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STIG MAGAZINE

Edition7: PURELY STIG

by: Mardy Co


DESIRE. ACHIEVE. INSPIRE. Individuals from across the globe who are breaking barriers by sharing their story and works, to instigate change, fuel DESIRE, that we may dare to ACHIEVE our dreams, and in turn INSPIRE others to do the same. It’s a cycle. It’s infectious. It’s what STIG Magazines are made of… page per page.


State of Mind

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STIG

State of Mind

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Looking beyond with no great expectation As the sun will rise & set before your eyes You’ll see that all is a gift of life That every turn & road leads to a discovery That every season is a different view of a journey & if by chance you’ll see a shoreline nearby Turn the wheel, set it aside & drop by Take that much desired walk and be calmed by each wave In life’s unconventional beauty be saved Nothing but your being simmering down through the ocean breeze Up to a soothing point of silence be seized Where there is nothing left but the sea & the sound of you breathing Lavish in it & feel your life unraveling & for the first time in a brink of innocence Open yourself up for something new...

- Mardy-

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State of Mind

Pack light for an endless road & horizon


Table of Contents

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STIG

Table of Contents

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The Truth Be Told p.7

MEET THE MASTERS Of 3 Dimensional Pieces Exclusive Interview: André Masters p.13 Andrew de Vries, p.43 Tienie Pritchard p.71 Sayaka Ganz p.105

MODELS W/ SUBSTANCE EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW:

Cover Girl Valentina Chemodenova p.133

STIG DIARY

Sequel 7: Let Be p.39

LOST IN PARADISE

Find Out Mystery Place No.7 p.153

CULMINATION OF FASHION FOR BRIDES TO BE EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW:

Wedding Gown Designer: Anna Schimmel p.175

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Table of Contents

STIG REVEALED


Truth be Told

Truth be Told You have every right to be here No matter where you are, what you’ve become and who you are You are born a part of and in perfect alignment with the universe You are made in the image and likeness of a creator And that makes you a creator yourself. You are gifted with free will in your life’s creative process … seize it You are made a little higher than angels You are without wings so you can walk the land and rule your own reality You are carving your way into a masterpiece You are a proof of heaven and hell on earth Because you are what you make of it Your purpose is what you say it is You call your own calling Your uniqueness exemplifies the greatest story ever told

S

T

I G

You are a oul’s ale of the nner od. You are...

STIG

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Photography

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masters

of Three Dimensional

Art

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galleries

and

museums; driving around commercial and business

districts and relaxing in public places such as parks, allow you to appreciate

Photography

V

isiting

public art forms such as sculptures. three-dimensional structures which are normally thematic in nature? Truth be told, the beauty of each sculpture depends on individual taste which is why the diversity of this art form allows numerous preferences to be met – including yours. When asked why sculptors do what they do, most answer in three simple words: the “need to create.” When asked why people purchase these art works, the answers are plentiful: appreciation for the art; hobby, investment, social status, etc. Whatever the reason may be, you cannot deny that viewing certain sculptures can evoke a response from within – which means that the artist was able to lure you in their creative realm and have successful touched your core.

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So what exactly attracts you to these


Art

masters

of Three Dimensional Art

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Exclusive Interview w/

Andre masters & CJ MUNN United Kingdom

All images are © 2015, Andre Masters & CJ Munn.

They are released for reproduction in STIG, online magazine .

André & CJ with their copper nude sculptures in the background for the RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2010 in Thomas Hoblyn’s Silver Gilt Medal-winning garden.

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Exclusive Interview w/ André Masters & CJMunn Tell us something personal about yourself and who you are as an artist. AM: After spending many years working in the film and commercial television industry I have now chosen to work mainly in the artistic community. I couldn’t find the necessary work/life balance working commercially which didn’t seem so important when I was younger, but as my priorities have changed, so must the working conditions which support my income and dictate the remaining time I have to pursue my other interests and hobbies with my family. Being recognized and valued as an artist is a significant step forward for me and each new commission feeds my creative passion to produce new and inspiring works of art. CJM: I am a lifecaster, sculptress and painter from Kent, UK. I am largely selftaught, although have learned a great deal from other artists including my mother, Diane Brazier (www.dianebrazier.co.uk) and obviously my partner and muse, André. It is hard to describe who I am as an artist, because I just am what I am. I was recently quizzed on TV by art critic Charlotte Mullins who asked me what I was ‘trying to do’ with my art, and I couldn’t think how to answer at that time because the question made no sense to me. I like to quote Yoda..’Do or do not do...there is no try.’ I’m not trying to do anything; I just make lovely

things which I like to make and I am delighted when other people love them too. And that should be enough. No need for hostile debate or lengthy essays trying to extract deep meaning from every work. Some pieces tell stories, others don’t. But I suppose what all my work has in common is that I put a bit of my soul into everything I make...that makes me sound like Voldemort, doesn’t it? How did you begin your career as a sculptor? What is the story behind it and why choose this particular art form? AM: I began sculpting and life casting at the age of eighteen. Very little information was available at that time but I found just enough reference at public and university libraries to get me started and gained most of my technical experience through trial and error. I always knew I wanted to work in the film and commercial advertising industries as a creative designer/maker but it was incredibly difficult getting in to that particular industry without the necessary contacts. It takes an enormous amount of persistence and dedication to work in such a competitive industry. Continuation On The Next Page >

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CJM: Before I got pregnant with my son, Jude, I used to work in TV. A career that many would consider glamorous and creative, but I found quite stifling and restrictive much of the time - the formats are too prescriptive. Having a baby allowed me to pause and question my direction in life; and finding out that I really didn’t have one. I became quite depressed. Only when I started making things again did I realize how essential to my happiness it is to be constantly making things, constantly learning new ways to make things and evolving as I spark off other artists and things I see around me. What inspires you as an artist to create timeless pieces and how would you define your style? AM: I would like to make a difference in other peoples’ lives, to inspire and provoke them; to open the general public perception that art doesn’t have to be weird, edgy or filled with controversy to be enjoyed, revered or appreciated. Art can be beautiful just for the sake of beauty. I find it difficult to define my work with any particular style other than to say, ‘I have always set my own standards for excellence far higher than my clients’ expectations.’ Page 21 visit www.StigMagazine.com


As a sculptor, can you explain what your creative process is when producing your art? Do you sketch them out beforehand? AM: Depending on the client’s brief and final outcome of the commission, I have to adapt my style, design and fabrication methods and techniques to suit the project. I work with so many different materials that it’s difficult to pin down a particular creative process. Projects always begin with either hand drawn or computer graphic sketches or three dimensional marquettes. CJ: I don’t sketch, at least not for myself; perhaps just to communicate an idea to someone else when necessary. I imagine, and the image becomes clearer and clearer in my head until I’m ready to make it happen. I might jot down ideas that are beyond my ability at present, or that I can’t yet afford the raw materials to make, and come back to those notes years later when I’ve caught up with myself.

What are your preferred tools when creating your masterpieces and do you follow a specific technique in order to achieve certain results? AM: My preferred tools vary depending on the initial design and the final result I am trying to achieve. The sculpture may be made from as many engineered parts as sculptural forms so I need to be flexible in my approach and always adapt as the project grows. Learning new fabrication techniques and being open to radical conceptual ideas or materials allows me greater freedom to grow as an artist and experiment without the fear of failure. CJM: Every single piece is different, so depending on the materials we’re working with or the body parts we start with, the technique will vary. But I do have a favourite hand tool - it’s a 3 sided wax scraper tool (left over from my silversmithing days) which I use for carving and shaping plaster forms, and looks a bit like a potato peeler.

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‘Gaia’ was a piece we dreamed up about 8 years ago, and had to wait many years for a client to commission its development. It was an incredibly complex piece to make; taking several weeks of our time and thousands of pounds in raw material components, but the results were stunning and even better than how we’d originally imagined it.

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CJM: I love to mix classic styles with modern material technologies to create objects of beauty that straddle the boundaries between classical and contemporary art. I’m inspired by everything from antique toilets, to wallpaper to tattoos. I would describe my current style as very feminine, obsessed with detail, and yet not overly fussy or pretentious. I make things that I would love to have in my home, and if someone else loves them enough to buy them then great, but if not...well, then I have another piece of art in my home that I love. So it’s win-win.


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It fits into the shape of my hand so well and has so many uses. I’ve hand-engraved the handle with a coiling snake; as I engrave all my hand tools with a unique pattern - so it’s very personal to me. My favourite power tool is my Black and Decker Powerfile. It has all the vvvvroom of a chainsaw but the precision of a butter knife. There’s something very satisfying about carving into plaster or fiberglass with it and kicking up enormous dust clouds. Billed as probably the most expensive egg cup in the world, Captain Nemo’s Eggmatic comes with its own mysterious legend and box of accompanying artefacts which help to tell its story. With fully jointed and animatable; limbs this exclusive hand-made objet d’art looks like it has stepped out of a steampunk novel - ready to make you breakfast. For the full legend of The Eggmatic, visit www.mastersandmunn. co.uk soon where it will soon be unveiled to the public in all its archaic glory. If you can recall, what was the first piece that you ever sold as a sculptor and how are you able to sustain yourself through your art nowadays? AM: The first sculptures I sold were for commercial clients, and although I aim to progress further into the eclectic arts, I still rely on a variety of commissions from a diverse client database. CJM: Well, I began working as a lifecaster about 13 and a half years ago; so it would have been something as simple as a baby’s foot. But of the more artistic pieces, it would have been one of my ceramic chimera sculptures. I would sculpt mainly pregnant women in clay and choose a spirit animal for them (or they would choose); and so you’d get a pregnant horse or breastfeeding cow or something.

They were crude little things, but had real character to them - they were meant to represent how at certain times in life, we rely much more on our animal instincts and heritage. I sustain myself through diversification. As long as the process is creative and interesting, I’ll do it and if I’m learning a new skill, even better. It’s easier to market yourself if you just stick to one thing. But that would drive me crazy to be so restricted again, and I’ve seen so many people who did ‘just one thing’ brilliantly and go out of business in the recession as that one thing fell out of fashion. I target half a dozen different markets so if one slackens off then I have others to fall back on. And when times are really tough, I teach what I know to my cherry-picked pupils, for which there is always quite a nice waiting list. Creating sculptures take a lot of time, patience and hard work. My question is how do you come up with a profitable pricing structure that includes the time and skills that you allot for your works and how do you market yourself effectively? AM: The pre-production process including all of the necessary research and development required to quote for a project needs to be methodical and very detailed. Every step of the process must be completely understood and priced up effectively. Time/labour, materials, workshop expenses including rent, utilities, travel expenses and ultimately profit need to be calculated in order to provide a realistic and worthwhile quotation. The best advertising is always word of mouth/ recommendation.

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Paid for advertising can generally be hit or miss but making the most from any networking opportunities is enormously important to get your work out to the masses and make the deepest impact.

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CJM: I have a minimum daily rate in my head, and then add on for materials and a 3rd extra for the taxman and then 30-60% for the gallery’s commission. It’s just simple math really. I used to be more flexible with price when I was starting out and trying to please everyone else, but with a mortgage to pay and a child to feed you have to be practical and know your own worth. There will always be people who undercut me, but I don’t believe they will offer the same service or quality or style. So I don’t bother competing...I loathed the competitiveness of working in the media. I’m secure enough in my own skin now to name my price and patiently wait to be paid what I know I’m worth, rather than scraping around for any paid work that will only just cover my expenses. In terms of marketing, it’s mainly through the website. People find us, and every piece we’ve ever made is an advert of our skills. We rely on word-of-mouth recommendations from customers, and repeat business. As our work is quite unusual we seem to naturally attract a lot of press attention as we go, which certainly helps.

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Art At this point in your life, what are you most proud of? AM: Gaia and The Eggmatic. Gaia was the most technically challenging piece I have made and involved many design and fabrication techniques which have taken our collective work to new heights. The Eggmatic was a personal project to make something from nothing. Raw brass, copper, steel, glass and rubber transformed in to an object with real personality and presence. The back story and history surrounding the project also captivates the audience, and for just a moment in time, you can believe it might actually be real. Continuation On The Next Page >

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We worked through one of the worst winters on record in an unheated, leaking hanger with icicles on the inside of the windows and hot water bottles shoved down our pants. But we were so happy doing what we love for a fantastic Continuation On The Next Page >

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CJM: Apart from being a mum, I’m most proud of our copper sculpture series we made for Tom Hoblyn’s award-winning Chelsea Flower Show garden. It was the longest, most challenging project André and I had done together and really cemented our partnership in both work and love.


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client and to show the work in a fantastic venue to so many people. Standing in ‘our’ garden on Press Day at Chelsea watching Escala playing live music in front of our work, with the press cameras flashing away and the sun shining; I needed to pinch myself to believe it was real. Although there have been very different moments of professional pride, like using our lifecasting skills to help people suffering from body dysmorphia, anorexia, Polio and breast cancer. That’s a real honour and privilege to be able to make even the smallest difference to people’s lives with our artwork. What do you consider to be overrated? AM: Piles of pretentious bricks or similar ‘works’ which have more spin and political nonsense attached to them for the sake of controversy instead of utilizing any raw artistic talent or technical ability. CJM: André and I are united in our disgust for ‘The Emperor’s New Clothes.’ In other words, art that takes no real skill or craftsmanship. I studied at Goldsmiths, where I saw many fine and worthy artists come in and mutate into showmen and producers of gimmicks. It made me sad to see friends stop drawing and painting altogether; and instead throw cups of coffee on canvasses or nail dead chickens to the wall and attempt to justify this in 10,000 word essays full of pretentious nonsense. But people like that have been fooling the art buying public for decades now. It’s beyond me. I’m hoping the tide is turning and real aestheticism and skills are going to come back into fashion and the nonsense will be seen just as that ...nonsense. Continuation On The Next Page >

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CJM: Frida Kahlo is a woman close to my heart. I actually find much of her paintwork a little crude and often not the sort of thing one would hang in one’s home. But she lived and breathed her art; she painted in bed when she was unwell, she painted her own body casts while she was in them, she painted herself, her pain, her love, her loss. She had things to say and she said them with paint, and she wouldn’t shut up just to be commercial or make people comfortable. And I love her monobrow. She wasn’t afraid to be different; she was proud of herself and turned her weaknesses into her most memorable strengths. If I can create art with even half her passion and liberty of expression then I’d be proud. In your opinion, what do you believe is your greatest contribution to the world today? AM: The work I have already produced in the field of ‘entertainment’ would certainly have some emotional impact due to the way advertising influences peoples’ perceptions whether they are conscious of it or not. I do believe I have only scratched the surface so far, and certainly, the best is yet to come. Continuation On The Next Page > visit www.StigMagazine.com Page 32

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AM: Ron Mueck. I respect Ron’s work ethic; phenomenal attention to detail and playful use of scale. Coming from a similar background working in film and television, I feel inspired to see other creative designer/makers being recognized for their artistic creativity instead of only having a commercial value associated with their work.

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A person or artist who inspires you and why?


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CJM: I’m making people smile, one at a time. It may not be a massive dent in the world’s problems, but every little bit helps; and every happy person or good deed tends to begat another - with our private commissions we are helping people to feel better about their bodies, more connected to themselves and their loved ones; celebrating the precious good moments in life and creating a lasting homage to the beauty of life itself to be passed down through families. It costs nothing to be nice. The world’s had enough of angry, rude artists trying to prove something. You don’t need to be a hippy to believe in positivity, beauty and fun. Your advice to aspiring artists who wish to follow in your footsteps AM: I certainly wouldn’t advise any aspiring artists to follow in my footsteps. If there was an easier way I must have missed the sign. My advice for anyone embarking on a creative career would be: Never restrict yourself with traditional or conventional techniques; views or opinions that would ultimately cap your overall potential. Allow yourself every opportunity to expand into new material technologies and learn from your peers, tutors and most importantly other artists. ‘A clever person learns from their own mistakes but a wise person learns from others.’ CJM: Find your own style, and give proper credit to styles you borrow from others as you are learning. Find out what you love doing and do it with every cell in your body as much as you can afford to. And network...because no man is an island and the support of fellow artists is invaluable. End >

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stig diary

Sequel 7:

Let Be

Sequel 8: Transformation ( STIG Magazine Edition 8)


way or another. So in the midst of your struggle, there will

letters. Such a short word, yet there’s a point

be a spark, somewhere, it could come from someone..

in our life where in we struggle to just “be”, or

somehow.

let things and people just “be”. To “be” is such a creative

Too often people chase money too much that they forget

word, and it requires a creative process. To BE requires

their passions in life and they wonder why at the end

a magnitude of sincerity and authenticity. To BE when

of the day they feel empty. But when we trace back to

perpetuated, can be so empowering. To let yourself BE is

people who actually made a name for themselves, created

to know who you are, what you’re for, how you operate.

exemplary products and services that seemed expensive?

To BE, is the truest form of yourself and in our life, that is

These were people who were so passionate about

our greatest mission. That like they say, a life is a journey

creating something they so loved, they would forget

to self discovery, that we may become the real essence

the hours they put in it. They love it so much, that they

of “being”. If you already know who you are, what you

strive for perfection, and that it does not become work

want, your choice of purpose to fulfill, and you are taking

anymore. To them it is their life as essential as breathing,

that into action, you are living a life of your choice. You

and they are thankful of it every day to the point that

are letting yourself BE.

people see and know how valuable it is, because when

Sometimes we’re still lost. Sometimes we are too proud

something is done with so much passion and love, it is

to admit it. Sometimes we’re just afraid. That we are

reflected thru their work. It becomes so priceless to the

leaving our dreams at the back of our heads, thinking

point that people just had to put some monetary value in

the thoughts that were just laid out for us as if we were

it to acquire it. Then, it becomes expensive.

programmed to do so, living the life that we were taught

So start by doing what you love. Let yourself BE.

to live by default. It’s such a vicious cycle. But you know what? Somehow, the universe knows what the heart seeks. Feelings are more affirmative than thoughts. With enough will, your feelings or instincts will guide you one

End >

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T

he word “BE” is only one word, with two


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masters

of Three Dimensional Art

________________________________________________________________

Exclusive Interview w/

andrew de vries United States

All images are © 2015, Andrew De Vries.

They are released for reproduction in STIG, online magazine .

“You have to use tools for certain areas but mostly I work the wax or clay with my hands. Each work decides for itself what it needs in order to be a success – all you have to do is to listen and follow.”

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Exclusive Interview w/ Andrew de Vries Tell us something personal about yourself and who you are as an artist.

What inspires you as an artist to create timeless pieces and how would you define your style?

http://www.andrewdevries.com/ aboutthe.htm this biography is the biography from my website.

Many things inspire me personally, all the arts, certain people alive or in the past – their thoughts and writings; nature - its subtle beauty and its sublime power.

How did you begin your career as a sculptor? What is the story behind it and why choose this particular art form? I believe that you can choose your destiny and in doing so, your destiny chooses you. The sculptures appear finished in my mind’s vision – I do not consider myself as the creator of these works I am the person who was selected to do them and choose to do so. The details are: Rieke Maria Love (choreographer and artistic director of Ballet Denver) one night suggested that I try sculpture – something just seem to tell her that. As soon as I had clay in my hands I realized that was what I came to earth for. Miracles do happen.

The works themselves, I believe come from all of what is within humanity’s spirit – that is what makes a work timeless. The works should be as relevant as they are today as they will be in a thousand years in the future – or as they might have been a thousand years in the past. Timeless. That (for me) is what makes a great work of art. Style depends on the vision – there are several different series – they always start with the figure though. At the heart of the work it is about the human form and spirit. Continuation On The Next Page >

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As a sculptor, can you explain what your creative process is when producing your art? Do you sketch them out beforehand? All of the visions appear done. A quick sketch captures the image so I can return to it and see it again - a sort of shorthand – there are many, many works that could become sculptures – more than 20 lifetimes I would say. Once you start the piece, it tells you what to do – that doesn’t mean its automatic – your skills of course are involved. If a work is over a 1/3 life and in a realistic style then a model will be used – first anatomical drawings and then modeling for 3 to 4 sessions – working on a specific areas - an arm or torso until it is complete and whole.

Commissioned portraiture is different – that involves your skill in capturing a likeness – both in how the person looks but also in a sense of truth in who they are. What are your preferred tools when creating your masterpieces and do you follow a specific technique in order to achieve certain results? My hands – you have to use tools for certain areas but mostly I work the wax or clay with my hands. Each work decides for itself what it needs in order to be a success – all you have to do is to listen and follow. Continuation On The Next Page >

Once the models leave then you can refer back to the drawings. It is important for me not to let the model interfere with the original vision. The vision holds the essence – a model – the right model can help but are mostly used as an anatomical road map.

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What emotions do you wish to evoke from your audience when they view your creations? The artworks’ energy is already there in the piece – people bring to the art their own life experiences – it is up to the conversation between the art and the people who view it – I rarely interject what the work means to me. If you can recall, what was the first piece that you ever sold as a sculptor and how are you able to sustain yourself through your art nowadays? A bronze ballet dancer – 1980 Through my sales and commissions. Continuation On The Next Page >

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Marketing the artwork – that is completely different from the making of the artwork but a great part of what I do.

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What would you say is the most challenging part of being an artist?


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Creating sculptures take a lot of time, patience and hard work. My question is how do you come up with a profitable pricing structure that includes the time and skills that you allot for your works and how do you market yourself effectively? You have to know your market and what your time and costs are – if you are charging a fair price and can justify it to interested clientele then they will buy it. The marketing question would take hours to write – and there is always the question of what is the most effective – we do a bit of everything. At this point in your life, what are you most proud of? Pride is the right word but I am confident in my ability to make great enduring artwork that people find joy, awe and beauty in. There really is no need for pride - it only gets in the way of being human. What do you consider to be overrated? There is so much hype and millions of dollars that are circulating at the high end of the contemporary art market – held aloft by curators, auction houses and dealers and probably museums as well – that is their business but it seems at times ridiculous if not outright scandalous.

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There are also many other philosophers/poets/composers/ visual artists etc. past and present – it would be a long list. I lean toward anything, person, place or object that brings a sense of beauty and understanding to my life. In your opinion, what do you believe is your greatest contribution to the world today? The sculptures bring beauty into people’s lives – beauty inspires us to go higher, to be better humans – I know they inspire people – we are told that all the time.

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John Neumeier – choreographer and director of the Hamburg Ballet. – His choreography is stunning and speaks truth for me. Dancers will always inspire me – their focus and dedication – something every artist needs.

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A person or artist who inspires you and why?


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Your advice to aspiring artists who wish to follow in your footsteps Know who you are and what you want in life - follow what is in your heart that is #1. Also know that if you have to make a living from your art you have 2 choices – sell your knowledge (teach) or sell your art. Make a business plan starting with that knowledge. Take charge of your career – don’t leave it to others. Learn something like a QuickBooks program – find a good accountant – start a good database of people who are interested in your work – stay in touch with them. Never stop improving in anything that you do. – this would be a list too long to write. What can we expect from you in the coming weeks or months? Great art. Specifically - the show at my gallery DeVries, Dance and Degas is all based on the dance series – that will continue through the end of October.

End >

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t is our pleasure to know about people’s dreams and ambitions as well as their share of fears and

inhibitions. You are welcome to send us your story and open up about your journey. We would love to get to know you more. Write to us by sending us an email, and we guarantee that we will respond to you on a personal note.

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In The World


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masters

of Three Dimensional Art

________________________________________________________________

Exclusive Interview w/

tienie pritchard South Africa All images are © 2015, Tienie Pritchard

They are released for reproduction in STIG, online magazine .

“My advice to aspiring artists is to work and work and work. There is no such thing as genius and perspiration is much more effective than inspiration. Every work that an artist produces, will find its place eventually. ”

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Exclusive Interview w/ Tienie Pritchard

Tell us something personal about yourself and who you are as an artist. I have been a professional sculptor for the past 45 years. I am 73 years old, married and have three sons and one daughter. I live on a small farm in the Hartebeespoort area, where I work from my studio. I work in the classical realistic style and my work is figurative. My main subject is the nude, because the nude human form is always the basis of my creative motivation. For my very first public commission I followed my heart and sculpted a composition of five nude figures.

The resulting controversy raged in the South African media for a period of four years and catapulted me on a controversial but successful career. Many public commissions followed, of which the nine meters high George Harrison (in Settler’s Park, Johannesburg), the discoverer of the main gold reef in South Africa, is the biggest. Although my public commissions made me well-known, it is the smaller free creations, where I could follow my own muse that lie closer to my heart.

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The sculpture was commissioned by the Department of Public Works and was destined for the new Civitas building in Pretoria that would house the Department of Internal Affairs. Conservative factions of the South African public protested against the nudity.

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What inspires you as an artist to create timeless pieces and how would you define your style? It is the nude human form that inspires me and is the vehicle that carries all the ideas I want to communicate. When the nude human form is turned into art, it can be symbolic of a very wide range of concepts. In my opinion the nude is actually a separate form of art. I am very interested in the cultural history of man and it is a recurring theme in my work. My style is classical realism.

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I discovered my art talent early in childhood and always sketched. During my high school years I started painting in oils and enrolled for a commercial art course in early adulthood; but I always felt that there was still something lacking in my work. It was only in my late twenties that I discovered clay and I immediately knew it was my preferred medium. I have found the lost third dimension.

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How did you begin your career as a sculptor? What is the story behind it and why choose this particular art form?


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As a sculptor, can you explain what your creative process is when producing your art? Do you sketch them out beforehand? All my ideas come directly out of the clay. I capture my initial idea by making a rough clay sketch. From there I enlarge it to the required size, starting with an armature consisting mainly of aluminium which is flexible and allows for changes. When the full size rough sculpture is ready, I employ a live model and sculpt by corresponding profiles. The completed clay sculpture is cast in plaster of Paris. I work the plaster of Paris further to obtain the desired surfaces and then send it to a bronze foundry for the casting in bronze. I finish the bronze with the help of my assistant and also do the patination myself.

What are your preferred tools when creating your masterpieces and do you follow a specific technique in order to achieve certain results? I fashion my wooden modeling tools myself to suit my hand. I obtain varying textures by different techniques. My smooth, polished surfaces I work with sandpaper in the plaster of Paris and again in the bronze. What emotions do you wish to evoke from your audience when they view your creations? Although I suggest certain emotions in my work, the viewer will always interpret it according to his/her own frame of reference. When a sculpture leaves my studio, I cannot control the message it carries any longer. It develops a life of its own. Continuation On The Next Page >

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Art prices are effectively structured by art galleries, who build an artist’s prices gradually through the years. The bronze casting cost, size and intricacy of a sculpture also influences the price. I never start a new sculpture without thorough research of the subject matter. The conception of the work, the modeling in clay, casting in plaster of Paris, touching up of the wax and finishing and polishing of the bronze is so time and energy consuming that the first edition is always sold at a huge financial loss. The work becomes profitable only from the second and consecutive casts. Therefore I cast a limited series of 15 of every work. When I have to produce a piece unique, it is much more expensive and affordable to very few. Previously my work was mainly marketed by my preferred art gallery, but nowadays my website is a very effective marketing tool. The Tienie Pritchard Museum, a private collection of my work that the owners opened up to the public at The Orient Boutique Hotel between Pretoria and Hartbeespoort, is also an effective marketing tool. Continuation On The Next Page >

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The very first bronze I sold was The Fallen Woman, a female nude. I resigned my work at the Department of Welfare and became a fulltime sculptor before I sold any bronzes. Therefore my initial years as a professional sculptor were hard times and that first bronze that was sold was a big triumph. Nowadays I sell my work at selected galleries and also directly out of my studio. I also accept smaller private commissions.

Creating sculptures take a lot of time, patience and hard work. My question is how do you come up with a profitable pricing structure that includes the time and skills that you allot for your works and how do you market yourself effectively?

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If you can recall, what was the first piece that you ever sold as a sculptor and how are you able to sustain yourself through your art nowadays?


Art

At this point in your life, what are you most proud of?

A person or artist who inspires you and why?

At this point in my life and career, I am most proud of The Tienie Pritchard Museum. It contains a substantial collection of my work, representing the whole time span of 45 years. It not only features my sculptures, but also press clippings, paraphernalia out of my studio and photographs and descriptions of my big public commissions. The museum originated as a private collection contained in a private home, but this art collector continued to sponsor new works and the collection grew so big that the museum was a spontaneous venture. The museum is situated on the grounds of the Orient Boutique Hotel in Elandsfontein between Pretoria and Hartebeespoort and is open to the public.

The sculpture dating out of the Greek classical period is in my opinion unsurpassed and it still inspires me. In my younger years, I was also immensely inspired by Michel Angelo and Rodin. I read and reread their biographies many times – during my initial struggling years as a sculptor; the lives and work of these two sculptors served as tremendous inspiration, for the simple reason that I share the passion these two maestros had for the nude human form.

Continuation On The Next Page >

What do you consider to be overrated? I do not consider any art genre or style to be overrated. There is space for all diversities. Art appreciation will always be subjective. Even in the event that a particular work or style does not appeal to me, I can identify and appreciate skill and professionalism.

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Your advice to aspiring artists who wish to follow in your footsteps My advice to aspiring artists is to work and work and work. There is no such thing as genius and perspiration is much more effective than inspiration. Every work that an artist produces, will find its place eventually. If passion for art is channelized into works of art, success will follow spontaneously.

I am preparing for an art exhibition with my youngest son Brindley, who is an artist (painter working in oil) in his own right. The exhibition is planned for midSeptember and the venue will be Oude Libertas near Stellenbosch in the Western Cape province of South Africa. I am also looking forward to the publication of my biography. The book is entitled Tienie Pritchard, Sculptor of the Nude and it will be launched later this year. The biography covers the story of my whole career and features all the sculptures (with very few exceptions) that I made.

End >

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In my opinion my greatest legacy that I contribute to the world is my whole body of work. I can not single out any of them as being better than the rest, because each one had a particular message I needed to communicate at the time it was created. Therefore The Tienie Pritchard Museum is such a rewarding (to myself) feature of my career. It represents a life time of work and provides me with feedback from my audience that never fails to reinforce my dedication.

What can we expect from you in the coming weeks or months?

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Art

masters

of Three Dimensional Art

________________________________________________________________

Exclusive Interview w/

sayaka ganz Japan / Brazil

All images are © 2015, Sayaka Ganz

They are released for reproduction in STIG, online magazine .

“Be free from social preconceptions of what an artist should look, behave and sound like. Find out who you are and what you want your role to be in your community. ”

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Exclusive Interview w/ Sayaka Ganz

Tell us something personal about yourself and who you are as an artist. I was born in Yokohama, Japan. My family moved to Sao Paulo, Brazil when I was 9 years old and we lived there for almost 5 years. We went back to Japan when I was 13, then moved to Hong Kong when I was 17. I graduated from high school in Hong Kong and came to the United States to attend university. Up until high school I never graduated from the same school I started in. I got my BFA in Printmaking from Indiana University Bloomington, and MFA in 3D Studies from Bowling Green State University (Ohio). How did you begin your career as a sculptor? What is the story behind it and why choose this particular art form? I always loved drawing and building sculptures as a child, and any kind of craft activity could engage me for hours and sometimes days. It took me a very long time to figure out what I wanted to major in (inside of the Fine Arts field) and as an undergraduate I studied printmaking.

I continued to pursue my interest in sculpture after I declared my major and became more and more fascinated with welding and modeling processes. My professors were wonderfully encouraging and allowed me to continue to create sculptures as long as I also produced prints, so my BFA exhibition consisted of half prints and half sculptures. My theory for why I love my particular sculpture process, which is additive assemblage using second hand plastic objects, is that I have always had a passion for puzzles and compassion for discarded objects. As a child I loved playing with jigsaw puzzles and other puzzles. Fitting odd shapes together gave me great satisfaction. I was born in Japan and in Japan we shun waste. Growing up being told that objects that are discarded before “their time” weep in the garbage bin at night or that the “Mottainai” ghost will haunt your dreams. We learn at an early age to respect not only the people around us but also nature in general and objects and materials that enrich our lives. Continuation On The Next Page >

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When I assemble my sculptures I am not necessarily consciously thinking of any of these things I mentioned above. They are simply ingrained in my heart and more of an emotional background of my studio. What I am thinking, is about form and flow and directions. The objects become more like people and characters. I try to direct each one so that they can exist in harmony with others and create a cohesive whole. What inspires you as an artist to create timeless pieces and how would you define your style? The inspiration comes from the objects themselves and the natural world. The objects are like my collaborators; providing me with limitations and preexisting forms to work with. The process is a three dimensional puzzle, and at the same time I have great creative freedom and spontaneity. The forms my sculptures take usually resemble an animal and I try to express the motion and atmosphere as well as the animal itself. I use objects like impressionist brush strokes, so that from the distance a viewer might only see the overall form of an animal but from up close a viewer can see the objects as dominant visual elements.

As a sculptor, can you explain what your creative process is when producing your art? Do you sketch them out beforehand? I do some sketches initially for the design of the armature - the metal skeleton that help support the weight. This part of my production is very slow and carefully calculated so that the support system also work as design elements and the lines visible in the finished sculpture do not contradict the direction of motion and flow that I am trying to convey. After the armature is complete, I attach plastic objects to it and this is a very spontaneous process. I drill holes in the objects and use electrical wire to tie them onto the armature and to one another. I work additively but during the production of a sculpture I do remove about one third of all objects that I attach at one time or another. I attach a few objects, step back, remove some, add some more and remove the ones that do not work or are visually redundant. Continuation On The Next Page >

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The tool I use the most is a cordless drill; to drill small holes in my plastic objects so that they can be tied to an armature. Lately I have been learning to TIG weld so that I can make my metal armature in aluminum instead of steel. What I’m looking for is clean, flowing linear forms with no bulky joints so welding works well. I use an angle grinder and a die grinder to smooth down the welds.

I want to evoke awe and joy of physical motion- this I have been successful in. I want to share my sympathy toward the inanimate discarded objects- this has been more of a challenge to communicate.

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What would you say is the most challenging part of being an artist? I think that the greatest challenge is in dealing with uncertainty- of financial future, career, success, and goals. My parents are both creative people and were very supportive of my decision to study art in college; but I know that many parents worry about the job opportunity and availability in art. It is also often difficult for family, friends and relatives to evaluate your work and they can only judge by your financial success (how many works you sold, for example) creating a lot of pressure for emerging artists whose works are not yet widely recognized or collected. It is often difficult for an artist to define artistic success, and it is different for everyone. I’m still not sure of it myself.

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What emotions do you wish to evoke from your audience when they view your creations?

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What are your preferred tools when creating your masterpieces and do you follow a specific technique in order to achieve certain results?


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If you can recall, what was the first piece that you ever sold as a sculptor and how are you able to sustain yourself through your art nowadays? The first piece I sold was a ceramic dog statue that sold for $30 back when I was a student. Now I am almost able to sustain myself through my art income. I also teach some classes as an adjunct instructor at Indiana University - Purdue University Fort Wayne. I love teaching and hope to continue teaching a few classes even if I start to make more money with my sculptures. Creating sculptures take a lot of time, patience and hard work. My question is how do you come up with a profitable pricing structure that includes the time and skills that you allot for your works and how do you market yourself effectively? I’m in the process of keeping a time log to track approximately how many hours have gone into each project. The way I look at it, right now I’m building up customer base and putting in extra hours to get my work out there. My business has not been hugely profitable as of yet but it is improving.

For a few years I was applying for several group exhibitions per year; all of which cost entry fee as well as shipping if my work was accepted. Now I get invited to enough exhibitions that I do not need to apply to so many and I am able to choose ones that can cover some of the cost of moving my sculptures. As for marketing- the best thing I did for my career was building my website. I got so many purchases inquiries through it and having a strong web presence which is very important. I also never decline a request for interviews or use of my images (with proper credit). At this point in your life, what are you most proud of? I’m proud of having been able to balance my personal life and career so far. I’m a workaholic, I am always doing something. Fortunately my husband, who is also an artist, has a very busy life as well and we have a great complementing relationship. I want to make people happy. I always try to be nice to customers and leave them pleased with the purchase. I like to help other artists. I’m very proud to not have sacrificed my integrity for the sake of my career.

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A person or artist who inspires you and why? Aurora Robson, Tara Donovan, and Jean Shin- these are the contemporary artists I have been following the most lately. Their use of materials is just so unique and fascinating. Christopher Ganz- my husband. His beautiful dark drawings, his intensity and success have always inspired me to keep pushing forward. In your opinion, what do you believe is your greatest contribution to the world today? I am most excited about the series I am working on right now. It is a series of four sculptures for the Monterey Bay Aquarium, to be installed in spring of 2012 in a permanent exhibit titled “Fragile Seas.” The exhibit features three local species that are particularly affected by plastic pollution in the ocean and the fourth sculpture will be of the Gyre, the ocean current that created the Pacific Garbage Patch.

Your advice to aspiring artists who wish to follow in your footsteps Be free from social preconceptions of what an artist should look, behave and sound like. Find out who you are and what you want your role to be in your community. What can we expect from you in the coming weeks or months? I am currently working on a series of sculptures to be installed at the Monterey Bay Aquarium in spring of 2012. I will be traveling to the Isle of Man for a private commission in October. In January 2012 my work will be in a group exhibition titled “Untamed” at the Craft Alliance in St. Louis, MO.

End >

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Trend and fame. It’s funny because right now I guess I’m in this eco art and found plastic art movement but I didn’t start making my sculptures because plastic is the hot new material every one is talking about. Certain amount of name recognition is necessary for success but excess fame is just annoying.

This series is important because of the number of visitors the aquarium welcomes and the educational nature of the exhibit. I hope that the visitors walk away both fascinated by the potential of plastic objects and saddened by the suffering caused by plastic pollution.

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Cover Girl

models

with Substance

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Exclusive Interview w/ Cover Girl

valentina chemodanova Siberia, Russia All images are © 2015, Valentina Chemodanova

They are released for reproduction in STIG, online magazine .

A

ll the way from Siberia comes a model that is currently conquering Asia – both in the fields of modeling and marketing. Valentina Chemodanova is the perfect blend of beauty and brains whose zest for life is clearly evident when she opted to go to a foreign land and try out modeling – a fine move for the determined and adventurous lass. An imagery that enchants and delights, this independent spirit is a joy; and how she inspires and impresses audiences all over the globe. Thanks to her beautiful portraits that are well applauded in the Middle East, Asia and Europe, she now takes the modeling scene by storm.

Creating beautiful-picture perfect shots; Valentina knows that emotions, feeling and thoughts are what it takes to produce emotive photos that will move your heart and soul. As such, she never takes anything for granted and practices even more. Placing importance on family and friends, this makes her more human; as she knows relationships are far more valuable than fame. So go ahead and admire the heartstealing, stunning looks of Valentina Chemodanova – you’re sure to hear more about her soon.

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Exclusive Interview Valentina Chemodanova Tell us something about yourself I’m from Siberia, but I’m always cold (even in Singapore, where I stay and work now in marketing). I love snowboarding. I’ve chosen to be a model when I had an alternative to work in consulting company instead. My very favorite food is Japanese. I’m 24 this year.

What got you into modeling or how were you discovered? Why do you love your craft? After my graduation from the university, I had 2 options - modeling in Beijing or business consulting in Moscow. I’ve chosen Beijing - it sounded more adventurous to me.

Tell us about your first photo shoot. Were you nervous? Sure I was nervous, and pretty much so! The following day, right after I came to the modeling agency, they sent me for a magazine shoot. It was an article about vacations and I was doing a shoot on the airport pretending like I’m extremely happy to go on holidays. It worked out quite well even though I was very scared of camera at that time.

What do you favor the most commercials, catwalks/runways or print and why? I love photoshoots for print as well as test-shoots. First, it gives you fame and money; second – the opportunity to be creative.

How do you stay in shape? What’s your workout regimen/diet like? There are no secrets; models should not overeat and also do some exercise. Simple (smiles). Continuation On The Next Page >

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Given that you have been modeling all over Asia, what is the most interesting place that you have traveled to as a model? There are many places I would call interesting - I do love Singapore, Hong Kong and Taiwan. Every country is interesting in its own way, but all three are very exciting destinations.

What are your accomplishments that you are most proud of? I’ve just finalized my first campaign with a client - from the brief to the creative agency to the FA. It’s like making an idea become a reality from visual to actual print. I’m quite proud of this project and I will be happy to launch it soon – worldwide.

What do you think surprises Currently, are there any issues people the most once they get to or causes that you feel strongly know you? about? Have you done any charity or volunteer work? Are Usually people expect that if you’re you a part of any organization a model, you’re just like a picture or group? and you can’t be interesting to talk I’m not a part of any organization; I’m not a team player. But I know I have a capability to convince people and to make them see my point of view. So if I really believe in something, I can make people go the same way.

to. I love to talk to people and love to listen to them. That usually surprises people and they normally say: “Wow, we’ve been talking for last X hours! I’ve never talked to anybody like this before.” Continuation On The Next Page >

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What are the three most important things in your life? Just one thing - happiness. What can be more important?

How do you think you can best inspire people with your works? I believe that we are always inspired by ourselves; we just don’t notice that usually.

What is your advice for those who wish to become a model? Practice, practice, practice - and get experience; even if you’re not paid right away. The more experience you have, the better you become; the better your works are and more works will be given to you.

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My friends and my family – the absolute and usual answer. I love them. I love to spend time with them; I love to talk to them, I love going out together. There are some days though when I’m by myself and I don’t need anybody else.

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What are your thoughts when it comes to describing a model with substance? Models are somewhere in between the absolute lie and real truth. They have to show that they feel something or at least pretend to feel something; and be someone that they might not actually be. Models have to be believable. The more you are able to portray the character assigned to you, the better model you become. Remember to really feel whatever you’re showing and you really have to be whoever you’re playing.

What can we expect in the coming months? Any new projects? I’m looking forward to be confirmed for a shoot for my very favorite mobile phones campaign - for BlackBerry. And I’m also working a new print from the client side. It’s great to be on the both sides in the industry.

End >

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Who are your favorite artists? Who’s on your iPod? I don’t have one, I mean iPod (grins). For the artists, it really depends.

Cover Girl

FUN FACTS:

Jeans? Just jeans.

Bags that you would definitely splurge on? Sounds weird for a girl, but I do spend much more for luggage than for a bags.

The Perfume that best describes your signature scent? It is a Franck Olivier’s “Passion”.

Worst pick-up line you’ve received I don’t think I’ve ever heard a good one (laughs)

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Your favorite Denim item?


Cover Girl

Best Assignment as a Model: Campaign for Philips. I see it everywhere - Europe, Middle East, Asia Pacific. That’s a great feeling - to see yourself on the posters in Hong Kong; in the newspapers in Amsterdam, in magazines in Tel Aviv and on the lightboxes in Singapore.

Favorite Photographer: From the guys I’ve worked with Mark Chien. Originally from Taiwan, he did his masters in photography in the US, and now he stays and works in Shanghai. By the way, that Philips camapign is my favorite work with Mark.

Favorite Designer: I love that designer from Siberia. She is from my home town, her name is Irina Sulyatickaya. She creates only dresses, and she is very good in that. I have quite a few dresses from her; all of them are custom made, unique. End >

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Travel

LOST IN PARADISE MYSTERY PLACE NO.7

N

ever lose your sense of adventure. You are a given an opportunity to learn and experience all fragments of moments in its ultimate state. The world is meant to be explored. Life is spectacular, it is meant to be seen and felt by you. Live it, like it’s the only way to be. All images are Š 2015, Mardy Co

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Travel

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travel

Let The Images Speak For Itself

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El Nido, Palawan (Philippines) Title: Crystal Splash

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Corong Corong, Palawan (Philippines) Title: No Boat Too Small


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El Nido, Palawan (Philippines) Title: Sailing Sunset


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Corong Corong, Palawan (Philippines) Title: At Shore


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Sibaltan, Palawan (Philippines) Title: On The Curve

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Sibaltan, Palawan (Philippines) Title: Deep Sand

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Corong Corong, Palawan (Philippines) Title: Silhouettes & Sunset

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Corong Corong, Palawan (Philippines) Title: Some Basking Hermit

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Secret Beach, Palawan (Philippines) Title: Coming Through

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Corong Corong, Palawan (Philippines) Title: Bloody Sky

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Sibaltan, Palawan (Philippines) Title: Under The Sea Terraces

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Sabang, Palawan (Philippines) Title: Monkey Family Tree

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Corong Corong, Palawan (Philippines) Title: Sunset Fishing


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Fashion

fashion

Culmination

________________________________________________________________

Exclusive Interview w/

anna schimmel

New Zealand

All images are © 2015, Anna Schimmel.

W

eddings are a wonderful symbol of love between two people; and if you notice, weddings are mostly about the bride and her dream wedding which consists of having the perfect wedding dress.

you look good; but most importantly, it should make you feel good. You know it is the perfect dress when there is a twinkle in your eyes as you parade the gown while looking at your reflection in the mirror glazed with a radiating smile.

Now whether you decide to purchase a ready made bridal gown or have someone design your bridal dress, the important thing is for you to love what you are wearing as this takes you to the path that leads to your “happilyever-after.”

Those “must-capture-moments” are the ones that bring most joy to many bridal gown designers who chose to be in this industry that caters to the union of love. The opportunity to dress the main protagonist in a highly celebrated event is not only a privilege but a pleasure to most.

Individuals such as Anna Schimmel, a bridal gown designer from New Zealand, have found a calling to be a part of such festive occasions like weddings; which is why she knows exactly what makes a wedding dress exceptional.

So get to know more about our bridal gown designer Anna Schimmel, whose works are constantly applauded thanks to its immaculate beauty and timeless appeal.

Schimmel knows that in order for you to fall in-love with your bridal gown, it should make

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Exclusive Interview w/ Anna Schimmel What led you to pursue a career in bridal fashion and what are the things that you learned, and are currently learning from being successful in your field? My background is in high fashion and couture, so bridal fashion was a natural progression. Running my business has taught me to clearly communicate my ideas and thoughts to clients and staff, and I’m still learning more about the business side of things.

If given a choice, would you have done something differently as a bridal designer during the earlier parts of your career? If I had the opportunity I would have become a photographer; if I had the skill, I would have been a musician.

What’s your favorite thing about designing wedding dresses? I am allowed and encouraged, never to compromise on luxury and quality.

Do you have an all-time favorite design or style? My all-time favorite designs and styles change with my moods. Continuation On The Next Page >

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How do you think your creations What’s a day in the life of ANNA affect people or how would you SCHIMMEL like? want them to be affected by it? Busy! In the course of a day, I meet When a bride wears one of my gowns, with clients, supervise my atelier I hope she feels beautiful and very and work on the administrative tasks involved in running a business. And special. in the back of my mind, I’m always Where do you normally draw imagining new gowns.

your inspiration from?

What is it about your profession Inspiration is all around – you just that you love so much? need to keep your eyes open.

I enjoy the creativity of design and the What’s the best gown type for technical skill involved in the creation different body shapes and what of haute couture, and I love luxurious would you suggest a bride to fabrics.

consider when choosing the shape At this point in your life, what are of her dress? you most proud of? We have a page on our Website that covers the ideal styles for body shapes To earn my living, combining in detail http://www.bridaldesign. technical skills with creativity. co.nz/top-10-tips/figure-defined Continuation On The Next Page >

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Tell us more about your latest collection. My latest collection features clean lines, dramatic detailing and hints of soft metallic and sorbet hues. Glamorous movie stars from the 1950s have also been a style reference.

Knuckle down and learn the craft of couture, and be prepared for hard work.

And lastly, what else can we look forward to in the coming weeks or months from you? We have just completed our new collection, which you can view on our Website. And we are participating in the New Zealand Fashion Week, in late August.

End >

If you could choose a muse to represent your brand, who would it be and why? I would choose Cindy Crawford, because she combines brains with beauty.

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My contribution would be creating wedding gowns that my brides adore. And passing-on the (sadly) dying knowledge and craftsmanship of my trade, onto the people who work with me.

Advice that you would give to someone who would like to become a bridal designer.

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In your opinion, what do you believe is your greatest contribution to your industry and to the world?


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TIPS FOR BRIDES-TO-BE: Suggestion when it comes to choosing a wedding dress that would complement one’s skin tone. Whites are either blue or yellow toned. Find the right tone (it will even out your skin) and stick with the related colour scheme.

What are some of the hottest styles for wedding dresses this season and what is the most popular shade of color? Strong silhouettes – skirts are either fitted or extravagantly large. Soft metallic or sorbet hues, and small blocks of strong colour are fashionable.

How should a wedding dress be stored in order to preserve its beauty? I would recommend storing your gown in acid free tissue paper and boxed; or wrapping the gown in washed white towels. A dab of lavender oil on the towels once in a while will keep the moths away. Always make sure the gown is kept out of the sunlight and in a dry place. If you clean your gown choose your drycleaner carefully.

How far in advance do you recommend purchasing a wedding dress? Ideally you should allow six months for the creation of a couture gown.

If the wedding is at a distant location, what’s the best way to pack the dress and freshen it up once it’s unpacked? If the gown isn’t too big, transport the gown in your carry-on luggage. Allow several days for creases to drop out. Some airlines will let you hang your gown, during the flight.

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___________

Thank You

thank you

for browsing through

We woul like to end this edition with a beautiful poem by our Ghost Poet


I work in a dream factory.
 Every night, I am made to wear a uniform. A mercurial night gown, A soft pillow helmet, 
 And a blank slate 
drawn from a wide-eyed stare.



 I have to park my worldly soul. 
 Keep my ideals in a locker.
 Now, go. 
I am told to begin work with tired eyes.
 They blink, each fold heavier than the last, 
 Until it turns dark. The bed to be unmade, the day to be undone.
 And I sleep on the job until my shift ends. But only to forget it the day after.
 “Start dreaming,” says the boss. 
“Start working,” was what he meant. 



Here, I pack desires in boxes. 
See those fears run free in the assembly line. 
Them leaky fantasies capped. 
Ambitions are heavily taxed, And nightmares are fined.
 Then, there’s you. 
 I can’t seem to afford to sleep with you. Not even with my forty winks. Not enough with these drinks. Busy days and nights come through. At the end of the day, I am made to pass through the gates of linen sheets. 
Where I am frisked, tossed then stripped of warmth. 
I go home cold every waking hour. Wanting to wake up next to you. @iampi314

Thank You

“Dream Factory”

STIG Magazine Edition 7: Purely STIG  

DESIRE. ACHIEVE. INSPIRE. Creative individuals from across the globe who are breaking barriers by sharing their story and works, to insti...

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