to you as a working actor? Modeling often incorporates elements of acting. Apart from all the interesting characters I’ve met through modeling, it’s helped in the logistical aspects of working on a set, utilizing the environment and being aware of how you’re lit while performing, and finding ways of expressing and connecting with an unfamiliar person or camera in a fast and meaningful way.

Continuation On The Next Page >

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 140

Cover Girl BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Apart from modeling, you have dabbled in theater, short films and television. How were those experiences like? Did modeling help pave the way for you to get into those industries?


Cover Girl


Photo by: Maegan BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Cover Girl


Cover Girl

How are you able to inspire those people that you work with as well as those who view your films and images? What emotions or feeling would you want your audience to take away from your works? I hope to one day inspire people to understand that they can be or do anything. Not that every image or film seeks to communicate this, but overall, I would hope to help people realize that we are all made of the same “stuff,” and that anyone can transform their life, whether physically or emotionally, like the characters in a story upon the screen or page.

You mentioned that you enjoy hiking and playing tennis and have won an award as a starboard rower. How important do you think it is to stay healthy and in shape particularly if you’re in the modeling profession? Staying active and finding enjoyable physical activity is important for anyone! Going for a hike with my dog or taking some time to stretch makes a difference in my day - emotionally as well as physically.

Continuation On The Next Page >

Page 143 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Photo by: Jonathan Ellis BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Cover Girl


Cover Girl Photo by: Jonathan Ellis


What object do you think best describes you?

Tea. I can’t seem to get enough of it and love to try exotic blends.

A canvas that is constantly being painted and refreshed

If you were reincarnated, what would you like to be and why?

Best Assignment as a Model:

Probably a cat passing the days exploring, hunting, and laying in the sun.

If you had a one-day pass to be in the shoes of any musician, artist or celebrity, who would you choose and why? Director Hayao Miyazaki, so I could see how he brings his imagination to life.

When was the last time you tried something new? Last weekend I actually made sushi rolls! And they looked/ tasted like the real deal!

One of my favorite assignments was traveling upstate from NYC to shoot Aimee G’s Spring/Summer ’10 collection. Surrounded by this great group of people in a location resembling a Romantic painting of the English countryside was a pretty great day on the job.

Favorite Photographer: Lucy Carr-Ellison. All of her work has this raw, emotive quality that is absolutely fantastic. She captures an essence or quality in each of her subjects that resonates very strongly with me, whether it’s a portrait or landscape.

Favorite Designer: Rodarte.

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 146

BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

What is your greatest extravagance?

Cover Girl

FUN FACTS


Cover Girl


Photo by: Jonathan Ellis BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Cover Girl


Model

models

with Substance

________________________________________________________________

Exclusive Interview w/ Male Model

tim arpin

United States

All images are © 2015, Tim Arpin

They are released for reproduction in STIG, online magazine .

W

ith a perfectly chiseled face and hard rock abs, it is hard to imagine that this Adonis once weighed 252lbs. Armed with a huge amount of passion, focus and determination, he soon found himself testing the waters of an industry where one’s physique is their main bread and butter. Tim Arpin who entered the glamorous, exciting and the highly competitive world of modeling remains all the more humble knowing that he is blessed to be doing something that he absolutely loves - which is why he appreciates everything that has to do with his profession.

This hot model with a heart of gold has done his share of charity work which shoots ups his “sexy-meter” at least ten notches high. Oozing with so much positivity and good vibes, it seems that everyone is just gravitating towards him. It is no wonder this working model has been blessed with non-stop projects with many lucrative offers under his belt - along with a wonderful set of individuals whom he never forgets to credit. Name it he has done it – from print advertising, commercials, runways and even winning an award for Male Model of the Year for the Jacksonville Fashion Week 2011, Tim Arpin is truly unstoppable!

Page 149 visit www.StigMagazine.com


BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Model


Model


Exclusive Interview Tim Arpin Can you tell us something personal about you and how would you describe yourself as a model?

What has your modeling career done for your personal and professional life? How has modeling changed you?

At one point in my life I weighed 252lbs and was 32% body fat. Anything is possible with dedication. I would describe myself as being Tall, Dark and European looking.

It has definitely opened a number of doors into contests and other job opportunities. I have been on the news a number of times and my participation in Charity events including a number of social scenes have certainly increased. As for modeling changing me, I am not sure how much. If anything, I am more modest now. I get complimented on my work but the work takes the effort of a talented photographer, MUA/Hair, Stylist, etc. - it takes a team to create that image. I spend more time giving credit then taking it.

How did you get into modeling and what lured you to this profession? Also, what has been the best thing about modeling for you at this time?

I got into modeling by going to a casting call on my birthday. I was comfortable enough with my body to go forward and pursue this professionally. What lured me to this profession are the people, the travel and the fact that I simply love Continuation On The Next Page > doing this. It rarely feels like work (only on those long days when things aren’t clicking, do I need to remind myself this is a job)

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 152

Model

________________________________________________________________

BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

models

with Substance


Model


BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Model


Model

Describe your best shoot to date and what made it so special for you? Also, what is the best location that you’ve been to when you did a photoshoot? My best shoot to date is between the shoot with photographer Kris –X with Excipio Photography, where we did about 7 looks in one day. The other shoot was up in the Hamptons with a bunch of other guys. The first was special because it was very productive, the MUA, Gemma Bourre-Pace (Gemmabmakeup.com) and photographer Kris are good friends since that shoot. The shoot up in the Hamptons was for a major magazine that should be released in November. That was probably the best location to shoot in during the summer months.

What turns you on creatively, spiritually or emotionally? I am not sure how I can put that answer into words. There is a huge range of things that will evoke emotions in me. It can be the artist’s story; their vision to a certain point of view or how I relate my past experiences to what they are showing. For my work, doing something for the 1st for time is the most exciting.

How are you able to inspire those people that you work with as well as those who view your images? What emotions or feelings would you want your audience to take away from your works? I would say I hope my attitude rubs off on people. A positive, upbeat attitude will affect those around you. It will inspire growth and productivity. I believe that not only in the work place but in life. I hope the audience enjoys what they see; that they relate to some shots which they admire or aspire to be – such as the lifestyle I represent or portray when I act those scenes.

Continuation On The Next Page >

Page 155 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Model BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here) visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 156


Model


The biggest misconceptions about models are that they are rude or have bitchy attitudes. I believe attitude plays a huge role in this field. If you are a needy, negative or high maintenance, people will only deal with you for as long as they have too. 98% of the people I have worked with have been great. They have a positive and upbeat attitude. Those negative people get ignored and eventually fade away.

I am into sports, water activities, like to Jet Ski and love the beach. I also do something called Bikram Yoga which you do in a 105 degree room wih 26 poses in 90 minutes - it is quite a work out!

Many influential models today have shown that there is more to them than just good looks and have used their popularity for a good cause. Are there any issues or causes that you feel strongly about? Have you done any charity or volunteer work? Are you a part of any organization or group that you truly believe in and wish others would support as well? I have been a part of a number of charity shows and functions. The two closest charities to me have been with Autism and Cancer. With Autism, I am fortunate enough to meet some of these wonderful kids through friends of mine who are specialist in this field. As for cancer, my mother is a breast cancer survivor. She went from diagnosis, to treatment, to being cleared in 30 days. There is no way that could of happened even 5 years ago.

What do you do for fun when you are not working?? I am very social, though I do not drink. I go out pretty often. I enjoy the night life and meeting new people. I try to live my life to the best of my ability.

Who are the people that you admire the most and why? I admire stylist/art director/designer named Liza Chung. She sent me a friend request and asked if I was interested in being in modeling for a magazine. I was paired with Yoanna House, winner of cycle 2 of America’s Next Top Model. It was my best assignment because it really sunk in - I can do this! The sky is the limit and the only thing holding me back is me. Continuation On The Next Page >

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 158

Model

What else are you passionate about or what are your other interests aside from modeling?

BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

In your opinion, what is the biggest misconception about modeling?


Model


BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Model


Model

Over time I have gotten to know Liza better. She shares around 10 inspirational shots daily of beautiful work. She travels, arranges set ups and creates shoot after shoot. She truly loves what she does and someone I certainly admire

What are your thoughts when it comes to describing a model with substance? I think demonstrating range is important - models that do stick out in my mind more than the ones that do not.

Words of wisdom to those who wish to follow in your footsteps. Get started shooting. Learn your angles and what looks good for you. No one is perfect. The quicker you learn your strengths and weaknesses the better. Then you work on your weaknesses.

What more can we expect from you in the coming weeks or months? I am single so there are a few things coming out revolving around that aspect of my life.

Continuation On The Next Page >

Page 161 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Model BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here) visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 162


Model


A week is a long time but I would say James Bond for as long as I have his survival skills so I can make it through.

If Hollywood made a movie about your life, whom would you like to see play the lead role as you? Peter Dante – He played Dante in Grandma’s Boy

If someone wrote a biography about you, what do you think the title should be? Blessed…

If you were a car, what kind would you be? Delorean

If you can jet-set to any place right now…where would you want to go? If I could jet set anywhere I would go to the Azores Island off Portugal... My mother’s family is from there and I would love to see it. Best Assignment as a Model: My best assignment as a model was for a luxury magazine. It did not even seem like work. I was pampered. Everyone had an assistant and the team was fantastic. I wore a $3000 suit, $38,000 watch and drove a $230,000 car with a beautiful woman on my arm. It was definitely something I could get used to.

Favorite Photographer: I am a fan of Richard Warren and would love to work with him one day Favorite Designer: Tom Ford

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 164

BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

If you could trade places with any other person for a week, famous or not famous, living or dead, real or fictional, with whom would it be?

Model

FUN FACTS


Model


BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Model


Model


BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Model


Art

painter

Hyperrealist

________________________________________________________________

Exclusive Interview w/ Painter

juan bautista

Spain

All images are © 2011, Juan Bautista

They are released for reproduction in STIG, online magazine .

P

owerful, majestic, unreal…these are but a few words that best illustrates the hyper-realism paintings of Juan Bautista Nieto; one of the foremost exponents of this technique whose works-of-art are exposed in the most prestigious art galleries around the world. Catching a glimpse of his creations, you stop, you look, you are drawn; and just like gravity, you are pulled in. That is exactly what the portraits of Juan Bautista Nieto do. So magnetic are his works that the glance turns into a prolonged stare as you begin to appreciate the astonishing details that makes the whole picture look so real; so close to perfection – creating a magical moment between the art piece and yourself.

With works that speaks volumes, he executes his masterpieces by using acrylic paint and ink; sometimes graphite and watercolor on prepared board. Armed with an obsession towards precision, he is fixated in producing better works each time; consumed by the thought of wanting to connect with you, his audience, which he has successful done. As his canvas comes to life, his images allow you to experience realism in a higher degree as he takes his art to whole new heights and you in turn form a greater level of art appreciation.

Page 169 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Photo by: Ahleks Fusilero BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Art


Art

Page 171 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Exclusive Interview w/ Juan Bautista Can you tell us something personal about yourself and who you are as an artist? I was born in Lora del Río, Seville (Spain) in 1963. I pursued the studies of childhood there and guided by my father, doctor in medicine, I was encouraged from a very early age to become a doctor. However, every day on my way to school I passed near of a professional painter’s studio and through the window I observed the artist working. I noted how a white and nude canvas becomes, some days later, an awesome realistic painting, at least that I thought so then! Thus began my secret fascination for painting and drawing which I suppressed because of my family’s pressure to follow my father’s profession.

I studied at the Faculty of Medicine in Seville where, as part of my tutorial program, I came into daily contact with inert and anonymous bodies. In later years this was to prove a formative influence on my understanding and appreciation of the human anatomy. After my dad’s loss, I made a crucial decision giving up medicine in favor of my secret passion for painting and drawing. In earnest I began to draw and paint initially studying privately on my own but then I embarked on a series of studies at the Fine Arts Faculty of Seville. My technique is equally obsessive and both demanding and exhaustive. Every facet of my subject is depicted with a minute and impersonal exactitude of detail. My materials are oil and acrylic combined to build an accumulation of delicate and continuous layers of shades and multiple tones of light, shadows and density. Continuation On The Next Page >

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 172

Art

________________________________________________________________

BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

painter

Hyperrealist


Art


BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Art


Art

What is your background in the arts and what is your signature style? About 19 years ago I dedicated my life exclusively to painting. After finishing my studies I started painting; influenced by local artists and later by other Spanish artists internationally recognized such as C. Toral, Pepe Hernández, A. López. From the beginning I was attracted to realistic painting, as I said above; starting with a blank canvas and convert it into a work which the viewer confuses with a photo seems something magical.

What inspired you to become a painter/artist and why did you choose to do photo-realism as your medium of choice compared to other forms of painting? I think every artist is attracted to a style or expressive form unconsciously and is all about pleasing it; not a matter of choice. This is my case with hyperrealistic painting. I’ve been haunted so many years, looking at the world around me and trying to find new tones and ideas to represent in photorealistic way which I would be very difficult to represent otherwise.

Currently, in some of my works, Continuation On The Next Page > I aimed to unite the real and the imaginary world with the same degree of details. In other pictures, I intended to bring the photo-realism one step further and reproduce the part of reality that I have decided as a main reason, as accurate as possible, to the point of obsession. My work presents an exaggerated obsession with recreating a reality which reaches beyond the precise representation of a photograph. It transcends the theme and the concept of hyperrealism using it as a vehicle to take us onto another level wherein it achieves an extraordinary kind of intensity which paradoxically creates a distinct feeling of unreality.

Page 175 visit www.StigMagazine.com


BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Art


Art


Once I had the opportunity to attend an exhibition of American photographer Joel-Peter Witkin, then I was fascinated by the aesthetics of black and white, the expressive possibilities of these colors and the way this minimal reduction of color can help to communicate with the viewer. I think from that point I started to reduce my palette down to the aesthetics of color which presents my work today.

“I think that the word that would describe this aid process would be “obsession;” obsession with trying to achieve better effects in my paintings..”

I think that the word that would describe this aid process would be “obsession;” obsession with trying to achieve better effects in my paintings, obsession to capture details of reality which until then had not been able to. Obsession by connecting with the audience more directly each time, obsession when it comes to give mediocre works already completed and tries to improve the next one. This system of “constructive criticism” is the one that has helped me improve since I started.

What emotions inspire you to create and what is the one thing that you cannot live without as an artist? Over time, once mastered the art of expression by the artist, it becomes unintentionally yet a mere translator of their physical and emotional - something like an acoustic amplifier. The artist receives subtle sensations of the world around him; makes his own and then through his work modifies and amplify until it reaches the viewer. I think this is what we mean by “creative process”. I think today, I would not be able to live and express myself differently. I could not do anything but paint.

Continuation On The Next Page >

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 178

Art

Of course I am from Seville and Diego Velázquez’s paintings left its mark on me since I discovered his work in my childhood; the environment that recreates in his paintings and having been able to paint the air of the scenes, he left in me a very marked trail.

What do you think helped you the most in further developing your skills over the years?

BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Could you describe the visual influences and personal choices that have contributed to your work?


Art Page 179 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Art BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 180


Art


What do you consider to be your most prized art work to date and what is the most exciting project that you have done, thus far? The most precious pieces in which I have contributed so far without any doubt are my daughters, the rest becomes pure circumstance. I think that the creation of a work for the artist makes sense only while he develops it. Once finished, it ceases to belong to him and begins to have its own life - justified only if someone sees it (the viewer). It’s him, the one who is giving a full meaning to it, completing what is lacking to convert it, if it so merits, in a remarkable work. Continuation On The Next Page > visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 182

BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

I do not think that any artist should be proposed beforehand to create a work of this kind. These, with luck, appear without notice after much work and many paintings. Anyway, usually, at least in my case, it begins with a simple idea that arises in any moment of the day; sometimes in the most unlikely moments. I write down this idea and begin drawing it into shapes and after maturing it, over time I build what could be a first outline of the table. I choose characters, backgrounds and attitudes that can enrich the idea. Once I determine all these, I develop several possible systems of lighting for the scene and once already chosen I begin sketching and then phase changes until I am satisfied with the now nearly finished idea. Then I follow the formal development of the paint until I finish it.

Art

Can you describe your creative process or your workflow when you are about to create a masterpiece?


Art

What do you hope your viewers will take away from your paintings? What experience do you wish for them to have when they see your works? What emotions do you want them to feel each time they get a glimpse of your creations? As I said before, I believe that the work of an artist can be likened to an incomplete circle which lacks only a small segment. The artist should never close this circle; the work must be kept opened - yet to be closed. I believe this will print a living character to the painting making it interesting in the eyes of the beholder. It is he (the viewer) who ends the closing of the circle when he contemplates on the painting; making it his own and creating a version of it that is completely different but still struggling from the same picture of another spectator. I wish this to happen with my paintings. I believe that apart from other considerations more deeply and critical, a picture, whatever the technical or expressive trend is, it must have an essential virtue which is to engage and capture the attention of whom is watching. For example, something so simple happens like a passerby who stops without knowing why, in front of a shop window because something has attracted him to the point that he stops and looks. I believe that in essence, this is the essential, the rest of the story is less important. Continuation On The Next Page > Page 184


Art BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here) visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 185


Art Page 186 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Art BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here) visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 187


Art

What is the most challenging as well as the most rewarding part of your work? As it can be deduced from the above, the biggest challenge is to stay fairly satisfied with the work once finished, something that happens rarely. The most rewarding is to find that a stranger who has been captivated by one of my paintings and is able to find nuances that I never found.

Apart from your art, what are your other interests or passions in life? I like to enjoy the trivial moments of the day, a cup of tea in the mid-morning in my studio, a walk after finishing the day, I love reading books and chatting with good friends etc‌ I am not extremely demanding and I easily get excited about anything. I think that enjoying these little pleasures with intensity, despite being so modest, is not always as easy as it seems.

Continuation On The Next Page >

Page 188 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Art My father made me write a phrase with large letters on a paper when I was small. Once written, he made me hanging it in my bedroom in front of my bed, so every morning when I woke up I could read it. It is what has helped me the most in my life. “To want means power.�

At this point in your life, what is your proudest accomplishment to date and what are you most proud of as an artist and as an individual? At the moment, I should be practicing as a doctor in medicine at any hospital. My greatest achievement has undoubtedly been to devote myself exclusively doing what I love the most in my life and that is painting. Entering my studio every morning, trying to do the best of what I know; the fact that my paintings are exposed in the most prestigious galleries around the world.

Continuation On The Next Page > visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 189

BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

What is the best advice that you have received about work and life in general?


Art Page 190 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Art BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here) visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 191


Art


BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Art


Art

Words of wisdom to those who wish to follow in your footsteps “Nobody trips over mountains. It is the small pebble that causes you to stumble. Pass all the pebbles in your path and you will find that you have crossed the mountain.� Unknown Author Continuation On The Next Page >

Page 193 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Art BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

What can we expect from you in the coming weeks or months? I am currently preparing some pictures that will be displayed in a collective exhibition at the Albemarle Gallery in London this December. I invite you to attend if you want. End >

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 194


Art


BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Art


Stylist

stylist

Hairstyles That Speaks Volumes

________________________________________________________________

Exclusive Interview w/ Stylist

dat tran

Canada

All images are © 2015, Dat Tran

They are released for reproduction in STIG, online magazine .

T

he highly published Dat Tran is a sought after hair stylist and hair salon owner who opened Dat Salon’s Hairdramatic which has been amassing rave reviews. Known for his avant-garde hair styling that is absolutely stunning and eye-catching, it is undeniable that this man has a creatively gifted mind coupled with extremely skilled hands. Able to create a story with his hair designs; you can’t help but be drawn to his artistry and the way he seamlessly makes hair come alive. The body, movement, texture, color and everything else is done to perfection; leaving the hair to truly become the star of the show.

Who would have thought hair could be as versatile as this; that it can become a work-of-art and a thing of beauty as well as a source of inspiration to those fortunate enough to witness it first hand. A believer that hair actually speaks volume when it comes depicting individualism as well as portraying significant moments in your life; hair is a truly magical canvas where Dat Tran is able to convey his genius and reveal to the world how majestic one’s crowning glory truly is.

Page 197 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Photo by: Ahleks Fusilero BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Stylist


Stylist


Exclusive Interview w/ Juan Bautista Can you tell us something personal about yourself and how would you describe yourself as a Fantasy Hair Stylist? Fantasy Hair stylist, I didn’t realize I was categorized as that. I thought I was more of an Avant-Garde hair stylist but I guess you can apply that to “fantasy” hair stylist because these hair styles would never be wore on a daily base. I think hair has no limits in terms of how one wishes to use their creativity in creating numerous hair styles. A lot of my work has always been with the model’s actual hair. I find it a lot easier to work with; but now I have grown to enjoy working with hair extensions.

What led you to pursue your career of choice and what are the things that you have learned, and are currently learning from being successful in your field? What is it about your profession that you love so much? I’m a second generation hair stylist. I grew up in a salon since the age of 10 but never liked it at all. I always thought it wasn’t for me. In my early twenties I came back from living in the prairies for a year and my mother saw me lounging around and told me to help her in the salon. I still wasn’t interested in hair as much, but what got me inspired was a Japanese drama I was watch called “Beautiful Life” wherein the main character was a hair stylist and the way he was holding his scissors inspired me to be a better hairstylist.

Continuation On The Next Page >

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 200

Stylist

________________________________________________________________

BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

stylist

Hairstyles That Speaks Volumes


Stylist

I never went to hair school so I mainly learned everything I knew from looking over other hair stylists and trying it out myself. My theory was “if they can do it so can I!” I learned that you have to keep on practicing if you want to grow. I am fortunate to be a part of the Kevin Murphy hair care product line. Since it enabled me to learn more about hair textures and be updated with the latest runway looks. “I LOVE HAIR!” – And the endless things that can be created with it and how you can change its textures. From being soft as cotton to being as hard like a rock; you can keep changing a model’s look with just a different hair style. That just blows me away.

What type of fantasy hair styling are you drawn to and what kind of training do you need to have for this? I would have to say “Big Hair” and the shape you can mold it into. What kind of training did I have? That would be a very good question. I never did. I just jumped into it. My first Updo was late August 2010. I just experiment kept on going from there.

What is the process like when you do fantasy hair styles? I believe that your imagination and creativity is really put to test in this type of genre. Can you walk us through the process? I use to draw the hair style I wanted to create but doing that limited my imagination and creativity. Also it would keep me up at night thinking about the hairstyle I have sketched and how I would be able to create it. A clothing designer I have worked with told me that sketching gave her limitation so she stopped and now she has become more creative. So I adapted that to my work and now I just go in with an understanding of what they want and will create it from there using my imagination and creativity. I would try to understand the theme of the shoot and what they would request from me as well as taking into consideration the model’s hair type. Once I am on the set, I exam the model’s hair to understand her texture. After that, I would be able to apply the right styling products to create the hair texture I want. It is crucial to apply the right styling tool to create the look which is why I usually take my time to prep the hair in order for it to go well with the shape of the styling tool. After the prep is done I would just let my imagination take hold of the hair and create from there.

Continuation On The Next Page >

Page 201 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Stylist BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here) visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 202


Stylist


BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Stylist


Stylist


Can you name some people (living or dead) that you would love to work with, with this type of craft? Robert Lobetta and Kevin Murphy would be the two people I would love to work with. Both artists are great at what they do and they inspired me to improve on my skills.

You are known to have given many memorable moments with your looks. What career highlights are you most proud of and why? The highlight of my career was opening my salon in March of 2010. It opened so many opportunities for me; from being an educator for Kevin Murphy to being published.

Continuation On The Next Page >

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 206

Stylist

Defying gravity is both a reward and challenge in doing fantasy hair. Not being afraid of trying would be my great success in the this field.

BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

What would you say are the rewards and the challenges of doing fantasy hair styles? Also, what do you think contributed to your great success in this field?


Stylist

What would you say are your most favorite works thus far, or what assignments did you enjoy the most? Any dream projects? My most favorite work so far would be the “Out of a Hat� shoot I did in October 2010 which got published in Canadian Hairdresser magazine in July 2011. That shoot opened me up to the industry and people took notice of my work and it just kept growing from there. My dream project would be able to do hair for Paris runaway. To be able to be a part of that is my where I want to be. My dream project at the moment is to be able to do hair for LG fashion week in Toronto and to shoot for Flare or Elle.

How would you like your finished creations to affect your audience once they catch a glimpse of your works? How are you able to know if you have successfully conveyed your vision and message to people? I would like the audience to do a double take after just having a glimpse of my work. Quite hard to answer on when I know I have successfully conveyed my vision because it really depends on how the audience views my vision.

Continuation On The Next Page >

Page 207 visit www.StigMagazine.com


BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Stylist


Stylist

Page 209 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Stylist BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 210


Stylist

Page 211 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Who would you say are the people that you look up to or admire in your life – both professionally and personally and why? I always look up to professionals who are doing the things that I would want to and once I am able to achieve it, I would look for someone that is further ahead of me and set my next goal.

If given a choice, would you have done something differently as a hair stylist during the earlier parts of your career? I would like to be a wardrobe stylist or a photographer.

Continuation On The Next Page >

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 212

BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

I draw my inspiration from everything - such as hats, nature and so on. But also works from global hair stylist, and I would try to create my own version of it as well.

Stylist

As an artist, where do you normally draw your inspiration from?


Stylist

At this point in your life, what are you most proud of and what would you still want to achieve? I am fortunate to be doing what I passionately love right now. To be able to work with great people and keep on working with amazing talents. I want to be able to keep on growing in this industry and there is no limit as to where it would bring me. I am proud of where I am now while still questioning what I am able to achieve in the future.

Advice to someone who would love to follow in your footsteps. Be passionate and never be afraid. Hair can always be interchangeable.

What more can we expect from you in the coming weeks or months? There should be more publications of my work that would be out soon this fall 2011.

End >

Page 213 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Stylist BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 214


Stylist


BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Stylist


Stylist


BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Stylist


Make-up Artist

Make-up

Colorful Strokes

________________________________________________________________

Exclusive Interview w/ Multi-awarded Makeup Artist

Nelly recchia

France

All images are © 2015, Nelly Recchia

They are released for reproduction in STIG, online magazine .

I

nternationally acclaimed and multiaward winning make-up artist and body painter Nelly Recchia is the quintessence avant-garde in the sphere of fantasy-like reality. Introducing to your conscious-state-of-mind the possibilities of what a true artist can conceive, she delivers gripping imageries that are in divine and mesmerizing in nature – so much so that it is hard to take your eyes away from such compelling art works. The precision that is ever present in every detail that she creates is remarkably jaw dropping. You can almost feel the love gush through each facet of her works, making you wonder how much passion and patience does one need to produce such “tour de force.”

Gifted with hands that seem to sinuously flow within the contours of her canvas’ body, the masterpiece soon comes alive with a stroke, brush and colors that are accompanied by designs capable to stir your emotions and catch your breath. With the essence of her works coming from her powerful imagination, it is the crucial element in her momentous creations. As Einstein would say, “Imagination is everything;” and so we anticipate more previews from Recchia’ uniquely ingenious mind and skillfully crafted hands.

Page 219 visit www.StigMagazine.com


visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 220

BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Make-up Artist


Make-up Artist Page 221 visit www.StigMagazine.com


________________________________________________________________

Make-up Artist

Make-up

Colorful Strokes

Can you tell us something personal about yourself and how would you describe yourself as a fantasy makeup artist? I was born and raised in a small town in the center of France. I grew up in my family’s junk cars yard which was my favorite playground and my mother told me ( I cannot remember this ) I used to do very strange make-ups on my dolls !!! As a teenager I was “playing” guitar and singing in a Heavy Metal band, then studied languages and philosophy until I realized I was completely walking on the wrong path and decided to pursue a profession in an artistic field. I chose makeup only because it seems to be a great opportunity to work within many art forms: dance, theater, fashion, photography, movie making and music. So I studied makeup artistry for almost a year.

What led you to pursue your career of choice and what are the things that you have learned, and are currently learning, from being successful in your field? What is it about your profession that you love so much? During this school year (which I mentioned in the previous question), I had learned the art of illusion that makeup can create. I find it so fascinating that with only a few colors and a brush, one can completely change a face and distort reality. I am ALWAYS learning which is probably what I like the most about this profession.

What type of fantasy make-up are you drawn to and what kind of training do you need to have for this? I absolutely believe there is NO training or tip to be an artist - you either have “it” in you or you don’t. One can learn about techniques but not about having an eye or sensitivity for the Art. Besides, I can see that nowadays the word art or artist is being used very loosely. Continuation On The Next Page >

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 222

BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Exclusive Interview w/ Nelly Recchia


Make-up Artist


BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Make-up Artist


Make-up Artist

What is the process like when you do fantasy make-up? I believe that your imagination and creativity is put to test with this type of genre. Can you walk us through the process? I usually do a sketch first and then I make sure that I pick the right model for the project. The process can be quite long (up to 13 hours sometimes). I mainly use waterbed body paint and work with brushes or sometimes an airbrush depending on what I need to achieve.

What would you say are the rewards and the challenges of doing fantasy make-up? Well, the fact that the canvas is alive; this in itself is a challenge. This is because there is that constant motion - like breathing. Also, once you start you have to finish it. Unlike a regular canvas, you cannot leave it in a corner, rest and go back to work on it the next day. At the same time having a human body as a canvas is so unique and intense. There is nothing like skin! What a great surface to project your imagination on!

Can you name some people (living or dead) that you would love to work with, with this type of craft? I would not necessary want to work with them but I love Marlene Dietrich and Audrey Hepburn and wish I could have seen them at least once. I find the supermodel Carmen Dell’orefice fascinating. I have a great admiration for photographers Ali Mahdavi, Steven Meisel and Eugenio Recuenco for the elegance poetic and sharpness of their imagery. Continuation On The Next Page > Page 225 visit www.StigMagazine.com


visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 226

BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Make-up Artist


Make-up Artist Page 227 visit www.StigMagazine.com


What would you say are your most favorite works thus far, or what assignments did you enjoy the most? Any dream projects? I have PLENTY of dream projects …and I have the intention to make them more than dreams!!! (grins)

How would you like your finished creations to affect your audience once they catch a glimpse of your works? How are you able to know if you have successfully conveyed your vision and message to people? To be honest, I don’t worry about how my work is going to affect the audience. We are all different and we emotionally react differently in front of a painting or a song. Sometimes it bothers me when for instance, in an art show , there is a “painting “ of a blue dot on a yellow canvas and a long pompous note from the author and his or her state of mind while “painting “ this. For me, if the work is good and powerful, there is NO need for explanation. Just let the viewer see what he or she wants to see and feel. Continuation On The Next Page >

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 228

Make-up Artist

Hopefully there will be many more but it was very nice to be able to work on Marilyn Manson’s videos because it was one of my wishes moving to America. Each job is an important one because there is so much to learn; therefore I cannot say I have a favorite one. I of course enjoyed being part of Madonna ‘s video American Life, not just because I get to witness an icon at work but also because I liked the director ‘s work as well!

BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

You are known to have given many memorable moments with your looks. What career highlights are you most proud of and why?


Make-up Artist

As an artist, where do you normally draw your inspiration from? Well, before answering this, I feel that it is necessary to define what being inspired really means - at least in my book. I think nowadays, more people tend to use the word inspire when all they really do is try to copy someone else’s work - without shame; and takes credit for somebody else’s imagination, creativity and style. I don’t see the point in this! I am not only talking about the makeup world, but about every artistic field today. Even if I believe no one is really inventing anything completely new anymore, and we are mainly recycling ideas, I am quite stunned at how so many self proclaimed “creative genius artists” all over the web lack personality and humility. As a body painter, when I have an idea in mind, I am certainly not going to look at other body painters’ work for references; and if I would, then it would be to make sure I am doing something very different.

Who would you say are the people that you look up to or admire in your life – both professionally and personally and why? My parents and a few other members of my family because they are so kind, true and brave. I have a huge admiration for Baroque Italian sculptor Bernini who was able to turn marble into flesh. His work inspires me to strive. I am often inspired by ballet - so much work and discipline behind such grace and elegance. Vintage illustrators like Rene Gruau for I love the shape yet pure lines of his drawings. Continuation On The Next Page > Page 229 visit www.StigMagazine.com


visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 230

BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Make-up Artist


Make-up Artist Page 231 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Advice to someone who would love to follow in your footsteps. A lot of timers, people tend to glamorize an artist’s life - or think it is all about glitter, but it is not. Like any other profession, it also has its unpleasant aspects such as VERY long hours on a set; dealing with inflated egos of people and the unsteady flow of jobs. With all these, one has to make sure that the choice is motivated by passion more then anything else - alongside a good amount of persistence!

What more can we expect from you in the coming weeks or months? Information about new works and collaborations can usually be found on my website nelyrecchia.com. At some point, given that I have received so many messages from people all over the globe asking for it, I am hoping to release a book - I just need to find the right publisher! End >

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 232

Make-up Artist

Even the mistakes are worth it. This is the best way that we can learn, so I guess I would not change a thing.

BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

If given a choice, would you have done something differently as a make-up artist during the earlier parts of your career?


Travel

LOST IN PARADISE MYSTERY PLACE NO.8

N

ever lose your sense of adventure. You are a given an opportunity to learn and experience all fragments of moments in its ultimate state. The world is meant to be explored. Life is spectacular, it is meant to be seen and felt by you. Live it, like it’s the only way to be.

All images are Š 2015, Mardy Co

They are released for reproduction in STIG, online magazine .

Page 233 visit www.StigMagazine.com


BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Travel


Travel


BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Travel


Travel

___________

travel

Let The Images Speak For Itself

Page 237 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Travel BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Nasugbu, Batangas (Philippines) Title: Ocean Blanket

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 238


Travel

Frotune Island, Batangas (Philippines) Title: Sunrise Over Ruins

Page 239 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Travel BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 240


Travel Page 241 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Travel BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 242


Travel


BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

Travel


Travel Page 245 visit www.StigMagazine.com


Travel BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS (Tap Here)

visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 246


___________

Thank You

thank you

for browsing through

We woul like to end this edition with a few words of encouragement.


Thank You Some people my think, Your crazy for chasing after your dreams. Take that as a compliment. Because most of those who dared and succeeded, Often are. - MC -

STIG Magazine Edition 8: Art In Motion  

DESIRE. ACHIEVE. INSPIRE. Creative individuals from across the globe who are breaking barriers by sharing their story and works, to insti...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you